1st edition 1999 pokemon booster box

Heritage Auctions has just announced a new record for the most expensive first-edition Pokémon booster set sold. The box set from 1999 sees. Discover a wide range of Pokemon cards at Chaos Cards, the premier source for Pokemon cards store in the UK. Find 30000 items in stock. Pokémon 25th anniversary auction with PSA Gem Mint 10 1st edition cards, unopened Base Set Booster Box and Booster Packs.

1st edition 1999 pokemon booster box -

Contents

Pokemon Nostaliga anyone?!

There are few things that can transport you back to your childhood like Base Set Pokémon Cards from 1999.

Trust me, I’ve tried the lot… Tamagotchis, Pogs, X-Brain Yo-Yo’s, even Merlin Premier League Footerball Sticks.

Those are all great, but there is something indescribably special about Pokémon Cards.

‘Gotta catch ’em all’never has a catch phrase been so true.

Collecting Pokemon cards is addictive, and the chase of a Charizard makes grown men fall to their knees in jubilation…

leonhart 1st edition charizard pull

If you don’t already know, this is Leonhart, one of the best Pokemon YouTubers there is! And this is a still of his reaction to pulling a 1st Edition Base Set Charizard! The Pokemon community salutes you Leonhart – Here’s a link to his channel for epic content!

So if you want to know a lot more about why these cards have such an effect on people, you’re in the right place!

In this article, we’re going to breakdown everything you could possibly want or need to know about Base Set Pokémon Cards.

Let’s get into it!

How much are Pokemon Base Set Cards Worth?

Before we go further into the many intricacies of Base Set Pokemon Cards, let’s discuss values!

If you’re one of the many people who rediscovered their old collection this past year, you’re probably interested in how much it’s worth!

A lot has changed in the world of Pokemon since the late 90s, in fact, since then there have been over 120 sets released! And that number keeps climbing every few months.

So how on earth do we determine the value of your Base Set Pokemon cards?!

Well, there’s a few factors I want you to consider:

  • Condition is everything! – The price swings between cards in ‘played’ condition versus ‘mint’ can be huge!
  • You’re not alone – So many people rediscovered their old Pokemon cards recently. Unless you have some real stand out pieces, you’re competing with everyone else.
  • Determining the value for one card is fairly straightforward – for binders full of cards, it’s not so simple!

I regularly get valuation requests with dozens of pictures, hundreds of cards, in various conditions and from various sets!

As you can imagine, it is not easy slapping a valuation on it!

So, my best advice for people looking to quickly covert it into cash – put it on eBay and let the market decide. 

Apologies if you’re looking for something a bit more detailed, but no collection is the same!

We’re not comparing apples with apples here, so take great pictures, show off your best cards (front and back) and let collectors come to you and bid (or make you offers). 

how much are base set pokemon cards worth

Another approach is to hold long term…

The Pokemon hype of 2020 has been and gone, and there have been significant re-corrections in the market. 

Wait for another peak (say the 30th anniversary of Pokemon) and pull the trigger then. 

That is my best advice.

For more detail on Pokemon card values, see the links below:

Hopefully these guides help you! Now for more info on Base Set, let’s take things back to the start…

When were Base Set Pokémon Cards Released?

  • The English Pokemon Base Set was released on 9th January 1999
  • The Japanese Pokemon Base Set was released on 20 October 1996

Check out this old school commercial!!

How to identify Base Set Pokemon Cards?

Every set of Pokemon cards has what’s called an ‘expansion symbol’. This is some kind of small visual identifier to help you assign a card to a particular set.

However! As Base Set was the first ever set, it doesn’t have an expansion symbol.

This is how you can identify Base Set Pokemon cards! 

  • Here is a really useful list of all the sets and their expansion symbols. 
  • Here is a handy visual guide to all the Base Set cards if you want to cross-reference your cards.

How many cards are there in the original Base Set?

Pokemon Base Set consists of 102 cards. 

  • There are 16 holographics and 18 non-holos
  • 32 cards are ‘rare’
  • 32 cards are ‘uncommon’
  • 38 cards are ‘common’

How many different print runs of Pokemon Base Set are there?

It may surprise you to learn that there were actually 8 different print runs of Base Set!

Before we go into what they were, let’s define a ‘print run’

In a nutshell, the cards in the set are the same, but they’ve changed a characteristic on one or some of the cards. For example, they fixed a design error.

So, here are the eight…

  1. Shadowless
  2. Unlimited
  3. Unlimited
  4. Unlimited
  5. Unlimited
  6. Unlimited
  7. Unlimited
  8. 1999-2000 Base Set

Wait, what?! Aren’t you missing 1st Edition Base Set?!

Interestingly, the cards were stamped with the 1st Edition symbol after the print run – fun fact!

Okay, but what the heck are the 1999-2000 Base Set cards?! 

Often incorrectly labelled the ‘UK Print’ (as they were also printed in the US and Australia too), the final print run of Base Set had a new copyright date added to the bottom and the colour is slightly paler than before. 

Famously, they also corrected Vulpix’s HP error which had somehow slipped through the previous seven print runs! All the way until 1999-2000 Base Set, Vulpix’s Hit Points read ‘HP 50′ instead of ’50 HP’! Very subtle of course, but it makes the corrected card a bit more sought after.

A simpler approach to Base Set Variations

Now, although my guide above is technically correct, it may not be entirely helpful to you – especially if you’re just getting back into Pokemon and trying to learn the ropes!

So let’s break the Base Set cards down into three variations for the sake of this article, and your understanding of the cards…

  • 1st Edition – As you probably know, the rarest and most valuable
  • Shadowless – Still pretty rare and valuable, just not as much as 1st Edition!
  • Unlimited – highest volume of cards printed, therefore less rare and valuable than the other two

1st Edition and Unlimited are pretty self-explanatory, but people often get a bit confused regarding Shadowless Pokemon cards (totally understandable!)

If you want to do a bit of extra reading I’ve written a handy guide to Shadowless Pokemon cards here.

Pokemon Base Set Booster Boxes

Once upon a time, a Pokemon Base Set booster box cost around £144. Now, 1st Edition boxes sell for north of £300k!

Where’s that time machine hey?!

Aside from the cards themselves, sealed Base Set booster boxes are some of the most desired items in the hobby.

Let’s explore some of the different variants, estimated values of how you can spot fake copies.

Base Set Booster Box Variations

1st Edition Base Set Booster Box

  • Estimated current value – £300k – £350k

1st-edition-base-set-booster-box

By far the most valuable as these are the first ever printed English Pokemon cards.

The boxes are easy to spot as they have a 1st Edition Stamp on them and the text ‘1ST EDITION LIMITED PRINTING’.

Important – 1st Edition boxes do not have the Wizards of the Coast logo printed on the cellophane wrapping. Stay well clear if you spot a box being sold with this – it’s fake.

Shadowless Base Set Booster Box

  • Estimated current value – £50k – £100k

shaodwless-base-set-booster-box-green-wing-charizard

Still very valuable and ultra rare, Shadowless booster boxes are harder to identify as there is no ‘shadowless’ labeling or anything of that nature.

Instead characteristics of the box (such as there being a ‘green-winged’ Charizard on the side), and very carefully being able to identify the packs within (without impacting the seal) is the way of identifying whether a box is shadowless or not. 

FYI – Green winged Charizard boxes don’t necessarily mean it’s shadowless – there are other factors too.

This guide goes into great detail on identifying a shadowless Base Set booster box.

Unlimited Base Set Booster Box

  • Estimated current value – £15k – £20k

 

Although this is the most commonly found Base Set booster box variant, it’s still no chump change! 

As more and more boxes are opened on YouTube etc, I’d expect the value to continue to creep up long term as supply dwindles. 

By default, a box that isn’t 1st edition or shadowless will be ‘unlimited’. 

How to Spot Fake Base Pokemon Set Booster Boxes

It’s a shame we have to even include a section like this, but the reality is there are people out there looking to scam the community and make a quick buck. 

If you’re serious about investing in sealed vintage Pokemon products, I implore you to educate yourself on how they should look and feel.

Do your research by looking at boxes sold by trusted auctioneers like Hertitage Auctions or PWCC.

Study the colours, the wrapping, key identifiers on the box. Then cross-reference that with item your considering. If anything doesn’t add up, err on the side of caution. 

Because of the different box variants it’s hard to provide specifics, but here are my general rules for spotting fake Pokemon booster boxes:

  1. Colours that look ‘off’  – too pale, too dark etc.
  2. Plastic wrapping – these boxes are 22+ years old, does the cellophane wrapping show signs of this? If not, why not? Where has it been stored? Does it have the WOTC logo on the wrapping? Is it the right size? Does it look like it might have been resealed?
  3. The Artwork – is the artwork on the box correct? Pokemon don’t reprint new box artworks. If something doesn’t look right, it’s probably fake.
  4. Study the typography – Look carefully at the font, look for typos or wrong descriptions of the contents within.
  5. The seller – Are they trustworthy? Do they have lots of positive feedback? Do they have a track record of selling Pokemon products? Are they trusted by the community – perhaps they have an Instagram following that can vouch for them?
  6. The images – Are they clear, showing all angles of the product and any blemishes? Or do they look like they’re trying to hide something? Scrutinize everything and ask for additional photos if required. 
  7. The price – if it’s too good to be true, it probably is!

In my opinion, it’s better to be safe than sorry, especially with such valuable items. Plus if you plan to buy and keep sealed, you don’t want a nasty surprise if you crack the hood many years from now!

Pokemon Base Set Booster Packs

Next, let’s drill down to Base Set booster packs!

Just like booster boxes, they can be identified with simple visual cues.

But before we go into that, I just want to explain a term you may or may not have come across…

What is a ‘Heavy’ Booster Pack

Basically, some smart Alec realised a long time ago that packs with a holographic card weigh more!

Generally speaking, the pull rates of a holo are 1:3 packs, therefore you can simply weigh the packs, extract the valuable items and flog the rest.

Not exactly fun or ethical right?!

But, that’s the game I guess when a lot of money is at stake. 

It’s important to know this for two reasons:

  1. When someone is selling a pack as ‘unweighed’ be very cautious! The only time I’d believe this is a live stream straight from a box break. 
  2. It means the value of booster packs can swing massively. A pack weighed ‘light’ or ‘heavy’ will differ in value considerably. This should hopefully explain the valuation ranges below!

Anyway, let’s get into the different pack variants…

1st Edition Base Set Booster Packs

  • Estimated current value – £5k – £10k 
  • Easily identifiable by the ‘1st Edition’ logo on the foil

1st-edition-pokemon-base-set-booster-pack

Shadowless Base Set Booster Packs

  • Estimated current value – £1k – £3k 
  • Harder to identify. This helpful article explain the different Shadowless booster pack variants

shadowless-base-set-booster-pack

‘Black Triangle’ Error Base Set Booster Packs

  • Estimated current value – £1k – £5k (depending on whether the pack is graded or not)
  • By far the most interesting Base Set booster pack story – for a short time Pokemon accidentally printed the 1st Edition symbol on packs containing unlimited cards! Their solution? Print a black triangle over it of course! The nature of the error and rarity make these packs highly sought after.

black-triangle-error-base-set-booster-pack

Unlimited Base Set Booster Packs

  • Estimated current value – £300 – £600
  • By default, any booster without the characteristics of the variants above will be ‘unlimited’

unlimited-pokemon-base-set-booster-pack

Pokemon Base Set Theme Decks

Now we can’t talk about Base Set without talking through the theme decks! 

Back in the day they were called ‘Preconstructed Theme Decks’ and specially designed for players of the TCG in mind. 

As the name suggests, each deck had a ‘theme’ and players could use the decks with a specific strategy in mind for gameplay.

What are The Base Set Theme Decks Called?

There are 5 theme decks in Base Set, they are called:

  • 2-Player Starter Set – contains fire and fighting Pokemon. The holographic card is Machamp.
  • Overgrowth – contains water and grass Pokemon. The holographic card is Gyarados.
  • Zap! – contains lighting and psychic Pokemon. The holographic card is Mewtwo.
  • Brushfire – contains fire and grass Pokemon. The holographic card is Ninetales.
  • Blackout – contains water and fighting Pokemon. The holographic card is Hitmonchan.

pokemon-base-set-theme-decks

Is it Worth Buying Base Set Theme Decks?

This is a topic I like talking about!

Although Theme Decks are pre-constructed, meaning you know what cards are inside, I love to buy sealed Base Set Theme decks.

Why?

Well, they’re considerably cheaper than buying booster packs and you’re guaranteed a holo!

I buy sealed, open and grade the best cards.

Sure it doesn’t have the lottery-style fun of opening a random base set booster (which has possibly been weighed), but it’s certainly a more sensible way to spend my Pokemon budget!

My personal favourites are Zap! as it contains a holo Mewtwo and four Pikachu’s and Brushfire as it contains a holo Ninetales, x1 arcanine, x2 Charmeleon’s and x4 Charmanders!

 

Pokemon Base Set Error Cards

Did you know there are over 40 different error cards from Base Set! 

This is brilliant because they are highly collectible, fun to chase, and extremely rare in some cases. 

However questions do have to be asked surrounding quality control checks back in the day!

If you’re interested building a collection of error cards, here’s a complete list of error cards from Base Set.

 

Pokemon Base Set Card List

No ultimate guide to Base Set would be complete without a full card list! So here’s a handy table of each card, it’s number in the set and its rarity:

1/102AlakazamHolographic
2/102BlastoiseHolographic
3/102ChanseyHolographic
4/102CharizardHolographic
5/102ClefairyHolographic
6/102GyaradosHolographic
7/102HitmonchanHolographic
8/102MachampHolographic
9/102MagnetonHolographic
10/102MewtwoHolographic
11/102NidokingHolographic
12/102NinetalesHolographic
13/102PoliwrathHolographic
14/102RaichuHolographic
15/102VenusaurHolographic
16/102ZapdosHolographic
17/102BeedrillRare
18/102DragonairRare
19/102DugtrioRare
20/102ElectabuzzRare
21/102ElectrodeRare
22/102PidgeottoRare
23/102ArcanineUncommon
24/102CharmeleonUncommon
25/102DewgongUncommon
26/102DratiniUncommon
27/102Farfetch’dUncommon
28/102GrowlitheUncommon
29/102HaunterUncommon
30/102IvysaurUncommon
31/102JynxUncommon
32/102KadabraUncommon
33/102KakunaUncommon
34/102MachokeUncommon
35/102MagikarpUncommon
36/102MagmarUncommon
37/102NidorinoUncommon
38/102PoliwhirlUncommon
39/102PorygonUncommon
40/102RaticateUncommon
41/102SeelUncommon
42/102WartortleUncommon
43/102AbraCommon
44/102BulbasaurCommon
45/102CaterpieCommon
46/102CharmanderCommon
47/102DiglettCommon
48/102DoduoCommon
49/102DrowzeeCommon
50/102GastlyCommon
51/102KoffingCommon
52/102MachopCommon
53/102MagnemiteCommon
54/102MetapodCommon
55/102Nidoran MCommon
56/102OnixCommon
57/102PidgeyCommon
58/102PikachuCommon
59/102PoliwagCommon
60/102PonytaCommon
61/102RattataCommon
62/102SandshrewCommon
63/102SquirtleCommon
64/102StarmieCommon
65/102StaryuCommon
66/102TangelaCommon
67/102VoltorbCommon
68/102VulpixCommon
69/102WeedleCommon
70/102Clefairy DollRare
71/102Computer SearchRare
72/102Devolution SprayRare
73/102Imposter Professor OakRare
74/102Item FinderRare
75/102LassRare
76/102Pokemon BreederRare
77/102Pokemon TraderRare
78/102Scoop UpRare
79/102Super Energy RemovalRare
80/102DefenderUncommon
81/102Energy RetrievalUncommon
82/102Full HealUncommon
83/102MaintenanceUncommon
84/102PlusPowerUncommon
85/102Pokemon CenterUncommon
86/102Pokemon FluteUncommon
87/102PokédexUncommon
88/102Professor OakUncommon
89/102ReviveUncommon
90/102Super PotionUncommon
91/102BillCommon
92/102Energy RemovalCommon
93/102Gust of WindCommon
94/102PotionCommon
95/102SwitchCommon
96/102Double Colorless EnergyUncommon
97/102Fighting Energy
98/102Fire Energy
99/102Grass Energy
100/102Lightning Energy
101/102Psychic Energy
102/102Water Energy

Wrapping Up

It’s very hard to sum up what Base Set means to collectors. 

Sure, it’s the starting point of an iconic hobby. The cards are very valuable in monetary terms and it’s a solid alternative investment for the future.

But it’s also so much more than that…

I (like many others) also like to think of the cards as a time machine back to my childhood!

There are few things in this world, pictures aside, that can transport us back to a moment in time, but Pokemon cards have this indescribable way of doing it.

You look at that holographic Charizard and there’s just something magical about it.

120HP, a devastating Fire Spin, a giant crease down the middle and you’re king or queen of the playground! 

The cards are just so memorable and have a subtle charm that just makes you want to show them off.

As a collector, I think the way Pokemon continues to reinvent card designs after 25 years if very impressive.

The full arts, the rainbow rares, the border popping ‘amazing rares’ – they continue to produce cards that I want!

But, for me, nothing is better than Base Set and I hope this article shows just how interesting of a set it is and how much I love it!

Thanks for reading 🙂

 

Quick disclaimer! It goes without saying, this article is not investment advice! I’m merely sharing my opinion. You are responsible for how you spend your money!

Last updated October 20, 2021

Источник: https://www.cardcollector.co.uk/pokemon-base-set/

1st Edition (TCG)

1st Edition cards in the Pokémon Trading Card Game refer to those that are printed in the first print run of a particular set. 1st Edition cards are typically only available in booster packs for a limited period after the initial release of a particular Expansion, and are then replaced by an Unlimited Edition until the printing of that set ceases.

Information

English (left) and Japanese (right) 1st Edition symbols

1st Edition cards are identified by the appearance of an "Edition 1" symbol on the card, often on the opposite side of the Expansion symbol (or next to it with early Japanese 1st Edition sets). This symbol is also present on 1st Edition booster packs and boxes.

The concept was used by Wizards of the Coast for the English and European releases from the beginning of the TCG's introduction to the West, starting with Base Set. Japanese cards did not have 1st Edition runs at this time. 1st Edition runs were produced for every set (except Base Set 2) up to and including Neo Destiny. A factor that likely led to Wizards scrapping the idea of 1st Edition cards was down to the pressure they faced to release sets on dates they had specified, which became particularly apparent during the Neo-era. Wizards even ceased pre-planned timed releases in late 2001. This led to 1st Edition runs being released alongside or even after their Unlimited release, rendering them obsolete. Another factor was likely due to the increased pressure on Wizards to release the e-card sets quickly before their license expired in 2003. After Nintendo gained control of the TCG, 1st Edition runs were rejected altogether. Coincidentally however, around the time English 1st Edition cards were beginning to face scrutiny, Japanese 1st Edition runs began to be produced.

Japan Release

Japanese 1st Edition runs began with the release of Pokémon VS and Pokémon Web in 2001, and continued through the release of Expansion Pack 20th Anniversary, the Japanese equivalent of Evolutions.

Quite a lot of Japanese sets have smaller unlimited print runs than 1st edition print runs, making unlimited cards often harder to find.

Value

In terms of value, 1st Edition cards are typically worth more than their Unlimited counterparts. However, as mentioned above, some of the last English 1st Edition sets were released either at the same time or after their Unlimited release, making them much less valuable compared to early TCG Expansion runs. The most valuable 1st Edition cards are regarded to be those from Base Set, as they were released before the Pokémon phenomenon got into full motion in the West. By the time the TCG became fully established, much of the 1st Edition had already sold out. With the first starter decks produced containing a foiled 1st Edition Machamp they laid down the style in which 1st Edition cards would appear.

1st Edition runs from later Expansions also showed card inconsistencies from their intended appearance (see Error cards). Many error cards provide additional material for collectors, as they are usually corrected in subsequent Unlimited runs. Those that are not (usually, text in attacks that do not match what was intended) are detailed in card errata issued by the gaming body.

Shadowless

Comparison between Base Set 1st Edition, "Shadowless" and Unlimited runs.

Base Set is also unique in that Wizards were still experimenting with the layout and aesthetics of the cards after the 1st Edition run, which becomes apparent when cards from both 1st Edition and Unlimited are compared. The most obvious change is the weighting of text for HP values and attacks; they are much bolder in Unlimited. Another was the inclusion of a drop shadow under the character illustration window, supposedly added to give the card more depth. This later inclusion led to the naming of a transitional run, often called Shadowless, in which a small print run of Base Set was produced without the 1st Edition symbol, as well as without the changes mentioned above that were added in the actual Unlimited run. The Shadowless cards are also highly sought after by collectors because of their rarity being close to that of the first edition.

Trainers and Energy cards from Base Set, don't have the image box lacking the shadow, so can't be Shadowless, however, there are other differences from this print run.

The major difference is: The copyright info.

  • The Shadowless print run says "© 1995, 96, 98, 99 Nintendo" while the Unlimited runs leave off the "99".
Источник: https://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/1st_Edition_(TCG)

Pokémon TCG Sealed Base Set 1st Ed Box On Auction At Heritage

Posted on by Joshua Nelson

Pokémon TCG: Authorities Discover and Bust a Massive Shipment of Counterfeit Cards

Customs officials at Shanghai's Pudong Airport made a massive bust after they uncovered over 7.6 tons of counterfeit Pokémon trading cards that were bound for the Netherlands.

The Twitter account for Yicai Global, a news service of Yicai Media Group based in China, reported that 20 boxes of the fake Pokémon cards were on their way to the European country from a company based in the Qingdao province of China. Yicai Global states that this "is one of the biggest fake IP hauls in recent years."

Related: Why the Weirdest Banned Pokémon Card Was Immediately Outlawed at Tournaments

The video from Yicai Global's post shows what appears to be a booster box adorned with the Pokémon Charizard, Gardevoir and Obstagoon. On closer inspection, the text on the booster box reads "espada e escudo voltaje vivido," the Spanish translation of Sword and Shield - Vintage Voltage. Sure enough, one can see "Sword and Shield - Vintage Voltage!" printed clearly in English on the back of the box at around nine seconds.

Pokémon's Sword and Shield - Vintage Voltage collection was released in 2020 and is the fourth expansion for the Sword and Shield series of the Pokémon Trading Card Game. This expansion continues the release of Pokémon V and VMAX cards, such as Pikachu V and Orbeetle VMAX. The set also boasts the inclusion of mythical Pokémon Celebi and Zarude, the latter of which has at least two V card variants. The Vintage Voltage booster box is currently listed at around $140 on the Pokémon Center website, while Amazon lists the set at $180. However, both websites note that either the booster box is currently out of stock or will be in stock soon. This lack of availability could well be the reasoning behind the forgers' grand attempt at moving such a horde of cards.

Related: New Pokémon TCG Expansion Celebrates the Franchise's 25-Year History

This is not the first time Pokémon cards have been in the news recently for nefarious reasons. It was previously reported that a man living in Dublin, Georgia was arrested for spending more than $57,000 on a rare Pokémon card with the assistance of COVID-19 support funds, which could see the man fined $250,000 and jailed for up to 20 years.

Pokémon cards are a valuable commodity in the collectibles scene. A Gem mint condition yellow cheeks Pikachu card sold for over $1,000 on Heritage Auctions recently. Elsewhere, prominent YouTuber Leonhart pulled a shadowless Charizard card worth $75,000 while doing an unboxing live stream of a previously unopened Base Set booster box from 1999. Shadowless Charizard cards are considered one of the most valuable Pokémon cards out there, with some copies having sold for over $100,000 at auction before.

Keep Reading: Now Is the Perfect Time for a New Pokémon TCG RPG

Source: Twitter

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Jamie White (14 Articles Published)

Jamie White is a freelance writer for CBR. A graduate of the University of Worcester in Film Studies, Jamie has worked as a screenplay consultant for a Hollywood-based screenwriting contest and consulting company. Jamie has also contributed insightful news and feature articles to various websites in the past. An aspiring fiction writer in his spare time, Jamie also finds solace in immersive and compelling video games.

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Источник: https://www.cbr.com/pokemon-cards-counterfeit-massive-bust/

Pokémon 25th anniversary auction with PSA Gem Mint 10 1st edition cards, unopened Base Set Booster Box and Booster Packs

ANNOUNCING an awesome opportunity to bid for some of the finest collectable Pokémon trading cards in the world!

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Pokémon on February 27, Richard Winterton Auctioneers is proud to present an international timed auction live from 9am GMT on Wednesday, February 24 until 10am GMT on Monday, March 8.

The sale consists of 42 lots including:

  • An extensive collection of around 1,000 assorted Pokémon cards from various sets, the majority PSA graded Gem Mint 10 1st editions
  • 70 sealed Team Rockets booster long packs each containing 11 cards, all complete, unopened and in very good condition
  • An unopened Base Set Booster Box from Wizards Of The Coast, 1999/2000, in its original WOTC cellophane marked as made in USA.

Check out the online catalogue and bid live from February 24.

A 1st edition Pokémon Team Rocket Dark Charizard Holo, PSA Gem Mint 10

From beginnings as a simple trading card game, the past few decades has seen Pokémon evolve into a serious collector’s business.

The rare and highly sought-after PSA Gem Mint 10 grade certifies that the card is in perfect condition.

This sale features around 740 cards so graded, including 1st editions and promo cards, securely sealed in PSA plastic cases with cellophane outer sleeves, plus several hundred others in very good condition and encased in plastic sleeves and folders.

A 1st edition Pokémon Team Rocket Dark Dragonite Holo, PSA Gem Mint 10

The PSA Gem Mint 10 graded cards include:

  • 1st edition Team Rocket Dark Charizard Holo, estimated to fetch between £3,000 and £5,000
  • 1st edition Fossil Dragonite Holo, est. £3,000-£5,000
  • 1st edition Team Rocket Dark Dragonite Holo, est. £2,000-£3,000
  • 1st edition Fossil Articuno Holo, est. £1,800-£2,000

The timed auction will be managed from The Lichfield Auction Centre at Fradley Park, Staffordshire, UK.

The sale starts to close from 10am GMT on March 8 – that will make it 7pm in Japan, 6pm in Hong Kong and China, 3.30pm in India, 5am in New York and Washington, 4am in Chicago, 3am in Denver, 2am in San Francisco and midnight in Hawaii.

A 1st edition Pokémon Fossil Dragonite Holo, PSA Gem Mint 10

“We have organised a timed sale rather than our more usual live auctions so as to enable bidders from all over the world to get in on the action,” said auctioneer Richard Winterton.

“We’ve also carefully timed the closing of the sale to ensure it falls on the same date and at as convivial a time as possible for bidders!

“Pokémon is quite simply a global sensation and the ultimate ‘new’ collectable.

“As the sale ties in with the 25th anniversary we expect huge interest across the globe, especially collectors in Japan, China and the USA.”

A 1st edition Pokémon Fossil Articuno Holo, PSA Gem Mint 10

He added: “This is the hottest Pokémon ticket in town and we are super excited to be in on the action.”

The family firm of auctioneers has become a go-to place for Pokémon, with recent collections of cards fetching thousands at auction.

In July 2020, a rare complete 1st edition Pokémon base set sold online with Richard Winterton Auctioneers for £25,000.

This latest sale is the company’s biggest yet.

International prices for Pokémon have skyrocketed – a sealed First Edition Booster box recently sold for £298,000. Last November, a PSA graded 10 1st edition Base Set Charizard sold for over $350,100.

And never has condition been so crucial.

Toy specialist Jon Price said: “The fact that these cards are PSA Gem Mint 10 graded massively increases their value and is particularly important in America.

“Grade 3 is considered very good; 10 is just incredible.”

The timed auction also has a real air of mystery thanks to the presence of 70 sealed Team Rockets booster packs, each containing 11 cards, and an unopened Base Set Booster Box from Wizards Of The Coast, still enclosed in its WOTC branded cellophane.

Pokémon Base Set Booster Box

Jon added: “The Booster Box is sealed in the original wrapping and because it’s unopened no-one knows for sure what’s inside.

“Some people might want to buy it to open it; some people might buy it to just sit on as an investment.

“Certainly, very few of these remain sealed and that gives this particular lot a real element of mystery!”

70 sealed Pokémon Team Rockets booster packs

Richard Winterton Auctioneers is already planning another online-only timed auction focussing on Pokémon to run from May 6 until May 19, with further entries needing to be consigned by April 23.

Mr Winterton added: “Pokémon may be a lot of fun but it’s also a very serious business for collectors who are prepared to hunt all over the world for that special card and will invest thousands and thousands of pounds to secure it.”

For enquiries, telephone 01543 251081 or email office@richardwinterton.co.uk.

Check out the online catalogue and bid live from February 24.

Back to news

Источник: https://www.richardwinterton.co.uk/news/pokemon-25th-anniversary-auction-with-psa-gem-mint-10-1st-edition-cards-unopened-base-set-booster-box-and-booster-packs/
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TCG $1199.99 Pokemon Base Booster Box or 1st EDITION Fossil Booster Box for $799.99?
These cards are all from the 1999/2000 generation made by Wizards of the Coast. I use to have a bunch of these when I was a kid but unfortunately during multiple moves and having kids of my own they have all but disappeared.

Looking to fulfil that nostalgia urge lol and I have countless cards in collection already so figured might as well go for these. Which one should I get first? All prices are in USD. I'm leaning more towards the 1st EDITION Fossil Booster Box due to it being first edition and slightly cheaper lol. Each box contains 36 Booster packs and each pack contains 11 cards.

Also out of curiosity the Base Set Booster box is not first edition but does that mean it won't have any first editions in any of those Booster packs? Or is there still the possibility of getting some first editions out of those packs?
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Источник: https://steamcommunity.com/discussions/forum/12/392185054118059694/?l=schinese

1st edition 1999 pokemon booster box -

Pokémon 25th anniversary auction with PSA Gem Mint 10 1st edition cards, unopened Base Set Booster Box and Booster Packs

ANNOUNCING an awesome opportunity to bid for some of the finest collectable Pokémon trading cards in the world!

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Pokémon on February 27, Richard Winterton Auctioneers is proud to present an international timed auction live from 9am GMT on Wednesday, February 24 until 10am GMT on Monday, March 8.

The sale consists of 42 lots including:

  • An extensive collection of around 1,000 assorted Pokémon cards from various sets, the majority PSA graded Gem Mint 10 1st editions
  • 70 sealed Team Rockets booster long packs each containing 11 cards, all complete, unopened and in very good condition
  • An unopened Base Set Booster Box from Wizards Of The Coast, 1999/2000, in its original WOTC cellophane marked as made in USA.

Check out the online catalogue and bid live from February 24.

A 1st edition Pokémon Team Rocket Dark Charizard Holo, PSA Gem Mint 10

From beginnings as a simple trading card game, the past few decades has seen Pokémon evolve into a serious collector’s business.

The rare and highly sought-after PSA Gem Mint 10 grade certifies that the card is in perfect condition.

This sale features around 740 cards so graded, including 1st editions and promo cards, securely sealed in PSA plastic cases with cellophane outer sleeves, plus several hundred others in very good condition and encased in plastic sleeves and folders.

A 1st edition Pokémon Team Rocket Dark Dragonite Holo, PSA Gem Mint 10

The PSA Gem Mint 10 graded cards include:

  • 1st edition Team Rocket Dark Charizard Holo, estimated to fetch between £3,000 and £5,000
  • 1st edition Fossil Dragonite Holo, est. £3,000-£5,000
  • 1st edition Team Rocket Dark Dragonite Holo, est. £2,000-£3,000
  • 1st edition Fossil Articuno Holo, est. £1,800-£2,000

The timed auction will be managed from The Lichfield Auction Centre at Fradley Park, Staffordshire, UK.

The sale starts to close from 10am GMT on March 8 – that will make it 7pm in Japan, 6pm in Hong Kong and China, 3.30pm in India, 5am in New York and Washington, 4am in Chicago, 3am in Denver, 2am in San Francisco and midnight in Hawaii.

A 1st edition Pokémon Fossil Dragonite Holo, PSA Gem Mint 10

“We have organised a timed sale rather than our more usual live auctions so as to enable bidders from all over the world to get in on the action,” said auctioneer Richard Winterton.

“We’ve also carefully timed the closing of the sale to ensure it falls on the same date and at as convivial a time as possible for bidders!

“Pokémon is quite simply a global sensation and the ultimate ‘new’ collectable.

“As the sale ties in with the 25th anniversary we expect huge interest across the globe, especially collectors in Japan, China and the USA.”

A 1st edition Pokémon Fossil Articuno Holo, PSA Gem Mint 10

He added: “This is the hottest Pokémon ticket in town and we are super excited to be in on the action.”

The family firm of auctioneers has become a go-to place for Pokémon, with recent collections of cards fetching thousands at auction.

In July 2020, a rare complete 1st edition Pokémon base set sold online with Richard Winterton Auctioneers for £25,000.

This latest sale is the company’s biggest yet.

International prices for Pokémon have skyrocketed – a sealed First Edition Booster box recently sold for £298,000. Last November, a PSA graded 10 1st edition Base Set Charizard sold for over $350,100.

And never has condition been so crucial.

Toy specialist Jon Price said: “The fact that these cards are PSA Gem Mint 10 graded massively increases their value and is particularly important in America.

“Grade 3 is considered very good; 10 is just incredible.”

The timed auction also has a real air of mystery thanks to the presence of 70 sealed Team Rockets booster packs, each containing 11 cards, and an unopened Base Set Booster Box from Wizards Of The Coast, still enclosed in its WOTC branded cellophane.

Pokémon Base Set Booster Box

Jon added: “The Booster Box is sealed in the original wrapping and because it’s unopened no-one knows for sure what’s inside.

“Some people might want to buy it to open it; some people might buy it to just sit on as an investment.

“Certainly, very few of these remain sealed and that gives this particular lot a real element of mystery!”

70 sealed Pokémon Team Rockets booster packs

Richard Winterton Auctioneers is already planning another online-only timed auction focussing on Pokémon to run from May 6 until May 19, with further entries needing to be consigned by April 23.

Mr Winterton added: “Pokémon may be a lot of fun but it’s also a very serious business for collectors who are prepared to hunt all over the world for that special card and will invest thousands and thousands of pounds to secure it.”

For enquiries, telephone 01543 251081 or email office@richardwinterton.co.uk.

Check out the online catalogue and bid live from February 24.

Back to news

Источник: https://www.richardwinterton.co.uk/news/pokemon-25th-anniversary-auction-with-psa-gem-mint-10-1st-edition-cards-unopened-base-set-booster-box-and-booster-packs/

Pokémon Box Set Sells For $408K

DALLAS -- Demand for rare, high-end Pokémon collectibles continues to soar as evidenced by the sale of a Pokémon First Edition Base Set Sealed Booster Box (Wizards of the Coast, 1999) for a world record-setting $408,000 at Heritage Auctions.

The box sold during the second session of Heritage’s four-day Comics & Comic Art Auction, which ran through Sunday, January 16. 

The afternoon session included 16 Pokémon lots that accounted for more than $1.3 million in sales. The record-setting booster box was one of three that produced six-figure results.

“Recent history has shown that the demand for First Edition Base Set Sealed Booster Boxes is soaring,” said Jesus Garcia, Trading Cards Expert in the Heritage Auctions Comics Department. "Based on the competitive bidding when Heritage Auctions sold a similar set in November, we expected the interest in this set to be even higher, and our collectors did not disappoint.”

Offered in its original shrink wrap, the First Edition Base Set Sealed Booster Box broke the previous world record for an auction sale, set when Heritage Auctions sold a similar booster box in November 2020 for $360,000. The set was created in 1999 by Wizards of the Coast and features 102 cards, most notably the Charizard. Today, an original shrink wrap version is considered the pinnacle of box collecting.

Due to their low print run, box sets are extremely scarce, especially those still in the original sealed state. The box contains 36 booster packs, each with 11 cards for a total of 396 cards, each of which potentially is in GEM MINT condition because the packs have not been handled.

In addition to the record-breaking First Edition Base Set Booster Box, two other Pokémon yielded spectacular six-figure results:

A Pokémon Blastoise #009/165R Commissioned Presentation Galaxy Star Hologram (Wizards of the Coast, 1998) CGC NM/Mint+ 8.5 set off a flurry of 52 bids before finishing at $360,000. The card is one of just two copies produced by Cartamundi to be used as "Presentation” pieces to seek Nintendo’s approval to begin producing Pokémon cards in English. The card was purchased by Thomas Fish at Blowout Cards, who said after the sale that “this is the card that started it all, perhaps the most prestigious and rare of all Pokémon collectibles. I am thrilled for our client and glad we could be part of this historic sale.”

A Pokémon Charizard #4 First Edition Base Set Rare Hologram Trading Card sold for $300,000, reflecting it's reputation as one of the hottest cards in the hobby. With artwork by Mitsuhiro Arita, the card is one of just 2,627 copies certified by PSA, only 120 of which earned a GEM MT grade.

Pokémon trading cards were first introduced in 1995 and rapidly gained worldwide acclaim. What began as a simple card trading game 25 years ago has quickly evolved into a serious collector’s game. Last fall, a PSA 10 1st edition Base Set Charizard sold for over $350,100.

Источник: https://www.antiquetrader.com
Tagged: 1st Edition, auction, Base Set, booster box, Charizard, heritage auctions, pokemon, TCG

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About Joshua Nelson

Josh Nelson is a Magic: The Gathering deckbuilding savant, a self-proclaimed scholar of all things Sweeney Todd, and, of course, a writer for Bleeding Cool. In their downtime, Josh can be found painting models, playing Magic, or possibly preaching about the horrors and merits of anthropophagy. You can find them on Twitter at @Burning_Inquiry for all your burning inquiries.
Источник: https://bleedingcool.com/games/pokemon-tcg-sealed-base-set-1st-ed-box-on-auction-at-heritage/

Pokémon TCG Sealed Base Set 1st Ed Box On Auction At Heritage

Posted on by Joshua Nelson

Contents

Pokemon Nostaliga anyone?!

There are few things that can transport you back to your childhood like Base Set Pokémon Cards from 1999.

Trust me, I’ve tried the lot… Tamagotchis, Pogs, X-Brain Yo-Yo’s, even Merlin Premier League Footerball Sticks.

Those are all great, but there is something indescribably special about Pokémon Cards.

‘Gotta catch ’em all’never has a catch phrase been so true.

Collecting Pokemon cards is addictive, and the chase of a Charizard makes grown men fall to their knees in jubilation…

leonhart 1st edition charizard pull

If you don’t already know, this is Leonhart, one of the best Pokemon YouTubers there is! And this is a still of his reaction to pulling a 1st Edition Base Set Charizard! The Pokemon community salutes you Leonhart – Here’s a link to his channel for epic content!

So if you want to know a lot more about why these cards have such an effect on people, you’re in the right place!

In this article, we’re going to breakdown everything you could possibly want or need to know about Base Set Pokémon Cards.

Let’s get into it!

How much are Pokemon Base Set Cards Worth?

Before we go further into the many intricacies of Base Set Pokemon Cards, let’s discuss values!

If you’re one of the many people who rediscovered their old collection this past year, you’re probably interested in how much it’s worth!

A lot has changed in the world of Pokemon since the late 90s, in fact, since then there have been over 120 sets released! And that number keeps climbing every few months.

So how on earth do we determine the value of your Base Set Pokemon cards?!

Well, there’s a few factors I want you to consider:

  • Condition is everything! – The price swings between cards in ‘played’ condition versus ‘mint’ can be huge!
  • You’re not alone – So many people rediscovered their old Pokemon cards recently. Unless you have some real stand out pieces, you’re competing with everyone else.
  • Determining the value for one card is fairly straightforward – for binders full of cards, it’s not so simple!

I regularly get valuation requests with dozens of pictures, hundreds of cards, in various conditions and from various sets!

As you can imagine, it is not easy slapping a valuation on it!

So, my best advice for people looking to quickly covert it into cash – put it on eBay and let the market decide. 

Apologies if you’re looking for something a bit more detailed, but no collection is the same!

We’re not comparing apples with apples here, so take great pictures, show off your best cards (front and back) and let collectors come to you and bid (or make you offers). 

how much are base set pokemon cards worth

Another approach is to hold long term…

The Pokemon hype of 2020 has been and gone, and there have been significant re-corrections in the market. 

Wait for another peak (say the 30th anniversary of Pokemon) and pull the trigger then. 

That is my best advice.

For more detail on Pokemon card values, see the links below:

Hopefully these guides help you! Now for more info on Base Set, let’s take things back to the start…

When were Base Set Pokémon Cards Released?

  • The English Pokemon Base Set was released on 9th January 1999
  • The Japanese Pokemon Base Set was released on 20 October 1996

Check out this old school commercial!!

How to identify Base Set Pokemon Cards?

Every set of Pokemon cards has what’s called an ‘expansion symbol’. This is some kind of small visual identifier to help you assign a card to a particular set.

However! As Base Set was the first ever set, it doesn’t have an expansion symbol.

This is how you can identify Base Set Pokemon cards! 

  • Here is a really useful list of all the sets and their expansion symbols. 
  • Here is a handy visual guide to all the Base Set cards if you want to cross-reference your cards.

How many cards are there in the original Base Set?

Pokemon Base Set consists of 102 cards. 

  • There are 16 holographics and 18 non-holos
  • 32 cards are ‘rare’
  • 32 cards are ‘uncommon’
  • 38 cards are ‘common’

How many different print runs of Pokemon Base Set are there?

It may surprise you to learn that there were actually 8 different print runs of Base Set!

Before we go into what they were, let’s define a ‘print run’

In a nutshell, the cards in the set are the same, but they’ve changed a characteristic on one or some of the cards. For example, they fixed a design error.

So, here are the eight…

  1. Shadowless
  2. Unlimited
  3. Unlimited
  4. Unlimited
  5. Unlimited
  6. Unlimited
  7. Unlimited
  8. 1999-2000 Base Set

Wait, what?! Aren’t you missing 1st Edition Base Set?!

Interestingly, the cards were stamped with the 1st Edition symbol after the print run – fun fact!

Okay, but what the heck are the 1999-2000 Base Set cards?! 

Often incorrectly labelled the ‘UK Print’ (as they were also printed in the US and Australia too), the final print run of Base Set had a new copyright date added to the bottom and the colour is slightly paler than before. 

Famously, they also corrected Vulpix’s HP error which had somehow slipped through the previous seven print runs! All the way until 1999-2000 Base Set, Vulpix’s Hit Points read ‘HP 50′ instead of ’50 HP’! Very subtle of course, but it makes the corrected card a bit more sought after.

A simpler approach to Base Set Variations

Now, although my guide above is technically correct, it may not be entirely helpful to you – especially if you’re just getting back into Pokemon and trying to learn the ropes!

So let’s break the Base Set cards down into three variations for the sake of this article, and your understanding of the cards…

  • 1st Edition – As you probably know, the rarest and most valuable
  • Shadowless – Still pretty rare and valuable, just not as much as 1st Edition!
  • Unlimited – highest volume of cards printed, therefore less rare and valuable than the other two

1st Edition and Unlimited are pretty self-explanatory, but people often get a bit confused regarding Shadowless Pokemon cards (totally understandable!)

If you want to do a bit of extra reading I’ve written a handy guide to Shadowless Pokemon cards here.

Pokemon Base Set Booster Boxes

Once upon a time, a Pokemon Base Set booster box cost around £144. Now, 1st Edition boxes sell for north of £300k!

Where’s that time machine hey?!

Aside from the cards themselves, sealed Base Set booster boxes are some of the most desired items in the hobby.

Let’s explore some of the different variants, estimated values of how you can spot fake copies.

Base Set Booster Box Variations

1st Edition Base Set Booster Box

  • Estimated current value – £300k – £350k

1st-edition-base-set-booster-box

By far the most valuable as these are the first ever printed English Pokemon cards.

The boxes are easy to spot as they have a 1st Edition Stamp on them and the text ‘1ST EDITION LIMITED PRINTING’.

Important – 1st Edition boxes do not have the Wizards of the Coast logo printed on the cellophane wrapping. Stay well clear if you spot a box being sold with this – it’s fake.

Shadowless Base Set Booster Box

  • Estimated current value – £50k – £100k

shaodwless-base-set-booster-box-green-wing-charizard

Still very valuable and ultra rare, Shadowless booster boxes are harder to identify as there is no ‘shadowless’ labeling or anything of that nature.

Instead characteristics of the box (such as there being a ‘green-winged’ Charizard on the side), and very carefully being able to identify the packs within (without impacting the seal) is the way of identifying whether a box is shadowless or not. 

FYI – Green winged Charizard boxes don’t necessarily mean it’s shadowless – there are other factors too.

This guide goes into great detail on identifying a shadowless Base Set booster box.

Unlimited Base Set Booster Box

  • Estimated current value – £15k – £20k

 

Although this is the most commonly found Base Set booster box variant, it’s still no chump change! 

As more and more boxes are opened on YouTube etc, I’d expect the value to continue to creep up long term as supply dwindles. 

By default, a box that isn’t 1st edition or shadowless will be ‘unlimited’. 

How to Spot Fake Base Pokemon Set Booster Boxes

It’s a shame we have to even include a section like this, but the reality is there are people out there looking to scam the community and make a quick buck. 

If you’re serious about investing in sealed vintage Pokemon products, I implore you to educate yourself on how they should look and feel.

Do your research by looking at boxes sold by trusted auctioneers like Hertitage Auctions or PWCC.

Study the colours, the wrapping, key identifiers on the box. Then cross-reference that with item your considering. If anything doesn’t add up, err on the side of caution. 

Because of the different box variants it’s hard to provide specifics, but here are my general rules for spotting fake Pokemon booster boxes:

  1. Colours that look ‘off’  – too pale, too dark etc.
  2. Plastic wrapping – these boxes are 22+ years old, does the cellophane wrapping show signs of this? If not, why not? Where has it been stored? Does it have the WOTC logo on the wrapping? Is it the right size? Does it look like it might have been resealed?
  3. The Artwork – is the artwork on the box correct? Pokemon don’t reprint new box artworks. If something doesn’t look right, it’s probably fake.
  4. Study the typography – Look carefully at the font, look for typos or wrong descriptions of the contents within.
  5. The seller – Are they trustworthy? Do they have lots of positive feedback? Do they have a track record of selling Pokemon products? Are they trusted by the community – perhaps they have an Instagram following that can vouch for them?
  6. The images – Are they clear, showing all angles of the product and any blemishes? Or do they look like they’re trying to hide something? Scrutinize everything and ask for additional photos if required. 
  7. The price – if it’s too good to be true, it probably is!

In my opinion, it’s better to be safe than sorry, especially with such valuable items. Plus if you plan to buy and keep sealed, you don’t want a nasty surprise if you crack the hood many years from now!

Pokemon Base Set Booster Packs

Next, let’s drill down to Base Set booster packs!

Just like booster boxes, they can be identified with simple visual cues.

But before we go into that, I just want to explain a term you may or may not have come across…

What is a ‘Heavy’ Booster Pack

Basically, some smart Alec realised a long time ago that packs with a holographic card weigh more!

Generally speaking, the pull rates of a holo are 1:3 packs, therefore you can simply weigh the packs, extract the valuable items and flog the rest.

Not exactly fun or ethical right?!

But, that’s the game I guess when a lot of money is at stake. 

It’s important to know this for two reasons:

  1. When someone is selling a pack as ‘unweighed’ be very cautious! The only time I’d believe this is a live stream straight from a box break. 
  2. It means the value of booster packs can swing massively. A pack weighed ‘light’ or ‘heavy’ will differ in value considerably. This should hopefully explain the valuation ranges below!

Anyway, let’s get into the different pack variants…

1st Edition Base Set Booster Packs

  • Estimated current value – £5k – £10k 
  • Easily identifiable by the ‘1st Edition’ logo on the foil

1st-edition-pokemon-base-set-booster-pack

Shadowless Base Set Booster Packs

  • Estimated current value – £1k – £3k 
  • Harder to identify. This helpful article explain the different Shadowless booster pack variants

shadowless-base-set-booster-pack

‘Black Triangle’ Error Base Set Booster Packs

  • Estimated current value – £1k – £5k (depending on whether the pack is graded or not)
  • By far the most interesting Base Set booster pack story – for a short time Pokemon accidentally printed the 1st Edition symbol on packs containing unlimited cards! Their solution? Print a black triangle over it of course! The nature of the error and rarity make these packs highly sought after.

black-triangle-error-base-set-booster-pack

Unlimited Base Set Booster Packs

  • Estimated current value – £300 – £600
  • By default, any booster without the characteristics of the variants above will be ‘unlimited’

unlimited-pokemon-base-set-booster-pack

Pokemon Base Set Theme Decks

Now we can’t talk about Base Set without talking through the theme decks! 

Back in the day they were called ‘Preconstructed Theme Decks’ and specially designed for players of the TCG in mind. 

As the name suggests, each deck had a ‘theme’ and players could use the decks with a specific strategy in mind for gameplay.

What are The Base Set Theme Decks Called?

There are 5 theme decks in Base Set, they are called:

  • 2-Player Starter Set – contains fire and fighting Pokemon. The holographic card is Machamp.
  • Overgrowth – contains water and grass Pokemon. The holographic card is Gyarados.
  • Zap! – contains lighting and psychic Pokemon. The holographic card is Mewtwo.
  • Brushfire – contains fire and grass Pokemon. The holographic card is Ninetales.
  • Blackout – contains water and fighting Pokemon. The holographic card is Hitmonchan.

pokemon-base-set-theme-decks

Is it Worth Buying Base Set Theme Decks?

This is a topic I like talking about!

Although Theme Decks are pre-constructed, meaning you know what cards are inside, I love to buy sealed Base Set Theme decks.

Why?

Well, they’re considerably cheaper than buying booster packs and you’re guaranteed a holo!

I buy sealed, open and grade the best cards.

Sure it doesn’t have the lottery-style fun of opening a random base set booster (which has possibly been weighed), but it’s certainly a more sensible way to spend my Pokemon budget!

My personal favourites are Zap! as it contains a holo Mewtwo and four Pikachu’s and Brushfire as it contains a holo Ninetales, x1 arcanine, x2 Charmeleon’s and x4 Charmanders!

 

Pokemon Base Set Error Cards

Did you know there are over 40 different error cards from Base Set! 

This is brilliant because they are highly collectible, fun to chase, and extremely rare in some cases. 

However questions do have to be asked surrounding quality control checks back in the day!

If you’re interested building a collection of error cards, here’s a complete list of error cards from Base Set.

 

Pokemon Base Set Card List

No ultimate guide to Base Set would be complete without a full card list! So here’s a handy table of each card, it’s number in the set and its rarity:

1/102AlakazamHolographic
2/102BlastoiseHolographic
3/102ChanseyHolographic
4/102CharizardHolographic
5/102ClefairyHolographic
6/102GyaradosHolographic
7/102HitmonchanHolographic
8/102MachampHolographic
9/102MagnetonHolographic
10/102MewtwoHolographic
11/102NidokingHolographic
12/102NinetalesHolographic
13/102PoliwrathHolographic
14/102RaichuHolographic
15/102VenusaurHolographic
16/102ZapdosHolographic
17/102BeedrillRare
18/102DragonairRare
19/102DugtrioRare
20/102ElectabuzzRare
21/102ElectrodeRare
22/102PidgeottoRare
23/102ArcanineUncommon
24/102CharmeleonUncommon
25/102DewgongUncommon
26/102DratiniUncommon
27/102Farfetch’dUncommon
28/102GrowlitheUncommon
29/102HaunterUncommon
30/102IvysaurUncommon
31/102JynxUncommon
32/102KadabraUncommon
33/102KakunaUncommon
34/102MachokeUncommon
35/102MagikarpUncommon
36/102MagmarUncommon
37/102NidorinoUncommon
38/102PoliwhirlUncommon
39/102PorygonUncommon
40/102RaticateUncommon
41/102SeelUncommon
42/102WartortleUncommon
43/102AbraCommon
44/102BulbasaurCommon
45/102CaterpieCommon
46/102CharmanderCommon
47/102DiglettCommon
48/102DoduoCommon
49/102DrowzeeCommon
50/102GastlyCommon
51/102KoffingCommon
52/102MachopCommon
53/102MagnemiteCommon
54/102MetapodCommon
55/102Nidoran MCommon
56/102OnixCommon
57/102PidgeyCommon
58/102PikachuCommon
59/102PoliwagCommon
60/102PonytaCommon
61/102RattataCommon
62/102SandshrewCommon
63/102SquirtleCommon
64/102StarmieCommon
65/102StaryuCommon
66/102TangelaCommon
67/102VoltorbCommon
68/102VulpixCommon
69/102WeedleCommon
70/102Clefairy DollRare
71/102Computer SearchRare
72/102Devolution SprayRare
73/102Imposter Professor OakRare
74/102Item FinderRare
75/102LassRare
76/102Pokemon BreederRare
77/102Pokemon TraderRare
78/102Scoop UpRare
79/102Super Energy RemovalRare
80/102DefenderUncommon
81/102Energy RetrievalUncommon
82/102Full HealUncommon
83/102MaintenanceUncommon
84/102PlusPowerUncommon
85/102Pokemon CenterUncommon
86/102Pokemon FluteUncommon
87/102PokédexUncommon
88/102Professor OakUncommon
89/102ReviveUncommon
90/102Super PotionUncommon
91/102BillCommon
92/102Energy RemovalCommon
93/102Gust of WindCommon
94/102PotionCommon
95/102SwitchCommon
96/102Double Colorless EnergyUncommon
97/102Fighting Energy
98/102Fire Energy
99/102Grass Energy
100/102Lightning Energy
101/102Psychic Energy
102/102Water Energy

Wrapping Up

It’s very hard to sum up what Base Set means to collectors. 

Sure, it’s the starting point of an iconic hobby. The cards are very valuable in monetary terms and it’s a solid alternative investment for the future.

But it’s also so much more than that…

I (like many others) also like to think of the cards as a time machine back to my childhood!

There are few things in this world, pictures aside, that can transport us back to a moment in time, but Pokemon cards have this indescribable way of doing it.

You look at that holographic Charizard and there’s just something magical about it.

120HP, a devastating Fire Spin, a giant crease down the middle and you’re king or queen of the playground! 

The cards are just so memorable and have a subtle charm that just makes you want to show them off.

As a collector, I think the way Pokemon continues to reinvent card designs after 25 years if very impressive.

The full arts, the rainbow rares, the border popping ‘amazing rares’ – they continue to produce cards that I want!

But, for me, nothing is better than Base Set and I hope this article shows just how interesting of a set it is and how much I love it!

Thanks for reading 🙂

 

Quick disclaimer! It goes without saying, this article is not investment advice! I’m merely sharing my opinion. You are responsible for how you spend your money!

Last updated October 20, 2021

Источник: https://www.cardcollector.co.uk/pokemon-base-set/

1st Edition (TCG)

1st Edition cards in the Pokémon Trading Card Game refer to those that are printed in the first print run of a particular set. 1st Edition cards are typically only available in booster packs for a limited period after the initial release of a particular Expansion, and are then replaced by an Unlimited Edition until the printing of that set ceases.

Information

English (left) and Japanese (right) 1st Edition symbols

1st Edition cards are identified by the appearance of an "Edition 1" symbol on the card, often on the opposite side of the Expansion symbol (or next to it with early Japanese 1st Edition sets). This symbol is also present on 1st Edition booster packs and boxes.

The concept was used by Wizards of the Coast for the English and European releases from the beginning of the TCG's introduction to the West, starting with Base Set. Japanese cards did not have 1st Edition runs at this time. 1st Edition runs were produced for every set (except Base Set 2) up to and including Neo Destiny. A factor that likely led to Wizards scrapping the idea of 1st Edition cards was down to the pressure they faced to release sets on dates they had specified, which became particularly apparent during the Neo-era. Wizards even ceased pre-planned timed releases in late 2001. This led to 1st Edition runs being released alongside or even after their Unlimited release, rendering them obsolete. Another factor was likely due to the increased pressure on Wizards to release the e-card sets quickly before their license expired in 2003. After Nintendo gained control of the TCG, 1st Edition runs were rejected altogether. Coincidentally however, around the time English 1st Edition cards were beginning to face scrutiny, Japanese 1st Edition runs began to be produced.

Japan Release

Japanese 1st Edition runs began with the release of Pokémon VS and Pokémon Web in 2001, and continued through the release of Expansion Pack 20th Anniversary, the Japanese equivalent of Evolutions.

Quite a lot of Japanese sets have smaller unlimited print runs than 1st edition print runs, making unlimited cards often harder to find.

Value

In terms of value, 1st Edition cards are typically worth more than their Unlimited counterparts. However, as mentioned above, some of the last English 1st Edition sets were released either at the same time or after their Unlimited release, making them much less valuable compared to early TCG Expansion runs. The most valuable 1st Edition cards are regarded to be those from Base Set, as they were released before the Pokémon phenomenon got into full motion in the West. By the time the TCG became fully established, much of the 1st Edition had already sold out. With the first starter decks produced containing a foiled 1st Edition Machamp they laid down the style in which 1st Edition cards would appear.

1st Edition runs from later Expansions also showed card inconsistencies from their intended appearance (see Error cards). Many error cards provide additional material for collectors, as they are usually corrected in subsequent Unlimited runs. Those that are not (usually, text in attacks that do not match what was intended) are detailed in card errata issued by the gaming body.

Shadowless

Comparison between Base Set 1st Edition, "Shadowless" and Unlimited runs.

Base Set is also unique in that Wizards were still experimenting with the layout and aesthetics of the cards after the 1st Edition run, which becomes apparent when cards from both 1st Edition and Unlimited are compared. The most obvious change is the weighting of text for HP values and attacks; they are much bolder in Unlimited. Another was the inclusion of a drop shadow under the character illustration window, supposedly added to give the card more depth. This later inclusion led to the naming of a transitional run, often called Shadowless, in which a small print run of Base Set was produced without the 1st Edition symbol, as well as without the changes mentioned above that were added in the actual Unlimited run. The Shadowless cards are also highly sought after by collectors because of their rarity being close to that of the first edition.

Trainers and Energy cards from Base Set, don't have the image box lacking the shadow, so can't be Shadowless, however, there are other differences from this print run.

The major difference is: The copyright info.

  • The Shadowless print run says "© 1995, 96, 98, 99 Nintendo" while the Unlimited runs leave off the "99".
Источник: https://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/1st_Edition_(TCG)

You can watch a thematic video

1999 Pokemon English Base Set Shadowless 1st Edition Booster Box Sealed 1st edition 1999 pokemon booster box

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