dare county nc commissioners

Dare County Board of Commissioners Chairman Bob Woodard has released the to service and leadership by the North Carolina Black Alliance. Iredell County Government Board of Commissioners Meeting Videos · Iredell County Video Tourbook. What's New in Iredell County. Commissioner Bill Fowler, who has been chairman since Feb. narcotics investigator, chief of detectives and county's first DARE officer in 1990. dare county nc commissioners

Dare county nc commissioners -

After public hearings on Oct. 18, 2021, Dare County commissioners adopted changes to two ordinances.

The board unanimously adopted flexible buffering standards for the Travel Trailer Park and Campground Ordinance. Buffering around a campground can now be vegetation or six-foot high fencing of solid wood or composite material. Previously, the standard only permitted vegetation. This change drew no commenters.

On the second hearing, two food truck owners supported the change to allow food truck courts with up to five food trucks.

Steven Bonney has stationed Stu’s Food Truck at the foot of the Avon Pier. “Competition makes everybody better,” said Bonney. Stu’s offers breakfast and lunch.

Luke Harris with Natalie Harris and two children also supported the food court concept. Roots and Leaves serves vegan food from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The truck is stationed at Koru Village Klub, adjacent to the Avon Pier.

Commissioner Ervin Bateman asked “is five too many?”

Joe Thompson, founder of Koru Village, responded that the number was arbitrary, but also noted that a food court needs variety. Thompson proposed both changes.

The board adopted the changes to the zoning ordinance for the unincorporated portions of the county and stated the amendments are consistent with the Dare County Land Use Plan.

Public comment drew four speakers.

Liza Yowell and Amanda Lotas spoke about Agenda 21, signed in 1992 at the end of a United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janerio, Brazil. President George H.W. Bush signed the document along with leaders of 177 other nations. It is a non-binding document.

Proclamation 12-02-05, adopted Feb. 20, 2012, the Dare County’s Board of Commissioners “recognizes the destructive and insidious nature of United Nations Agenda 21 and does hereby expose to the public and public policy makers the dangerous intent of the plan and urges communities to reject the radical policies and destructive ‘sustainable development’ strategies of United Nations Agenda 21.”

Lotas asked the commissioners to revisit that proclamation and to declare Dare County a “sanctuary county opposing government overreach.”

Melanie Brewer brought the county’s Board of Education masking policy to the commissioners.

She asked the commissioners to “overrule mandates.” She pleaded “please stop this. Allow parents to choose.” She supported the request for a county of sanctuary.

Reese Stecher charged that federal coronavirus funding, namely Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) funding, had strings attached. He lobbied for funding antibody tests for all students with ESSER money.

For the various boards and commissioners, the commissioners:

– Reappointed Jason Brian Heilig and Roberta Midgett to the Rodanthe-Waves-Salvo Community Building Board,

– Reappointed Cynthia Harris and Claudia Hennessey to the Older Adult Services Advisory Council,

– Appointed to the Dare County Tourism Board councilman David Hines from Kitty Hawk and Dennis Robinson from Hatteras for the at-large Hatteras seat; and reappointed commissioner Ervin Bateman and Tim Cafferty as an at-large member.

READ ABOUT MORE NEWS HERE.

Print Article

Источник: https://www.thecoastlandtimes.com/2021/10/23/dare-commissioners-adopt-two-ordinance-changes/

NORTH CAROLINA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

1961 SESSION

 

 

CHAPTER 802

HOUSE BILL 877

 

 

AN ACT TO AUTHORIZE THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, IN ITS DISCRETION, TO CAUSE ELECTIONS TO BE HELD IN HATTERAS OR KENNAKEET TOWNSHIPS IN DARE COUNTY, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER OR NOT BEER AND/OR WINE SHOULD BE SOLD IN EITHER OF SAID TOWNSHIPS.

 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact:

 

Section 1. The Board of County Commissioners of Dare County is hereby authorized and empowered, in its discretion, to require the County Board of Elections of Dare County to hold and conduct elections in Hatteras or Kennakeet Township in Dare County for the purpose of determining whether or not beer and/or wine shall be sold in either of said townships. Upon the Board of County Commissioners of Dare County filing a written request with the Board of Elections of Dare County, it shall be the duty of the said Board of Elections of Dare County to hold and conduct an election in Hatteras or Kennakeet Township of said county for the purpose of determining whether beer and/or wine shall be sold in either of said townships or not, and said election shall be held and conducted in accordance with the notice, time and machinery provided in Article 11 of Chapter 18 of the General Statutes of North Carolina (Cumulative Supplement of 1951); that the effect of the vote in said election for and against the sale of beer and/or wine in either of said townships shall have the same result as set forth in G. S. 18-126 (Cumulative Supplement of 1951), and said election shall be applicable to either of said townships as to the result of said election and is hereby re-enacted for said purpose; that the form of the ballot shall be as is contained in G. S. 18-125 (Cumulative Supplement of 1951), and the time of calling the election, notice and other restrictions, as set forth in G. S. 18-124 (Cumulative Supplement of 1951), shall be applicable to said election except that it shall not be necessary to have any petition requesting said election, and the provisions of Subsections (a), (b) and (c) of G. S. 18-124 (Cumulative Supplement of 1951) shall not be applicable to the elections herein provided.

Sec. 2. All laws and clauses of laws in conflict with this Act are hereby repealed.

Sec. 3. This Act shall be in full force and effect from and after its ratification.

In the General Assembly read three times and ratified, this the 14th day of June, 1961.

Источник: https://www.ncleg.net/EnactedLegislation/SessionLaws/HTML/1961-1962/SL1961-802.html

Nags Head Questions Nourishment Funds

Reprinted from the Outer Banks Voice

Dare County plans to fund sand pumping efforts in both Southern Shores and Avon by withholding $1.4 million in beach nourishment funds from each of the five oceanfront communities was met with some pushback from Nags Head commissioners at their Jan. 6 meeting while sparking a broader discussion on funding mechanisms for these projects.

During a presentation to commissioners, County Manager Bobby Outten explained that both Southern Shores and Avon need beach nourishment, but that the current $8.5 million in the county’s fund falls short of what’s needed to help finance the two projects. But, he said, reducing the county’s contributions for replenishment efforts to each town by $1.4 million – the same amount the towns received in a state grant this fall for beach nourishment projects – would free up enough money to do so.

“We got lucky, I suppose, at least from my perspective,” Outten told the Nags Head Commissioners.

But not everyone appeared to share that view.

Expressing dismay about the loss in revenue, commissioners voiced concern over how the beach nourishment fund, which comes from a portion of the occupancy tax, is divvied up among the towns, asked about assurances of future funding and wondered whether there was a better source of funding that could be explored other than occupancy tax revenues.

Commissioner Michael Siers, referring to the state grant, contended the county was trying to “retrieve grant money that we received for damages from Dorian.”

In response, Outten asserted, “That’s not correct …We are not taking any of your money. You got a grant that had nothing to do with Dorian or anything else, it was just a grant. We got one as well.”

For his part, Commissioner Webb Fuller suggested the county needed a formula that provides some degree of certainty about how much each community is going to receive in the future and asked if funds were being dispersed fairly.

Outten responded that such a formula already exists, one that projects 10 years into the future.

“You assume none of that has occurred but the (beach nourishment model) shows you what we are going to give each community into the future,” he said. Speaking of equity, the county manager said, “every community has skin in the game because everybody is going to be taxed.”

Beginning in 2011 with the Nags Head beach nourishment project, the county has contributed roughly 50 percent to each town’s sand pumping efforts and also commits money for future maintenance projects. Towns also fund their perspective projects through municipal and service district taxes.

In response to a question by Commissioner Renee Cahoon about whether Avon property owners on the west side of N.C. 12 would be taxed, Outten said the community would likely be faced with a 40-cent tax on oceanside property and a 10-cent tax in other areas of the community to help fund its project.

Outten told commissioners if the county moves forward with its intended plan, “You are going to be in exactly the same place, with exactly the same amount of sand, exactly the same amount of everything. You just won’t have as much of it funded with Dare’s money.”

He added, “If there is a better way to do this, we’d love to hear it. Our goal is to take care of the beaches of Dare County as a whole and if there is a better way to do it, we want to do it.”

Following Outten’s presentation, Commissioner Kevin Brinkley observed that, “What the county is doing is, they already spent money out of that fund, but yet he’s coming to us now asking for our blessing, our okay, to spend the rest of the money for the projects.”

At the conclusion of the discussion, commissioners considered the need to pursue different funding options for beach nourishment and floated the idea of area professionals in the field forming a working group to explore those options. Mayor Ben Cahoon said he would suggest a gathering of the mayors following COVID-19 guidelines to discuss possibilities.

County Manager Outten has made a similar presentation to the Kitty Hawk, Southern Shores and Duck town councils and is expected to go to the Kill Devil Hills Board of Commissioners Monday, Jan. 11. The Dare County Board of Commissioners is expected to take up the matter at its mid-month meeting Jan. 19.

This story is provided courtesy of the Outer Banks Voice, a digital newspaper covering the Outer Banks. Coastal Review Online is partnering with the Voice to provide readers with more environmental and lifestyle stories of interest about our coast.

Filed Under: News BriefsTagged With: beach nourishmentReprint this Story

Источник: https://coastalreview.org/2021/01/nags-head-questions-nourishment-funds/

About Us

Tyrrell County is one of North Carolina’s oldest counties, founded in 1729 and named for Sir John Tyrrell, one of the Lord’s Proprietors of the Carolinas.

Located in northeastern North Carolina, Tyrrell County is bordered on the north by the Albemarle Sound, on the south by Hyde County, on the east by the Alligator River and Dare County, and on the west by Washington County. It is located approximately 150 miles east of the Triangle Area (Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill) and 100 miles south of Tidewater Virginia (Norfolk/Chesapeake/Virginia Beach). The county has a total area of 600 square miles of which 390 square miles is comprised of land and 210 square miles of water.

The county seat and only municipality is Columbia, located on the banks of the Scuppernong River. The county is divided into five townships – Alligator, Columbia, Gum Neck, Scuppernong, and South Fork.

According to the 2010 United States’ census, the population of the county was 4,407, making it the least populous county in the state. Agri-business, commercial fishing, forestry, and tourism contribute to the economy. Access to water and the abundance of forest land and wildlife for recreational fishing and hunting are valuable assets of the county.

The county has a five member Board of Commissioners/Manager type of government. The five members are elected at large by a limited voting election system and serve staggered four-year terms.

Источник: http://tyrrellcounty.org/en/about-tyrrell

 Chair


Bertie County Commissioner Tammy Lee

 

Tammy A. Lee

Term Expires: 2022

 

2940 Wakelon Road

Colerain, NC 27924

252-325-4125

 

 

Representing District III - Colerain 1&2 and Mitchells 1&2

 

Elected in 2014, Commissioner Lee was voted the 2021 Chair of the Board. She is currently serving her second overall term as a Bertie County Commissioner. She also served as the Board's Vice Chairman in 2015 and 2020.

 

Current Occupation:  Retired

Employment History: 

• Correctional Training Specialist II2010-2014
• Hostage Negotiator2007-2014
• Correctional Case Manager 2006-2010
• Correctional Sergeant 2000-2006
• Correctional Officer1997-2000
• Bertie County Public Schools1992-1997

 

Education:

• Perquimans High School

• College of the Albemarle

• General Instructor Certification

• Control, Restraints, Defensive Techniques (CRDT)

• Unlawful Workplace Harassment Instructor

• Firearms Instructor

 

Family:

• Vernon W. Lee – Husband – Dare County Sheriff’s Office

• Christopher E. Lee – Son – NC Marine Patrol

• Samual Bryan Lee – Son – Minister of Youth & Education

• Daughter of the late Rufus and Margie Ashworth

• Melissa Lee – Daughter in Law

 

 

Selected Public Service & Community Activities

• Prior Vice Chairman – Bertie County Board of Commissioners, 2015

• Attend Askewville Assembly of God

• Serve on Mission Team

• Relay for Life

• March of Dimes

 

 

Other Public Service/Boards/Committees:

• Executive Board for Albemarle Regional Health Service

• Tri-County Airport Authority

• Healthy Carolinians Committee

• Peanut Belt RPO TAC

• Aulander Peanut Festival Committee

NCACC Board of Directors

• NCACC Justice and Public Safety Steering Committee

• NACo Justice and Public Safety Steering Committee

• NACo Veterans and Military Services Committee 

• Albemarle Library Strategic Plan Committee

• NC Sentencing and Policy Advisory Committee

• 4H Advisory Council

 

 

 

Источник: http://www.co.bertie.nc.us/commissioners/lee.html

Avery

October 28, 2021. WAMY Community Action’s newest youth program, ‘The Hangout’, will join the Afterschool Alliance in this year’s Lights On Afterschool, a nationwide series of events celebrating and supporting afterschool programs, on November 2nd.  This 22nd annual Lights On Afterschool is expected to include thousands of in-person and virtual events across the nation, including open houses, science fairs, fun runs, student showcases, academic contests, community service, sports competitions, and more at schools, 4-Hs, Boys & Girls Clubs, YMCAs, parks, museums, community centers, state capitols and other places. Lights On Afterschool is the only national rally for afterschool. The Hangout’s Lights On Afterschool event will be at 358 Beech Street in Newland from 5-7 PM on Tuesday, November 2nd. We will offer a FREE dinner, t-shirt tye dying, & information booths about WAMY’s programs. We will also offer a tour of the facility for the program. 

Read more

Источник: https://www.hcpress.com/avery

 Chair


Bertie County Commissioner Tammy Lee

 

Tammy A. Lee

Term Expires: 2022

 

2940 Wakelon Road

Colerain, NC 27924

252-325-4125

 

 

Representing District III - Colerain 1&2 and Mitchells 1&2

 

Elected in 2014, Commissioner Lee was voted the 2021 Chair of the Board. She is currently serving her second overall term as a Bertie County Commissioner. She also served as the Board's Vice Chairman in 2015 and 2020.

 

Current Occupation:  Retired

Employment History: 

• Correctional Training Specialist II2010-2014
• Hostage Negotiator2007-2014
• Correctional Case Manager 2006-2010
• Correctional Sergeant 2000-2006
• Correctional Officer1997-2000
• Bertie County Public Schools1992-1997

 

Education:

• Perquimans High School

• College of the Albemarle

• General Instructor Certification

• Control, Restraints, Defensive Techniques (CRDT)

• Unlawful Workplace Harassment Instructor

• Firearms Instructor

 

Family:

• Vernon W. Lee – Husband – Dare County Sheriff’s Office

• Christopher E. Lee – Son – NC Marine Patrol

• Samual Bryan Lee – Son – Minister of Youth & Education

• Daughter of the late Rufus and Margie Ashworth

• Melissa Lee – Daughter in Law

 

 

Selected Public Service & Community Activities

• Prior Vice Chairman – Bertie County Board of Commissioners, 2015

• Attend Askewville Assembly of God

• Serve on Mission Team

• Relay for Life

• March of Dimes

 

 

Other Public Service/Boards/Committees:

• Executive Board for Albemarle Regional Health Service

• Tri-County Airport Authority

• Healthy Carolinians Committee

• Peanut Belt RPO TAC

• Aulander Peanut Festival Committee

NCACC Board of Directors

• NCACC Justice and Public Safety Steering Committee

• NACo Justice and Public Safety Steering Committee

• NACo Veterans and Military Services Committee 

• Albemarle Library Strategic Plan Committee

• NC Sentencing and Policy Advisory Committee

• 4H Advisory Council

 

 

 

Источник: http://www.co.bertie.nc.us/commissioners/lee.html

Board of Commissioners

Mayor Ronald Pappas

Having served in both municipal and corporate leadership positions throughout his career, Mayor Ron Pappas brings over 40 years’ executive experience to the office of Mayor. His senior positions include Region President, President, and Vice President for top Fortune 500 Real Estate Development and Home Building Companies, President of a Regional Real Estate Brokerage Services company, and comprehensive involvement in County and regional Planning Boards.

He and his wife Camine have two grown children.

Phone:  (704) 219-4686
Email: ron.pappas@waxhaw.com

 

Mayor Pro-Tem Brenda McMillon

Term Expires: December 2021

Commissioner Brenda McMillon believes it is important for government officials to be accountable and accessible to the citizens of Waxhaw and will bring a common-sense approach with a dedicated work ethic to the Board. She understands the need to implement planning and vision together with policies and procedures.

Commissioner McMillon recently served on Waxhaw's Planning Board. She has worked in the North Carolina school system, as a Union County Board of Education Approved Substitute Teacher; has been active in the school system, having served on Kensington Elementary, Cuthbertson Middle and Cuthbertson High Schools site-based management team, where members are involved in the decision-making process for the school; PTSO member / committee representative, proctor; Community HOA transition team member; Samaritan's Feet volunteer. Brenda is also a member of Delta Sigma Theta, Inc., a not-for-profit Greek-lettered sorority of college educated women dedicated to public service.

Commissioner McMillon and her husband, Lucius have three children.

Phone:  (704) 219-5406
Email: brenda.mcmillon@waxhaw.com

 

Commissioner Pedro Morey

Commissioner Pedro R. Morey is a married father of two girls and has been a resident of Waxhaw for four years. He is a retired police officer and a United States Marine combat veteran having won service and valor awards during his service as both a police officer and United States Marine.

Upon taking residence in Waxhaw, Commissioner Morey immediately became engaged with the community by serving as a Site-Based parent at Kensington Elementary School and later being elected to serve as Vice President of his Home Owners Association. Commissioner Morey then began serving the Town of Waxhaw as a sitting member of the Town of Waxhaw's Board of Adjustment. He also serves the public while being an active member of the charity organization Rotary International and is involved with veterans groups like the Waxhaw American Legion Post and the nearby Veterans of Foreign Wars post.

Commissioner Morey is a strong supporter of local businesses and a strong advocate of Waxhaw, not just locally but at the county and state level. He is in communication with several county and state elected officials advocating and promoting Waxhaw. Commissioner Morey believes in being visible and engaged with the public so that residents concerns are represented and transparency is maintained.

In his spare time Commissioner Morey spends time with his family and can sometimes be seen riding his motorcycle down Waxhaw's winding roads.

Phone:  (704) 219-8866
Email: pedro.morey@waxhaw.com

 

Commissioner Anne Simpson

Anne M. Simpson brings a diverse and vital set of skills and experience to her leadership position as Town Commissioner. Her background includes serving on the Town of Waxhaw’s Organizational Advisory Board as well as her own community’s Home Owner Association. She has even participated in the Town’s Citizens Police Academy and Waxhaw 101; informative activities she recommends to all citizens.

Her professional background is highlighted by a broad spectrum of diverse accomplishments, including experience as an Operational Consultant working to bring efficiency and cultural harmony to small businesses. She is an FAA Certified Flight Instructor and since 2006, Anne has been a practicing Registered Nurse. She is currently pursuing her Master’s Degree in Nursing Education.

As a Town Commissioner, Anne intends to follow a multi-disciplined philosophy of combining citizen engagement with structured, informed decision making. Eager to make a difference, her ultimate goal is to ensure a sustainable future for our Town, dare county nc commissioners working to maintain the historic charm and character of Waxhaw for all future generations.

Anne and her husband Carroll, along with their two children, have been Waxhaw residents since 2010.

Phone:  (704) 219-8949
Email: anne.simpson@waxhaw.com

 

Commissioner Tracy Wesolek

Term Expires: December 2021

Commissioner Tracy Wesolek plans on being the voice for the dare county nc commissioners of Waxhaw by maintaining open communication and transparency with her constituents. Her goal in the office is to maintain the small town feel of Waxhaw while using smart growth plans. She is a strong supporter of small business and believes in being fiscally conservative with the taxpayer's money. 

Prior to the election, Commissioner Wesolek was serving her second term on Waxhaw's Board of Adjustment. She has volunteered at several Waxhaw schools and has been a Girls on the Run coach and a member of the Waxhaw Woman's Club.

Commissioner Wesolek has lived in Waxhaw for 4 years and has 3 children. She enjoys gardening and is a NC Master Gardener.

Email: tracy.wesolek@waxhaw.com

 

Commissioner Jason Hall

Term Expires: December 2021

Commissioner Jason Hall brings an analytical-driven approach and a committed work ethic to Waxhaw. He believes that government officials are public servants who should be accountable, transparent, and accessible to the citizens they represent.  

Throughout his professional career, Jason has worked as a critical thinker in conducting technology assessments for the largest counties and Federal agencies in North America.  He has worked with the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission, the Department of the Interior, and private and public sectors to deploy highly regulated systems.

Jason is the founder and CEO of Waxhaw-based McCloy Hall & Co., an information management consulting agency.  Jason holds a Bachelor of Arts in International Business Administration from Barry University in Miami, Florida, and a Certificate of Project Management from Virginia Polytechnic and State University.

“My promise to all residents of Waxhaw is to be an analytical-driven Commissioner who will bring thoughtful ideas and vote based on data and what best serves the town”. ~ Commissioner Jason Hall

Jason and his wife, Flavia, have two young daughters (Isabelle & Adelene) attending school in Waxhaw. He spends much time in Waxhaw’s parks, downtown & local businesses. Jason and his family have lived in Waxhaw for seven years.

Phone:  (704) 219-5449
Email: jason.hall@waxhaw.com

Источник: https://www.waxhaw.com/government/board-of-commissioners

Parole Commissioners

Bill Fowler

Willis J. Fowler

Commissioner Bill Fowler, who has been chairman since Feb. 13, 2017, served as a Raleigh police officer and detective from 1964-1972 before joining the Department of Correction as a parole officer. After the state's parole and probation supervision systems dare county nc commissioners merged, he supervised both probationers and parolees for many years. In 1983, Fowler was promoted to a parole hearing officer. He was a chief parole hearing officer when Gov. Mike Easley appointed him to the Parole Commission in July 2005.

Eric Montgomery

Commissioner Eric Montgomery of Charlotte was appointed by Gov. Roy Cooper on Dec. 8, 2017. Montgomery is the president of the Montgomery Law Firm. He previously served as assistant general counsel for Bank of America and Flagstar Corportation. Montgomery is also a member of the board of directors for the African American Community Foundation. 

Angela R. Bryant

Angela R. Bryant of Rocky Mount was appointed by Gov. Roy Cooper on March 19, 2018. Bryant served six years in the NC House and more than 5 years in the NC Senate, where she sponsored legislation that focused on reentry planning for offenders and establishing local reentry councils and related programs. Bryant served as chair of the NC Legislative Black Caucus from 2017 until her appointment. She is an attorney and previously served as Deputy Commissioner of the NC Industrial Commission and as an administrative law judge with the Office of Administrative Hearings. For more than 30 years, Bryant has worked as a diversity and organizational development consultant affiliated with VISIONS Inc., a non-profit she co-founded. Bryant has also served on the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and the Board of Governors for the UNC System.


Graham Atkinson

Commissioner Graham Atkinson was appointed by Gov. Roy Cooper on March 24, 2017. He has more than 30 years of service as a law enforcement officer with the Surry County Sheriff's Office, including sheriff from 2006 until his retirement in April 2017. He served as a patrol deputy, detective, narcotics investigator, chief of detectives and county's first DARE officer in dare county nc commissioners. He served on the executive board of the NC Sheriffs' Association for several years, and was president in 2016-17. Atkinson also served two terms on the Surry County Board of Education, including three years as chairman. He is a graduate of Surry Community College and Gardner-Webb University.
Источник: https://www.ncdps.gov/about-dps/boards-commissions/post-release-supervision-parole-commission/commissioners

Hyde County Board of Commissioners

Earl Pugh Jr., Chairman

Phone: (252) 925-4581
32 Nebraska Road
Engelhard, NC 27824
[email protected]

M. Shannon Swindell, Vice-Chairman

Phone: (252) 924-0497
7295 Sladesville-Credle Rd.
Scranton, NC 27875
[email protected]

Randal G. Mathews

Benjamin Simmons III

Phone:  (252) 944-3070
709 Simmons Way
Fairfield, NC 27826
[email protected]

Goldie Topping

Phone: (252) 926-1711
Cell: (252) 945-7607
1740 Juniper Bay Road
Swan Quarter, NC 27885
[email protected]

Lois Stotesberry

Phone:  (252) 926-4178
P.O. Box 188
Swan Quarter NC, 27885
[email protected]


Ordinances & Resolutions

Want to learn more about County Government?

Submit Public Comments for the Next Commissioner Meeting

Источник: https://www.hydecountync.gov/commissioners_contact_info.php

dare county nc commissioners Us

Tyrrell County is one of North Carolina’s oldest counties, founded in 1729 and named for Sir John Tyrrell, one of the Lord’s Proprietors of the Carolinas.

Located in northeastern North Carolina, Tyrrell County is bordered on the north by the Albemarle Sound, on the south by Hyde County, on the east by the Alligator River and Dare County, and on the west by Washington County. It is located approximately 150 miles east of the Triangle Area (Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill) and 100 miles south of Tidewater Virginia (Norfolk/Chesapeake/Virginia Beach). The county has a total area of 600 square miles of which 390 square miles is comprised of land and 210 square miles of water.

The county seat and only municipality is Columbia, located on the banks of the Scuppernong River. The county is divided into five townships – Alligator, Columbia, Gum Neck, Scuppernong, and South Fork.

According to the 2010 United States’ census, the population of the county was 4,407, making it the least populous county in the state. Agri-business, commercial fishing, forestry, and tourism contribute to the economy. Access to water and the abundance of forest land and wildlife for recreational fishing and hunting are valuable assets of the county.

The county has a five member Board of Commissioners/Manager type of government. The five members are elected at large by a limited voting election system and serve staggered four-year terms.

Источник: http://tyrrellcounty.org/en/about-tyrrell

Nags Head Questions Nourishment Funds

Reprinted from the Outer Banks Voice

Dare County plans to fund sand pumping efforts in both Southern Shores and Avon by withholding $1.4 million in beach nourishment funds from each of the five oceanfront communities was met with some pushback from Nags Head commissioners at their Jan. 6 meeting while sparking a broader discussion on funding mechanisms for these projects.

During a presentation to commissioners, County Manager Bobby Outten explained that both Southern Shores and Avon need beach nourishment, but that the dare county nc commissioners $8.5 million in the county’s fund falls short of what’s needed to help finance the two projects. But, he said, reducing the county’s contributions for replenishment efforts to each town by $1.4 million – the same amount the towns received in a state grant this fall for beach nourishment projects – would free up enough money to do so.

“We got lucky, I suppose, at least from my perspective,” Outten told the Nags Head Commissioners.

But not everyone appeared to share that view.

Expressing dismay about the loss in revenue, commissioners voiced concern over how the beach nourishment fund, which comes from a portion of the occupancy tax, is divvied up among the towns, asked about assurances of future funding and wondered whether there was a better source of funding that could be explored other than occupancy tax revenues.

Commissioner Michael Siers, referring to the state grant, contended the county was trying to “retrieve grant money that we received for damages from Dorian.”

In response, Outten asserted, “That’s not correct …We are not taking any of your money. You got a grant that had nothing to do with Dorian or anything else, it was just a grant. We got one as well.”

For his part, Commissioner Webb What in soy milk is bad for you suggested the county needed a formula that provides some degree of certainty about how much each community is going to receive in the future and asked if funds were being dispersed fairly.

Outten responded that such a formula already exists, one that projects 10 years into the future.

“You assume none of that has occurred but the (beach nourishment model) shows you what we are going to give each community into the future,” he said. Speaking of equity, the county manager said, “every community has skin in the game because everybody is going to be taxed.”

Beginning in 2011 with the Nags Head beach nourishment project, the county has contributed roughly 50 percent to each town’s sand pumping efforts and also commits money for future maintenance projects. Towns also fund their perspective projects through municipal and service district taxes.

In response to a question by Commissioner Renee Cahoon about whether Avon property owners on the west side of N.C. 12 would be taxed, Outten said the community would likely be faced with a 40-cent tax on oceanside property and a 10-cent tax in other areas of the community to help fund its project.

Outten told commissioners if the county moves forward with its intended plan, “You are going to be in exactly the same place, with exactly the same amount of sand, exactly the same amount of everything. You just won’t have as much of it funded with Dare’s money.”

He added, “If there is a better way to do this, we’d love to hear it. Our goal is to take care of the beaches of Dare County as a whole and if there is a better way to do it, we want to do it.”

Following Outten’s presentation, Commissioner Kevin Brinkley observed that, “What the county is doing is, they already spent money out of that fund, but yet he’s coming to us now asking for our blessing, our okay, to spend the rest of the money for dare county nc commissioners projects.”

At the conclusion of the discussion, commissioners considered the need to pursue different funding options for beach nourishment and floated the idea of area professionals in the field forming a working group to explore those options. Mayor Ben Cahoon said he would suggest a gathering of the mayors following COVID-19 guidelines to discuss possibilities.

County Manager Outten has made a similar presentation to the Kitty Hawk, Southern Shores and Duck town councils and is expected to go to the Kill Devil Hills Board of Commissioners Monday, Jan. 11. The Dare County Board of Commissioners is expected to take up the matter at its mid-month meeting Jan. 19.

This story is provided courtesy of the Outer Banks Voice, a digital newspaper covering the Outer Banks. Coastal Review Online is partnering with the Voice to provide readers with more environmental and lifestyle stories of interest about our coast.

Filed Under: News BriefsTagged With: beach nourishmentReprint this Dare county nc commissioners https://coastalreview.org/2021/01/nags-head-questions-nourishment-funds/

Commissioners rename Dare Center after Virginia Tillett 

By Outer Banks Voice on November 16, 2021

During the November 15, 2021 Dare County Board of Commissioners meeting, Virginia Tillett’s granddaughter and sons accepted framed copies of the Dare County Board of Commissioners’ resolution to rename the Dare County Center in Manteo the Virginia Tillett Center. From left to right: Maya Tillett, Johnny Tillett, Chairman Bob Woodard and Michael Tillett.

Admired community leader passed away in October

(Dare County)

At its Nov. 15 meeting, the Dare County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to approve a resolution to rename the Dare County Center in Manteo as the Virginia Tillett Center in honor of the professional educator and community leader who served Dare County as an elected official for more than 30 years.

Many of Tillett’s family members and friends attended Monday’s meeting in her honor, including her two sons, Michael Tillett of Manteo and Johnny Tillett of Raleigh, both of whom were presented with framed copies of the resolution that had been signed by Commissioners Chairman Bob Woodard. Tillett passed away in early October.

The Dare County Center, which is located at 950 Marshall C. Collins Drive in Manteo, is a multi-generational facility that provides resources, programs and activities designed to enhance the lives of all Dare County citizens ranging from youth and adults to seniors and families.

Tillett — who was elected to the Dare County Board of Commissioners in 2002 after serving in the positions of both chair and vice chair on the Dare County Board of Education for 20 years —played an instrumental role in the development of the Dare County Center, which has had a profound and positive impact on thousands of Dare County residents since it opened its doors in 2009.

According to the resolution, “Without Virginia Tillett’s tireless efforts and her vision for the facility, specifically as a place where individuals of all ages could get together and learn from one another, these individuals would not benefit from the wide array of programs and services it offers to the Dare County community.”

Tillett has been honored with a number of awards over the past several decades, including the Dare County Outstanding Citizen of the Year award and the Outer Banks Chamber of Commerce’s Citizen of the Year award, both of which she received in 2015.

In 2006, she was honored by North Carolina Governor Michael Easley, who awarded her the prestigious Order of the Long Leaf Pine Award, and in April 2021, Tillett was recognized for her accomplishments and dedication to servant leadership by the North Carolina Black Alliance, which presented her with a 2021 Trailblazer Award.

A separate announcement will be made for the building dedication ceremony. For the latest updates, as well as more information about the facility and its programs and activities, visit www.DareNC.com/DCC.



Источник: https://www.outerbanksvoice.com/2021/11/16/commissioners-rename-dare-center-after-virginia-tillett/

: Dare county nc commissioners

UNION BANK PACIFIC BEACH HOURS
HOW DO I PAY MY PHONE BILL WITH METRO PCS
What is capital market efficiency in finance

Dare county nc commissioners -

Nags Head Questions Nourishment Funds

Reprinted from the Outer Banks Voice

Dare County plans to fund sand pumping efforts in both Southern Shores and Avon by withholding $1.4 million in beach nourishment funds from each of the five oceanfront communities was met with some pushback from Nags Head commissioners at their Jan. 6 meeting while sparking a broader discussion on funding mechanisms for these projects.

During a presentation to commissioners, County Manager Bobby Outten explained that both Southern Shores and Avon need beach nourishment, but that the current $8.5 million in the county’s fund falls short of what’s needed to help finance the two projects. But, he said, reducing the county’s contributions for replenishment efforts to each town by $1.4 million – the same amount the towns received in a state grant this fall for beach nourishment projects – would free up enough money to do so.

“We got lucky, I suppose, at least from my perspective,” Outten told the Nags Head Commissioners.

But not everyone appeared to share that view.

Expressing dismay about the loss in revenue, commissioners voiced concern over how the beach nourishment fund, which comes from a portion of the occupancy tax, is divvied up among the towns, asked about assurances of future funding and wondered whether there was a better source of funding that could be explored other than occupancy tax revenues.

Commissioner Michael Siers, referring to the state grant, contended the county was trying to “retrieve grant money that we received for damages from Dorian.”

In response, Outten asserted, “That’s not correct …We are not taking any of your money. You got a grant that had nothing to do with Dorian or anything else, it was just a grant. We got one as well.”

For his part, Commissioner Webb Fuller suggested the county needed a formula that provides some degree of certainty about how much each community is going to receive in the future and asked if funds were being dispersed fairly.

Outten responded that such a formula already exists, one that projects 10 years into the future.

“You assume none of that has occurred but the (beach nourishment model) shows you what we are going to give each community into the future,” he said. Speaking of equity, the county manager said, “every community has skin in the game because everybody is going to be taxed.”

Beginning in 2011 with the Nags Head beach nourishment project, the county has contributed roughly 50 percent to each town’s sand pumping efforts and also commits money for future maintenance projects. Towns also fund their perspective projects through municipal and service district taxes.

In response to a question by Commissioner Renee Cahoon about whether Avon property owners on the west side of N.C. 12 would be taxed, Outten said the community would likely be faced with a 40-cent tax on oceanside property and a 10-cent tax in other areas of the community to help fund its project.

Outten told commissioners if the county moves forward with its intended plan, “You are going to be in exactly the same place, with exactly the same amount of sand, exactly the same amount of everything. You just won’t have as much of it funded with Dare’s money.”

He added, “If there is a better way to do this, we’d love to hear it. Our goal is to take care of the beaches of Dare County as a whole and if there is a better way to do it, we want to do it.”

Following Outten’s presentation, Commissioner Kevin Brinkley observed that, “What the county is doing is, they already spent money out of that fund, but yet he’s coming to us now asking for our blessing, our okay, to spend the rest of the money for the projects.”

At the conclusion of the discussion, commissioners considered the need to pursue different funding options for beach nourishment and floated the idea of area professionals in the field forming a working group to explore those options. Mayor Ben Cahoon said he would suggest a gathering of the mayors following COVID-19 guidelines to discuss possibilities.

County Manager Outten has made a similar presentation to the Kitty Hawk, Southern Shores and Duck town councils and is expected to go to the Kill Devil Hills Board of Commissioners Monday, Jan. 11. The Dare County Board of Commissioners is expected to take up the matter at its mid-month meeting Jan. 19.

This story is provided courtesy of the Outer Banks Voice, a digital newspaper covering the Outer Banks. Coastal Review Online is partnering with the Voice to provide readers with more environmental and lifestyle stories of interest about our coast.

Filed Under: News BriefsTagged With: beach nourishmentReprint this Story

Источник: https://coastalreview.org/2021/01/nags-head-questions-nourishment-funds/

 Chair


Bertie County Commissioner Tammy Lee

 

Tammy A. Lee

Term Expires: 2022

 

2940 Wakelon Road

Colerain, NC 27924

252-325-4125

 

 

Representing District III - Colerain 1&2 and Mitchells 1&2

 

Elected in 2014, Commissioner Lee was voted the 2021 Chair of the Board. She is currently serving her second overall term as a Bertie County Commissioner. She also served as the Board's Vice Chairman in 2015 and 2020.

 

Current Occupation:  Retired

Employment History: 

• Correctional Training Specialist II2010-2014
• Hostage Negotiator2007-2014
• Correctional Case Manager 2006-2010
• Correctional Sergeant 2000-2006
• Correctional Officer1997-2000
• Bertie County Public Schools1992-1997

 

Education:

• Perquimans High School

• College of the Albemarle

• General Instructor Certification

• Control, Restraints, Defensive Techniques (CRDT)

• Unlawful Workplace Harassment Instructor

• Firearms Instructor

 

Family:

• Vernon W. Lee – Husband – Dare County Sheriff’s Office

• Christopher E. Lee – Son – NC Marine Patrol

• Samual Bryan Lee – Son – Minister of Youth & Education

• Daughter of the late Rufus and Margie Ashworth

• Melissa Lee – Daughter in Law

 

 

Selected Public Service & Community Activities

• Prior Vice Chairman – Bertie County Board of Commissioners, 2015

• Attend Askewville Assembly of God

• Serve on Mission Team

• Relay for Life

• March of Dimes

 

 

Other Public Service/Boards/Committees:

• Executive Board for Albemarle Regional Health Service

• Tri-County Airport Authority

• Healthy Carolinians Committee

• Peanut Belt RPO TAC

• Aulander Peanut Festival Committee

NCACC Board of Directors

• NCACC Justice and Public Safety Steering Committee

• NACo Justice and Public Safety Steering Committee

• NACo Veterans and Military Services Committee 

• Albemarle Library Strategic Plan Committee

• NC Sentencing and Policy Advisory Committee

• 4H Advisory Council

 

 

 

Источник: http://www.co.bertie.nc.us/commissioners/lee.html

After public hearings on Oct. 18, 2021, Dare County commissioners adopted changes to two ordinances.

The board unanimously adopted flexible buffering standards for the Travel Trailer Park and Campground Ordinance. Buffering around a campground can now be vegetation or six-foot high fencing of solid wood or composite material. Previously, the standard only permitted vegetation. This change drew no commenters.

On the second hearing, two food truck owners supported the change to allow food truck courts with up to five food trucks.

Steven Bonney has stationed Stu’s Food Truck at the foot of the Avon Pier. “Competition makes everybody better,” said Bonney. Stu’s offers breakfast and lunch.

Luke Harris with Natalie Harris and two children also supported the food court concept. Roots and Leaves serves vegan food from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The truck is stationed at Koru Village Klub, adjacent to the Avon Pier.

Commissioner Ervin Bateman asked “is five too many?”

Joe Thompson, founder of Koru Village, responded that the number was arbitrary, but also noted that a food court needs variety. Thompson proposed both changes.

The board adopted the changes to the zoning ordinance for the unincorporated portions of the county and stated the amendments are consistent with the Dare County Land Use Plan.

Public comment drew four speakers.

Liza Yowell and Amanda Lotas spoke about Agenda 21, signed in 1992 at the end of a United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janerio, Brazil. President George H.W. Bush signed the document along with leaders of 177 other nations. It is a non-binding document.

Proclamation 12-02-05, adopted Feb. 20, 2012, the Dare County’s Board of Commissioners “recognizes the destructive and insidious nature of United Nations Agenda 21 and does hereby expose to the public and public policy makers the dangerous intent of the plan and urges communities to reject the radical policies and destructive ‘sustainable development’ strategies of United Nations Agenda 21.”

Lotas asked the commissioners to revisit that proclamation and to declare Dare County a “sanctuary county opposing government overreach.”

Melanie Brewer brought the county’s Board of Education masking policy to the commissioners.

She asked the commissioners to “overrule mandates.” She pleaded “please stop this. Allow parents to choose.” She supported the request for a county of sanctuary.

Reese Stecher charged that federal coronavirus funding, namely Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) funding, had strings attached. He lobbied for funding antibody tests for all students with ESSER money.

For the various boards and commissioners, the commissioners:

– Reappointed Jason Brian Heilig and Roberta Midgett to the Rodanthe-Waves-Salvo Community Building Board,

– Reappointed Cynthia Harris and Claudia Hennessey to the Older Adult Services Advisory Council,

– Appointed to the Dare County Tourism Board councilman David Hines from Kitty Hawk and Dennis Robinson from Hatteras for the at-large Hatteras seat; and reappointed commissioner Ervin Bateman and Tim Cafferty as an at-large member.

READ ABOUT MORE NEWS HERE.

Print Article

Источник: https://www.thecoastlandtimes.com/2021/10/23/dare-commissioners-adopt-two-ordinance-changes/

About Us

Tyrrell County is one of North Carolina’s oldest counties, founded in 1729 and named for Sir John Tyrrell, one of the Lord’s Proprietors of the Carolinas.

Located in northeastern North Carolina, Tyrrell County is bordered on the north by the Albemarle Sound, on the south by Hyde County, on the east by the Alligator River and Dare County, and on the west by Washington County. It is located approximately 150 miles east of the Triangle Area (Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill) and 100 miles south of Tidewater Virginia (Norfolk/Chesapeake/Virginia Beach). The county has a total area of 600 square miles of which 390 square miles is comprised of land and 210 square miles of water.

The county seat and only municipality is Columbia, located on the banks of the Scuppernong River. The county is divided into five townships – Alligator, Columbia, Gum Neck, Scuppernong, and South Fork.

According to the 2010 United States’ census, the population of the county was 4,407, making it the least populous county in the state. Agri-business, commercial fishing, forestry, and tourism contribute to the economy. Access to water and the abundance of forest land and wildlife for recreational fishing and hunting are valuable assets of the county.

The county has a five member Board of Commissioners/Manager type of government. The five members are elected at large by a limited voting election system and serve staggered four-year terms.

Источник: http://tyrrellcounty.org/en/about-tyrrell

Commissioners rename Dare Center after Virginia Tillett 

By Outer Banks Voice on November 16, 2021

During the November 15, 2021 Dare County Board of Commissioners meeting, Virginia Tillett’s granddaughter and sons accepted framed copies of the Dare County Board of Commissioners’ resolution to rename the Dare County Center in Manteo the Virginia Tillett Center. From left to right: Maya Tillett, Johnny Tillett, Chairman Bob Woodard and Michael Tillett.

Admired community leader passed away in October

(Dare County)

At its Nov. 15 meeting, the Dare County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to approve a resolution to rename the Dare County Center in Manteo as the Virginia Tillett Center in honor of the professional educator and community leader who served Dare County as an elected official for more than 30 years.

Many of Tillett’s family members and friends attended Monday’s meeting in her honor, including her two sons, Michael Tillett of Manteo and Johnny Tillett of Raleigh, both of whom were presented with framed copies of the resolution that had been signed by Commissioners Chairman Bob Woodard. Tillett passed away in early October.

The Dare County Center, which is located at 950 Marshall C. Collins Drive in Manteo, is a multi-generational facility that provides resources, programs and activities designed to enhance the lives of all Dare County citizens ranging from youth and adults to seniors and families.

Tillett — who was elected to the Dare County Board of Commissioners in 2002 after serving in the positions of both chair and vice chair on the Dare County Board of Education for 20 years —played an instrumental role in the development of the Dare County Center, which has had a profound and positive impact on thousands of Dare County residents since it opened its doors in 2009.

According to the resolution, “Without Virginia Tillett’s tireless efforts and her vision for the facility, specifically as a place where individuals of all ages could get together and learn from one another, these individuals would not benefit from the wide array of programs and services it offers to the Dare County community.”

Tillett has been honored with a number of awards over the past several decades, including the Dare County Outstanding Citizen of the Year award and the Outer Banks Chamber of Commerce’s Citizen of the Year award, both of which she received in 2015.

In 2006, she was honored by North Carolina Governor Michael Easley, who awarded her the prestigious Order of the Long Leaf Pine Award, and in April 2021, Tillett was recognized for her accomplishments and dedication to servant leadership by the North Carolina Black Alliance, which presented her with a 2021 Trailblazer Award.

A separate announcement will be made for the building dedication ceremony. For the latest updates, as well as more information about the facility and its programs and activities, visit www.DareNC.com/DCC.



Источник: https://www.outerbanksvoice.com/2021/11/16/commissioners-rename-dare-center-after-virginia-tillett/

NORTH CAROLINA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

1961 SESSION

 

 

CHAPTER 802

HOUSE BILL 877

 

 

AN ACT TO AUTHORIZE THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, IN ITS DISCRETION, TO CAUSE ELECTIONS TO BE HELD IN HATTERAS OR KENNAKEET TOWNSHIPS IN DARE COUNTY, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER OR NOT BEER AND/OR WINE SHOULD BE SOLD IN EITHER OF SAID TOWNSHIPS.

 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact:

 

Section 1. The Board of County Commissioners of Dare County is hereby authorized and empowered, in its discretion, to require the County Board of Elections of Dare County to hold and conduct elections in Hatteras or Kennakeet Township in Dare County for the purpose of determining whether or not beer and/or wine shall be sold in either of said townships. Upon the Board of County Commissioners of Dare County filing a written request with the Board of Elections of Dare County, it shall be the duty of the said Board of Elections of Dare County to hold and conduct an election in Hatteras or Kennakeet Township of said county for the purpose of determining whether beer and/or wine shall be sold in either of said townships or not, and said election shall be held and conducted in accordance with the notice, time and machinery provided in Article 11 of Chapter 18 of the General Statutes of North Carolina (Cumulative Supplement of 1951); that the effect of the vote in said election for and against the sale of beer and/or wine in either of said townships shall have the same result as set forth in G. S. 18-126 (Cumulative Supplement of 1951), and said election shall be applicable to either of said townships as to the result of said election and is hereby re-enacted for said purpose; that the form of the ballot shall be as is contained in G. S. 18-125 (Cumulative Supplement of 1951), and the time of calling the election, notice and other restrictions, as set forth in G. S. 18-124 (Cumulative Supplement of 1951), shall be applicable to said election except that it shall not be necessary to have any petition requesting said election, and the provisions of Subsections (a), (b) and (c) of G. S. 18-124 (Cumulative Supplement of 1951) shall not be applicable to the elections herein provided.

Sec. 2. All laws and clauses of laws in conflict with this Act are hereby repealed.

Sec. 3. This Act shall be in full force and effect from and after its ratification.

In the General Assembly read three times and ratified, this the 14th day of June, 1961.

Источник: https://www.ncleg.net/EnactedLegislation/SessionLaws/HTML/1961-1962/SL1961-802.html

Notice: Undefined variable: z_bot in /sites/msofficesetup.us/1st/dare-county-nc-commissioners.php on line 144

Notice: Undefined variable: z_empty in /sites/msofficesetup.us/1st/dare-county-nc-commissioners.php on line 144

3 Replies to “Dare county nc commissioners”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *