amazon warehouse portland

Amazon fulfillment center. Image courtesy of Amazon The single-story building will rise 46 feet at 8991 S. Portland Ave. and occupy a. PORTLAND, OR. RSVP. TICKETS. FEB 02 WED. SHOWBOX SODO. SEATTLE, WA WAREHOUSE LIVE - BALLROOM. HOUSTON, TX. RSVP. TICKETS. MAR 11 FRI. 1323 N. STEMMONS. I thought it was supposed to open around the holidays and I've seen the same semi trucks parked in the docks for months now.

Amazon warehouse portland -

Amazon begins hiring to fill 800 positions in Salem


Amazon on Friday kicked off a hiring spree for more than 800 positions at its Salem packing and shipping warehouse.

The Seattle e-commerce giant is taking a staggered approach to fill its earlier promised target of about 1,000 jobs at the approximately 1-million-square-foot Salem outpost.

The warehouse, 4775 Depot Court SE, opens in August. Workers can expect to pack and ship larger products including sports equipment, gardening tools and patio furniture. 

Amazon has adopted a $15 hourly minimum wage. Oregon's minimum wage in the Salem area rose to $11.25 on July 1 and will increase to $13.50 in 2022 under state legislation enacted in 2016.

The company offers employee benefits such as up to 20 weeks of paid parental leave. Candidates for the Salem jobs have to be at least 18 years old and have a high school diploma or equivalent.

Applicants can go online at www.amazon.com/salemjobs or text SALEMNOW to 77088.

During a recent tour of the warehouse, rows of massive shelves can be seen towering toward the ceiling.

Jobs: Oregon's unemployment rate decreases to 4.1%

Once the warehouse hums to life, forklift-like machines operated by workers will zip around the facility, placing and plucking large products from the shelves. The packing department will ready products to ship out. And during downtime, employees will share break room computers.

Although the company touts its pay and benefits as competitive, the company has come under fire recently for working conditions.

In Portland, workers complained about excessive heat and an overly loud warning siren at the warehouse there, according to OPB.

At a warehouse in Shakopee, Minnesota, Amazon workers staged a protest Monday to raise awareness of what they say are unfair working conditions. A group of tech workers in Seattle, called Amazon Employees for Climate Justice, is supporting the strike. Amazon said roughly 15 workers participated in the event outside of the Shakopee fulfillment center.

A company spokesperson issued the following response:

"The fact is Amazon offers already what this outside organization is asking for. We provide great employment opportunities with excellent pay – ranging from $15-$18.50 an hour in the Portland region – and full-time employees receive industry-leading benefits including comprehensive healthcare, up to 20 weeks parental leave, paid education, promotional opportunities, and more. We encourage anyone to compare our pay, benefits, and workplace to other retailers and major employers in the Portland metro and across the country.

"Regarding the small protest that occurred on Wednesday at the Amazon delivery station, roughly 10 associates participated in the event outside of the facility. It was obvious to the more than 600 employees that work at this facility (as part of the 2,000+ workforce in the greater Portland region) that an outside organization used Prime Day to raise its own visibility, conjured misinformation and a few associate voices to work in their favor, and relied on political rhetoric to fuel media attention. The fact is that Amazon provides a safe, quality work environment in which associates are the heart and soul of the customer experience, and Wednesday’s event shows that our associates know that to be true."

In Salem, opening the new warehouse further broadens Amazon’s reach inside Oregon. Three Amazon fulfillment centers, including Salem, will eventually employ about 3,500 throughout the state.

Customer demand in the area is driving the growth, said company spokeswoman Eileen Hards. The warehouse will serve much of the Portland metro area and other parts of Oregon, she said.

“Amazon’s growing logistics network in Oregon is providing accessible job opportunities,” said Nathan Buehler, spokesperson for Business Oregon, the state’s economic development agency. “The fast-growing back-office and logistics sector is a great compliment to our diverse industry mix in Oregon.

"In addition to providing jobs that don’t require 4-year degrees, it’s driving indirect economic impacts for regional businesses in these communities.”

Taxpayers are helping foot the bill for Amazon's Salem location. When plans for the Salem warehouse were unveiled in 2017, economic development officials noted the site would be eligible for upwards of $3.7 million in tax incentives over three years.

Opinion: Amazon investment, jobs will contribute to vibrant Salem community

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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Источник: https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2019/07/19/amazon-hiring-salem-warehouse-filling-800-positions/1634745001/

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported 345 cases of COVID-19 at Amazon’s Troutdale facility since May, making the Amazon PDX9 Fulfillment Center the workplace with the highest number of cases in the state. This follows a previous outbreak with over 100 cases at the same facility last December, bringing the total number of reported cases at PDX9 to at least 500 since the pandemic began.

The case numbers surpass those even at overwhelmed medical centers like Salem Hospital that has seen 299 reported cases since May, Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center with 108 cases since July, and even skilled nursing facilities. The Amazon Aumsville facility in Salem, Oregon sits at third place on the workplace outbreak list, with 185 cases since May.

The weekly outbreak reports demonstrate that Amazon and other warehouses, distribution centers, hospitals and K-12 schools are major vectors of transmission, as employees are forced to work in unsafe conditions where the Delta variant is spreading like wildfire.

OHA dispatched a bulletin on August 26 reporting 2,057 new COVID-19 cases and 9 new deaths, which brings Oregon’s total confirmed coronavirus cases to 265,210 and the death toll to 3,095. The state is currently experiencing the largest number of cases and hospitalizations of any time during the pandemic. Hospitals across the state are completely overwhelmed without enough intensive care unit (ICU) beds to treat every patient who needs one. Doctors and nurses must make extremely difficult choices about who is eligible to receive life-saving treatment. This is hitting rural areas like Southern Oregon particularly hard that have low vaccination rates and underfunded health care facilities.

The Amazon Troutdale warehouse, which in 2019 and employed 2,000 workers, was already infamous for being one of Amazon’s most dangerous facilities. In 2019, the Portland Mercury newspaper reported on PDX9’s records saying, “26 out of every 100 workers at PDX9 sustained an injury in 2018.”

As the World Socialist Web Sitereported in December last year, Amazon made PDX9 workers sign non-disclosure agreements during its massive COVID-19 outbreak. These agreements subject workers to civil liability if they disclose “proprietary or confidential information of Amazon in whatever form, tangible or intangible, whether or not marked or otherwise designated as confidential, that is not otherwise generally known to the public, relating or pertaining to Amazon’s business, projects, products, customers, suppliers, inventions, or trade secrets.”

These NDAs have helped Amazon to conceal the severity of coronavirus infections among its workforce because any worker who brings outbreak information to the public could face an expensive lawsuit. This information is often hidden from the workers themselves, with management referencing privacy laws to justify not sharing infection information with workers in order to avoid any potential disruptions to its operations.

As has been the case across the US, Amazon has been relaxing mask requirements and COVID workplace rules in the past few months just as the Delta variant spread rapidly. At the end of July, Amazon shut down their free on-site testing, ended temperature checks at the entrances to its fulfillment centers, disbanded its social distancing enforcement crews and stopped requiring masks for unvaccinated workers.

In February, Amazon released statistics that said that it spent $11.5 billion on COVID-19-related costs in 2020. Amazon spokesperson Maria Boschetti said in an email statement, “As our employees and communities continue to get vaccinated and health authorities evolve guidance, we are continuously evaluating the temporary measures we implemented in response to COVID-19 and making adjustments in alignment with public health authority guidance. As a result, we will begin ramping down our U.S. testing operations by July 30, 2021.” She continued, “[Amazon would] always align our safety protocols with updated guidance from the CDC and other public health officials.”

Boschetti revealed that Amazon was putting the burden on workers by recommending vaccination with few other workplace protections. Amazon reversed its position on masks in early August, requiring them again for all employees regardless of vaccine status. However, proper masking is only one component of the comprehensive mitigation strategies needed to keep essential workers safe on the job, and by itself does not stop the spread of the virus.

Amazon has enjoyed a massive increase in profits during the pandemic, due to increased sales during the pandemic as customers stayed away from in-person shopping. In the second quarter of 2021, Amazon grew its total sales by a whopping 27 percent to $113.1 billion and increased its profits by about 50 percent to $7.8 billion. Its share price grew by 87 percent between January 2020 and March 2021, and Jeff Bezos’ personal wealth grew by nearly two-thirds, reaching a staggering $195 billion.

Along with increased online ordering by customers, Amazon has ramped up the exploitation of its workers through the use of surveillance and automated efficiency algorithms. Cameras watch drivers’ and workers’ every move, and electronic devices control worker speed and even which musculoskeletal group a worker uses on a given day.

Anger is rising as warehouse workers and drivers realize the dangers they face from lack of adequate safeguards to protect them from COVID-19 and work injuries while management suppresses lifesaving information and Jeff Bezos soars into space on board his rocket. Apparently Bezos saw no irony in the fact that this trip was financed off the sweat and blood of his workers, declaring at his post-launch briefing, “I want to thank every Amazon employee, and every Amazon customer, because you guys paid for all this … thank you from the bottom of my heart very much.” Thanks indeed!

The conditions at Amazon illustrate more than ever the need to build rank-and-file safety committees to organize Amazon workers in the defense of their own safety and democratic rights. Through these committees, workers can call for strict testing and contact tracing, transparent reporting, and 48-hour shutdowns when viral spread occurs at their site.

In carrying out their fight, Amazon workers join the growing network of autoworkers, teachers, nurses, and other workers in a collective struggle to raise their own demands for better conditions. This struggle requires opposition to the corporations, political establishment, and pro-capitalist trade unions, all of which have defended the reckless policies that have led to nearly 700,000 COVID-19 deaths in the US alone.

It is possible to mobilize the resources of society to successfully eradicate the virus, using a combination of vaccines and public health measures known to be effective in fighting pandemics, such as short-term lockdowns, rigorous testing and contact tracing, ventilation, and masks. However, the ruling class has proven its unwillingness to carry out these life-saving measures, which would impede upon their urgent campaign to fully reopen the economy and send all workers back into facilities to generate record profits.

Only the working class has the power to change the course of the pandemic through an active struggle to assert that saving human lives must take priority over the profit mania of billionaires like Bezos. We urge workers at PDX9 across the US and internationally to contact the International Amazon Workers Voiceto share your experiences, get assistance in forming rank-and-file committees, and join the fight for socialism.

Sign up for the International Amazon Workers Voice newsletter

For information, strategy and updates, sign up below.

Источник: https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2021/08/30/pdx9-a30.html

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On the Clock

On the Clock is Motherboard's reporting on the organized labor movement, gig work, automation, and the future of work.

See More →

Last week, two well-established Amazon delivery companies in Portland, Oregon offered Amazon an ultimatum: agree to a set of conditions that it said would improve revenue and driver safety—or we'll stop delivering Amazon packages.  

Amazon refused, and the two companies in the Portland area terminated their contract with Amazon, their only client, effectively shutting down. 

"Amazon’s conduct over the past two years has become intolerable, unconscionable, unsafe, and most importantly, unlawful," a letter sent to Amazon by the attorney of the two delivery companies, Triton and Last Mile and obtained by Motherboard, reads. 

The incident is notable as it appears to be the first public example in the United States of Amazon delivery service partners, small businesses that deliver packages exclusively for Amazon, using their leverage to protest against Amazon—which has been known to enforce strict rules that squeeze productivity out of their delivery drivers, putting drivers and the public at risk. 

Amazon's delivery service partner program, which launched in 2019 to compete with FedEx and UPS, relies on 2,000 small delivery companies that employ 115,000 drivers in the United States to deliver billions of packages each year. Delivery service partners are responsible for paying drivers and assume liability for all aspects of the operations—shielding Amazon from scrutiny and responsibility. Delivery service partners are not owned by Amazon, but deliver packages exclusively for the company, and have to adhere to a strict set of rules from Amazon around hiring, pay, delivery times and routes, and more. 

"The companies were losing money and employees trying to satisfy Amazon and their constant abusive changes,” Tom Rask, an attorney for Last Mile and Triton, told Motherboard. "You have to hire numerous drivers who may or may not be working. One day Amazon dictates that you have thirty routes, the next day forty, then the day after twenty. You’re supposed to have enough drivers for back-up while Amazon is lowering pay. Amazon’s actions are unlawful."

To date, there are few recorded instances of Amazon delivery drivers in the United States collectively protesting against Amazon—though drivers in one warehouse in upstate New York staged a walkout during the pandemic, and last week, the Teamsters union announced a coordinated national effort to unionize Amazon employees, in particular its delivery drivers. 

In their letter to Amazon, the two Portland companies outlined a series of grievances, such as cutting routes from delivery companies without notice, unevenly distributing workloads among drivers, lowering reimbursement for drivers' wages, accessing their employee's records and personal information, and firing their drivers without input from delivery companies. Amazon frequently changes rules on a whim without notifying delivery service partners, the letter alleges.   

In recent days, Rask said he's received an outpouring of phone calls from Amazon delivery service partners around the country asking him for legal advice on how and whether to shut down operations because of Amazon's predatory business model. 

The Portland delivery service partners' letter to Amazon outlines a set of demands as a condition for doing business with Amazon again, including a limit on packages and stops, a 8.5-hour cap on delivery routes, a commitment to at least 40 routes per company, and $20 per hour per driver. (Drivers earned $18 an hour until last week's layoffs.) The companies are also requesting $36 million to compensate laid off drivers and for damages to both companies. Until Amazon agrees, they will not do business with the company, the letter to Amazon obtained by Motherboard states. 

"At one point both companies had 150 employees," Rask said. "Amazon's actions killed these companies. They were the best performing in Portland and then they were crushed by Amazon’s arbitrary and improper behavior.”


Kate Kudrna, a spokesperson for Amazon, emphasized that the two companies were putting their drivers at risk by shutting down. “Last week, two Delivery Service Partners abruptly threatened to stop servicing the Amazon account and jeopardize the livelihood of their drivers if we did not pay them $36 million within 48 hours along with a string of other demands," she said. 

"We refused their demands and they followed through with their threat, terminating their contract with us, leaving their employees confused and looking for answers," she continued. "We’re doing everything we can to support the affected employees including connecting them with other Delivery Service Partners in the area who are hiring.”

Currently, Amazon delivery drivers are expected to deliver upwards of 400 packages a day on 10-hour routes that often extend up to 12 hours. The two Portland delivery companies are demanding a cap at 250 packages and 150 stops per 8.5 hour route. As Motherboard has previously reported, in order to qualify for bonuses and complete their routes on time to avoid discipline, drivers have been forced to suspend safety monitors, run across busy four-lane highways, skip lunch breaks, and pee and defecate in their vans rather than find bathrooms.  

The letter says that Amazon forces its delivery companies to commit to routes three weeks in advance but Amazon can change drivers' schedules within a day or less than a day's notice. This forces scheduled drivers to show up to work without actual work to do, and companies to pay drivers' wages for days when they didn't deliver packages. 

A new program also allows Amazon to increase or decrease routes each day by 10 percent without any advance notice to delivery companies—forcing them to eat the cost of extra scheduled drivers, according to the letter. Under Oregon law, delivery companies must pay drivers for their scheduled hours even if the work is unavailable. In such cases, Amazon forces their delivery companies to pay drivers' wages, the letter states. 

"As a result of this one-sided arrangement, Last Mile and Triton must commit employees to Amazon in advance, while Amazon can save costs when it experiences low inventory or labor shortages at its warehouse by suddenly changing or reducing routes when it no longer needs those drivers," the letter states.  "Meanwhile, Last Mile and Triton must still pay those drivers who committed to the routes, with no reimbursement from Amazon."

Amazon frequently touts its commitment to paying its employees higher wages than its competitors, but the letter also outlines the ways in which Amazon actually drives down wages in package delivery and leaves it up to small delivery companies to pay the market rate.  

According to Triton and Last Miles' letter to Amazon, Amazon agreed to reimburse the delivery companies for drivers wages as part of their contract. Amazon agreed to pay drivers $17.25 an hour, but the two companies had to raise the rate to $18.00—the actual market rate for drivers in Portland. Amazon did not make up for the extra 50 cents. 

In April, Amazon announced it would reduce the amount it paid for drivers from $17.25 to $16.00 an hour, according to the letter. This meant Amazon delivery companies were paying even more for drivers' wages. 

Weeks later, Amazon announced a series of raises for its drivers around the country as part of a public relations push following a union drive at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama. In Portland, Amazon raised rates from $16.00 to $17.50 an hour, but Amazon delivery drivers at Triton and Last Mile were already making $18 an hour, meaning they didn't qualify for Amazon's raise. "Last Mile and Triton had to inform their entire staff of drivers that they would not be able to increase wages, despite Amazon’s announcement," the letter states. 

Are you an Amazon delivery service partner owner or manager with a tip to share with us? Please get in touch with the reporter Lauren by emailing Lauren.gurley@vice.com or securely on Signal 201-897-2109.

The letter states that Amazon distributes packages to drivers unevenly on the same 10-hour shifts, pushing some drivers to complete their shifts with more packages in ten hours to qualify for bonuses, pushing them to drive faster, presenting a danger to both drivers and the public. 

"Amazon may assign one driver 300 packages to deliver, while assigning a different driver 200 packages to deliver," the letter states. "The difference in package count does not correspond to the difficulty or challenges associated with a particular route. Consequently, in order to fully complete Amazon’s required routes in a single day, drivers must often work 12 hours a day, but Amazon only reimburses for a 10-hour shift."

Rask, the delivery partners' attorney, says both companies will be filing a lawsuit against Amazon with similar allegations shortly.  

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Источник: https://www.vice.com/en/article/v7ez5x/amazon-delivery-companies-revolt-against-amazon-shut-down

PHOTOS: Amazon Robotics Fulfillment Center in Troutdale


Amazon's 855,000 square-foot Troudale fulfillment center began operations one year ago.  On Aug. 2 it opened doors to the press for the first time. It was explained the company wanted to get any kinks out of the operation before offering tours.  While this location uses robots to do the heavy lifting, it was surprising to see how much of the manual labor was still performed by people.  

The machines of automation certainly make the shipping of thousands of orders a day more efficient, but the facility still employs about 2,000 people full time to run the shipping line 22 hours a day, with two hours downtime for maintenance.  

DSCF8992.jpg

The tour was lead by Michael Moore, the fulfillment center's general manager.  We journalists had to be wired for sound so that we could hear Moore over the whirring din of the machinery.  

DSCF9113.jpg

The robots themselves have an understated design.  In the photo above they can be seen under the yellow "pods" that they move around.  These robots are able to move up to 750 pounds.  

DSCF8973.jpg

When products arrive in the center, they are brought to a "Universal Station." Here an associate takes them from a yellow bin and scans them.  As each item is scanned, the computer tells the associate where it should be stowed in the pod.  When the pod is full a robot rolls it to the storage area and a new one shows up to be loaded with merchandise.  

The work seems repetitive and well suited to a machine.  Why is a worker doing this stowing?  Moore explains that some jobs require certain fine motor skills and tactile responses that people are just better at.  He adds that the company is investigating robotic solutions.  It's also worth noting that the stower needs to inspect each item to make a judgement about its quality and readiness for sale, a job that would be difficult for a robot.  

DSCF8995.jpg

 All the operations in the fulfillment center are monitored by a "Quarterback" in the Command Center.  

DSCF9064.jpg

Once a product is ordered a robot rolls the pod over to a packer.  A computer tells the packer which box is best suited to the object, which is packed and sealed quickly.  

Amazon has a program to cover tuition for education in many high-demand areas.  It encourages associates to further their schooling, perhaps because the company understands that many of the entry-level positions are bound to be eliminated as the process becomes more automated.  

DSCF9040.jpg

Once packaged, the items run through the "SLAM" line which stands for Scan, Label, Apply, Manifest.  

 DSCF9083.jpg

During the trip down the SLAM line, the boxes are weighed and shipping labels are automatically applied.  

DSCF9105.jpg

If there is a jam on the line, a person is notified immediately so they can help the system get moving again.  

DSCF9053.jpg

A "Singulator" funnels all the boxes into a single line with the correct orientation.  From there they are fed into a scanner, which reads the shipping destination.  

DSCF9016.jpg

After scanning, yellow tabs move the boxes off the conveyor belt down the chute that brings them to the correct truck to deliver the orders to their final destination.  

This facility is just one of several fulfillment centers in the region.  With Amazon receiving more than one million orders a day, fulfillment is really the entirety of their business. 


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Источник: https://www.oregonbusiness.com/article/restaurants-retail/item/18825-a-look-inside-the-amazon-robotics-fulfillment-center-in-troutdale
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Live in Hillsboro? Near Hillsboro? Need a job? Amazon may be the answer. The Seattle-based company is hiring about 1,000 people - full-time and part-time to work in a new sorting center.

Amazon will be opening a 303,000-square foot warehouse in the Majestic Brookwood Business Park as part of their expansion efforts.

The warehouse will act as a distribution center where packages will arrive, be sorted by zip code and then sent to customers.

Find out what's happening in Hillsboro with free, real-time updates from Patch.

The company has posted a help-wanted ad on their website:

"Sort it. Wrap it. Ship it. Own it. Sounds a little like a game, but it's Amazon's game – that is if you're in one of our high-speed, high-tech sortation centers. Ready to play, join the team today! Amazon is looking for Part-Time Associates to join the team at our sortation center in PDX5."

Find out what's happening in Hillsboro with free, real-time updates from Patch.

The jobs pay $12.50 per hour.

But, as they say, that's not all - at least according to Amazon.

"Let's sweeten the deal…

Weekly pay schedule

Holiday overtime pay

Basic Life, AD&D insurance after 30 days

On-the-job training and skill development

Employee Assistance Program."

The news was first reported by The Portland Business Journal.

Photo Amazon

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Источник: https://patch.com/oregon/hillsboro/hillsboro-jobs-amazon-opening-facility-hiring-1-000
An Amazon worker preps a box for delivery at a warehouse

Amazon workers in 20 countries - including the US, UK, and several in the EU - are planning protests and work stoppages on Black Friday.

The shopping-centric day is among Amazon's busiest all year.

The Make Amazon Pay group says: "Amazon takes too much and gives back too little."

It is backed by a coalition of labour groups, trade unions, grassroots campaigns and non-profit-making organisations in individual countries.

In the UK, that includes the:

  • GMB Union

  • Trades Union Congress

  • Momentum

  • War on Want

  • International Transport Workers' Federation

  • Labour Behind the Label

No UK Amazon warehouses are unionised, so legally they can't strike.

Many amazon warehouse portland will be working on the day, but campaign groups which include Amazon workers will be staging protests at Amazon buildings in Coalville, Leicestershire, Coventry, Peterborough and at its London headquarters.

But strikes are being encouraged elsewhere.

In Germany, for example, the union Verdi called on employees at major shipping centres to strike, beginning on Wednesday night.

Worldwide, nearly 50 organisations have signed up to a list of "common demands", published by the Make Amazon Pay coalition, which include:

  • raising warehouse workers' pay and adding hazard pay and peak time increments

  • halting worker "surveillance" and strict productivity targets

  • extending sick leave and improving Covid-19 tracking and reporting

  • ending casual employment status and "union-busting" activities

  • paying taxes without using loopholes or tax havens

"This company is a pandemic profiteer can afford to do better," said Mick Rix, from the GMB Union. "It's time for Amazon sit down with their workers' union GMB and make Amazon a great, safe place to work. "

Amazon reported a tripling of profits earlier this year, attributed to its success during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The company has also been accused of taking an anti-union stance across its operations, particularly in the US.

A landmark push to unionise a workplace in Bessemer, Alabama, failed earlier this year but was examined by the US regulator over allegations the company had put pressure on employees during the vote.

Owen Espley, from the War on Want campaign group, said: "Amazon's growing power is a threat to communities and workers around the world.

"Amazon is abusing its dominance across online retail, cloud services, and logistics, to create unfair competition that is driving down standards for everyone.

"Amazon workers face unsafe conditions, constant surveillance and are treated like robots.

"It's time for Amazon to pay fair wages, fair taxes, and for its impact on the planet."

Amazon did not respond to a request for comment on the UK action.

But its representatives have told US media outlets it is already addressing many of the concerns laid out by the Make Amazon Pay group, while admitting things "are not perfect" as they are.

Источник: https://ca.sports.yahoo.com/news/amazon-workers-plan-black-friday-152525796.html?src=rss

On the Clock

On the Clock is Motherboard's reporting on the organized labor movement, gig work, automation, and the future of work.

See More →

Last week, two well-established Amazon delivery companies in Portland, Oregon offered Amazon an ultimatum: agree to a set of conditions that it said would improve revenue and driver safety—or we'll stop delivering Amazon packages.  

Amazon refused, and the two companies in the Portland area terminated their contract with Amazon, their only client, effectively shutting down. 

"Amazon’s conduct over the past two years has become intolerable, unconscionable, unsafe, and most importantly, unlawful," a letter sent to Amazon by the attorney of the two delivery companies, Triton and Last Mile and obtained by Motherboard, reads. 

The incident is notable as it appears to be the first public example in the United States of Amazon delivery service partners, small businesses that deliver packages exclusively for Amazon, using their leverage to protest against Amazon—which has been known to enforce strict rules that squeeze productivity out of their delivery drivers, putting drivers and the public at risk. 

Amazon's delivery service partner program, which launched in 2019 to compete with FedEx and UPS, relies on 2,000 small delivery companies that employ 115,000 drivers in the United States to deliver billions of packages each year. Delivery service partners are responsible for paying drivers and assume liability for all aspects of the operations—shielding Amazon from scrutiny and responsibility. Delivery service partners are not owned by Amazon, but deliver packages exclusively for the company, and have to adhere to a strict set of rules from Amazon around hiring, pay, delivery times and routes, and more. 

"The companies were losing money and employees trying to satisfy Amazon and their constant abusive changes,” Tom Rask, an attorney for Last Mile and Triton, told Motherboard. "You have to hire numerous drivers who may or may not be working. One day Amazon dictates that you have thirty routes, the next day forty, then the day after twenty. You’re supposed to have enough drivers for back-up while Amazon is lowering pay. Amazon’s actions are unlawful."

To date, there are few recorded amazon warehouse portland of Amazon delivery drivers in the United States collectively protesting against Amazon—though drivers in one warehouse in upstate New York staged a walkout during the pandemic, and last week, the Teamsters union announced a coordinated national effort to unionize Amazon employees, in particular its delivery drivers. 

In their letter to Amazon, the two Portland companies outlined a series of grievances, such as cutting routes from delivery companies without notice, unevenly distributing workloads among drivers, lowering reimbursement for drivers' wages, accessing their employee's records and personal information, and firing their drivers without input from delivery companies. Amazon frequently changes rules on a whim without notifying delivery service partners, the letter alleges.   

In recent days, Rask said he's received an outpouring of phone calls from Amazon delivery service partners around the country asking him for legal advice on how and whether to shut down operations because of Amazon's predatory business model. 

The Portland delivery service partners' letter to Amazon outlines a set of demands as a condition for doing business with Amazon again, including a limit on packages and stops, a 8.5-hour cap on delivery routes, a commitment to at least 40 routes per company, and $20 per hour per driver. (Drivers earned $18 an hour until last week's layoffs.) The companies are also requesting $36 million to compensate laid off drivers and for damages to both companies. Until Amazon agrees, they will not do business with the company, the letter to Amazon obtained by Motherboard states. 

"At one point both companies had 150 employees," Rask said. "Amazon's actions killed these companies. They were the best performing in Portland and then they were crushed by Amazon’s arbitrary and improper behavior.”


Kate Kudrna, a spokesperson for Amazon, emphasized that the two companies were putting their drivers at risk by shutting down. “Last week, two Delivery Service Partners abruptly threatened to stop servicing the Amazon account and jeopardize the livelihood of their drivers if we did not pay them $36 million within 48 hours along with a string of other demands," she said. 

"We refused their demands and they followed through with their threat, terminating their contract with us, leaving their employees confused and looking for answers," she continued. "We’re doing everything we can to support the affected employees including connecting them with other Delivery Service Partners in the area who are hiring.”

Currently, Amazon delivery drivers are expected to deliver upwards of 400 packages a day on 10-hour routes that often extend up amazon warehouse portland 12 hours. The two Portland delivery companies are demanding a cap at 250 packages and 150 stops per 8.5 hour route. As Motherboard has previously reported, in order to qualify for bonuses and complete their routes on time to avoid discipline, drivers have been forced to suspend safety monitors, run across busy four-lane highways, skip lunch breaks, and pee and defecate in their vans rather than find bathrooms.  

The letter says that Amazon forces its delivery companies to commit to routes three weeks in advance but Amazon can change drivers' schedules within a day or less than a day's notice. This forces scheduled drivers to show up to work without actual work to do, and companies to pay drivers' wages for days when they didn't deliver packages. 

A new program also allows Amazon to increase or decrease routes each day by 10 percent without any advance notice to delivery companies—forcing them to eat the cost of extra scheduled drivers, according to the letter. Under Oregon law, delivery companies must pay drivers for their scheduled hours even if the work is unavailable. In such cases, Amazon forces their delivery companies to pay drivers' wages, the letter states. 

"As a result of this one-sided arrangement, Last Mile and Triton must commit employees to Amazon in advance, while Amazon can save costs when it experiences low inventory or labor shortages at its warehouse by suddenly changing or reducing routes when it no longer needs those drivers," the letter states.  "Meanwhile, Last Mile and Triton must still pay those drivers who committed to the routes, with no reimbursement from Amazon."

Amazon frequently touts its commitment to paying its employees higher wages than its competitors, but the letter also outlines the ways in which Amazon actually drives down wages in package delivery and leaves it up to small delivery companies to pay the market rate.  

According to Triton and Last Miles' letter to Amazon, Amazon agreed to reimburse the delivery companies for drivers wages as part of their contract. Amazon agreed to pay drivers $17.25 an hour, but the two companies had to raise the rate to $18.00—the actual market rate for drivers in Portland. Amazon did not make up for the extra 50 cents. 

In April, Amazon announced it would reduce the amount it paid for drivers from $17.25 to $16.00 an hour, according to the letter. This meant Amazon delivery companies were paying amazon warehouse portland more for drivers' wages. 

Weeks later, Amazon announced a series of raises for its drivers around the country as part of a public relations push following a union drive at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama. In Portland, Amazon raised rates from $16.00 to $17.50 an hour, but Amazon delivery drivers at Triton and Last Mile were already making $18 an how to close checking account td bank, meaning they didn't qualify for Amazon's raise. "Last Mile and Triton had to inform their entire staff of drivers that they would not be able to increase wages, despite Amazon’s announcement," the letter states. 

Are you an Amazon delivery service partner owner or manager with a tip to share with us? Please get in touch with the reporter Lauren by emailing Lauren.gurley@vice.com or securely on Signal 201-897-2109.

The letter states that Amazon distributes packages to drivers unevenly on the same 10-hour shifts, pushing some drivers to complete their shifts with more packages in ten hours to qualify for bonuses, pushing them to drive faster, presenting a danger to both drivers and the public. 

"Amazon may assign one driver 300 packages to deliver, while assigning a different driver 200 packages to deliver," the letter states. "The difference in package count does not correspond to the difficulty or challenges associated with a particular route. Consequently, in order to fully complete Amazon’s required routes in a single day, drivers must often work 12 hours a day, but Amazon only reimburses for a 10-hour shift."

Rask, the delivery partners' attorney, says both companies will be filing a lawsuit against Amazon with similar allegations shortly.  

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Источник: https://www.vice.com/en/article/v7ez5x/amazon-delivery-companies-revolt-against-amazon-shut-down

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Amazon gave iced scarves to warehouse employees to keep them working during the Seattle heatwave — but some staff reportedly left early because they couldn't cope

  • Some Amazon warehouse staff in Seattle left work early because of the heatwave, The Seattle Times reported.
  • One worker said some workstation fans weren't working, and said Amazon had been "ill-prepared."
  • But another worker, at a different warehouse, said staff got iced neck scarves to keep them cool.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Some Amazon warehouse workers in Seattle haven't been able to cope with the huge heatwave hitting the Northwest, according to a report by The Seattle Times.

A worker at Amazon's massive fulfilment center in Kent told the publication that Amazon had been "ill-prepared" for the weather, and that some staff left early on Sunday because they couldn't handle the heat.

Temperatures reached 104 degrees Fahrenheit on Seattle on Sunday, and hit 108 on Monday.

The worker estimated that the temperature in the warehouse reached nearly 90 degrees Fahrenheit by midday Sunday, The Times reported. 

Some workstations didn't have functioning fans, they told The Times.

An Amazon spokesperson told Insider that they company had installed climate control in its fulfillment centers "many years ago."

A seconder work, from a different warehouse in the same complex, told The Times that staff were given iced neck scarves and drinking water to help them cope. They said that Amazon had supplemented the usual giant rotating ceiling fans with "massive" floor fans.

They were "happy" with the temperature inside the warehouse, they said.

Read more: Amazon pays struggling employees as much as $30,000 to leave and never work at the company again, leaked documents show

The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings on Washington, Oregon, and parts of Idaho. Portland, Oregon, recorded an 80-year high of 112 degrees over the weekend.

The first Amazon worker said that some departments had tried to boost productivity during chase bank increase credit limit heatwave by holding "power hours," when managers try to pump up warehouse staff to work even harder for 60 minutes by rewarding the fastest workers with prizes, such as Amazon gift cards.

"I was sweating immediately," the worker said. "I'm really surprised at how ill-prepared they are, given we have known it would be this hot for a little bit now."

The Amazon spokesperson said that it constantly measured the temperature in the building and that its safety team monitored the temperature on each floor. "We're also making sure that everyone has easy access to water and can take time off cheap trailer homes for rent they choose to, though we're finding that many people prefer to be in our buildings because of the A/C," the spokesperson said.

The spokesperson didn't respond to The Times' questions about power hours or the temperatures inside the warehouse during the heatwave.

Amazon did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

The second worker, who received the neck amazon warehouse portland, told the publication that they had been worried about how hot the warehouse would be, but that they were happy with how Amazon had handled the heatwave.

"If this is how it will be all summer, it will be just fine," they said.

Delivery drivers have been hit by the heatwave, too. The Times reported that Amazon told delivery contractors nationwide to give drivers extra breaks during the heatwave. It cited an email Amazon sent to delivery contractors.

The soaring heat has forced Pacific Northwest residents to head to cooling centers – in some cases with their pets – and bring farm animals inside.

Amazon is offering its Meeting Center on its South Lake Union campus as one of these cooling centers. City officials said the center was open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., with capacity for 1,000 people.

Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-warehouse-workers-heatwave-seattle-washington-kent-temperature-power-hour-2021-6

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Amazon begins hiring to fill 800 positions in Salem


Amazon on Friday kicked off a hiring spree for more than 800 positions at its Salem packing and shipping warehouse.

The Seattle e-commerce giant is taking a staggered approach to fill its earlier promised target of about 1,000 jobs at the approximately 1-million-square-foot Salem outpost.

The warehouse, 4775 Depot Court SE, opens in August. Workers can expect to pack and ship larger products including sports equipment, gardening tools and patio furniture. 

Amazon has adopted a $15 hourly minimum wage. Oregon's minimum wage in the Salem area rose to $11.25 on July 1 and will increase to $13.50 in 2022 under state legislation enacted in 2016.

The company offers employee benefits such as up to 20 weeks of paid parental leave. Candidates for the Salem jobs have to be at least 18 years old and have a high school diploma or equivalent.

Applicants can go online at www.amazon.com/salemjobs or text SALEMNOW to 77088.

During a recent tour of the warehouse, rows of massive shelves can be seen towering toward the ceiling.

Jobs: Oregon's unemployment rate decreases to 4.1%

Once the warehouse hums to life, forklift-like machines operated by workers will zip around the facility, placing and plucking large products from the shelves. The packing department will ready products to ship out. And during downtime, employees will share break room computers.

Although the company touts its pay and benefits as competitive, the company has come under fire recently for working conditions.

In Portland, workers complained about excessive heat and an overly amazon warehouse portland warning siren at the warehouse there, according to OPB.

At a warehouse in Shakopee, Minnesota, Amazon workers staged a protest Amazon warehouse portland to raise awareness of what they say are unfair working conditions. A group of tech workers in Seattle, called Amazon Employees for Climate Justice, is supporting the strike. Amazon said roughly 15 workers participated in the event outside of the Shakopee fulfillment center.

A company spokesperson issued the following response:

"The fact is Amazon offers already what this outside organization is asking for. We provide great employment opportunities with excellent pay – ranging from $15-$18.50 an hour in the Portland region – and full-time employees receive industry-leading benefits including comprehensive healthcare, up to 20 weeks parental leave, paid education, promotional opportunities, and more. We encourage anyone to compare our pay, benefits, and workplace to other retailers and major employers in the Portland metro and across the country.

"Regarding the small protest that occurred on Wednesday at the Amazon delivery station, roughly 10 associates participated in the event outside of the facility. It was obvious to the more than 600 employees that work at this facility (as part of the 2,000+ workforce in the greater Portland region) that an outside organization used Prime Day to raise its own visibility, conjured misinformation and a few associate voices to work in their favor, and relied on political rhetoric to fuel media attention. The fact is that Amazon provides a safe, quality work environment in which associates are the heart and soul of the customer experience, and Wednesday’s event shows that our associates know that to be true."

In Salem, opening the new warehouse further broadens Amazon’s reach inside Oregon. Three Amazon fulfillment centers, including Salem, will eventually employ about 3,500 throughout the state.

Customer demand in the area is driving the growth, said company spokeswoman Eileen Hards. The warehouse will serve much of the Portland metro area and other parts of Oregon, she said.

“Amazon’s growing logistics network in Oregon is providing accessible job opportunities,” said Nathan Buehler, spokesperson for Business Oregon, the state’s economic development agency. “The fast-growing back-office and logistics sector is a great compliment to our diverse industry mix in Oregon.

"In addition to providing jobs that don’t require 4-year degrees, it’s driving indirect economic impacts for regional businesses in these communities.”

Taxpayers are helping foot the bill for Amazon's Salem location. When plans for the Salem warehouse were unveiled in 2017, economic development officials noted the site would be eligible for upwards of $3.7 million in tax incentives over three years.

Opinion: Amazon investment, jobs will contribute to vibrant Salem community

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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Источник: https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2019/07/19/amazon-hiring-salem-warehouse-filling-800-positions/1634745001/

PHOTOS: Amazon Robotics Fulfillment Center in Troutdale


Amazon's 855,000 square-foot Troudale fulfillment center began operations one year ago.  On Aug. 2 it opened doors to the press for the first time. It was explained the company wanted to get any kinks out of the operation before offering tours.  While this location uses robots to do the heavy lifting, it was surprising to see how much of the manual labor was still performed by people.  

The machines of automation certainly make the shipping of thousands of orders a day more efficient, but the facility still employs about 2,000 people full time to run the shipping line 22 hours a day, with two hours downtime for maintenance.  

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The tour was lead by Michael Moore, the fulfillment center's general manager.  We journalists had to be wired for sound so that we could richmond county savings bank annadale Moore over the whirring din of the machinery.  

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The robots themselves have an understated design.  In the photo above they can be seen under the yellow "pods" that they move around.  These robots are able to best websites to buy used cars in india up to 750 pounds.  

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When products arrive in the center, they are brought to a "Universal Station." Here an associate takes them from a yellow bin and scans them.  As each item is scanned, the computer tells the associate where it should be stowed in the pod.  When the pod is full a robot rolls it to the storage area and a new one shows up to be loaded with merchandise.  

The work seems repetitive and well suited to a machine.  Why is a worker doing this stowing?  Moore explains that some jobs require certain fine motor skills and tactile responses that people are just better at.  He adds that the company is investigating robotic solutions.  It's also worth noting that the stower needs to inspect each item to make a judgement about its quality and readiness for sale, a job that would be difficult for a robot.  

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 All the operations in the fulfillment center are monitored by a "Quarterback" in the Command Center.  

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Once a product is ordered a robot rolls the pod over to a packer.  A computer tells the packer which box is best suited to the object, which is packed and sealed quickly.  

Amazon has a program to cover tuition for education in many high-demand areas.  It encourages associates to further their schooling, perhaps because the company understands that many of the entry-level positions are bound to be eliminated as the process becomes more automated.  

DSCF9040.jpg

Once packaged, the items run through the "SLAM" line which stands for Scan, Label, Apply, Manifest.  

 DSCF9083.jpg

During the trip down the SLAM line, the boxes are weighed and shipping labels are automatically applied.  

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If there is a jam on the line, a person is notified immediately so they can help the system get moving again.  

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A "Singulator" funnels all the boxes into a single line with the correct orientation.  From there they are fed into a scanner, which reads the shipping destination.  

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After scanning, yellow tabs move the boxes off the conveyor belt down the chute that brings them to the correct truck to deliver the orders to their final destination.  

This facility is just one of several fulfillment centers in the region.  With Amazon receiving more than one million orders a day, fulfillment is really the entirety of their business. 


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Источник: https://www.oregonbusiness.com/article/restaurants-retail/item/18825-a-look-inside-the-amazon-robotics-fulfillment-center-in-troutdale

watch the video

Amazon Prime Now: A peek inside NW Portland hub

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5 Replies to “Amazon warehouse portland”

  1. Nice video... But u have to mention the charges of particular alert of sms. Or overall charges for all facility.

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