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Cibo Blame Shibo. Blame · cibo · Shibo. Original resolution: 1680x1050px File format: JPG. Download. Original. Total views: 18. Created: 2021-03-20. Check out our cibo blame! selection for the very best in unique or custom, handmade pieces from our clothing shops. Later in the manga, Cibo's physical body is killed by the Safeguard, but her mind takes over Sanakan's body. However, Sanakan's consciousness still remains in.

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SPRING IS IN THE AIR

We are The Clean Thinkers, and at the most fundamental (and uninspired) level you could say that we provide personal and professional coaching services. But what we truly are is so much more than that. We are an engine of personal, professional, and societal change, improving the world one person and one company at a time. We do not provide your everyday life coaching or executive coaching. Instead, what we provide is thought coaching for a better life.

You're probably asking yourself what the hell that even means. Well, it means that through our proprietary coaching methodology we help people and companies break down the mental barriers preventing attainment of their most important goals. We breakdown these mental barriers – which are built from the negative subjective influences present in all of our minds – by recognizing that these barriers exist in the first place, and then taking action to manage and mitigate their effects on our lives and on our businesses.

We begin this by asking the question posed above: “Do you know why?” It’s one of the most important questions we can ever ask ourselves and can take many different forms. Do you know why you keep making the same ineffective choices? Do you know why you feel this way about that group of people? Do you know why you feel that way about this group of people? Do you know why you eat too much? Drink too much? Spend too much? Do you know why you’re unsatisfied? Unhappy? Do you know why you don’t know why?

The list goes on, but no matter the specific question, the axioms of Clean Thinking hold true: to achieve our desires and to be our best, or for our business to be its best, we must first understand what has kept us from being there already. To gain that understanding, we must be willing to give an honest and objective appraisal of the choices we make, the conclusions we reach, and the beliefs we hold. Once we’ve done that, and determined which are serving us and which are not, we are well on our way to achieving Clean Thinking and realizing our true potential.

Источник: https://www.thecleanthinkers.com/

Blame! (film)

Not to be confused with Blame (2017 film).

2017 Japanese anime science fiction action film by Hiroyuki Seshita

Blame! (stylized as BLAME!) is a 2017 Japanese CGIanimescience fictionaction film directed by Hiroyuki Seshita, produced by Polygon Pictures, written by Tsutomu Nihei and based on the manga series Blame!, which was written and illustrated by Tsutomu Nihei. It was released globally by Netflix on May 20, 2017.[1]

Plot[edit]

In the distant technological future, civilization has reached its ultimate Net-based form. An "infection" in the past caused the automated systems to spiral out of control, resulting in a multi-leveled city structure that replicates itself infinitely in all directions. Now humanity has lost access to the city's controls and is hunted down to be purged by the defense system known as the Safeguard. In a village, a group known as the Electro-Fishers is facing eventual extinction, trapped between the threat of the Safeguard and dwindling food supplies. A girl named Zuru goes on a journey to find food for her village with a group of friends, only to inadvertently cause doom when a Watchtower senses her and spawns a Safeguard pack to eliminate them. With her companions dead and all escape routes blocked, the sudden arrival of Killy the Wanderer, on his quest to find a human who possesses the Net Terminal Gene, saves her along with Tae, her close friend.

Killy is brought back to the village, where he meets Pop, leader of the village, who expresses interest in him after they hear that he has been from '6000 levels below'. Killy even helps to assist with the village's food problem by passing them a large amount of rations. Abruptly, he leaves for an area below the village named the Rotting Shrine, and followed by Zuru and Tae, he finds the spoilt machine-corpse of Cibo, a former scientist from before the disaster. Cibo reveals that it is she that built a shield generator that protects the village from the Safeguard, and tells the villagers that it is possible to produce more of the rations by going to a nearby 'automated factory'.

Heeding her words, a group of Electro-Fishers including Tae and Zuru travel to the automated factory in search of more rations. Arriving there, Cibo assists in logging into the system and produces a large amount of rations, much to the delight of the Electro-Fishers. However, right after she produces a machine for Killy, the system rejects her log-in and starts to mass-produce Exterminators to eliminate the Electro-Fishers. Cibo, who remakes herself using the system in a cyborg form, leads the villagers, with Tae now having broken her arm, to a railway car and escapes back to the village. During the ride, Killy is knocked unconscious trying to save the Electro-Fishers.

Arriving at the village, the villagers celebrate the sudden amount of food while also mourning their loss. While holding the celebration, Cibo secretly wakes Killy up with only Zuru as a witness and leads him down towards the shield generator with the machine. While heading down, Tae takes her gun to the observatory platform and shoots the shield generator, whereupon it is revealed that the real Tae was killed and replaced by a cyborg representative for the Safeguard back at the factory. Sanakan, as she now calls herself, proceeds to kill most of the villagers, deeming them illegal residents while destroying the village in the process.

Killy, realizing what has occurred, runs back up to the village on his own. Cibo travels further down at a faster pace, where she sets the machine right next to the destroyed Shield Generator and connects herself to it. Back at the top, Sanakan is killing villagers, but the village elders frantically lead the rest of the villagers to the top of the village where they resist her using their remaining weapons. Killy himself enters combat with Sanakan, who after knocking him down, notes that he is a body 'stolen from the Safeguard'. Killy is saved at the last minute by Zuru, who throws his gun to him; which he shoots and destroys Sanakan, but not before Sanakan destroys Cibo.

Cibo, in an alternate dimension, pleads with the Authority, which controls the Safeguard, to let the villagers go. Unable to do so, they allow her to access the City's map, revealing an abandoned level safe from Safeguard control where the villagers can evacuate to.

Cibo, now functioning through her only remaining arm, leads the remaining villagers to a trans-level railway car, but right after the villagers get in, a Watchtower spots them and spawns a gigantic Exterminator. Killy throws the device which has been keeping him safe from the Safeguard to Zuru, upon which he says that he still wants to find the Net Terminal Gene, which enables human control of the Safeguard. Killy seemingly sacrifices himself so that the villagers could escape.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Plans for a full-length CG animated film were announced in 2007.[2] However, this proposed CG film project was not released before Micott and Basara (the studio hired) filed for bankruptcy in 2011.[3]

It was announced in November 2015 that the series would get an anime theatrical film adaptation.[4] The film was directed by Hiroyuki Seshita and written by Tsutomu Nihei and Sadayuki Murai, with animation by Polygon Pictures and character designs by Yuki Moriyama. It was released globally as a Netflix original on the 20th of May 2017.[5]

Release[edit]

Blame! was released by Polygon Pictures on May 19, 2017. It was made available to subscribers on Netflix on May 20, 2017.

On October 5, 2017, Viz Media announced at their New York Comic Con panel that they had licensed the home video rights to Blame! They released the film on Blu-ray Disc and DVD on March 27, 2018.[6]

Reception[edit]

Michael Nordine of IndieWire rated it B− and wrote that its worth a watch, but the "world-building is more engaging than its plotting".[7] Toussaint Egan of Paste praised the adaptation for being both faithful and opening it to wider appeal, concluding that it is "one of the most conceptually entertaining anime films of late".[8] James Brusuelas of Animation World Network wrote that although the plot is familiar, it is "definitely worth your time".[9]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blame!_(film)

Manga / Blame

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Blame!.png

Part man. Part machine. No parts expressive.

"Maybe on Earth, Maybe in the Future"

Blame! 『ブラム!』 is a 10-volume cyberpunkSeinenManga.

The story follows Killy, a silent loner possessing an incredibly powerful gun known as a Graviton Beam Emitter, as he wanders an immeasurably vast technological world known as "The City". The City is inhabited by scattered human and transhuman tribes, as well as hostile cyborgs known as Silicon Creatures.

Killy's primary goal is to recover the Net Terminal Genes, an extremely rare genetic marker that allows humans to access the Net Sphere, and gain control of The City's network. Doing so would allow him to halt the unhindered, chaotic expansion of The City, as well as stop the murderous horde known as The Safeguard from destroying what remains of humanity... or more correctly all humans who lack Net Terminal Genes (which is essentially all humans).

This story has a prequel, NOiSE, and a followup anthology called Blame Academy! And So On containing two short sequel chapters: Net Sphere Engineer and Blame!2; as well as a three chapter spin off manga, featuring all the characters of Blame! in...high school? That's right Blame! Academy — Adventure-student Killy in the Cyber school quest! Tsutomu Nihei is obviously even more insane than we gave him credit for.

A short six episode Web-Anime series adaptation was created by Group TAC in 2003. The manga received another anime adaptation in the form of a cel-shaded CGI film called Blame produced by Polygon Pictures (who also adapted Nihei's Knights of Sidonia) and has been licenced by Netflix. You can watch the first trailer here and the second here. The film was released in Japan and worldwide via Netflix on May 20, 2017.


Blame! provides examples of the following:

  • Abnormal Ammo: Darts that turn people into Faceless Mooks, guns that fire a murderous sentient polymer that absorbs all surrounding raw materials to make itself larger, etc...
  • Abusive Precursors: The Safeguard.
  • Action Girl: Cibo, Sana-Kan.
  • Affectionate Parody: Blame! Academy - A non-canon spin-off series by the same author, which involves putting his characters into stereotypical Japanese school-life comedy situations. The effect is very amusing given the originalseries'tone.
  • After the End: Or if you look at the prequel works, it's technically after, after, after the end.
  • And the Adventure Continues: In the last chapter, Killy seems to have been killed by a Boom, Headshot!, but the embryo with the Net Terminal Gene starts growing upon being exposed to uncontaminated water. On the very last page, after a Time Skip, we see Killy protecting a young girl wearing a hazmat suit, who is presumably the embryo grown up.
  • Another Dimension: The gravity-based engine of Toha Heavy Industries creates a few.
    • Killy is trapped in one for a short period, and meets an alternate-reality (or future) Cibo, whose body is then brought to Killy's dimension and serves as a container for the present Cibo.
    • Mensab and Seu apparently take refugee in one.
  • Anyone Can Die: The number of surviving characters can be counted on the fingers of one hand. That has recently been through a leaf shredder. Not that it's really surprising.
  • Arm Cannon: Sana-Kan.
  • Art Evolution: Nihei's style and character design changes dramatically at several points in the manga.
  • Art Shift: Used in the spin-off, Blame! Academy, for laughs. That girl with the ahoge is the Silicon Lifeform with the slasher smile Killy killed early in the manga. Same with the Gonk.
  • Back-to-Back Badasses: Killy and Dhomochevsky in one chapter.
  • Badass Bookworm: Cibo.
  • Badass Longcoat: A fashion statement frequently worn by both Silicon Creatures and high-level Safeguards.
  • Badass Normal: Seu, so very much. In a world where baseline humans are armed with BFGs or hyper-sophisticated hacking equipment, and still die by the dozens, Seu stands alone, as an almost-baseline human who fights off dozens of cyborgs, including the genuinely badass Ivy and Maeve while armed with nothing more than a perfectly normal BFS.
  • BFG: Abundant, and frequently played with. The biggest and baddest guns are the Graviton Beam Emitters, of which Killy's tiny pistol seems to be the most advanced. More of a Wave Motion pistol. However, some unnamed characters are seen using BFG style weapons.
    • GBEs have a range measured in dozens of Kilometers, no matter what is in their way. Killy's GBE is stated to have a range of 70 kilometers.
  • BFS: Ivy's weapon is this even without the additional sections concealed inside that can fold out like a switchblade to make it longer.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Cibo and Sana-Kan are dead, along with many others. However, Killy finds a place to put Cibo's "egg" containing a human with Net Terminal Genes on the edge of the city, which finally restores some form of order.
  • Bizarrchitecture: Nihei's architecture is more improbable than bizarre most of the time. The amount of raw materials that would be needed to create most of the structures in Blame! is mind-boggling, and the City is at least the size of the solar system. Construction bots apparently beam stuff into existence; if availability of matter was of any relevance, the setting simply couldn't happen.
  • Big Damn Heroes: It seems everyone gets at least one Big Damn Heroes moment in Blame! Even Cibo.
  • Big Bad: While it initially appears that the Safeguard is the main antagonist of the series, it turns out that they aren't even malevolent. The Safeguard command lost control of the city's mechanisms and are responsible not only for Killy's appearance but provide him with whatever help they can. While there are certainly rotten people found within the City, there is no one single person responsible for any of it. In essence, the City itself, with its unchecked growth and rampant Safeguard creatures, is the only thing that can be considered the real threat.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: Sana-Kan, in her first appearance.
  • Body Horror: A common occurrence. Cibo fighting Sana-Kan for control of her body springs to mind, as do the silicon clone factories.
  • Bookends: The manga begins and ends with Killy escorting a child.
  • Boom, Headshot!: Pretty much the only way to guarantee that someone stays dead in the Blame! universe. And in Killy's case, not even then.
    • In the 2017 film, Cibo has the forethought to avert this by putting her brain into one of her arms.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Justified, seeing as how the GBE takes its power from Killy himself.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: Blame! Academy chapter 2 has fun with this when a pair of Silicon Life Forms appear, and ask Killy if he remembers them. Cibo nonchalantly identifies them from the second half of Blame! volume 1 and concludes that they must be out for revenge, but it turns out they're just mad because all the characters shown in chapter 1 appeared except them.
  • Came Back Wrong: Seu is repeatedly healed by a Matter Replicator, but each time his mind degrades more and more.
  • City Solar System
  • Chiaroscuro
  • Cloning Blues: In one chapter, Killy and Cibo stumble across a machine that has been continually cloning the same woman for untold centuries. The worst part? the original woman — hooked up to the machine and completely incapacitated — has apparently been alive and conscious for all that time.
  • Clothing Damage:
    • Oddly averted - Killy's outfits seem to be as resilient as he is. It's revealed to be "Second Skin." Whatever that means, it's probably tough considering he's a Safeguard.
      • After being nuked, the clothes are revealed to literally be a part of him.
    • Played straight in Blame! Academy. Severaltimes.
  • Composite Character: In the compressed anime "demo" of Blame!, it is implied that Cibo is every female character that Killy has ever met, including the girl on the elevator with the dog at the beginning.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: Applies to the Safeguard.
    • Justified in that there are apparently several different classes of Safeguard.
  • Cool Guns: Again, lots of these. Examples include:
    • Killy's GBE. It's deceptively tiny and absurdly powerful.
    • A group of nameless Red Shirts in the beggining are armed with assault rifles, one of which is well-detailed and another one fires bullets that leave watermelon-sized craters.
    • The Electrofishers use Exterminator-killing spear guns that resemble lever-action rifles.
    • Dhomochevsky's pistol fires different types of munitions.
    • Killy at one point dual-wields a pistol and a shotgun as tall as he is.
  • Cool Sword: The Safeguard Sword. Think GBE, but instead of shooting, you get cutting. Strangely enough, only Silicon Life like Pcell are seen using this blade. Seu and Ivy have cool swords too.
    • The one wielded by Susono in the PrequelNOiSE is a powered up version, easily slicing through an enormous building.
  • Crapsack World: The City grew in a chaotic and insecure manner, leading to loss of control. The Safeguards now attempting to destroy anyone without the Net Terminal Gene (which, in the timeframe of the story, is essentially all of humanity) due to their goals being corrupted is the icing on top of the cake.
  • Cyberspace: Both the Authority and the Safeguard exist within the Netsphere, a Cyberspace that also houses much of humanity.
  • Cryptic Background Reference: Ubiquitous.
  • Cyberpunk: Has its roots here. Monolithic megacorporations, The Government inept or out to get you, anti-heroes, and transhumanism that creates as many problems as it solves, are all taken to such extremes that, like The Matrix, it becomes less like traditional cyberpunk. Post-post-cyberpunk, if you will. Perhaps Neo-Cyberpunk.
  • Dark Is Evil/Light Is Good: The most dangerous Silicon Creatures, such as Schiff, the one with the "bubbler" cannon, and the Silicon Knights, have entirely black armor. Conversely, the characters who come closest to Lawful Good, like Mensab, Seu and representatives of the Authority, are completely white. Everyone else, who subscribe to Gray-and-Grey Morality, tend to have pale skin and wear black clothes.
  • Death of a Child: Anyone Can Die, children too.
  • Death of Personality: After Cibo enters the Netsphere and transforms into the Level 9 Safeguard, her personality is destroyed and she's left as a child-like Empty Shell.
  • Decompressed Comic: Blame! personifies this style.
  • Deflector Shields: The Silicon Life Knights carry shields that emit an energy field powerful enough to deflect low-level Graviton Beams. The GBE often act as such.
  • Dented Iron: Though Killy spends most of the series as a unstoppable badass, by the final volume he is visibly tired and injured - even forced to use a piece of bent metal as a crude prosthetic leg.
  • The Determinator: Killy is the epitome of the Determinator trope. Sana-Kan and Dhomo fit, too.
  • Dull Surprise: At first justified due to Killy's stoic nature, but with the benefit of hindsight it's mostly due to Nihei's character designs not being particularly emotive. Cibo does show some surprise early on, though.
  • Did We Just Have Tea with Cthulhu?: Probably the strangest example in recent history, but every time someone meets up with the Authority, this is pretty much how it feels. And in a dystopian cyber-punk post-apocalyptic wasteland who better to count as an Eldritch Abomination than an ancient omniscient A.I-like ruler who is essentially a god?
  • Dystopia: Blame! is a prime example of dystopian fiction.
  • Earth That Was: As the ending of NOiSE shows, the Earth is completely engulfed by The City's automated construction system. By the time Blame! takes place, nobody even remembers that there was an Earth. One chapter towards the end implies that the machinery has swallowed most, if not all, of the Solar System.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Faceless organic-machines that morph out of ordinary people and six-story tall monsters with guns for mouths certainly qualify.
  • Eldritch Location: The super structure that serves as the series’ environment is arguably this. It either defies the amount of materials actually available to build something at this scale, or the Earth's core was used up as well. If the latter is the case, gravity, oxygen levels, molecular friction, etc. would all have to be addressed. Those challenges don't even account for reaching another planet's gravitational pull.
    • Some of the artwork implies the structure reached Jupiter. If that's true, the distance between Earth and the Sun is less than half the distance between Earth and Jupiter. Assuming it still rotates like the Earth, the Sun's destructive energy would have to be neutralized or the structure would tear itself apart.
  • Elevator Action Sequence: Though it quickly ends up outside.
  • Elite Mooks: Higher level Safeguard and Silicon Life.
  • Energy Weapon: Here and there. Flavors include infantry-sized laser weapons to Graviton beams.
  • Evil Minions: Davine has a small army of them.
  • Evil Twin: A hairless, Safeguard-controlled copy of Killy appears in the final chapter and shoots the original in the head.
  • Face Framed in Shadow
  • Faceless Goons: Safeguard. Killed in the thousands, mostly because they line up and Zerg Rush the guy who has a pistol that can penetrate 50 miles of steel.
  • Fantastic Racism: It's not obvious under all the fighting for survival, but when Killy kills a cyborg who didn't hurt anybody who even provided information(!) and wanted to be left alone, that he justifies it with only "he was silicon life" makes it clear that he would murder them even on principle.
  • Feel No Pain: Killy just seems to be used to massive physical trauma by now. Maybe he still does feel pain, but since he's The Stoic, it's hard to say.
  • Fish Eyes: Maeve has these.
  • Flashback: One of these is used to introduce Dhomochevsky...
    • Flashback Cut: ...and Killy has multiple single-frame flashbacks as he reboots after 40.82% of his body is obliterated.
  • Forgot I Could Fly: Killy's ability to scan things with his eyes, among other things, got restored after he was hit with darts from a safeguard.
  • The Fog of Ages: Killy is incredibly old, and admits to having forgotten a lot. This could be averted by the reactivation of the Netsphere, which is implied to house the memories of all humans. Though it isn't certain that an ancient pre-Safeguard construct like Killy would be included in the deal.
  • Gangsta Style: Killy has a notable fondness for firing the GBE this way. As with most things about Blame!, whether or not there's a reason for this is anyone's guess.
  • Giant Mook: Some giant Safeguard units and Silicon Life, proving that size doesn't matter when you have a GBE.
  • Good Is Not Nice: Killy. He has principles, but he also has his mission, and may the gods help you if you come into conflict with either one of those things.
  • Good Scars, Evil Scars: Averted. Killy could easily pass as a bad guy in any other series, if one were to judge on looks alone. The character design as a whole tends to purposely lean towards pale, sickly and generally depressing.
  • Good Thing You Can Heal!: Especially when you have a gun that can snap your arm in half on its lowest settings.
  • The Government: The Authority and The Safeguard. The former is a benevolent yet mostly impotent system that requires regular humans with a extremely rare genetic marker to tell them what to do, while the latter acts like an anti-virus system that happens to see all humans without said gene as viruses.
  • Grey-and-Gray Morality: Since everyone is technically human they do what humans do best, fight so that their faction can prosper at the expense of others. Who do you side with? The freedom-loving but utterly insane Silicon Life who want to maintain the chaotic decay of the City, and are willing to exterminate humans who have the Net Terminal Gene to prevent the Authority from regaining control? The Knight Templar Safeguard who will kill anyone to keep the City from decaying further than it already has, even though it is evidently hopeless? The inept bureaucrats of the Authority who want to reverse the decay of the Megastructure and employ the sometimes heroic, sometimes ruthless protagonist on a quest that has gone on for millennia without tangible results? Or the more human factions that struggle to get by in this crapsack Dyson sphere?
  • Guilt-Free Extermination War: The Silicon Life have been hunting humans since the dawn of the city, as they pose a threat to the established state of the Net Sphere. Humans fare no better: when they get a hold of the architects, they find no guilt in destroying entire hives, as told by Pcell in the sequel one shot. Neither seem to consider coexistence to be possible, even though the City is big enough to house both their civilizations. She seems to value human life, however, so there might be hope after all.
  • Gun Porn: Nihei loves his guns. Shells ejecting? Check. Nameless Red Shirts using detailed weaponry that is often bigger than them? Check. Safeguard weaponry that range from pistols to portable beam emitters?Check indeed.
  • Guns Akimbo: Killy does this once, and in addition to her GBE, Sana-Kan's battle form has a hand that fires darts which transform organic life into Exterminator units.
  • Gratuitous English: Common fan speculation is that the series title is a mistranslation of the English onomatopoeia for gun-fire, "BLAM!". The Author has yet to comment on this.
  • Hand Cannon: Killy's Graviton Beam Emitter. A small pistol slightly larger than a small Glock... that better qualifies as a Wave-Motion Gun.
  • Hard Head: Killy, literally, has half his head blown off and survives.
  • Healing Factor: Killy has the most resilient one. Various high level Safeguard and Silicons also have the ability to reform their bodies much more quickly, but no one sticks around like Killy does.
  • Heel–Face Revolving Door: Sana-Kan.
  • High School A.U.: Blame! Academy.
  • Homosexual Reproduction: Sana-Kan and Cibo are the mothers of the child with the Net Terminal Gene. Just go with it, okay?
  • I Am Who?: Killy is related to the Safeguard. It is also theorized (and lampshaded by the author) that he is also a kind of Internet Ghost that appears whenever humanity is in danger... And judging by the sequel, not only humanity. Everyone is human in Blame! anyway.
  • Ideal Hero: Seu
  • In a Single Bound: Justified, seeing as how most characters are augmented in some way.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villains: The two nameless Silicon Creatures killed off near the beginning of Blame! return in Blame! Academy 2 and 3 as a pair of these.
  • Inherent in the System: Doubly so, seeing as how the system is literally trying to wipe out humanity at the same time.
  • Instant Death Bullet: Justified in that even the most mundane weapons in this 'verse are quite powerful.
  • Interquel: "Fort of Silicon Creatures" is a one-shot Blame! chapter packaged with the deluxe Blu-ray edition of The Movie, drawn by Nihei in his modern Aposimz art style. It's set during the last volume of the original Blame! manga when Killy was traveling with "Mori", the personality construct recorded on a backup device that Killy wore around his neck.
  • The Juggernaut: Killy, Sana-Kan. But especially Killy.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: In chapter 4, Killy finds a factory were baby cyborgs are born. After eating all their food the nursebot becomes angry with him. His response? Blow things up. In the next chapter he taunts a pair of Silicon Creatures about killing their kids. Keep in mind that the Silicon Creatures as a whole are on a campaign to wipe out all of humanity, except for the one who is apparently nothing more than a dedicated amateur astronomer. Killy shoots him just to be safe.
    • He appears to have mellowed out somewhat in Blame!2 - he is now shown to protect Silicon Life from the Safeguard, presumably because they are no longer the destabilizing threat they used to be.
  • Killed Off for Real: Cibo and Sana-Kan don't survive until the end.
  • Large and in Charge: In the grim darkness of the far future every president of every remaining corporation is literally The Big Giant Head. Many headshots ensue.
  • Law of Inverse Recoil: Averted spectacularly. At its lowest setting, firing the Graviton Beam Emitter causes Killy's arm to violently snap backwards; at max output, it sends him flying; when he overcharges the gun, it rips his arm off.
  • Layered Metropolis: In the form of a Dyson Sphere.
  • Legacy Character: Another "version" of Pcell is the main character in Blame!2. It's not entirely clear if she is a reincarnation of the same Pcell, or a descendant.
  • Little Miss Badass: Again Cibo, when she takes over Sana-Kan's sleep-mode body.
  • Lost Technology: Lots of this. Even Killy's own weapon is considered as such.
  • MacGuffin: "I'm looking for humans with Net Terminal Genes."
  • Made of Iron: Many characters.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Killy seems to be on some kind of a mission, and towards the end it is shown that his actions are being monitored by some unknown authority. He is actually shown to be in contact, or at least on friendly terms, with said Authority several times prior to that.
  • The Medic: Again, Cibo.
  • Mega-Corp:
    • Toha Heavy Industries. A subversion, as despite being a monolithic and once mighty organization, they lack any real power outside of their jurisdiction.
    • The Bio-electric Corporation that rules Cibo's home district are a smaller but more conventional example. Although small fry compared to Toha, they'd be an N.G.O. Superpower in any other 'verse. They also seem to have done a surprisingly good job rebuilding civilization from scratch without the help of the Safeguard or Authority.
  • Mega Dungeon: The superstructure is essentially this, and effectively the entire world as well.
  • Messianic Archetype: Killy, and later the Net Gene Child.
  • Mind Screw: You'll be lucky if you catch everything the first read through.
  • Mooks: Basic Exterminator units. At least if you have a GBE. The Safeguard is apparently commanded by Zap Brannigan, since they Zerg Rush targets armed with kilomega teraton class weapons.
  • Mook Maker: Conversion Towers
  • Motive Decay:
    • The Silicon Life start out attempting to destroy all traces of the Net Terminal Genes and forever seal humanity from the Netsphere - but by the time Blame!2 takes place, the new generation of Synthetic Life are being hunted down and simply want to be left in peace.
    • The Safeguard was originally set up to keep unauthorized users like Silicon Creatures from logging onto the netsphere and screwing things up by killing them. Now that people with the Net Terminal Gene that grants authorization are essentially extinct, they usually just kill everyone everywhere and hope that things will work out.
  • Ms. Exposition: Cibo fills this role at times, if only to give the story a semblance of coherency. This is justified though as she was a scientist, and so most of the time she is trying to sort things out.
  • Mysterious Past: Again, Killy. May also apply to Dhomochevsky.
  • Nerves of Steel: Killy, don't expect his composure to crumble under any sort of situation.
  • '90s Anti-Hero: Killy is just a stoic, less muscle-headed version.
  • No Brows: most characters other than Killy and Cibo.
  • Normal Fish in a Tiny Pond: Basic Safeguard exterminators. In the movie the basic exterminators are considered very dangerous robots, that keep the human population completely terrified, while in the Manga they are in fact low-level Mooks.
  • Not Quite Dead: Happens quite often. It is arguable that no one really dies in the world of Blame!, thanks to the Cyberspace backups.
  • Not So Stoic: Though his expression never changes, Killy rips into the trader and the dock workers of the Bio-Electric Company when he realizes that he had unwittingly helped their operation for harvesting organs from the Dry Men (but especially after noticing that the girl he had previous rescued was among the bodies). And though he may not mourn their passing, he does seemingly go out of his way to save his companions from harm.
    • He has been seen grinning several times while causing total mayhem. The guy seems to get off on violence that has been cranked Up to Eleven.
  • No Transhumanism Allowed: Completely and thoroughly inverted. Humans who haven't been altered in some way or another are completely extinct, and it is unlikely a normal person would be able to survive in The City. The MacGuffin itself is a result of averting this trope: only humans with a very ancient gene are allowed to access the "series of tubes" in this future. Attempting to log onto the Internet without said genes will result in an immediate permaban by the Safeguard.
  • The Nudifier: The Women's Clothing Disintegrating Beam Emitter from Blame Academy!
  • Older Than They Look:
    • Killy is well over 3000 years old, but looks to be somewhere in his 20's.
    • Almost all characters, for that matter: Dhomochevsky was fighting Davinel's gang for at least 300 years before Killy arrived.
  • One-Man Army: Killy, Sana-Kan.
  • One-Word Title
  • Only a Flesh Wound: Killy has a habit of losing limbs, only to shrug it off. Dhomochevsky also has a similar outlook:

    "By the way, you might see my arm lying around somewhere.If you could pick it up, that'd be great."

  • Only Six Faces: While non-human characters have a great variety of facial features, humans have a much more limited repertoire. This is why Blame ver. 0.11, the 2003 series of animated shorts, can justify saying that the girl with the dog from the beginning of the manga is Cibo in some kind of time loop — they look exactly the same.
  • Order Versus Chaos: In NOiSE, the main character is a cop investigating a cult who worship the power of chaos who are kidnapping children to use for human sacrifices in their bizarre Magitek rituals. When they kill her, she is resurrected by the Safeguard, protectors of order, but they turn out to be a pack of fascists who plan on disenfranchising or killing everybody who can't afford network implants and brainwashing the ones who do. Then in Blame!, we see the aftermath of this; the cult succeeded in throwing the world into chaos, but since they're so poorly organized their descendants, the Silicon Creatures, don't amount to much more than a bunch of roving cyber-barbarians. The Safeguard doesn't fare much better, as their directives become so corrupted that they essentially believe that everything that's not them must be exterminated with extreme prejudice.
  • Out of the Closet, Into the Fire: Cibo and Sana-Kan are killed shortly after it's revealed that they conceived a child together (see the entry for Homosexual Reproduction).
  • Overly Long Name: Davinellulinvega, usually shortened to Davine.
  • Partly Cloudy with a Chance of Death: One of the last scenes shows Killy being drenched by rain for the first time in the series, right before he has an encounter that leaves him pretty much dead.
    • Although there is a sequel, Killy's alive, although there a rather endless number of ways to get around the whole being dead thing in Blame.
  • Percussive Maintenance: In Chapter 2, the woman with the dog gets a communications device to work by kicking it. One of the few humorous moments in Blame!
  • Perpetual Frowner: Killy again, though to be fair, he does smile once... Sort of.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: Killy, Sana-Kan. Emphasis on mass.Level 9 Safeguard Cibo.
  • Pet the Dog: Killy indiscriminately destroys any Silicon Life he encounters, regardless of whether they're hostile to him or not. Until Blame!2, where he rescues a heavily injured SL from the Safeguard and takes her to safety.
  • Platonic Life-Partners: Dhomochevsky and Iko.
  • Power Gives You Wings: Slight subversion. Most wings seen in Blame! are black, but they do coincide with the character having a notable upgrade. Considering that most power upgrades coincide with being able to change your body shape, it's fairly reasonable that you would want to have wings in a superstructure with huge chasms of hundreds (or thousands) of kilometers.
  • Red Baron: In the epilogue Blame!2, the silicon beings refer to Killy as "The Calamity".
  • Resurrection Sickness: Seu suffers from this — seems being the Badass Normal isn't always enough to survive in Blame!, since this happens to him a lot. The constant amnesia of being healed also interferes with his love life...
  • The Reveal: Turns out that Safeguard command has lost control of their own security protocols, and as a result they are unable to do anything about the Safeguard creatures that attack anyone who attempts to access the Netsphere without Net Terminal Genes. They are just as confused as the protagonists about the true scope of The City, and are only able to provide minimal support to Killy in hopes of discovering a human with Net Terminal Genes.
  • Ridiculously Human Robot: Killy, apparently. He needs to eat and sleep (at least at first), feels pain and doesn't show up as anything but human to doctors like Cibo who heal him, but he's revealed to be much more than that eventually.
  • The Rival: Killy and Sana-Kan, Seu and Ivy, Dhomochevsky and Davinel.
  • Robot War: Both Safeguards and Silicon Life are mechanical constructs trying to hunt down what remains of humanity. In fact they come from the same template: the former made to secure access to the Netsphere and the latter reprogrammed to serve the machinations of a chaotic sect.
  • Russian Guy Suffers Most: Considering how crap every other character's life is, "most" might be an overstatement, but Dhomochevsky's certainly wasn't pleasant. It should be noted that Dhomochevsky isn't Russian, he just has a Polish sounding name. It's all the same place anyway.
  • Scars Are Forever: Killy gains several noticeable facial scars throughout the course of the series.
  • Scavenger World: almost everything that's still working is running on automatic. Killy gets by by finding equipment caches set up centuries in advance; the Electrofishers and tech-nomads have put their suits and guns together out of stuff they found. Partially averted by Cibo's people and Silicon Life, who are both developing new technology and rediscovering the secrets of the City, but tend to overestimate their own abilities.
  • Scenery Porn: It is impossible to read this manga and not stop on a double page dedicated entirely to depicting a single piece of gritty, abstract architecture and think, "Wow... Just, wow."
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: Having found herself on the outside of the City itself at the end of Blame!2, Pcell decides to leave and find a new home where she can peacefully restart the Silicon Creature civilization using the recorded archive of her home she's carried with her.
  • Secondary Fire: Kind of. The GBE has 4 modes of firing. Though this is more of an Up to Eleven thing, really.
  • Sequel Hook: ...And it got two. One, Net Sphere Engineer, was planned to be a full length manga, but the author dropped it after just one chapter. The second, Blame2, was in full colour and also a single chapter long, but it served to show that Killy is alive and kicking.
  • Short-Range Long-Range Weapon: Killy has a habit of being in spitting distance of his target before pulling the trigger, despite his weapon having an unstoppable 70km range. It helps to be sure.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Killy's name seems to be a tribute to Killeen, the protagonist of Gregory Benford's Great Sky River and its sequels.
    • Silicon Creatures have heads like Borg, bodies like Xenomorphs, and dress like Cenobites.
  • Silent Scenery Panel: Many, many, MANY of these.
  • Slasher Smile: Most Silicon Creatures have mastered the Slasher Smile. Dhomochevsky is often depicted with one in artwork, and both Killy and Sana-Kan do it at least once.
  • Sleep-Mode Size: Sana-Kan's one is a little creepy girl.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism vs. Cynicism: Largely idealistic, even if it wears a mask of cynicism.
  • Sliding Scale of Silliness vs. Seriousness: Hits the Serious end and keeps sliding.
  • Spell My Name with an "S": Early scanlations translated Sana-Kan's name as "Sanakan", but Tokyopop insists Sana-Kan is the correct spelling.
  • The Stoic: Killy defines stoic. Killy is also the latest and possibly leading contender for the title of master of the ellipsis.
  • Storming the Castle: See Crowning Moment Of Awesome.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: When your gun does more damage than an atomic bomb, it is hard not to make some explosions.
  • Super Senses: Killy, Dhomochevsky, Cibo... In fact, most beings in Blame! seem to possess superhuman senses. Though it isn't surprising, seeing as how they all live in a futuristic dystopian hellhole where it pays to come prepared for anything.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: In "Fort of Silicon Creatures", "Mori" transfers her mind into a new body that looks almost exactly like Cibo's, except for a Beauty Mark on her cheek. This may be justified if you assume that this type of female body is very commonly manufactured.
  • Sweet Polly Oliver: In Blame! Academy, the "Women's Clothing Dissolving Beam"-Emitter reveals that Iko is actually female.
  • Synchronized Swarming: Issue 7 has the main character briefly interacting with a swarm of microorganisms, which assumes various simple forms — :) for "hello", O for "yes", X for "no", etc — to answer his queries.
  • Tabletop Games: Blam!, a homebrew RPG.
  • Take a Third Option: This may be Cibo's motivation when she double registers using Seu's Net-Terminal Genes, and Sana-kan's motivation for advising Cibo against trusting the The Authority after Cibo fuses with the Level 9 and transcribes the Genes into herself, and then going on to be her bodyguard. This makes sense once you realize that, in the prequel (NOiSE), The Authority and the Safeguard were planning to disefranchise all humans without Net-Terminal Genes and install a fascist government of some sort. This would also explain The Authority's "new plan" that involved a 1st Level Exterminator trying to eat the Sphere.
  • Talking Is a Free Action: Averted constantly.
  • Tele-Frag: The AI controlling Toha Heavy Industries attempts to teleport the Toha "building" (actually a failed prototype starship) out of the City, but it doesn't realize how big the City is. Each of the building's thirteen caves materializes in a volume already occupied by City structures, wiping everything out.
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: Graviton Beam Emitter. It apparently becomes too much overkill for Killy near the end, as he takes the first opportunity to invest in a more... subtle weapon.
  • Time Abyss: One caption reads off how many seconds later it's been...in the quadrillions. A quadrillion seconds is about 317,000 years.
    • In the film, Cibo mentions she's been waiting 17 million hours for someone to come and find her. That's almost 2 thousand years.
  • Tiny Guy, Huge Girl: Played with. Cibo comes from an area where humans are much taller than Killy is and she's at least as tall (if not a little taller) than him. When both of them get through to an area where humans are short, she looks like a beanstalk. When Cibo moves into her next body, she's half Killy's size.
  • Token Heroic Orc:
    • Killy and eventually Sana-Kan are the only Safeguards who want humans to reclaim the Net Terminal Gene, without it falling under the control of the Authority.
    • Pcell VIII in Blame!2 is the sole survivor of her village after Silicon Creatures became victims of persecution from humans.
    • In "Fort of Silicon Creatures", the red-suited female Silicon Creature is considered dangerous by her superiors for wanting to make peace with Killy.
  • Transhuman: In its entirety, we do not see a single purely biological human. Everyone is heavily modified, be they cyborgs, human-descended androids, or gene-modded superhumans. The closest to "pure" human we get is Seu, and he's an eight-foot giant with enough enhancements to fight in hand-to-hand combat with advanced Silicon Life warriors, who has been reconstructed and had his personality restored from backup countless times. Most "normal" humans were exterminated by either the Silicon Creatures or the Safeguard, given the events of NOiSE, Blame!'s prequel.
  • Unnecessarily Creepy Robot: Every robot and Silicon Creature.
  • Unnecessarily Large Interior: At least one a chapter. Blame! is set in an endless series of Unnecessarily Large Interiors. One of the rooms Killy walks through is roughly the size of Jupiter, and judging from the ending of the prequel comic NOiSEwhere the Earth and Moon are enveloped by the machines, it's implied that this room is where Jupiter used to be.
    • The artbook explains that The City itself extends out from the Sun to roughly Jupiter's orbit (~5 AU; roughly 750 million km), while "the world" extends to the edges of the system. In this verse, the planets, along with the Sun, have been absorbed for energy, Dyson Sphere-style. This is what happens when you let mindless nanomachines go rampant.
  • Visible Silence: Take a shot every time someone shows the reader their best impression of Mt. Rushmore accompanied by ellipses. Enjoy your liver transplant.
  • Walk The Solar System
  • Wave-Motion Gun: This is Killy's handgun the Graviton Beam Emitter. A pistol so powerful it can carve a four meter diameter shaft through 55km of steel. It is so overpowered that there are actually a couple of situations where it's a bad idea for Killy to use it, but most of the time he just blasts away, heedless of how much damage to the artificial environment he's causing. Thankfully, most of the MegaStructure is uninhabited.
  • Weapon of Choice: The GBE for Killy and Sana-Kan, the 'Electro Rod' for Cibo, The multi-purpose multi-firing-mode gun for Dhomochevsky, etc.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: So what ever became of that girl with the dog who Killy seemed to know? Verges on Early Installment Weirdness as the initial party was just sort of dropped.
  • What Measure Is a Non-Human?:
    • Killy kills sentient silicon lifeforms on sight without even the slightest hint of hesitation or remose, even when they're completely non-hostile and harmless.
    • Played to extreme measures by the Safeguard as a whole, who consider anyone without the Net Terminal Gene to be non-human and subject to immediate execution. Unfortunately for everyone involved, the Net Terminal Gene practically died out long ago, meaning nobody has it and effectively turning most of the Safeguard into Omnicidal Maniacs.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Killy gets one of these when he kills a Non-hostile Silicon Creature and his companion calls him out on it.
  • When All You Have is a Hammer…: Killy's immediate answer to most situations is to shoot first and leave questions to those who talk more.
  • World of Chaos: Some of the architecture is just bizarre or large; some of it clearly has more going on. Toha Heavy Industries also has one of these inside it.
  • Word Salad Title: The title is seemingly nonsensical, at least if you assume the title is supposed to be Blame! in the first place. It's believed it may be a misspelling of Blam!, and there's certainly a lot of gunfire going on.
  • Zerg Rush: Safeguard exterminator units.

Источник: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Manga/Blame

Blame! (film)

Not to be confused with Blame (2017 film).

2017 Japanese anime science fiction action film by Hiroyuki Seshita

Blame! (stylized as BLAME!) is a 2017 Japanese CGIanimescience fictionaction film directed by Hiroyuki Seshita, produced by Polygon Pictures, written by Tsutomu Nihei and based on the manga series Blame!, which was written and illustrated by Tsutomu Nihei. It was released globally by Netflix on May 20, 2017.[1]

Plot[edit]

In the cibo blame technological future, civilization has reached its ultimate Net-based form. An "infection" in the past caused the automated systems to spiral out of control, resulting in a multi-leveled city structure that replicates itself infinitely in all directions. Now humanity has lost access to the city's controls and is hunted down to be purged by the defense system known as the Safeguard. In a village, a group known as the Electro-Fishers is facing eventual extinction, trapped between the threat of the Safeguard and dwindling food supplies. A girl named Zuru goes on a journey to find food for her village with a group of friends, only to inadvertently cause doom when a Watchtower senses her and spawns a Safeguard pack to eliminate them. With her companions dead and all escape routes blocked, the sudden arrival of Killy the Wanderer, on his quest to find a human who possesses the Net Terminal Gene, saves her along with Tae, her close friend.

Killy is brought back to the village, where he meets Pop, leader of the village, who expresses interest in him after they hear that he has been from '6000 levels below'. Killy even helps to assist with the village's food problem by passing them a large amount of rations. Abruptly, he leaves for an area below the village named the Rotting Shrine, and followed by Zuru and Tae, he finds the spoilt machine-corpse of Cibo, a former scientist from before the disaster. Cibo reveals that it is she that built a cibo blame generator that protects the village from the Safeguard, and tells the villagers that it is possible to produce more of the cibo blame by going to a nearby 'automated factory'.

Heeding her words, a group of Electro-Fishers including Tae and Zuru travel to the automated factory in search of more rations. Arriving there, Cibo assists in logging into the system and produces a large amount of rations, much to the delight of the Electro-Fishers. However, right after she produces a machine for Killy, the system rejects her log-in and starts to mass-produce Exterminators to eliminate the Electro-Fishers. Cibo, who remakes herself using the system in a cyborg form, leads the villagers, with Tae now having broken her arm, to a railway car and escapes back to the village. During the ride, Killy is knocked unconscious trying to save the Electro-Fishers.

Arriving at the village, the villagers celebrate the sudden amount of food while also mourning their loss. While holding the celebration, Cibo secretly wakes Killy up with only Zuru as a witness and leads him down towards the shield generator with the machine. While heading down, Tae takes her gun to the observatory platform and shoots the shield generator, whereupon it is revealed that the real Tae was killed and replaced by a cyborg representative for the Safeguard back at the factory. Sanakan, as she now calls herself, proceeds to kill most of the villagers, deeming them illegal residents while destroying the village in the process.

Killy, realizing what has occurred, runs back up to the village on his own. Cibo travels further down at a faster pace, where she sets the machine right next to the destroyed Shield Generator and connects herself to it. Back at the top, Sanakan is killing villagers, but the village elders frantically lead the rest of the villagers to the top of the village where they resist her using their remaining weapons. Killy himself enters combat with Sanakan, who after knocking him down, notes that he is a body 'stolen from the Safeguard'. Killy is saved at the last minute by Zuru, who throws his gun to him; which he shoots cibo blame destroys Sanakan, but not before Sanakan destroys Cibo.

Cibo, in an alternate dimension, pleads with the Authority, which controls the Safeguard, to let the villagers go. Unable to do so, they allow her to access the City's map, revealing an abandoned level safe from Safeguard control where the villagers can evacuate to.

Cibo, now functioning through her only remaining arm, leads the remaining villagers to a trans-level railway car, but right after the villagers get in, a Watchtower spots them and spawns a gigantic Exterminator. Killy throws the device which has been keeping him safe from the Safeguard to Zuru, upon which he says that he still wants to find the Net Terminal Gene, which enables human control of the Safeguard. Killy seemingly sacrifices himself so that the villagers could escape.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Plans for a full-length CG animated film were announced in 2007.[2] However, this proposed CG film project was not released before Micott and Basara (the studio hired) filed for bankruptcy in 2011.[3]

It was announced in November 2015 that the series would get an anime theatrical film adaptation.[4] The film was directed by Hiroyuki Seshita and written by Tsutomu Nihei and Sadayuki Murai, with animation by Polygon Pictures and character designs by Yuki Moriyama. It was released globally as a Netflix original on the 20th of May 2017.[5]

Release[edit]

Blame! was released by Polygon Pictures on May 19, 2017. It was made available to subscribers on Netflix on May 20, 2017.

On October 5, 2017, Viz Media announced at their New York Comic Con panel that they had licensed the home video rights to Blame! They released the film on Blu-ray Disc and DVD on March 27, 2018.[6]

Reception[edit]

Michael Nordine of IndieWire rated it B− and wrote that its worth a watch, but the "world-building is more engaging than its plotting".[7] Toussaint Egan of Paste praised the adaptation for being both faithful and opening it to wider appeal, concluding that it is "one of the most conceptually entertaining anime films of late".[8] James Brusuelas of Animation World Network wrote that although the plot is familiar, it is "definitely worth your time".[9]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blame!_(film)

Climate crisis pushes albatross ‘divorce’ rates higher – study

Albatrosses, some of the world’s most loyally monogamous creatures, are “divorcing” more often – and researchers say global heating may be to blame.

In a new Royal Society study, researchers say climate change and warming waters are pushing black-browed albatross break-up rates higher. Typically after choosing a partner, only 1-3% would separate in search of greener romantic pastures.

But in the years with unusually warm water temperatures, that average consistently rose, with up to 8% of couples splitting up. The study looked at a wild population of 15,500 breeding pairs in the Falkland Islands over 15 years.

For seabirds, warmer waters mean less fish, less food and a harsher environment. Fewer chicks survive. The birds’ stress hormones increase. They are forced farther afield to hunt.

As some of the most loyal partners of the animal kingdom, the love lives of albatrosses have long been a subject of scientific study. “There are all these things we think of as being cibo blame human,” says Dr Graeme Elliot, principal science adviser at New Zealand’s department of conservation, who has been studying albatrosses in the country’s waters for three decades.

The birds lend themselves to anthropomorphism: living for 50-60 years, they have a long, awkward teen phase as they learn how to seduce a mate through dance, and take years-long trips away from home as they mature. They usually to mate for life, and loudly celebrate when greeting a partner after a long absence.

But now, they increasingly share another rite of passage that may sound familiar to young humans: under stress from the climate crisis, working longer hours to eat, and faced with the logistical difficulties of a traveling partner, some are struggling to maintain relationships.

Francesco Ventura, researcher at University of Lisbon and co-author of the Royal Society study, said the researchers were surprised to learn that warmer waters were associated with unusually high rates of albatross couples splitting up, even when the lack of fish were accounted for.

Albatross divorce was usually predicted by a reproductive failure, Ventura said. If a pair failed to produce a chick, they had a higher chance of splitting up. Less food for birds could lead to more failures. But the researchers were surprised to find that even when they accounted for that, higher water temperatures were having an extra effect – pushing up divorce rates even when reproduction was successful.

Ventura floated two possible reasons – one that warming waters were forcing the birds to hunt for longer and fly further. If birds then failed return for a breeding season, their partners may move on with someone new. Added to that, when waters are warmer and in harsher environments, albatross stress hormones go up. Ventura said the birds may feel that, and blame their partner.

​ “We propose this partner-blaming hypothesis – with which a stressed female might feel this physiological stress, and attribute these higher stress levels to a poor performance of the male,” he says.

The research comes as many international albatross populations are in trouble. “Their numbers are plummeting,” Elliot. The populations of wandering albatrosses that he studies were now declining at rates of 5-10% every year, and had been dropping since around 2005. Those dropping numbers come as a result of less prey, warming seas, and increasing encounters with tuna line-fishing boats, which accidentally catch and kill the birds.

Dropping population numbers were changing the birds’ mating patterns in other ways, Elliot said, with more homosexual couplings appearing. “We’re getting male-male pairs amongst the birds on Antipodes Island, which we haven’t had before,” he said. “A few percent of the boys are pairing up with another boy because they can’t find a female partner.”

The Royal Society study had looked at a population of black-browed albatrosses in the Falkland Islands, where numbers were still strong, and where divorce was not catastrophic, Ventura said – birds could find other partners. But he said the same dynamics could apply to other albatross populations, and have a more damaging effect where bird numbers were more fragile. “If we’re talking about a population with a much lower number of breeding pairs, that disruption of a bond might definitely induce some disturbance in the regular breeding processes,” he said.

Now, Elliot hopes that some of the sympathies people have for albatrosses could motivate changes in behaviour, to address the environmental threats the birds are facing – particularly climate change, and tuna fishing. “We kind of need an international campaign to save these birds,” Elliot says. “If we don’t turn it around, they’ll go extinct.”

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/nov/24/climate-crisis-pushes-albatross-divorce-rates-higher-study
Cibo
Cibo.jpg
GenderFemale
RaceHuman
HairWhite(originally black)
First AppearanceLog.9
Last AppearanceLog.65
StatusDeceased(technically)
AlliesKilly
Voice ActorCristina Vee
SeiyūKana Hanazawa

Cibo (SEE-boh) was the head scientist of the Bio-Electric Corporation. Once found and resurrected by Killy, she becomes his sole true ally in his quest to find the Net Terminal Gene.

Appearance[]

Cibo's appearance changes multiple times throughout the story, as she transfers her consciousness into new bodies or suffers fatal injuries that force her to change her appearance.

Human body[]

Centuries before the main storyline, when Cibo still worked as the head scientist at Bio-Electric, she was a tall, slim human woman with short black hair. She wore a black skinsuit with a bulky collar and a utility belt that housed her various tools and instruments.

Bio Electric Imprisonment[]

She was imprisoned by their President for her failed experimentation with artificial Net Terminal Genes, which resulted in the Safeguard destroying the facility. During her hundreds of years of imprisonment, her biological body decayed and rotted away to nearly nothing. She was sustained by a life-support system embedded in her chest, which also housed her speech apparatus and held a backup of her personality, memories, and DNA.

First Built Body[]

Once Killy connected her to an interface inside the Corporation she built herself a new body. Cibo then assumed her more iconic appearance: a very tall, slim woman with shoulder-length white hair. In her battle alongside Killy against the President, she wore a very large, cumbersome jacket-like device that appeared to power her weapons. This is also the first time Cibo is seen with wires embedded into her head, a trait shared by each of her successive forms. She eventually becomes Killy's most prominent partner in his quest to find net genes.

Cibo is a very perceptive being, able to sense electromagnetic frequencies and scan humans from far distances. She can also read letters, something most humans can no longer do, which allows her to access Toha Heavy Industries. After Sanakan attacks the Fishermen, she learns to speak to the Builders from Killy.

Even though Cibo apparently dies numerous times, she can transfer her consciousness into other bodies and recreate herself using back-up data. She does this after the initial Safeguard attack, where her body is destroyed in a massive explosion, and again when Killy returns her to the Corporation's facilities.

Sanakans Body[]

Later she dies while using a Builder to battle a Safeguard, and uploads herself into Sanakan's body, though she is not strong enough to destroy her consciousness. While in control of Sanakan's body, Cibo can access almost any of the Safeguard's functions, including changing her physical appearance and shape.

Alternate Cibo[]

Killy meets an alternate-reality Cibo after getting caught in Mensab's teleportation field. This alternate version has an advanced cybernetic suit capable of flight. She helps him and the original Cibo stop Toha Heavy Industries' gravity furnace and return to their original timeline, although she is killed by a newer model Cyborg. Her body survives the teleportation, however, and when Toha's defenses critically damage the original Cibo, she finds the alternate's body and successfully transfers before Sanakan retakes control of her own body.

Level 9 Safeguard[]

When the Silicon Life Davine Lu Linvega steals the illegal Level 9 Safeguard data, he transfers it into Cibo's body, and it manifests before anyone can stop it. The Safeguard becomes hostile, but Killy critically damages its globe before it obliterates the entire area and retreats in a weakened state. The defenseless Cibo is attacked by Cyborgs but saved by Sanakan, who has been reprogrammed by the Governing Agency. She reveals that Cibo has become the carrier of the new Net Terminal Gene, which is a mixture of both their genes. Although they both die to a High Level Exterminator in the following battle, Killy manages to save the globe containing their "child."

Blame! Movie[]

The first time Killy finds Cibo as a robotic torso and head in the ruins under the Electrofisher town. She tells him and the Electrofishers that she was conducting experiments in that location. She also says that she set an Electric Barrier Generator to keep the Safeguard away.

She asks Killy to escort her to the Factory, once they get there escorted by some Electrofisher warriors, she creates a heap of Food Ration Bars, a new body for herself and an unknown device.

After they get back to town Cibo uses the device she printed in the Factory to connect to the Netsphere.

Screen Shot 2017-08-25 at 10.02.22 PM

Cibo before transferring cibo blame a new body

Cibo chapter 10

Cibo in Chapter 10

Other World Cibo 5 edited 1

Cibo from the other World Line (alternate reality) without helmet

Other World Cibo 4 edited 1

Cibo from the other World Line (alternate reality) in full armor

Источник: https://blame.fandom.com/wiki/Cibo

CIBO BLAME STANDING ANIME 1/8 UNPAINTED RESIN FIGURE MODEL KIT

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We predicted that wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald wouldn't have the big numbers he had during the Kurt Warner era of Arizona Cardinals football, and we were correct. Without a good quarterback, a wide-out doesn't get many quality touches. That is, last year's pathetic crop of Cards QBs couldn't throw the pigskin into Town Lake. Nevertheless. Fitzgerald still is the best wide receiver in professional football, and we'll make another prediction: He will return to form with new QB Kevin Kolb, whom the Cardinals got in a trade with the Philadelphia Eagles this summer. Nobody could make last year's signal-callers look good, but we think Fitzgerald will make Kolb glad he's moved from the Rust Belt to the desert. Because Fitz has got it all: size, hands, speed, leaping ability, wingspan. He plucks impossible balls out of the air. We're not exaggerating to call him the Captain America of Valley athletes (his physique rivals that of actor Chris Evans in the movie). Consider Fitz's most important accolade: In the Cardinals' run to the Super Bowl 2008, he smashed the league's post-season receiving record with seven touchdown catches and 30 overall receptions for 544 yards. The former Minnesota Vikings ball boy is a perennial Pro Bowl cibo blame. If he and Kolb mesh as he and Warner did, the Cardinals could make it to another Super Bowl, or at least win the NFC West title again.

If Diana Taurasi were a man, she would be as rich as Kobe Bryant. Almost. And rivaling him for best player in the NBA. Almost. As it is, she is the best female basketball player in the world and makes about $100,000 a year playing for the Phoenix Mercury (plus a reported $500,000 annually playing in Europe during the WNBA's off-season). She led the Phoenix Mercury to two WNBA championships, was named best collegiate basketball player (regardless of sex) in history after she led her Connecticut Huskies to three NCAA women's championships, and was a member of the USA Olympic women's basketball teams that won gold medals in 2004 and 2008. Hey, we don't have room enough to list all of Tenacious D's accolades. Suffice it to say that the Suns' Steve Nash may be the most famous basketballer in town, but Diana Taurasi may be the best. At 6 feet, the native of Chino, California, has averaged 21 points a game during her professional career, and who says white women can't dunk? Though Taurasi hasn't slammed the ball during a game, she did it in practice for our reporter a few years ago. She says dunking is just not part of the women's game. Pity. Proving that white women can also drink, Taurasi became still another professional athlete to get nailed for DUI here. Authorities said her blood-alcohol level was 0.17 when she was stopped two years ago this summer. Extreme DUI and speeding charges eventually were dropped, and Taurasi served a day in jail.

For a few delightful, if delusional years, some of us thought that the Phoenix Suns might become the Los Angeles Lakers or the San Antonio Spurs, a team that annually competed for, or actually won, an NBA championship. At one point, the franchise had one of the all-time great point guards (Steve Nash), a pure athlete with incredible offensive skills (Amar'e Stoudemire), a perennial All-Star (Shawn Marion), and a dynamite supporting cast in what was one of the more entertaining and effective units in all of pro sports. Then along came Mr. Sarver, whose idea of running a franchise was to scrimp when- and wherever and not to listen to those on his staff who certainly knew (and know) more than him about the sport, including his highly successful general manager, Steve Kerr. Sarver has earned a terrible jacket with his employees as an often mean-spirited fellow keen to blame others as the Suns have slipped into the league's second tier. We never thought we'd be saying this, but previous majority owner Jerry Colangelo is looking awfully good these days.

We were at Chase Field in July when starting pitcher Daniel Hudson hit his first big-league home run, and the Diamondbacks went on to take a series against the hated Los Angeles Dodgers, two games to one. And it was all Hudson, almost all the time, that day; he not only pitched a one-run, five-hit complete game, he drove in all but one of the Diamondbacks' runs, with the homer and a two-run single later in the game. The single was especially sweet, since the Dodgers had hoped to force Hudson out of the game by putting in a hard-throwing cibo blame with two men on base and two outs. But manager Kirk Gibson was having none of it. Most managers would have put in a pinch-hitter in this situation, but Gibson left his right-handed hurler in to either save the day or blow an opportunity to seal the deal. When Hudson zapped the ground ball into left field, the Dodgers pitching coach was cursing the day he was born. Along with Ian Kennedy, Hudson is the great hope for the Diamondbacks pitching staff, which (until this season) had stunk for quite some time. The win on this day in July gave him a 10-5 record (3.56 ERA). But more than that, his offensive might added to his .359 batting average. Now, that's a great average for a player who hits every day. For a pitcher, it's stupid-good. We mean, not many actual pinch-hitters anywhere in the bigs have an average like that. No wonder Gibson stuck cibo blame Hudson in this clutch situation. For the uninformed, though pitchers may throw manly 95-mile-an-hour fastballs, when they come up to bat, they usually whiff at pitches like little girls in T-ball. Not Dan "The Man" Hudson, the best-hitting pitcher in baseball.

Remember when crucifix-sucking Chris Young sucked? When the center fielder (who likes to taste his silver necklace during games) was sent down to the minors for a stint because he couldn't buy a hit. Yes, his M.O. was to pop out to an infielder in 2009, when he cooled his heels with the Reno Aces for three weeks. His batting average dropped below .200 that year, and he finished that season at .212 with 15 homers (he had hit 32 in 2007 and 22 in 2008.). Well, this year, he had 16 homers with the season slightly half done and a .262 average. When he was in his slump, he was lucky to bat seventh when he was in the game at all. Last year, he was moved to leadoff and his production improved. And this year, he's batted fourth (cleanup) on many nights, because of his 50-plus runs batted in. In addition to the hitting, Young is an avid base-stealer. In a game with the Milwaukee Brewers late last season, he became the first major leaguer to become a member of the vaunted 20-20 club — he hit his 20th homer to go along with 22 stolen bases. This year, he has 14 steals so far. Two seasons ago, predictions were that he might be sent to the farm permanently and soon be out of baseball, but the naysayers were wrong. What turned Young around? Part of it was hard work, which included adjusting his swing, and part of it was having a manager, Kirk Gibson, who believes in him. Whatever mojo is working, Young has not only saved his career but vastly improved what was the worst offense in the big leagues last year.

"I wanted to act like I belong here. It's a dream come true. You see the stadium on TV, and you wish and hope you'll be out there like those guys." This is what Ian Kennedy was quoted as saying before his first start with the New York Yankees in 2007. And he acquitted himself well in that first major-league win, striking out six, walking two, and giving up five hits in seven innings. But it didn't go so well after that with the Bronx Bombers. After poor outings and health issues — including an aneurysm under non huntington atm fees left armpit — he was in and out of the Yankees' minor-league organizations. He never pitched a full season until after he was involved in a three-way trade with New York and the Detroit Tigers in winter 2009. Pitching for the D-Backs against San Diego late last season, Kennedy struck out 12 Padres and gave up one hit and two walks in seven innings. It was the beginning of his resurgence, and by the time this season rolled around, he was named the Diamondbacks' opening-day starter. Now the ace of the Arizona staff, the Huntington Beach, California, native and University of Southern California alum was 13-5, with a 3.39 ERA, after the All-Star Game this season. With the Diamondbacks in the playoffs, they need Kennedy to produce. And he is capable. He's always had his share of strikeouts, with 168 last year and 113 this season. He's also capable of walking a lot of batters: 70 last year and 37 so far this season. An interesting side note: When Kennedy and his wife, former USC basketball player Allison Jaskowiak, were wed a few years ago, they left the church to the strains of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame."

The fact that the Arizona Diamondbacks have clinched the National League West lands squarely on the broad shoulders of manager Kirk Gibson, the guy who (with a two-day growth of beard) looks like he could chew nails. But what we hear he's done is chew players' asses. That is, he won't accept mediocrity. And what he has done with a roster of (previous) no-names is nothing short of unbelievable. His players talk about clubhouse "tension" now that Gibby's in charge. But it's not by way of complaining. They know they're going to be held accountable, and they like it that way. Players know that they must work hard or else. The square-jawed Gibson commands respect, and you can see it on his face: He hates freakin' losing! Which is exactly what the Diamondbacks have needed all these years. In the past, they have been coddled by lightweight managers (Gibson's predecessor, A.J. Finch, comes to mind) who commanded little respect — hadn't been there/done that. Gibson was a star in the major leagues, a two-time World Series champion. He led the Detroit Tigers to their 1984 title, but he's best known for the homer he hit for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first game of the 1988 World Series, against the Oakland A's. You know, the one that literally is one of the greatest moments in sports history. When a hobbled-by-injuries Gibby dragged himself around the bases to the screams of everybody with a pulse in the City of Angels. We lived in L.A. at the time and saw people run out into the streets to hug strangers and dance on the roofs of cars in the middle of Sunset Boulevard. We want to see that kind of thing here, and we believe Gibson, the no-nonsense manager now, can make it happen.

Justin Upton made his second All-Star team appearance this year, just as we predicted he would. All it took was playing on a better team than the miserable Snakes squad of last year, when Upton missed the mid-summer classic after having made it in 2009. Upton's young (24 this season), and the desperation of playing on a last-place team got to him in 2010. This season, he was the only Arizona Diamondback to make the cut, until injuries allowed catcher Miguel Montero a roster spot. Upton's destined to be a superhero in his sport, a sure future Hall of Famer. What makes him so special is that he's a solid power hitter, a guy who (when he gets a little older) will challenge the likes of Milwaukee's Prince Fielder and St Louis' Albert Pujols. In a very exclusive club of long-ball hitters, Upton narrowly missed selection to the National League's home run derby squad during All-Star week in Phoenix this summer. Before this season is over, the D-Backs right fielder could still eclipse the year he had in 2009, when he hit .300, with 26 home runs and 86 runs batted in. He was at 15 homers keycorp preferred stock he went into the All-Star Game and was batting .281 with 46 runs batted in. The downside to Upton is his streakiness. After the All-Star break, he slumped briefly and then surged, with 21 home runs at this writing. Let's hope that manager Kirk Gibson can make him a more consistent player, because Gibson will need him to win that next World Series title we hope for around here.

Dustin Pedroia is a phenom with a .303 batting average going on six seasons with the Boston Red Sox. He's the best hitter to come out of Arizona State University since Barry Bonds. Better than Bonds when you look at his average and worth to his team — and there's no doubt that the 5-foot-9, 180-pounder never has done steroids. Not only is Pedroia a probable future Hall of Famer, based on his hitting; he is a stellar infielder. He's an American League Gold Glove (2008) second baseman who has committed only 28 errors since the 2006 season. It was a good bet that Pedroia would do well in the majors. During his ASU career, he hit .384, with 71 doubles, 14 homers, and 146 runs batted in — incredible stats for a college player. In addition, he was 2003 National Defensive Player of the Year while at ASU. He went on to win AL Rookie of the year in 2007, his first full season in the bigs — which coincidentally was the year that Boston won its second World Series in four years (before 2004, it hadn't won the title since 1918). On the first pitch of his first World Series at-bat, the Woodland, California, native homered over Fenway Park's Green Monster. This season, he's on a pace to hit more home runs than in any other season, with 13 since the All-Star game — as Boston led the American League East. Never known as a power-hitter, his previous HR total was 17 in 2008. Now 27, he's billed in Boston as the spark plug of his team — the proverbial little man who plays big.

Miguel Montero is the most fundamentally sound player on the Arizona Diamondbacks' roster. Because of injuries to other players around the National League, he was an All-Star this year, but he deserved it. How many times have we seen the guy get a clutch hit for the D-Backs through his five full seasons with the team? That was a rhetorical question — meaning it's a lot. His on-base percentage is .346. Plus the guy has been the field general over a bunch of young pitchers this year, with amazing results. As a defender against the steal, he's improved vastly. A banner game for Montero this season came on July 23 against the Colorado Rockies, when he hit a home run, a double, and drove in five runs. He couldn't lose that day; he even walked in a run. He's had to fight off injuries, but if he can stay healthy, he will be one of the reasons that the Diamondbacks can go deep in the post-season. A solid .280 hitter for most of this season, he finished the year with a career-best 17 home runs. Miggy's a quiet guy, leaving the limelight to more flamboyant players like Justin Upton. He just does his job.

Источник: https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/best-of/2011/sports-and-recreation/best-male-pro-athlete-6469916

CIBO BLAME STANDING ANIME 1/8 UNPAINTED RESIN FIGURE MODEL KIT

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CIBO BLAME STANDING ANIME 1/8 UNPAINTED RESIN FIGURE MODEL KIT

CIBO BLAME STANDING ANIME 1/8 UNPAINTED RESIN FIGURE MODEL KIT

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cibo blame

Cibo blame -

We predicted that wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald wouldn't have the big numbers he had during the Kurt Warner era of Arizona Cardinals football, and we were correct. Without a good quarterback, a wide-out doesn't get many quality touches. That is, last year's pathetic crop of Cards QBs couldn't throw the pigskin into Town Lake. Nevertheless. Fitzgerald still is the best wide receiver in professional football, and we'll make another prediction: He will return to form with new QB Kevin Kolb, whom the Cardinals got in a trade with the Philadelphia Eagles this summer. Nobody could make last year's signal-callers look good, but we think Fitzgerald will make Kolb glad he's moved from the Rust Belt to the desert. Because Fitz has got it all: size, hands, speed, leaping ability, wingspan. He plucks impossible balls out of the air. We're not exaggerating to call him the Captain America of Valley athletes (his physique rivals that of actor Chris Evans in the movie). Consider Fitz's most important accolade: In the Cardinals' run to the Super Bowl 2008, he smashed the league's post-season receiving record with seven touchdown catches and 30 overall receptions for 544 yards. The former Minnesota Vikings ball boy is a perennial Pro Bowl selection. If he and Kolb mesh as he and Warner did, the Cardinals could make it to another Super Bowl, or at least win the NFC West title again.

If Diana Taurasi were a man, she would be as rich as Kobe Bryant. Almost. And rivaling him for best player in the NBA. Almost. As it is, she is the best female basketball player in the world and makes about $100,000 a year playing for the Phoenix Mercury (plus a reported $500,000 annually playing in Europe during the WNBA's off-season). She led the Phoenix Mercury to two WNBA championships, was named best collegiate basketball player (regardless of sex) in history after she led her Connecticut Huskies to three NCAA women's championships, and was a member of the USA Olympic women's basketball teams that won gold medals in 2004 and 2008. Hey, we don't have room enough to list all of Tenacious D's accolades. Suffice it to say that the Suns' Steve Nash may be the most famous basketballer in town, but Diana Taurasi may be the best. At 6 feet, the native of Chino, California, has averaged 21 points a game during her professional career, and who says white women can't dunk? Though Taurasi hasn't slammed the ball during a game, she did it in practice for our reporter a few years ago. She says dunking is just not part of the women's game. Pity. Proving that white women can also drink, Taurasi became still another professional athlete to get nailed for DUI here. Authorities said her blood-alcohol level was 0.17 when she was stopped two years ago this summer. Extreme DUI and speeding charges eventually were dropped, and Taurasi served a day in jail.

For a few delightful, if delusional years, some of us thought that the Phoenix Suns might become the Los Angeles Lakers or the San Antonio Spurs, a team that annually competed for, or actually won, an NBA championship. At one point, the franchise had one of the all-time great point guards (Steve Nash), a pure athlete with incredible offensive skills (Amar'e Stoudemire), a perennial All-Star (Shawn Marion), and a dynamite supporting cast in what was one of the more entertaining and effective units in all of pro sports. Then along came Mr. Sarver, whose idea of running a franchise was to scrimp when- and wherever and not to listen to those on his staff who certainly knew (and know) more than him about the sport, including his highly successful general manager, Steve Kerr. Sarver has earned a terrible jacket with his employees as an often mean-spirited fellow keen to blame others as the Suns have slipped into the league's second tier. We never thought we'd be saying this, but previous majority owner Jerry Colangelo is looking awfully good these days.

We were at Chase Field in July when starting pitcher Daniel Hudson hit his first big-league home run, and the Diamondbacks went on to take a series against the hated Los Angeles Dodgers, two games to one. And it was all Hudson, almost all the time, that day; he not only pitched a one-run, five-hit complete game, he drove in all but one of the Diamondbacks' runs, with the homer and a two-run single later in the game. The single was especially sweet, since the Dodgers had hoped to force Hudson out of the game by putting in a hard-throwing reliever with two men on base and two outs. But manager Kirk Gibson was having none of it. Most managers would have put in a pinch-hitter in this situation, but Gibson left his right-handed hurler in to either save the day or blow an opportunity to seal the deal. When Hudson zapped the ground ball into left field, the Dodgers pitching coach was cursing the day he was born. Along with Ian Kennedy, Hudson is the great hope for the Diamondbacks pitching staff, which (until this season) had stunk for quite some time. The win on this day in July gave him a 10-5 record (3.56 ERA). But more than that, his offensive might added to his .359 batting average. Now, that's a great average for a player who hits every day. For a pitcher, it's stupid-good. We mean, not many actual pinch-hitters anywhere in the bigs have an average like that. No wonder Gibson stuck with Hudson in this clutch situation. For the uninformed, though pitchers may throw manly 95-mile-an-hour fastballs, when they come up to bat, they usually whiff at pitches like little girls in T-ball. Not Dan "The Man" Hudson, the best-hitting pitcher in baseball.

Remember when crucifix-sucking Chris Young sucked? When the center fielder (who likes to taste his silver necklace during games) was sent down to the minors for a stint because he couldn't buy a hit. Yes, his M.O. was to pop out to an infielder in 2009, when he cooled his heels with the Reno Aces for three weeks. His batting average dropped below .200 that year, and he finished that season at .212 with 15 homers (he had hit 32 in 2007 and 22 in 2008.). Well, this year, he had 16 homers with the season slightly half done and a .262 average. When he was in his slump, he was lucky to bat seventh when he was in the game at all. Last year, he was moved to leadoff and his production improved. And this year, he's batted fourth (cleanup) on many nights, because of his 50-plus runs batted in. In addition to the hitting, Young is an avid base-stealer. In a game with the Milwaukee Brewers late last season, he became the first major leaguer to become a member of the vaunted 20-20 club — he hit his 20th homer to go along with 22 stolen bases. This year, he has 14 steals so far. Two seasons ago, predictions were that he might be sent to the farm permanently and soon be out of baseball, but the naysayers were wrong. What turned Young around? Part of it was hard work, which included adjusting his swing, and part of it was having a manager, Kirk Gibson, who believes in him. Whatever mojo is working, Young has not only saved his career but vastly improved what was the worst offense in the big leagues last year.

"I wanted to act like I belong here. It's a dream come true. You see the stadium on TV, and you wish and hope you'll be out there like those guys." This is what Ian Kennedy was quoted as saying before his first start with the New York Yankees in 2007. And he acquitted himself well in that first major-league win, striking out six, walking two, and giving up five hits in seven innings. But it didn't go so well after that with the Bronx Bombers. After poor outings and health issues — including an aneurysm under his left armpit — he was in and out of the Yankees' minor-league organizations. He never pitched a full season until after he was involved in a three-way trade with New York and the Detroit Tigers in winter 2009. Pitching for the D-Backs against San Diego late last season, Kennedy struck out 12 Padres and gave up one hit and two walks in seven innings. It was the beginning of his resurgence, and by the time this season rolled around, he was named the Diamondbacks' opening-day starter. Now the ace of the Arizona staff, the Huntington Beach, California, native and University of Southern California alum was 13-5, with a 3.39 ERA, after the All-Star Game this season. With the Diamondbacks in the playoffs, they need Kennedy to produce. And he is capable. He's always had his share of strikeouts, with 168 last year and 113 this season. He's also capable of walking a lot of batters: 70 last year and 37 so far this season. An interesting side note: When Kennedy and his wife, former USC basketball player Allison Jaskowiak, were wed a few years ago, they left the church to the strains of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame."

The fact that the Arizona Diamondbacks have clinched the National League West lands squarely on the broad shoulders of manager Kirk Gibson, the guy who (with a two-day growth of beard) looks like he could chew nails. But what we hear he's done is chew players' asses. That is, he won't accept mediocrity. And what he has done with a roster of (previous) no-names is nothing short of unbelievable. His players talk about clubhouse "tension" now that Gibby's in charge. But it's not by way of complaining. They know they're going to be held accountable, and they like it that way. Players know that they must work hard or else. The square-jawed Gibson commands respect, and you can see it on his face: He hates freakin' losing! Which is exactly what the Diamondbacks have needed all these years. In the past, they have been coddled by lightweight managers (Gibson's predecessor, A.J. Finch, comes to mind) who commanded little respect — hadn't been there/done that. Gibson was a star in the major leagues, a two-time World Series champion. He led the Detroit Tigers to their 1984 title, but he's best known for the homer he hit for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first game of the 1988 World Series, against the Oakland A's. You know, the one that literally is one of the greatest moments in sports history. When a hobbled-by-injuries Gibby dragged himself around the bases to the screams of everybody with a pulse in the City of Angels. We lived in L.A. at the time and saw people run out into the streets to hug strangers and dance on the roofs of cars in the middle of Sunset Boulevard. We want to see that kind of thing here, and we believe Gibson, the no-nonsense manager now, can make it happen.

Justin Upton made his second All-Star team appearance this year, just as we predicted he would. All it took was playing on a better team than the miserable Snakes squad of last year, when Upton missed the mid-summer classic after having made it in 2009. Upton's young (24 this season), and the desperation of playing on a last-place team got to him in 2010. This season, he was the only Arizona Diamondback to make the cut, until injuries allowed catcher Miguel Montero a roster spot. Upton's destined to be a superhero in his sport, a sure future Hall of Famer. What makes him so special is that he's a solid power hitter, a guy who (when he gets a little older) will challenge the likes of Milwaukee's Prince Fielder and St Louis' Albert Pujols. In a very exclusive club of long-ball hitters, Upton narrowly missed selection to the National League's home run derby squad during All-Star week in Phoenix this summer. Before this season is over, the D-Backs right fielder could still eclipse the year he had in 2009, when he hit .300, with 26 home runs and 86 runs batted in. He was at 15 homers as he went into the All-Star Game and was batting .281 with 46 runs batted in. The downside to Upton is his streakiness. After the All-Star break, he slumped briefly and then surged, with 21 home runs at this writing. Let's hope that manager Kirk Gibson can make him a more consistent player, because Gibson will need him to win that next World Series title we hope for around here.

Dustin Pedroia is a phenom with a .303 batting average going on six seasons with the Boston Red Sox. He's the best hitter to come out of Arizona State University since Barry Bonds. Better than Bonds when you look at his average and worth to his team — and there's no doubt that the 5-foot-9, 180-pounder never has done steroids. Not only is Pedroia a probable future Hall of Famer, based on his hitting; he is a stellar infielder. He's an American League Gold Glove (2008) second baseman who has committed only 28 errors since the 2006 season. It was a good bet that Pedroia would do well in the majors. During his ASU career, he hit .384, with 71 doubles, 14 homers, and 146 runs batted in — incredible stats for a college player. In addition, he was 2003 National Defensive Player of the Year while at ASU. He went on to win AL Rookie of the year in 2007, his first full season in the bigs — which coincidentally was the year that Boston won its second World Series in four years (before 2004, it hadn't won the title since 1918). On the first pitch of his first World Series at-bat, the Woodland, California, native homered over Fenway Park's Green Monster. This season, he's on a pace to hit more home runs than in any other season, with 13 since the All-Star game — as Boston led the American League East. Never known as a power-hitter, his previous HR total was 17 in 2008. Now 27, he's billed in Boston as the spark plug of his team — the proverbial little man who plays big.

Miguel Montero is the most fundamentally sound player on the Arizona Diamondbacks' roster. Because of injuries to other players around the National League, he was an All-Star this year, but he deserved it. How many times have we seen the guy get a clutch hit for the D-Backs through his five full seasons with the team? That was a rhetorical question — meaning it's a lot. His on-base percentage is .346. Plus the guy has been the field general over a bunch of young pitchers this year, with amazing results. As a defender against the steal, he's improved vastly. A banner game for Montero this season came on July 23 against the Colorado Rockies, when he hit a home run, a double, and drove in five runs. He couldn't lose that day; he even walked in a run. He's had to fight off injuries, but if he can stay healthy, he will be one of the reasons that the Diamondbacks can go deep in the post-season. A solid .280 hitter for most of this season, he finished the year with a career-best 17 home runs. Miggy's a quiet guy, leaving the limelight to more flamboyant players like Justin Upton. He just does his job.

Источник: https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/best-of/2011/sports-and-recreation/best-male-pro-athlete-6469916

Climate crisis pushes albatross ‘divorce’ rates higher – study

Albatrosses, some of the world’s most loyally monogamous creatures, are “divorcing” more often – and researchers say global heating may be to blame.

In a new Royal Society study, researchers say climate change and warming waters are pushing black-browed albatross break-up rates higher. Typically after choosing a partner, only 1-3% would separate in search of greener romantic pastures.

But in the years with unusually warm water temperatures, that average consistently rose, with up to 8% of couples splitting up. The study looked at a wild population of 15,500 breeding pairs in the Falkland Islands over 15 years.

For seabirds, warmer waters mean less fish, less food and a harsher environment. Fewer chicks survive. The birds’ stress hormones increase. They are forced farther afield to hunt.

As some of the most loyal partners of the animal kingdom, the love lives of albatrosses have long been a subject of scientific study. “There are all these things we think of as being super-duper human,” says Dr Graeme Elliot, principal science adviser at New Zealand’s department of conservation, who has been studying albatrosses in the country’s waters for three decades.

The birds lend themselves to anthropomorphism: living for 50-60 years, they have a long, awkward teen phase as they learn how to seduce a mate through dance, and take years-long trips away from home as they mature. They usually to mate for life, and loudly celebrate when greeting a partner after a long absence.

But now, they increasingly share another rite of passage that may sound familiar to young humans: under stress from the climate crisis, working longer hours to eat, and faced with the logistical difficulties of a traveling partner, some are struggling to maintain relationships.

Francesco Ventura, researcher at University of Lisbon and co-author of the Royal Society study, said the researchers were surprised to learn that warmer waters were associated with unusually high rates of albatross couples splitting up, even when the lack of fish were accounted for.

Albatross divorce was usually predicted by a reproductive failure, Ventura said. If a pair failed to produce a chick, they had a higher chance of splitting up. Less food for birds could lead to more failures. But the researchers were surprised to find that even when they accounted for that, higher water temperatures were having an extra effect – pushing up divorce rates even when reproduction was successful.

Ventura floated two possible reasons – one that warming waters were forcing the birds to hunt for longer and fly further. If birds then failed return for a breeding season, their partners may move on with someone new. Added to that, when waters are warmer and in harsher environments, albatross stress hormones go up. Ventura said the birds may feel that, and blame their partner.

​ “We propose this partner-blaming hypothesis – with which a stressed female might feel this physiological stress, and attribute these higher stress levels to a poor performance of the male,” he says.

The research comes as many international albatross populations are in trouble. “Their numbers are plummeting,” Elliot. The populations of wandering albatrosses that he studies were now declining at rates of 5-10% every year, and had been dropping since around 2005. Those dropping numbers come as a result of less prey, warming seas, and increasing encounters with tuna line-fishing boats, which accidentally catch and kill the birds.

Dropping population numbers were changing the birds’ mating patterns in other ways, Elliot said, with more homosexual couplings appearing. “We’re getting male-male pairs amongst the birds on Antipodes Island, which we haven’t had before,” he said. “A few percent of the boys are pairing up with another boy because they can’t find a female partner.”

The Royal Society study had looked at a population of black-browed albatrosses in the Falkland Islands, where numbers were still strong, and where divorce was not catastrophic, Ventura said – birds could find other partners. But he said the same dynamics could apply to other albatross populations, and have a more damaging effect where bird numbers were more fragile. “If we’re talking about a population with a much lower number of breeding pairs, that disruption of a bond might definitely induce some disturbance in the regular breeding processes,” he said.

Now, Elliot hopes that some of the sympathies people have for albatrosses could motivate changes in behaviour, to address the environmental threats the birds are facing – particularly climate change, and tuna fishing. “We kind of need an international campaign to save these birds,” Elliot says. “If we don’t turn it around, they’ll go extinct.”

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/nov/24/climate-crisis-pushes-albatross-divorce-rates-higher-study

Blame! (film)

Not to be confused with Blame (2017 film).

2017 Japanese anime science fiction action film by Hiroyuki Seshita

Blame! (stylized as BLAME!) is a 2017 Japanese CGIanimescience fictionaction film directed by Hiroyuki Seshita, produced by Polygon Pictures, written by Tsutomu Nihei and based on the manga series Blame!, which was written and illustrated by Tsutomu Nihei. It was released globally by Netflix on May 20, 2017.[1]

Plot[edit]

In the distant technological future, civilization has reached its ultimate Net-based form. An "infection" in the past caused the automated systems to spiral out of control, resulting in a multi-leveled city structure that replicates itself infinitely in all directions. Now humanity has lost access to the city's controls and is hunted down to be purged by the defense system known as the Safeguard. In a village, a group known as the Electro-Fishers is facing eventual extinction, trapped between the threat of the Safeguard and dwindling food supplies. A girl named Zuru goes on a journey to find food for her village with a group of friends, only to inadvertently cause doom when a Watchtower senses her and spawns a Safeguard pack to eliminate them. With her companions dead and all escape routes blocked, the sudden arrival of Killy the Wanderer, on his quest to find a human who possesses the Net Terminal Gene, saves her along with Tae, her close friend.

Killy is brought back to the village, where he meets Pop, leader of the village, who expresses interest in him after they hear that he has been from '6000 levels below'. Killy even helps to assist with the village's food problem by passing them a large amount of rations. Abruptly, he leaves for an area below the village named the Rotting Shrine, and followed by Zuru and Tae, he finds the spoilt machine-corpse of Cibo, a former scientist from before the disaster. Cibo reveals that it is she that built a shield generator that protects the village from the Safeguard, and tells the villagers that it is possible to produce more of the rations by going to a nearby 'automated factory'.

Heeding her words, a group of Electro-Fishers including Tae and Zuru travel to the automated factory in search of more rations. Arriving there, Cibo assists in logging into the system and produces a large amount of rations, much to the delight of the Electro-Fishers. However, right after she produces a machine for Killy, the system rejects her log-in and starts to mass-produce Exterminators to eliminate the Electro-Fishers. Cibo, who remakes herself using the system in a cyborg form, leads the villagers, with Tae now having broken her arm, to a railway car and escapes back to the village. During the ride, Killy is knocked unconscious trying to save the Electro-Fishers.

Arriving at the village, the villagers celebrate the sudden amount of food while also mourning their loss. While holding the celebration, Cibo secretly wakes Killy up with only Zuru as a witness and leads him down towards the shield generator with the machine. While heading down, Tae takes her gun to the observatory platform and shoots the shield generator, whereupon it is revealed that the real Tae was killed and replaced by a cyborg representative for the Safeguard back at the factory. Sanakan, as she now calls herself, proceeds to kill most of the villagers, deeming them illegal residents while destroying the village in the process.

Killy, realizing what has occurred, runs back up to the village on his own. Cibo travels further down at a faster pace, where she sets the machine right next to the destroyed Shield Generator and connects herself to it. Back at the top, Sanakan is killing villagers, but the village elders frantically lead the rest of the villagers to the top of the village where they resist her using their remaining weapons. Killy himself enters combat with Sanakan, who after knocking him down, notes that he is a body 'stolen from the Safeguard'. Killy is saved at the last minute by Zuru, who throws his gun to him; which he shoots and destroys Sanakan, but not before Sanakan destroys Cibo.

Cibo, in an alternate dimension, pleads with the Authority, which controls the Safeguard, to let the villagers go. Unable to do so, they allow her to access the City's map, revealing an abandoned level safe from Safeguard control where the villagers can evacuate to.

Cibo, now functioning through her only remaining arm, leads the remaining villagers to a trans-level railway car, but right after the villagers get in, a Watchtower spots them and spawns a gigantic Exterminator. Killy throws the device which has been keeping him safe from the Safeguard to Zuru, upon which he says that he still wants to find the Net Terminal Gene, which enables human control of the Safeguard. Killy seemingly sacrifices himself so that the villagers could escape.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Plans for a full-length CG animated film were announced in 2007.[2] However, this proposed CG film project was not released before Micott and Basara (the studio hired) filed for bankruptcy in 2011.[3]

It was announced in November 2015 that the series would get an anime theatrical film adaptation.[4] The film was directed by Hiroyuki Seshita and written by Tsutomu Nihei and Sadayuki Murai, with animation by Polygon Pictures and character designs by Yuki Moriyama. It was released globally as a Netflix original on the 20th of May 2017.[5]

Release[edit]

Blame! was released by Polygon Pictures on May 19, 2017. It was made available to subscribers on Netflix on May 20, 2017.

On October 5, 2017, Viz Media announced at their New York Comic Con panel that they had licensed the home video rights to Blame! They released the film on Blu-ray Disc and DVD on March 27, 2018.[6]

Reception[edit]

Michael Nordine of IndieWire rated it B− and wrote that its worth a watch, but the "world-building is more engaging than its plotting".[7] Toussaint Egan of Paste praised the adaptation for being both faithful and opening it to wider appeal, concluding that it is "one of the most conceptually entertaining anime films of late".[8] James Brusuelas of Animation World Network wrote that although the plot is familiar, it is "definitely worth your time".[9]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blame!_(film)

SPRING IS IN THE AIR

We are The Clean Thinkers, and at the most fundamental (and uninspired) level you could say that we provide personal and professional coaching services. But what we truly are is so much more than that. We are an engine of personal, professional, and societal change, improving the world one person and one company at a time. We do not provide your everyday life coaching or executive coaching. Instead, what we provide is thought coaching for a better life.

You're probably asking yourself what the hell that even means. Well, it means that through our proprietary coaching methodology we help people and companies break down the mental barriers preventing attainment of their most important goals. We breakdown these mental barriers – which are built from the negative subjective influences present in all of our minds – by recognizing that these barriers exist in the first place, and then taking action to manage and mitigate their effects on our lives and on our businesses.

We begin this by asking the question posed above: “Do you know why?” It’s one of the most important questions we can ever ask ourselves and can take many different forms. Do you know why you keep making the same ineffective choices? Do you know why you feel this way about that group of people? Do you know why you feel that way about this group of people? Do you know why you eat too much? Drink too much? Spend too much? Do you know why you’re unsatisfied? Unhappy? Do you know why you don’t know why?

The list goes on, but no matter the specific question, the axioms of Clean Thinking hold true: to achieve our desires and to be our best, or for our business to be its best, we must first understand what has kept us from being there already. To gain that understanding, we must be willing to give an honest and objective appraisal of the choices we make, the conclusions we reach, and the beliefs we hold. Once we’ve done that, and determined which are serving us and which are not, we are well on our way to achieving Clean Thinking and realizing our true potential.

Источник: https://www.thecleanthinkers.com/

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Manga / Blame

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Blame!.png

Part man. Part machine. No parts expressive.

"Maybe on Earth, Maybe in the Future"

Blame! 『ブラム!』 is a 10-volume cyberpunkSeinenManga.

The story follows Killy, a silent loner possessing an incredibly powerful gun known as a Graviton Beam Emitter, as he wanders an immeasurably vast technological world known as "The City". The City is inhabited by scattered human and transhuman tribes, as well as hostile cyborgs known as Silicon Creatures.

Killy's primary goal is to recover the Net Terminal Genes, an extremely rare genetic marker that allows humans to access the Net Sphere, and gain control of The City's network. Doing so would allow him to halt the unhindered, chaotic expansion of The City, as well as stop the murderous horde known as The Safeguard from destroying what remains of humanity... or more correctly all humans who lack Net Terminal Genes (which is essentially all humans).

This story has a prequel, NOiSE, and a followup anthology called Blame Academy! And So On containing two short sequel chapters: Net Sphere Engineer and Blame!2; as well as a three chapter spin off manga, featuring all the characters of Blame! in...high school? That's right Blame! Academy — Adventure-student Killy in the Cyber school quest! Tsutomu Nihei is obviously even more insane than we gave him credit for.

A short six episode Web-Anime series adaptation was created by Group TAC in 2003. The manga received another anime adaptation in the form of a cel-shaded CGI film called Blame produced by Polygon Pictures (who also adapted Nihei's Knights of Sidonia) and has been licenced by Netflix. You can watch the first trailer here and the second here. The film was released in Japan and worldwide via Netflix on May 20, 2017.


Blame! provides examples of the following:

  • Abnormal Ammo: Darts that turn people into Faceless Mooks, guns that fire a murderous sentient polymer that absorbs all surrounding raw materials to make itself larger, etc...
  • Abusive Precursors: The Safeguard.
  • Action Girl: Cibo, Sana-Kan.
  • Affectionate Parody: Blame! Academy - A non-canon spin-off series by the same author, which involves putting his characters into stereotypical Japanese school-life comedy situations. The effect is very amusing given the originalseries'tone.
  • After the End: Or if you look at the prequel works, it's technically after, after, after the end.
  • And the Adventure Continues: In the last chapter, Killy seems to have been killed by a Boom, Headshot!, but the embryo with the Net Terminal Gene starts growing upon being exposed to uncontaminated water. On the very last page, after a Time Skip, we see Killy protecting a young girl wearing a hazmat suit, who is presumably the embryo grown up.
  • Another Dimension: The gravity-based engine of Toha Heavy Industries creates a few.
    • Killy is trapped in one for a short period, and meets an alternate-reality (or future) Cibo, whose body is then brought to Killy's dimension and serves as a container for the present Cibo.
    • Mensab and Seu apparently take refugee in one.
  • Anyone Can Die: The number of surviving characters can be counted on the fingers of one hand. That has recently been through a leaf shredder. Not that it's really surprising.
  • Arm Cannon: Sana-Kan.
  • Art Evolution: Nihei's style and character design changes dramatically at several points in the manga.
  • Art Shift: Used in the spin-off, Blame! Academy, for laughs. That girl with the ahoge is the Silicon Lifeform with the slasher smile Killy killed early in the manga. Same with the Gonk.
  • Back-to-Back Badasses: Killy and Dhomochevsky in one chapter.
  • Badass Bookworm: Cibo.
  • Badass Longcoat: A fashion statement frequently worn by both Silicon Creatures and high-level Safeguards.
  • Badass Normal: Seu, so very much. In a world where baseline humans are armed with BFGs or hyper-sophisticated hacking equipment, and still die by the dozens, Seu stands alone, as an almost-baseline human who fights off dozens of cyborgs, including the genuinely badass Ivy and Maeve while armed with nothing more than a perfectly normal BFS.
  • BFG: Abundant, and frequently played with. The biggest and baddest guns are the Graviton Beam Emitters, of which Killy's tiny pistol seems to be the most advanced. More of a Wave Motion pistol. However, some unnamed characters are seen using BFG style weapons.
    • GBEs have a range measured in dozens of Kilometers, no matter what is in their way. Killy's GBE is stated to have a range of 70 kilometers.
  • BFS: Ivy's weapon is this even without the additional sections concealed inside that can fold out like a switchblade to make it longer.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Cibo and Sana-Kan are dead, along with many others. However, Killy finds a place to put Cibo's "egg" containing a human with Net Terminal Genes on the edge of the city, which finally restores some form of order.
  • Bizarrchitecture: Nihei's architecture is more improbable than bizarre most of the time. The amount of raw materials that would be needed to create most of the structures in Blame! is mind-boggling, and the City is at least the size of the solar system. Construction bots apparently beam stuff into existence; if availability of matter was of any relevance, the setting simply couldn't happen.
  • Big Damn Heroes: It seems everyone gets at least one Big Damn Heroes moment in Blame! Even Cibo.
  • Big Bad: While it initially appears that the Safeguard is the main antagonist of the series, it turns out that they aren't even malevolent. The Safeguard command lost control of the city's mechanisms and are responsible not only for Killy's appearance but provide him with whatever help they can. While there are certainly rotten people found within the City, there is no one single person responsible for any of it. In essence, the City itself, with its unchecked growth and rampant Safeguard creatures, is the only thing that can be considered the real threat.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: Sana-Kan, in her first appearance.
  • Body Horror: A common occurrence. Cibo fighting Sana-Kan for control of her body springs to mind, as do the silicon clone factories.
  • Bookends: The manga begins and ends with Killy escorting a child.
  • Boom, Headshot!: Pretty much the only way to guarantee that someone stays dead in the Blame! universe. And in Killy's case, not even then.
    • In the 2017 film, Cibo has the forethought to avert this by putting her brain into one of her arms.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Justified, seeing as how the GBE takes its power from Killy himself.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: Blame! Academy chapter 2 has fun with this when a pair of Silicon Life Forms appear, and ask Killy if he remembers them. Cibo nonchalantly identifies them from the second half of Blame! volume 1 and concludes that they must be out for revenge, but it turns out they're just mad because all the characters shown in chapter 1 appeared except them.
  • Came Back Wrong: Seu is repeatedly healed by a Matter Replicator, but each time his mind degrades more and more.
  • City Solar System
  • Chiaroscuro
  • Cloning Blues: In one chapter, Killy and Cibo stumble across a machine that has been continually cloning the same woman for untold centuries. The worst part? the original woman — hooked up to the machine and completely incapacitated — has apparently been alive and conscious for all that time.
  • Clothing Damage:
    • Oddly averted - Killy's outfits seem to be as resilient as he is. It's revealed to be "Second Skin." Whatever that means, it's probably tough considering he's a Safeguard.
      • After being nuked, the clothes are revealed to literally be a part of him.
    • Played straight in Blame! Academy. Severaltimes.
  • Composite Character: In the compressed anime "demo" of Blame!, it is implied that Cibo is every female character that Killy has ever met, including the girl on the elevator with the dog at the beginning.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: Applies to the Safeguard.
    • Justified in that there are apparently several different classes of Safeguard.
  • Cool Guns: Again, lots of these. Examples include:
    • Killy's GBE. It's deceptively tiny and absurdly powerful.
    • A group of nameless Red Shirts in the beggining are armed with assault rifles, one of which is well-detailed and another one fires bullets that leave watermelon-sized craters.
    • The Electrofishers use Exterminator-killing spear guns that resemble lever-action rifles.
    • Dhomochevsky's pistol fires different types of munitions.
    • Killy at one point dual-wields a pistol and a shotgun as tall as he is.
  • Cool Sword: The Safeguard Sword. Think GBE, but instead of shooting, you get cutting. Strangely enough, only Silicon Life like Pcell are seen using this blade. Seu and Ivy have cool swords too.
    • The one wielded by Susono in the PrequelNOiSE is a powered up version, easily slicing through an enormous building.
  • Crapsack World: The City grew in a chaotic and insecure manner, leading to loss of control. The Safeguards now attempting to destroy anyone without the Net Terminal Gene (which, in the timeframe of the story, is essentially all of humanity) due to their goals being corrupted is the icing on top of the cake.
  • Cyberspace: Both the Authority and the Safeguard exist within the Netsphere, a Cyberspace that also houses much of humanity.
  • Cryptic Background Reference: Ubiquitous.
  • Cyberpunk: Has its roots here. Monolithic megacorporations, The Government inept or out to get you, anti-heroes, and transhumanism that creates as many problems as it solves, are all taken to such extremes that, like The Matrix, it becomes less like traditional cyberpunk. Post-post-cyberpunk, if you will. Perhaps Neo-Cyberpunk.
  • Dark Is Evil/Light Is Good: The most dangerous Silicon Creatures, such as Schiff, the one with the "bubbler" cannon, and the Silicon Knights, have entirely black armor. Conversely, the characters who come closest to Lawful Good, like Mensab, Seu and representatives of the Authority, are completely white. Everyone else, who subscribe to Gray-and-Grey Morality, tend to have pale skin and wear black clothes.
  • Death of a Child: Anyone Can Die, children too.
  • Death of Personality: After Cibo enters the Netsphere and transforms into the Level 9 Safeguard, her personality is destroyed and she's left as a child-like Empty Shell.
  • Decompressed Comic: Blame! personifies this style.
  • Deflector Shields: The Silicon Life Knights carry shields that emit an energy field powerful enough to deflect low-level Graviton Beams. The GBE often act as such.
  • Dented Iron: Though Killy spends most of the series as a unstoppable badass, by the final volume he is visibly tired and injured - even forced to use a piece of bent metal as a crude prosthetic leg.
  • The Determinator: Killy is the epitome of the Determinator trope. Sana-Kan and Dhomo fit, too.
  • Dull Surprise: At first justified due to Killy's stoic nature, but with the benefit of hindsight it's mostly due to Nihei's character designs not being particularly emotive. Cibo does show some surprise early on, though.
  • Did We Just Have Tea with Cthulhu?: Probably the strangest example in recent history, but every time someone meets up with the Authority, this is pretty much how it feels. And in a dystopian cyber-punk post-apocalyptic wasteland who better to count as an Eldritch Abomination than an ancient omniscient A.I-like ruler who is essentially a god?
  • Dystopia: Blame! is a prime example of dystopian fiction.
  • Earth That Was: As the ending of NOiSE shows, the Earth is completely engulfed by The City's automated construction system. By the time Blame! takes place, nobody even remembers that there was an Earth. One chapter towards the end implies that the machinery has swallowed most, if not all, of the Solar System.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Faceless organic-machines that morph out of ordinary people and six-story tall monsters with guns for mouths certainly qualify.
  • Eldritch Location: The super structure that serves as the series’ environment is arguably this. It either defies the amount of materials actually available to build something at this scale, or the Earth's core was used up as well. If the latter is the case, gravity, oxygen levels, molecular friction, etc. would all have to be addressed. Those challenges don't even account for reaching another planet's gravitational pull.
    • Some of the artwork implies the structure reached Jupiter. If that's true, the distance between Earth and the Sun is less than half the distance between Earth and Jupiter. Assuming it still rotates like the Earth, the Sun's destructive energy would have to be neutralized or the structure would tear itself apart.
  • Elevator Action Sequence: Though it quickly ends up outside.
  • Elite Mooks: Higher level Safeguard and Silicon Life.
  • Energy Weapon: Here and there. Flavors include infantry-sized laser weapons to Graviton beams.
  • Evil Minions: Davine has a small army of them.
  • Evil Twin: A hairless, Safeguard-controlled copy of Killy appears in the final chapter and shoots the original in the head.
  • Face Framed in Shadow
  • Faceless Goons: Safeguard. Killed in the thousands, mostly because they line up and Zerg Rush the guy who has a pistol that can penetrate 50 miles of steel.
  • Fantastic Racism: It's not obvious under all the fighting for survival, but when Killy kills a cyborg who didn't hurt anybody who even provided information(!) and wanted to be left alone, that he justifies it with only "he was silicon life" makes it clear that he would murder them even on principle.
  • Feel No Pain: Killy just seems to be used to massive physical trauma by now. Maybe he still does feel pain, but since he's The Stoic, it's hard to say.
  • Fish Eyes: Maeve has these.
  • Flashback: One of these is used to introduce Dhomochevsky...
    • Flashback Cut: ...and Killy has multiple single-frame flashbacks as he reboots after 40.82% of his body is obliterated.
  • Forgot I Could Fly: Killy's ability to scan things with his eyes, among other things, got restored after he was hit with darts from a safeguard.
  • The Fog of Ages: Killy is incredibly old, and admits to having forgotten a lot. This could be averted by the reactivation of the Netsphere, which is implied to house the memories of all humans. Though it isn't certain that an ancient pre-Safeguard construct like Killy would be included in the deal.
  • Gangsta Style: Killy has a notable fondness for firing the GBE this way. As with most things about Blame!, whether or not there's a reason for this is anyone's guess.
  • Giant Mook: Some giant Safeguard units and Silicon Life, proving that size doesn't matter when you have a GBE.
  • Good Is Not Nice: Killy. He has principles, but he also has his mission, and may the gods help you if you come into conflict with either one of those things.
  • Good Scars, Evil Scars: Averted. Killy could easily pass as a bad guy in any other series, if one were to judge on looks alone. The character design as a whole tends to purposely lean towards pale, sickly and generally depressing.
  • Good Thing You Can Heal!: Especially when you have a gun that can snap your arm in half on its lowest settings.
  • The Government: The Authority and The Safeguard. The former is a benevolent yet mostly impotent system that requires regular humans with a extremely rare genetic marker to tell them what to do, while the latter acts like an anti-virus system that happens to see all humans without said gene as viruses.
  • Grey-and-Gray Morality: Since everyone is technically human they do what humans do best, fight so that their faction can prosper at the expense of others. Who do you side with? The freedom-loving but utterly insane Silicon Life who want to maintain the chaotic decay of the City, and are willing to exterminate humans who have the Net Terminal Gene to prevent the Authority from regaining control? The Knight Templar Safeguard who will kill anyone to keep the City from decaying further than it already has, even though it is evidently hopeless? The inept bureaucrats of the Authority who want to reverse the decay of the Megastructure and employ the sometimes heroic, sometimes ruthless protagonist on a quest that has gone on for millennia without tangible results? Or the more human factions that struggle to get by in this crapsack Dyson sphere?
  • Guilt-Free Extermination War: The Silicon Life have been hunting humans since the dawn of the city, as they pose a threat to the established state of the Net Sphere. Humans fare no better: when they get a hold of the architects, they find no guilt in destroying entire hives, as told by Pcell in the sequel one shot. Neither seem to consider coexistence to be possible, even though the City is big enough to house both their civilizations. She seems to value human life, however, so there might be hope after all.
  • Gun Porn: Nihei loves his guns. Shells ejecting? Check. Nameless Red Shirts using detailed weaponry that is often bigger than them? Check. Safeguard weaponry that range from pistols to portable beam emitters?Check indeed.
  • Guns Akimbo: Killy does this once, and in addition to her GBE, Sana-Kan's battle form has a hand that fires darts which transform organic life into Exterminator units.
  • Gratuitous English: Common fan speculation is that the series title is a mistranslation of the English onomatopoeia for gun-fire, "BLAM!". The Author has yet to comment on this.
  • Hand Cannon: Killy's Graviton Beam Emitter. A small pistol slightly larger than a small Glock... that better qualifies as a Wave-Motion Gun.
  • Hard Head: Killy, literally, has half his head blown off and survives.
  • Healing Factor: Killy has the most resilient one. Various high level Safeguard and Silicons also have the ability to reform their bodies much more quickly, but no one sticks around like Killy does.
  • Heel–Face Revolving Door: Sana-Kan.
  • High School A.U.: Blame! Academy.
  • Homosexual Reproduction: Sana-Kan and Cibo are the mothers of the child with the Net Terminal Gene. Just go with it, okay?
  • I Am Who?: Killy is related to the Safeguard. It is also theorized (and lampshaded by the author) that he is also a kind of Internet Ghost that appears whenever humanity is in danger... And judging by the sequel, not only humanity. Everyone is human in Blame! anyway.
  • Ideal Hero: Seu
  • In a Single Bound: Justified, seeing as how most characters are augmented in some way.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villains: The two nameless Silicon Creatures killed off near the beginning of Blame! return in Blame! Academy 2 and 3 as a pair of these.
  • Inherent in the System: Doubly so, seeing as how the system is literally trying to wipe out humanity at the same time.
  • Instant Death Bullet: Justified in that even the most mundane weapons in this 'verse are quite powerful.
  • Interquel: "Fort of Silicon Creatures" is a one-shot Blame! chapter packaged with the deluxe Blu-ray edition of The Movie, drawn by Nihei in his modern Aposimz art style. It's set during the last volume of the original Blame! manga when Killy was traveling with "Mori", the personality construct recorded on a backup device that Killy wore around his neck.
  • The Juggernaut: Killy, Sana-Kan. But especially Killy.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: In chapter 4, Killy finds a factory were baby cyborgs are born. After eating all their food the nursebot becomes angry with him. His response? Blow things up. In the next chapter he taunts a pair of Silicon Creatures about killing their kids. Keep in mind that the Silicon Creatures as a whole are on a campaign to wipe out all of humanity, except for the one who is apparently nothing more than a dedicated amateur astronomer. Killy shoots him just to be safe.
    • He appears to have mellowed out somewhat in Blame!2 - he is now shown to protect Silicon Life from the Safeguard, presumably because they are no longer the destabilizing threat they used to be.
  • Killed Off for Real: Cibo and Sana-Kan don't survive until the end.
  • Large and in Charge: In the grim darkness of the far future every president of every remaining corporation is literally The Big Giant Head. Many headshots ensue.
  • Law of Inverse Recoil: Averted spectacularly. At its lowest setting, firing the Graviton Beam Emitter causes Killy's arm to violently snap backwards; at max output, it sends him flying; when he overcharges the gun, it rips his arm off.
  • Layered Metropolis: In the form of a Dyson Sphere.
  • Legacy Character: Another "version" of Pcell is the main character in Blame!2. It's not entirely clear if she is a reincarnation of the same Pcell, or a descendant.
  • Little Miss Badass: Again Cibo, when she takes over Sana-Kan's sleep-mode body.
  • Lost Technology: Lots of this. Even Killy's own weapon is considered as such.
  • MacGuffin: "I'm looking for humans with Net Terminal Genes."
  • Made of Iron: Many characters.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Killy seems to be on some kind of a mission, and towards the end it is shown that his actions are being monitored by some unknown authority. He is actually shown to be in contact, or at least on friendly terms, with said Authority several times prior to that.
  • The Medic: Again, Cibo.
  • Mega-Corp:
    • Toha Heavy Industries. A subversion, as despite being a monolithic and once mighty organization, they lack any real power outside of their jurisdiction.
    • The Bio-electric Corporation that rules Cibo's home district are a smaller but more conventional example. Although small fry compared to Toha, they'd be an N.G.O. Superpower in any other 'verse. They also seem to have done a surprisingly good job rebuilding civilization from scratch without the help of the Safeguard or Authority.
  • Mega Dungeon: The superstructure is essentially this, and effectively the entire world as well.
  • Messianic Archetype: Killy, and later the Net Gene Child.
  • Mind Screw: You'll be lucky if you catch everything the first read through.
  • Mooks: Basic Exterminator units. At least if you have a GBE. The Safeguard is apparently commanded by Zap Brannigan, since they Zerg Rush targets armed with kilomega teraton class weapons.
  • Mook Maker: Conversion Towers
  • Motive Decay:
    • The Silicon Life start out attempting to destroy all traces of the Net Terminal Genes and forever seal humanity from the Netsphere - but by the time Blame!2 takes place, the new generation of Synthetic Life are being hunted down and simply want to be left in peace.
    • The Safeguard was originally set up to keep unauthorized users like Silicon Creatures from logging onto the netsphere and screwing things up by killing them. Now that people with the Net Terminal Gene that grants authorization are essentially extinct, they usually just kill everyone everywhere and hope that things will work out.
  • Ms. Exposition: Cibo fills this role at times, if only to give the story a semblance of coherency. This is justified though as she was a scientist, and so most of the time she is trying to sort things out.
  • Mysterious Past: Again, Killy. May also apply to Dhomochevsky.
  • Nerves of Steel: Killy, don't expect his composure to crumble under any sort of situation.
  • '90s Anti-Hero: Killy is just a stoic, less muscle-headed version.
  • No Brows: most characters other than Killy and Cibo.
  • Normal Fish in a Tiny Pond: Basic Safeguard exterminators. In the movie the basic exterminators are considered very dangerous robots, that keep the human population completely terrified, while in the Manga they are in fact low-level Mooks.
  • Not Quite Dead: Happens quite often. It is arguable that no one really dies in the world of Blame!, thanks to the Cyberspace backups.
  • Not So Stoic: Though his expression never changes, Killy rips into the trader and the dock workers of the Bio-Electric Company when he realizes that he had unwittingly helped their operation for harvesting organs from the Dry Men (but especially after noticing that the girl he had previous rescued was among the bodies). And though he may not mourn their passing, he does seemingly go out of his way to save his companions from harm.
    • He has been seen grinning several times while causing total mayhem. The guy seems to get off on violence that has been cranked Up to Eleven.
  • No Transhumanism Allowed: Completely and thoroughly inverted. Humans who haven't been altered in some way or another are completely extinct, and it is unlikely a normal person would be able to survive in The City. The MacGuffin itself is a result of averting this trope: only humans with a very ancient gene are allowed to access the "series of tubes" in this future. Attempting to log onto the Internet without said genes will result in an immediate permaban by the Safeguard.
  • The Nudifier: The Women's Clothing Disintegrating Beam Emitter from Blame Academy!
  • Older Than They Look:
    • Killy is well over 3000 years old, but looks to be somewhere in his 20's.
    • Almost all characters, for that matter: Dhomochevsky was fighting Davinel's gang for at least 300 years before Killy arrived.
  • One-Man Army: Killy, Sana-Kan.
  • One-Word Title
  • Only a Flesh Wound: Killy has a habit of losing limbs, only to shrug it off. Dhomochevsky also has a similar outlook:

    "By the way, you might see my arm lying around somewhere.If you could pick it up, that'd be great."

  • Only Six Faces: While non-human characters have a great variety of facial features, humans have a much more limited repertoire. This is why Blame ver. 0.11, the 2003 series of animated shorts, can justify saying that the girl with the dog from the beginning of the manga is Cibo in some kind of time loop — they look exactly the same.
  • Order Versus Chaos: In NOiSE, the main character is a cop investigating a cult who worship the power of chaos who are kidnapping children to use for human sacrifices in their bizarre Magitek rituals. When they kill her, she is resurrected by the Safeguard, protectors of order, but they turn out to be a pack of fascists who plan on disenfranchising or killing everybody who can't afford network implants and brainwashing the ones who do. Then in Blame!, we see the aftermath of this; the cult succeeded in throwing the world into chaos, but since they're so poorly organized their descendants, the Silicon Creatures, don't amount to much more than a bunch of roving cyber-barbarians. The Safeguard doesn't fare much better, as their directives become so corrupted that they essentially believe that everything that's not them must be exterminated with extreme prejudice.
  • Out of the Closet, Into the Fire: Cibo and Sana-Kan are killed shortly after it's revealed that they conceived a child together (see the entry for Homosexual Reproduction).
  • Overly Long Name: Davinellulinvega, usually shortened to Davine.
  • Partly Cloudy with a Chance of Death: One of the last scenes shows Killy being drenched by rain for the first time in the series, right before he has an encounter that leaves him pretty much dead.
    • Although there is a sequel, Killy's alive, although there a rather endless number of ways to get around the whole being dead thing in Blame.
  • Percussive Maintenance: In Chapter 2, the woman with the dog gets a communications device to work by kicking it. One of the few humorous moments in Blame!
  • Perpetual Frowner: Killy again, though to be fair, he does smile once... Sort of.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: Killy, Sana-Kan. Emphasis on mass.Level 9 Safeguard Cibo.
  • Pet the Dog: Killy indiscriminately destroys any Silicon Life he encounters, regardless of whether they're hostile to him or not. Until Blame!2, where he rescues a heavily injured SL from the Safeguard and takes her to safety.
  • Platonic Life-Partners: Dhomochevsky and Iko.
  • Power Gives You Wings: Slight subversion. Most wings seen in Blame! are black, but they do coincide with the character having a notable upgrade. Considering that most power upgrades coincide with being able to change your body shape, it's fairly reasonable that you would want to have wings in a superstructure with huge chasms of hundreds (or thousands) of kilometers.
  • Red Baron: In the epilogue Blame!2, the silicon beings refer to Killy as "The Calamity".
  • Resurrection Sickness: Seu suffers from this — seems being the Badass Normal isn't always enough to survive in Blame!, since this happens to him a lot. The constant amnesia of being healed also interferes with his love life...
  • The Reveal: Turns out that Safeguard command has lost control of their own security protocols, and as a result they are unable to do anything about the Safeguard creatures that attack anyone who attempts to access the Netsphere without Net Terminal Genes. They are just as confused as the protagonists about the true scope of The City, and are only able to provide minimal support to Killy in hopes of discovering a human with Net Terminal Genes.
  • Ridiculously Human Robot: Killy, apparently. He needs to eat and sleep (at least at first), feels pain and doesn't show up as anything but human to doctors like Cibo who heal him, but he's revealed to be much more than that eventually.
  • The Rival: Killy and Sana-Kan, Seu and Ivy, Dhomochevsky and Davinel.
  • Robot War: Both Safeguards and Silicon Life are mechanical constructs trying to hunt down what remains of humanity. In fact they come from the same template: the former made to secure access to the Netsphere and the latter reprogrammed to serve the machinations of a chaotic sect.
  • Russian Guy Suffers Most: Considering how crap every other character's life is, "most" might be an overstatement, but Dhomochevsky's certainly wasn't pleasant. It should be noted that Dhomochevsky isn't Russian, he just has a Polish sounding name. It's all the same place anyway.
  • Scars Are Forever: Killy gains several noticeable facial scars throughout the course of the series.
  • Scavenger World: almost everything that's still working is running on automatic. Killy gets by by finding equipment caches set up centuries in advance; the Electrofishers and tech-nomads have put their suits and guns together out of stuff they found. Partially averted by Cibo's people and Silicon Life, who are both developing new technology and rediscovering the secrets of the City, but tend to overestimate their own abilities.
  • Scenery Porn: It is impossible to read this manga and not stop on a double page dedicated entirely to depicting a single piece of gritty, abstract architecture and think, "Wow... Just, wow."
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: Having found herself on the outside of the City itself at the end of Blame!2, Pcell decides to leave and find a new home where she can peacefully restart the Silicon Creature civilization using the recorded archive of her home she's carried with her.
  • Secondary Fire: Kind of. The GBE has 4 modes of firing. Though this is more of an Up to Eleven thing, really.
  • Sequel Hook: ...And it got two. One, Net Sphere Engineer, was planned to be a full length manga, but the author dropped it after just one chapter. The second, Blame2, was in full colour and also a single chapter long, but it served to show that Killy is alive and kicking.
  • Short-Range Long-Range Weapon: Killy has a habit of being in spitting distance of his target before pulling the trigger, despite his weapon having an unstoppable 70km range. It helps to be sure.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Killy's name seems to be a tribute to Killeen, the protagonist of Gregory Benford's Great Sky River and its sequels.
    • Silicon Creatures have heads like Borg, bodies like Xenomorphs, and dress like Cenobites.
  • Silent Scenery Panel: Many, many, MANY of these.
  • Slasher Smile: Most Silicon Creatures have mastered the Slasher Smile. Dhomochevsky is often depicted with one in artwork, and both Killy and Sana-Kan do it at least once.
  • Sleep-Mode Size: Sana-Kan's one is a little creepy girl.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism vs. Cynicism: Largely idealistic, even if it wears a mask of cynicism.
  • Sliding Scale of Silliness vs. Seriousness: Hits the Serious end and keeps sliding.
  • Spell My Name with an "S": Early scanlations translated Sana-Kan's name as "Sanakan", but Tokyopop insists Sana-Kan is the correct spelling.
  • The Stoic: Killy defines stoic. Killy is also the latest and possibly leading contender for the title of master of the ellipsis.
  • Storming the Castle: See Crowning Moment Of Awesome.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: When your gun does more damage than an atomic bomb, it is hard not to make some explosions.
  • Super Senses: Killy, Dhomochevsky, Cibo... In fact, most beings in Blame! seem to possess superhuman senses. Though it isn't surprising, seeing as how they all live in a futuristic dystopian hellhole where it pays to come prepared for anything.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: In "Fort of Silicon Creatures", "Mori" transfers her mind into a new body that looks almost exactly like Cibo's, except for a Beauty Mark on her cheek. This may be justified if you assume that this type of female body is very commonly manufactured.
  • Sweet Polly Oliver: In Blame! Academy, the "Women's Clothing Dissolving Beam"-Emitter reveals that Iko is actually female.
  • Synchronized Swarming: Issue 7 has the main character briefly interacting with a swarm of microorganisms, which assumes various simple forms — :) for "hello", O for "yes", X for "no", etc — to answer his queries.
  • Tabletop Games: Blam!, a homebrew RPG.
  • Take a Third Option: This may be Cibo's motivation when she double registers using Seu's Net-Terminal Genes, and Sana-kan's motivation for advising Cibo against trusting the The Authority after Cibo fuses with the Level 9 and transcribes the Genes into herself, and then going on to be her bodyguard. This makes sense once you realize that, in the prequel (NOiSE), The Authority and the Safeguard were planning to disefranchise all humans without Net-Terminal Genes and install a fascist government of some sort. This would also explain The Authority's "new plan" that involved a 1st Level Exterminator trying to eat the Sphere.
  • Talking Is a Free Action: Averted constantly.
  • Tele-Frag: The AI controlling Toha Heavy Industries attempts to teleport the Toha "building" (actually a failed prototype starship) out of the City, but it doesn't realize how big the City is. Each of the building's thirteen caves materializes in a volume already occupied by City structures, wiping everything out.
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: Graviton Beam Emitter. It apparently becomes too much overkill for Killy near the end, as he takes the first opportunity to invest in a more... subtle weapon.
  • Time Abyss: One caption reads off how many seconds later it's been...in the quadrillions. A quadrillion seconds is about 317,000 years.
    • In the film, Cibo mentions she's been waiting 17 million hours for someone to come and find her. That's almost 2 thousand years.
  • Tiny Guy, Huge Girl: Played with. Cibo comes from an area where humans are much taller than Killy is and she's at least as tall (if not a little taller) than him. When both of them get through to an area where humans are short, she looks like a beanstalk. When Cibo moves into her next body, she's half Killy's size.
  • Token Heroic Orc:
    • Killy and eventually Sana-Kan are the only Safeguards who want humans to reclaim the Net Terminal Gene, without it falling under the control of the Authority.
    • Pcell VIII in Blame!2 is the sole survivor of her village after Silicon Creatures became victims of persecution from humans.
    • In "Fort of Silicon Creatures", the red-suited female Silicon Creature is considered dangerous by her superiors for wanting to make peace with Killy.
  • Transhuman: In its entirety, we do not see a single purely biological human. Everyone is heavily modified, be they cyborgs, human-descended androids, or gene-modded superhumans. The closest to "pure" human we get is Seu, and he's an eight-foot giant with enough enhancements to fight in hand-to-hand combat with advanced Silicon Life warriors, who has been reconstructed and had his personality restored from backup countless times. Most "normal" humans were exterminated by either the Silicon Creatures or the Safeguard, given the events of NOiSE, Blame!'s prequel.
  • Unnecessarily Creepy Robot: Every robot and Silicon Creature.
  • Unnecessarily Large Interior: At least one a chapter. Blame! is set in an endless series of Unnecessarily Large Interiors. One of the rooms Killy walks through is roughly the size of Jupiter, and judging from the ending of the prequel comic NOiSEwhere the Earth and Moon are enveloped by the machines, it's implied that this room is where Jupiter used to be.
    • The artbook explains that The City itself extends out from the Sun to roughly Jupiter's orbit (~5 AU; roughly 750 million km), while "the world" extends to the edges of the system. In this verse, the planets, along with the Sun, have been absorbed for energy, Dyson Sphere-style. This is what happens when you let mindless nanomachines go rampant.
  • Visible Silence: Take a shot every time someone shows the reader their best impression of Mt. Rushmore accompanied by ellipses. Enjoy your liver transplant.
  • Walk The Solar System
  • Wave-Motion Gun: This is Killy's handgun the Graviton Beam Emitter. A pistol so powerful it can carve a four meter diameter shaft through 55km of steel. It is so overpowered that there are actually a couple of situations where it's a bad idea for Killy to use it, but most of the time he just blasts away, heedless of how much damage to the artificial environment he's causing. Thankfully, most of the MegaStructure is uninhabited.
  • Weapon of Choice: The GBE for Killy and Sana-Kan, the 'Electro Rod' for Cibo, The multi-purpose multi-firing-mode gun for Dhomochevsky, etc.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: So what ever became of that girl with the dog who Killy seemed to know? Verges on Early Installment Weirdness as the initial party was just sort of dropped.
  • What Measure Is a Non-Human?:
    • Killy kills sentient silicon lifeforms on sight without even the slightest hint of hesitation or remose, even when they're completely non-hostile and harmless.
    • Played to extreme measures by the Safeguard as a whole, who consider anyone without the Net Terminal Gene to be non-human and subject to immediate execution. Unfortunately for everyone involved, the Net Terminal Gene practically died out long ago, meaning nobody has it and effectively turning most of the Safeguard into Omnicidal Maniacs.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Killy gets one of these when he kills a Non-hostile Silicon Creature and his companion calls him out on it.
  • When All You Have is a Hammer…: Killy's immediate answer to most situations is to shoot first and leave questions to those who talk more.
  • World of Chaos: Some of the architecture is just bizarre or large; some of it clearly has more going on. Toha Heavy Industries also has one of these inside it.
  • Word Salad Title: The title is seemingly nonsensical, at least if you assume the title is supposed to be Blame! in the first place. It's believed it may be a misspelling of Blam!, and there's certainly a lot of gunfire going on.
  • Zerg Rush: Safeguard exterminator units.

Источник: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Manga/Blame

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