first book sold on amazon

Your book cover is the first thing a reader sees. Consider hiring a book cover designer as one of your highest priorities before you publish. The courts found that the first sale doctrine (called “patent exhaustion”) trumpted the single use restriction. Now the Supreme Court will have. Sold by. Amazon.com BTW: The First book sold on amazon. (trivia) I bought this book after reading Melanie Mitchell's book Complexity: A Guided Tour. first book sold on amazon

First book sold on amazon -

On July 16, 1995, Amazon officially opens for business as an online bookseller. Within a month, the fledgling retailer had shipped books to all 50 U.S. states and to 45 countries. Founder Jeff Bezos’s motto was “get big fast,” and Seattle-based Amazon eventually morphed into an e-commerce colossus, selling everything from groceries to furniture to live ladybugs, and helping to revolutionize the way people shop.

Bezos earned an undergraduate degree in computer science and electrical engineering from Princeton University in 1986 then worked in the financial services industry in New York City. In 1994, after realizing the commercial potential of the Internet and determining that books might sell well online, he moved to Washington state and founded Amazon. 

He initially dubbed the business Cadabra (as in abracadabra) but after someone misheard the name as “cadaver,” Bezos decided to call his startup Amazon, after the enormous river in South America, a moniker he believed wouldn’t box him into offering just one type of product or service.

In the spring of 1995, Bezos invited a small group of friends and former colleagues to check out a beta version of Amazon’s website, and the first-ever order was placed on April 3 of that year, for a science book titled Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies. When Amazon.com went live to the general public in July 1995, the company boldly billed itself as “Earth’s biggest bookstore,” although sales initially were drummed up solely by word of mouth and Bezos assisted with assembling orders and driving the packages to the post office. 

By the end of 1996 Amazon had racked up $15.7 million in revenues, and in 1997 Bezos took the company public with an initial public offering that raised $54 million. That same year, Bezos personally delivered his company’s one-millionth order, to a customer in Japan who had purchased a Windows NT manual and a Princess Diana biography. In 1998, Amazon extended beyond books and started selling music CDs, and by the following year it had added more product categories, such as toys, electronics and tools.

By December 1999, Amazon had shipped 20 million items to 150 countries around the globe. That same month, Bezos was named Time magazine’s Person of the Year. In 2000, the company introduced a service allowing individual sellers and other outside merchants to peddle their products alongside Amazon’s own items. Meanwhile, Amazon continued to spend heavily on expansion and didn’t post its first full-year profit until 2003.

In 2007, Amazon debuted its Kindle e-reader; four years later, the company announced it was selling more e-books than print books. Also in 2011, Amazon’s tablet computer, the Kindle Fire, was released. Among a variety of other ventures, Amazon launched a cloud computing and video on demand services in 2006; a studio that develops movies and TV series, in 2010; and an online marketplace for fine art, in 2013, which has featured original works by artists including Claude Monet and Norman Rockwell. 

Additionally, Amazon has acquired a number of companies, including Zappos and Whole Foods. In 2015, Amazon surpassed Walmart as the world’s most valuable retailer. Two decades after its founding and with Bezos still at the helm, Amazon’s market value was $250 billion. In 2017, Bezos was named the richest man in the world. On July 5, 2021, Bezos stepped down as CEO of Amazon to focus on his aerospace company Blue Origin. 

Источник: https://www.history.com
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This story is part of Holiday Gift Guide 2021, our list of ideas, by topic, by recipient and by price, to help you discover the perfect gift.

You're not imagining it: you have been blasted with Black Friday deals for weeks. Retailers turned the once one-day shopping event into a month-long shopping experience, for better or worse. The Black Friday deals usually come in waves, and the first few have passed, but the best ones are typically held until the big day. Which is now a few hours away.  Sifting through all of those sales can get overwhelming, but that's where CNET comes in! We've been poring over newspaper ad scans, scouring retailer websites (Amazon, Target, Walmart and Best Buy, just to name a few), and found the deals you won't want to miss, as well as keeping you abreast of our newest finds on the fly via our live blog. You'll even find good streaming deals, like Hulu offering yearlong subscriptions for 99 cents per month.

We've got a section-by-section breakdown below to help you find what you're looking for, but first, here's what you should know as you prepare to start shopping:

  • Macy's Black Friday sale started Tuesday.
  • Many Amazon device sales (Echo, Fire tablets, Fire TVs, Ring security systems) started last Friday.
  • Best Buy's sale started last Friday, including the lowest price ever on Apple Watch SE.
  • Target's Black Friday sale started Sunday.
  • Staples' Black Friday sale started Sunday.
  • Walmart's Black Friday sale started Monday and includes possible access to PlayStation 5 and Xbox consoles for Walmart Plus members. Initial PS5 and Xbox console availability is already sold out.
  • More Amazon Black Friday sales started today.

Best Black Friday deals so far

TCL 6-Series Roku TV: $699 and up

Save $100 to $700

David Katzmaier/CNET

The TCL 6-Series Roku TV is the best TV for the money overall that we've tested, and every size in the series is down to its lowest price of the year. The 6-Series features excellent picture quality thanks to mini-LED backlight technology, QLED color and full-array local dimming. Though this TV technically debuted in 2020, the 6-Series is still a current model for 2021. 

All three sizes are on sale but the largest savings is on the 65-inch model. The new $800 price is $98 less than the previous sale price of just a few days ago, and the best price ever.

Read our TCL 6-Series Roku TV review.

AirPods 3: $150

Save $30

David Carnoy/CNET

Amazon has Apple's newest AirPods, the AirPods 3, on sale for just $150. That's $30 less than the Apple Store and their lowest price to date. Note that at Amazon, you get an extra $5 off at checkout -- it's listed in green under the larger red price. If you don't see "Save $5 at checkout," the deal has expired. The AirPods 3 have been in and out of stock at this price.

Fire HD 8 Tablet: $45

Save $45

Amazon last refreshed the Fire HD 8 tablet in 2020 by doubling the onboard storage, enhancing the processor inside and adding USB-C charging instead of Micro-USB. It comes in four different colors and if you want to upgrade to the 64GB model you can for an extra $30.

Those aren't the only terrific discounts we've found. Among the deals that jump out at us the most are a variety of offers on AirPods. In addition to the AirPods 3 above, the new AirPods Pro with MagSafe charging casefor $159 at Walmart hits at $90 less than you'll pay at the Apple Store and the lowest price we've seen for them yet. 

Walmart also slashed the price of the 2nd-gen Google Nest Hub down to just $50, another tempting offer. This Google Assistant smart display offers a 7-inch screen that you can watch videos on, read recipes, host video chats and so much more. At this price, you may want to just grab two of them since you're going to want them around the house.

This is also a great time of year to stock up on essentials, like light bulbs. The Kasa Smart bulb is just $10 at Amazon, $12 off its usual price. You control it with the free Kasa Home app on your phone or by chatting with Alexa or Google Assistant, to change the colors, automate its on/off cycle and more.

Amazon has also knocked $50 off of the price of the Bose Quiet Comfort 45 (QC45) wireless noise cancelling headphones, bringing the cost down to $279. Those headphones come with a strong recommendation from CNET's David Carnoy and would make a terrific gift (even if it's a gift for yourself).

Another timeless gift candidate: a KitchenAid stand mixer. Target's got some pretty tempting deals, including a 5-quart model marked down to $220, saving you $210. Look for additional color options at the same Black Friday price over at Best Buy. 

It's hard to cough up the change for a robot vacuum when it's not on sale, but lucky for us that's what Black Friday's for. One of the most notable deals we've seen is for the the iRobot Roomba i3 Plus at $400 (model 3350), $200 off its normal price. Its sensors can distinguish between carpet and hardwood, and can even detect the dirtiest part of your home, so it knows where to concentrate its efforts. It will even empty itself, so you hardly have to think about it.

After letting the vacuum do all the hard work, it's time to sit your tired bones down to take advantage of Hulu's 99 cent per month deal for a year of its ad-supported plan, open to new or lapsed (for more than a month) subscribers. After that the price returns to its normal $7 per month (at which point you can cancel). Sadly, anyone who took advantage of last year's Black Friday $1.99 deal is excluded.

Sometimes it's just easier to stick with a single retailer for all your shopping, especially if you do it in person. So here are some of the best you can find at them.

Best Best Buy Black Friday deals

It's a little late to the game, but Best Buy has finally revealed the details of its sales happening the week of Black Friday. It's not quite as cut-and-dried as some other retailers' sales, which have clear start and end dates, but essentially Best Buy's sale has already started and will be adding more items in the coming days. There have already been a number of drops, including great deals like the first sale of the season on the Apple Watch SE. 

Here's what you can expect from each wave of deals:

Read more:Best Black Friday deals at Best Buy

Best Target Black Friday deals

Target's Black Friday sale has already begun and runs through Saturday, Nov. 27. Target is offering big savings on everything from tech to toys to home goods. This sneak peek circular also advertises the Nintendo Switch OLED, which has been notoriously difficult to snag since it was released this October, so keep an eye on the deal page and your local Target's stock if you've been hoping to get your hands on one. 

Here are some of the best Target deals currently available:

Read More:Target's Black Friday sales

Best Walmart Black Friday deals

Walmart's Black Friday sales started Monday, Nov. 22 at 4 p.m. PT (7 p.m. ET). Early access to some deals started four hours earlier for Walmart Plus members. Walmart is noting that it will be making the PS5 and Xbox Series X available online during Black Friday week, but details on times aren't yet available. Here are some of the deals we're most excited about.

Read more:Walmart's Black Friday 2021

Best Amazon Black Friday deals

Amazon's Black Friday deals are now in full swing, with some great new ones on Apple AirPods and Beats headphones. Amazon also has the Switch bundle in stock at the time of this writing. Some of the highlights include up to 40% off Instant brand kitchen appliances, up to 50% on select Fire HD tablets, and up to 30% on select TVs from Samsung, Sony and LG. Here are some of our favorites.

Read more:Best Black Friday TV deals

Best Black Friday headphone deals

You can always find headphones on sale during Black Friday events, but finding the right balance between a good deal and a good set of headphones can be a challenge. Here's the best sales on headphones and earbuds.

Read more: Best early Black Friday 2021 headphones deals available right now

Best Black Friday TV deals

Televisions frequently fill out Black Friday sale pages, but it's not always easy to tell which sales are actually worthwhile. Here are some of the best TV deals you'll see for Black Friday.

Read more:Best TV deals for Black Friday 2021 so far

Best Black Friday laptop deals

And some of the best laptop deals this week:

Read more:Best Black Friday laptop deals

Best Black Friday tablet deals

It's never hard to find a cheap tablet, but it can occasionally be challenging to find a good tablet at a reasonable price. Here are all of the worthwhile tablet deals now and around the corner.

Best Black Friday smart home deals

Smart home gadgets can help you automate things like lights and appliances around the house, and Black Friday week is a great time to catch them on sale. Here are some of the better offers we've spotted thus far:

Read more:Black Friday's best smart home deals

Best Black Friday kitchen deals

Kitchen tech can totally change the way you cook, and a great sale on kitchen tech makes that exploration even more enjoyable. Here are the best Black Friday kitchen deals included in this week's sales.

Источник: https://www.cnet.com/tech/computing/incredible-black-friday-deals-are-already-live/

Amazon Is Reshaping Contemporary Literature

Interview by
Alex N. Press

Amazon is the third-largest company on Earth by revenue. Its influence is ubiquitous and growing. While many businesses downsized during the pandemic, Amazon went on an unprecedented hiring spree. In the first ten months of 2020 alone, the company more than doubled its US employee base. Through exploiting workers and plundering public resources, Amazon has amassed the power to shape not just consumer markets, but culture, too.

That’s what interests Mark McGurl, the Albert L. Guérard Professor of Literature at Stanford University. His latest book, Everything and Less: The Novel in the Age of Amazon, studies Amazon’s effect on a literary world in decline.

McGurl joined Alex Press on a recent episode of Jacobin’s Primer, a podcast about all things Amazon. The following transcript has been edited for clarity and length.


ANP

Books make up a small amount of Amazon’s total business — less than 7 percent of its revenue comes from books — but they’re foundational to the company.

Amazon started as a bookseller, and it has achieved dominance in that industry. About half of all paperback and hardback purchases in the United States are made on Amazon, as well as just about every ebook purchase, via Amazon’s Kindle, which has about six million ebooks. Amazon also owns Audible and Goodreads.

In your book, you write about how fiction is particularly central to Amazon’s view of itself. Amazon has created narrative and world-building tales about itself, with Jeff Bezos as protagonist. One of the founding tales of the company — that Bezos started it in his garage — is a well-planned-out myth. Bezos was already a rich Wall Street investment banker who then bought a house with a garage so he could enact the classic scrappy-founder myth of the tech industry, starting a business in his garage.

At a cellular level, what’s the relationship between fiction and Amazon?

MM

The primary fact is that the company began as a bookstore. For a long time, that attachment to books had been treated as merely incidental. Books just happened to have certain qualities that made them ideal for an internet business in the early days of e-commerce. They’re relatively durable; they’re all roughly the same shape; there are so many millions of them that the largest physical bookstore could never have even a tiny fraction; and they were already trackable through ISBN numbers. This was the explanation for why Amazon originally chose to deal in books.

I wouldn’t dispute that account whatsoever, but I want to add to it. One of Amazon’s first employees, MacKenzie Scott (Bezos’s ex-wife), was an aspiring novelist and ultimately achieved success. Bezos himself is an inveterate reader and consumer of science fiction. He’s obsessed with Star Trek.

Bezos is somebody who, from a young age, was steeped in the American epic — a spacefaring, commerce-building narrative. That doesn’t disappear, even when you’re constructing an enterprise where the bottom line is at issue. There’s always going to be a story you tell.

So I started thinking of Amazon as a science fiction epic sprung to life, with all of the incredible enthusiasm for technological innovation on the part of Bezos and the company. Amazon as a self-reflexive, fictionalizing enterprise. We become bit players in that narrative.

ANP

In your book, you explore what Amazon’s rise means for literature — not just the book publishing industry but also the substance of what’s in fiction. What is the house style of novels in the age of Amazon?

MM

It would be hard to say that there’s one house style. It’s more about an increased sensitivity to what readers want — an imperative to serve the reader and think of them as a customer. On some level, that seems obvious. But for much of literary history, the idea that writers are servants to their readers was anathema.

Nowadays, authors are under a lot of pressure to serve a market. In a way, that’s blindingly obvious. In another way, that’s always been the case. There’s an aspect of Amazon that is an intensification of certain themes in the history of print capitalism.

So I wouldn’t say that there’s a house style outside of what Amazon self-publishes. But that’s an important caveat. One of Amazon’s more extraordinary innovations is so-called Kindle Direct Publishing, through which hundreds of thousands — if not millions — of works have been self-published in the last several years.

All who have achieved success in that system are writers of formulaic genre fiction. That’s certainly the keynote of literature in our time, although it doesn’t necessarily add up to a house style. But there’s a remarkable pressure on any writer who wants to ask their reader to work for what they have to offer, as opposed to simply giving it to them.

ANP

You say that literature is now thought of as providing a service. If that’s the case, what did people used to think literature was meant to do? What did they want out of it?

MM

I don’t think we’re looking at something fundamentally new. People have always looked to novels for an existential supplement. They want an addition to their lives. The lives we read about in novels are, almost by definition, compressed. They are lives that have been made into epitomes that we can absorb in a few days or a week.

Clearly, there are millions of us who need that sort of supplement. And we always have. But the rise of a service-model economy has brought a skepticism about the high-modernist, experimental literary project in which the writer asks their readers to work. I know there are writers out there who still do that, but I sense little patience in the world for that model.

I wouldn’t say that this is Amazon’s doing. This book is more about using Amazon to illuminate the current moment of literary history than stipulating causal chains.

In some ways, Amazon is extraordinarily passive about what literature should look like. It’s almost as though they don’t care. The only salient factor is whether someone will buy what they’re selling. There’s not much strong judgment by the company. Amazon mostly just offers a platform for writers to provide a service to readers.

ANP

Amazon’s passivity has led to a proliferation of genres on their platform. They list thousands of them, which can be useful for marketing: authors can rise to the top of an obscure genre, publicize it, and use that achievement to propel their career.

Some of the literature you discuss in the book is quite niche, such as the works of Chuck Tingle, which include titles like Bigfoot Pirates Haunt My Balls. You also mention the genre of adult baby diaper lover erotica, which you write “may be the quintessential Amazonian genre of literature.” What’s the importance of these niches?

MM

The salience of genre started to hit me near the beginning of my research. Amazon is notable in that it has developed an organizing system that permutates genres. They just keep adding modifiers. That’s why the erotica space is so lacking in traditional literary value.

It’s interesting to see writers seek out niches and kinks that some readers might find appealing. Maybe the community of readers is fairly small. But writers can play the not unimportant role of providing them with what they want.

This points to a broader logic. Genres are being permutated and recombined over time. The developmental logic of literature is starting to resemble an algorithm.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, with the rise of literary modernism, the academy believed that generic identification was potentially problematic. There was thought to be a deficit of originality if writers could be identified as within a certain genre. And it’s true. What genre is James Joyce’s Ulysses? We call it a novel but, man, is it a weird novel.

Amazon seems deaf to that argument. They just care that the books get sold.

ANP

In the book, you write that “romance paints life as gendered, as generative and as generic, and as lived in conditions of radical disparities of power.” Could you explain why romance as a genre was relevant to the thesis?

MM

Romance has been obliterated as a vehicle for conveying interesting messages. The genre has seen better days. Jane Austen was a writer of romance novels. She’s both transcendent and pleasurable to read. Austen is unique for the formal perfection of her work, as well as the majestic third-person perspective she takes on human folly. She mastered a sense of warmth and distance in her writing.

So, romance novels can be masterpieces. Beginning in the twentieth century, though, the genre’s quality absolutely collapsed. But its popularity didn’t. Numerically, romance remained the most popular genre by far.

Many romance readers just read one or two novels per year. But the genre also has a large number of devotees, some of whom read as many as four hundred or five hundred romances per year. This is a form of literary consumption that is quite distinct.

I wanted to consider all of that in the book. Romance is the backdrop against which literary history moves. The same is true of the literary present.

A wrinkle I’ve noticed since finishing the book is the importance of Sally Rooney. She has described her own works as romance novels of a certain kind. And that’s the operative phrase: “of a certain kind.” There are perceptible differences between Rooney’s writing and a Harlequin romance — or Fifty Shades of Grey, God knows. Nonetheless, Rooney believes — and this can be contextualized with her left politics — that romance is appealing because humans are at their most interesting in intimate situations.

All of this is to say that the history of romance is a huge, fascinating story. There have been some great critics who have written about romance. I wanted to add my bit by reminding everyone that romance is the norm. It’s the average novel that people are reading right now.

ANP

Rooney writes soap operas for thirty-year-old socialists in cities, so, naturally, I enjoy her writing.

MM

I was reading an interview of hers where she said she was proud to claim an affiliation with the romance genre. She doesn’t want to hold herself above it. That was an interesting moment of lucid self-reflection from a writer who has struggled to manifest her political beliefs in the realm of bourgeois entertainment.

ANP

I also want to ask about autofiction. You say that autofiction isn’t much different from existing genre fiction. You write that the genre features “beta intellectuals” who, though “well equipped to interrogate the meaning of ‘love,’” can be “as problematic in their way as the abusive alpha, and not only for their disappointing feebleness.” Examples here would include Tao Lin’s Taipei and Ben Lerner’s latest book. The men in these stories “seize the historical privilege of romantic indecision and wield it as a kind of soft power” over the “attractive ladies whose opinions they ambiguously respect.” You add, “They don’t want to whip them, just to waste their time.”

MM

Readers look for works in a given genre, and authors intend to write in a given genre. But there’s another way of thinking about genre: as an analytical tool. You can look at a bunch of different books and try to identify common characteristics or a shared project.

It occurred to me that there’s a growing counterpart to the alpha billionaire type. Alpha billionaire novels are pretty self-explanatory: they focus on a billionaire who is often super aggressive. But there are a lot of books with the opposite guy at their center.

I think it reflects a systemwide meditation on masculinity. The alpha billionaire is all about the old-school, domineering version of a man getting what he wants and you learning to love it. Contrast that with what I call the “beta intellectual romance.” The main characters of those novels are just the opposite. They’re completely indecisive. They have trouble holding down a job. They don’t know if they really like their love interest. It’s a point-by-point refutation of the alpha billionaire.

ANP

Let’s return to the economics of Amazon and publishing. Earlier, you referenced self-publishing via Kindle Direct Publishing. Some people argue that Amazon opened a route to self-publishing, allowing writers to bypass the gatekeeping, cliquishness, and credentialism of the publishing world. How do you understand the self-publishing revolution?

MM

In 2013 and 2014, there was a great sense of liberation as self-published writers had their moment. Amazon had given them the requisite tools, which let a handful of writers thumb their noses at mainstream publishing. They now had an avenue to success that wasn’t there previously.

But the brand of self-published writers being spokespeople for Amazon is diminishing. Self-published writers who have tried to make a living on Amazon inevitably notice that the company is a forceful and authoritarian gatekeeper in its own right. Amazon isn’t a world of creative freedom. It imposes a set of burdens, including the terrifying quantity of writing Amazon self-publishers must produce. Those with experience have said that you need to be releasing a new novel every three months to maintain a readership and avoid being forgotten.

Here we see a convergence between content creation of other kinds and novel writing. The latter has been put on a serial basis. It doesn’t have to be this way. But if you want to make it in the literary world, it’s good to be a very fast writer.

Amazon self-publishing got off to a populist start. It was hard not to have at least one or two cheers, if not three. Folks suddenly had a chance to do something that they weren’t able to before because they lacked connection or what have you. I’m all for that. But, at the end of the day, it was always going to be a corporate populism.

There are many problems that come with that. Amazon conditions readers to think that $0.99 is a reasonable amount to pay for a novel. That may be contributing to the reported deflation in author incomes. How can they support themselves when literary experiences are being valued at such a low rate?

ANP

Another problem is that traditional publishers may become more hesitant to take risks on experimental literary works. Some would say that this is largely Amazon’s doing, by cutting into their profit margins.

MM

Yes — with the irony that, because it’s an open platform, anyone can publish whatever the hell they want on Kindle Direct Publishing. There’s no barrier to entry for experimental, even audience-hostile, fiction.

Amazon didn’t bring the market to books. Print capitalism has been around for a long time. As Benedict Anderson pointed out, books are reliable indicators for what’s going on in capitalism. For example, the printing press was one of the first machines.

Books have always been deeply embedded in the market. Sure enough, the corporatization of publishing — beginning roughly in the 1980s — is a huge part of the story, too. It’s no doubt the most important part if you’re wondering why the midlist is ailing and even successful midlist writers often need a second job — sometimes they become teachers. We’re at a point now where having several respected novels doesn’t necessarily add up to a living.

ANP

You mentioned writers becoming teachers. Your last book, The Program Era: Postwar Fiction and the Rise of Creative Writing, is about how the MFA program has influenced American literature after World War II. The move to professor-writer and cliché refrains like “show, don’t tell” and “find your voice” are products of that shift.

What’s the relationship between The Program Era and this book? Have we passed from the program era to the Amazon era?

MM

I think of the two books as different optic angles of analysis. The Program Era is about the rise of the university as a patron of literary art and the various ways it does that through creative writing instruction, which has provided a new path to becoming a professional writer. I centered the rise of the school to a particular point of importance in literary history.

In Everything and Less, I rotate that 180 degrees. The school is one institution. But I went for the rawest form of market institution — the corporation — and studied their role in shaping contemporary literature.

There’s a way of thinking about Amazon as a successor to creative writing programs in universities. People enroll in those programs because they desire to become published writers. If that’s what you want, you can already do it. You don’t need to go to school. Amazon gives you a way.

But it’s not that simple. You still have traditional literary culture, which is essentially what’s at issue in creative writing programs. To an extraordinary extent, those programs teach literary fiction. Over in Amazonia, however, it’s all about the market.

The two seem complementary. That’s why I wanted to entertain the notion of Amazon succeeding from traditional literary culture. But, in the book, I quickly back off that strong of a claim. Clearly, they’re coexistent phenomena. Creative writing programs are more familiar to those of us who have read books in school. Meanwhile, Amazon is the Wild West of current print capitalism.

Mark McGurl is the Albert L. Guérard Professor of Literature at Stanford University. He is the author of Everything and Less: The Novel in the Age of Amazon and The Program Era: Postwar Fiction and the Rise of Creative Writing.

About the Interviewer

Alex N. Press is a staff writer at Jacobin. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, Vox, the Nation, and n+1, among other places.

Источник: https://jacobinmag.com/2021/11/amazon-literature-everything-less-novel-books

How many books are sold on Amazon each year?

How Many Kindle Books Has Amazon Sold? About 22 Million This Year.

What year did Amazon start selling more than books?

Amazon is an internet behemoth today. But where did it all begin? In terms of revenue, Amazon is the biggest internet-based company in the world. When it started out selling books online in 1994, Jeff Bezos had an idea that the best way to succeed online was to grow big and fast.

How many books are sold on Amazon?

Amazon is the largest book retailer in the world. They carry over 33 million titles and ship them pretty much anywhere in the world.

Why did Amazon start selling more than just books?

Online bookstore and IPO Bezos finally decided that his new business would sell books online, because of the large worldwide demand for literature, the low unit price for books, and the huge number of titles available in print. Amazon was founded in the garage of Bezos’ rented home in Bellevue, Washington.

Will Amazon go out of business?

“Amazon will go bankrupt. If you look at large companies, their lifespans tend to be 30-plus years, not a hundred-plus years,” he said. Bezos said it was his job to delay that date by as long as possible. Amazon turned 27 years old Monday, so it is fast approaching Bezos’s 30-year benchmark.

Has there ever been a Quadrillionaire?

For just a few glorious minutes an American man was the first ever quadrillionaire. That is if you were taking his Paypal balance into account… “This was obviously an error and we appreciate that Mr Reynolds understands this was the case,” PayPal said in a statement to the BBC.

What is above a Centillionaire?

Novemdecillionaire (60 zeros) Vigintillionaire (63 zeros) Undecillionaire (60 zeros) Centillionaire (303 zeros) * All of the numbers above are based on the modern “Short scale” used by the US, Canada and the UK.

Who is the richest black woman on earth?

Folorunsho Alakija is ranked by Forbes as the richest woman in Nigeria with an estimated net worth of $1 billion as of 2020….

Folorunso Alakija
NationalityNigerian
OccupationBusinesswoman
Net worthUS$1.0 billion (January 2020)
TitleManaging director, Rose of Sharon Group Vice chairman, Famfa Oil
Источник: https://www.mvorganizing.org/how-many-books-are-sold-on-amazon-each-year/

History of Amazon

Overview of the history of Amazon

This article is about the history of the internet company. For other topics, see Amazon (disambiguation).

This is the history of Amazon, an American internet sales company.

Founding[edit]

The company was created as a result of what Jeff Bezos called his "regret minimization framework", which described his efforts to fend off any regrets for participating sooner in the Internet business boom during that time.[1] In 1994, Bezos left his employment as vice-president of D. E. Shaw & Co., a Wall Street firm, and moved to Seattle, Washington, where he began to work on a business plan[2] for what would become Amazon.com.

On July 5, 1994, Bezos initially incorporated the company in Washington state with the name Cadabra, Inc.[3] After a few months, he changed the name to Amazon.com, Inc, because a lawyer misheard its original name as "cadaver".[4] In its early days, the company was operated out of the garage of Bezos's house on Northeast 28th Street in Bellevue, Washington.[5]

Choosing a name[edit]

Bezos selected the name by looking through a dictionary; he settled on "Amazon" because it was a place that was "exotic and different", just as he had envisioned for his Internet enterprise. The Amazon River, he noted, was the biggest river in the world, and he planned to make his store the biggest bookstore in the world.[6] Additionally, a name that began with "A" was preferred because it would probably be at the top of an alphabetized list.[6] Bezos placed a premium on his head start in building a brand and told a reporter, "There's nothing about our model that can't be copied over time. But you know, McDonald's got copied. And it's still built a huge, multibillion-dollar company. A lot of it comes down to the brand name. Brand names are more important online than they are in the physical world."[7].

Online bookstore and IPO[edit]

After reading a report about the future of the Internet that projected annual web commerce growth at 2,300%, Bezos created a list of 20 products that could be marketed online. He narrowed the list to what he felt were the five most promising products, which included: compact discs, computer hardware, computer software, videos, and books. Bezos finally decided that his new business would sell books online, because of the large worldwide demand for literature, the low unit price for books, and the huge number of titles available in print.[8] Amazon was founded in the garage of Bezos' rented home in Bellevue, Washington.[6][9][10] Bezos' parents invested almost $250,000 in the start-up.[11]

In July 1995, Amazon opened as an online bookseller, selling the world's largest collection of books to anyone with World Wide Web access.[12] The first book sold on Amazon.com was Douglas Hofstadter's Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought.[13] In the first two months of business, Amazon sold to all 50 states and over 45 countries. Within two months, Amazon's sales were up to $20,000/week.[14] In October 1995, the company announced itself to the public.[15] In 1996, it was reincorporated in Delaware. Amazon issued its initial public offering of stock on May 15, 1997, at $18 per share, trading under the NASDAQ stock exchange symbol AMZN.[16]

Barnes & Noble sued Amazon on May 12, 1997, alleging that Amazon's claim to be "the world's largest bookstore" was false because it "...wasn't a bookstore at all. It's a book broker." The suit was later settled out of court and Amazon continued to make the same claim.[17]Walmart sued Amazon on October 16, 1998, alleging that Amazon had stolen Walmart's trade secrets by hiring former Walmart executives. Although this suit was also settled out of court, it caused Amazon to implement internal restrictions and the reassignment of the former Walmart executives.[17]

In 1999, Amazon first attempted to enter the publishing business by buying a defunct imprint, "Weathervane", and publishing some books "selected with no apparent thought", according to The New Yorker. The imprint quickly vanished again, and as of 2014[update] Amazon representatives said that they had never heard of it.[18] Also in 1999, Time magazine named Bezos the Person of the Year when it recognized the company's success in popularizing online shopping.[19]

Amazon Toys Team employees circa 2000 during a summer Amazon party. Jeff Bezos is wearing the black shirt.

2000s[edit]

Since June 19, 2000, Amazon's logotype has featured a curved arrow leading from A to Z, representing that the company carries every product from A to Z, with the arrow shaped like a smile.[20]

According to sources, Amazon did not expect to make a profit for four to five years. This comparatively slow growth caused stockholders to complain that the company was not reaching profitability fast enough to justify their investment or even survive in the long term. In 2001, the dot-com bubble burst destroyed many e-companies in the process, but Amazon survived and moved forward beyond the tech crash to become a huge player in online sales. The company finally turned its first profit in the fourth quarter of 2001: $0.01 (i.e., 1¢ per share), on revenues of more than $1 billion. This profit margin, though extremely modest, proved to skeptics that Bezos' unconventional business model could succeed.[21][22]

2010s to present[edit]

In 2011, Amazon had 30,000 full-time employees in the US, and by the end of 2016, it had 180,000 employees.[citation needed]

In 2014, Amazon launched the Fire Phone. The Fire Phone was meant to deliver media streaming options but the venture failed, resulting in Amazon registering a $170 million loss. This would also lead to the Fire Phone production being stopped the following year. In August of the same year, Amazon would finalize the acquisition of Twitch, a social video gaming streaming site, for $970 million. This new acquisition would be integrated into the game production division of Amazon.

In June 2017, Amazon announced that it would acquire Whole Foods, a high-end supermarketchain with over 400 stores, for $13.4 billion.[23][24] The acquisition was seen by media experts as a move to strengthen its physical holdings and challenge Walmart's supremacy as a brick and mortar retailer. This sentiment was heightened by the fact that the announcement coincided with Walmart's purchase of men's apparel company Bonobos.[25] On August 23, 2017, Whole Foods shareholders, as well as the Federal Trade Commission, approved the deal.[26][27]

In September 2017, Amazon announced plans to locate a second headquarters in a metropolitan area with at least a million people.[28] Cities needed to submit their presentations by October 19, 2017 for the project called HQ2.[29] The $5 billion second headquarters, starting with 500,000 square feet and eventually expanding to as much as 8 million square feet, may have as many as 50,000 employees.[30] In 2017, Amazon announced it would build a new downtown Seattle building with space for Mary's Place, a local charity in 2020.[31]

As 2017 came to a close, Amazon had over 566,000 employees worldwide.[32][33]

According to an August 8, 2018 story in Bloomberg Businessweek, Amazon has about a 5 percent share of US retail spending (excluding cars and car parts and visits to restaurants and bars), and a 43.5 percent share of American online spending in 2018. The forecast is for Amazon to own 49 percent of the total American online spending in 2018, with two-thirds of Amazon's revenue coming from the US.[34]

Amazon launched the last-mile delivery program and ordered 20,000 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter Vans for the service in September 2018.[35][36]

Amazon generated $386 billion in US retail e-commerce sales in 2020, up 38% over 2019. Amazon's Marketplace sales represent an increasingly dominant portion of its e-commerce business.

HQ2[edit]

In November 2018, Amazon announced it would open its highly sought-after new headquarters, known as (HQ2) in Long Island City, Queens, New York City,[37][38] and in the Crystal City neighborhood of Arlington, Virginia.[39] On February 14, 2019, Amazon announced it was not moving forward with plans to build HQ2 in Queens[40] but would instead focus solely on the Arlington location. The company plans to locate at least 25,000 employees at HQ2 by 2030 and will invest more than US$2.5 billion[41] to establish its new headquarters in Crystal City as well as neighboring Pentagon City and Potomac Yard, an area jointly marketed as "National Landing." The announcement also created a new partnership with Virginia Tech University to develop an Innovation Campus to fill demand for high-tech talent in National Landing and beyond.

COVID-19[edit]

At the end of March 2020, some workers of the Staten Island warehouse staged a walkout in protest of the poor health situation at their workplace amidst the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. One of the organizers, Chris Smalls, was first put on quarantine without anyone else being quarantined, and soon afterwards fired from the company.[42][43][44][45][46]

The pandemic caused a surge in online shopping and resulted in shortages of household staples both online and some brick-and-mortar stores. From March 17[47] to April 10, 2020,[48] Amazon warehouses stopped accepting non-essential items from third-party sellers. The company hired approximately 175,000 additional warehouse workers and delivery contractors to deal with the surge, and temporarily raised wages by $2/hour.[48]

Acquisition of MGM[edit]

After months of speculation due to MGM's poor financial performance from the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on the movie industry, Amazon entered negotiations to acquire MGM at an estimated $9 billion in May 2021.[49] The companies agreed to the merger deal on May 26, 2021 for a total value of $8.45 billion, subject to regulatory approval. The deal would allow Amazon to add the MGM library to the Amazon Prime Video catalog, with the studio continuing to operate as a label under the new parent company.[50]

Amazon Go[edit]

On January 22, 2018, Amazon Go, a store that uses cameras and sensors to detect items that a shopper grabs off shelves and automatically charges a shopper's Amazon account, was opened to the general public in Seattle.[51][52] Customers scan their Amazon Go app as they enter, and are required to have an Amazon Go app installed on their smartphone and a linked Amazon account to be able to enter.[51] The technology is meant to eliminate the need for checkout lines.[53][54][55]Amazon Go was initially opened for Amazon employees in December 2016.[56][57][58] By the end of 2018, there will be 8 total Amazon Go stores located in Seattle, Chicago, San Francisco and New York.[59]

Amazon 4-Star[edit]

Amazon announced to debut the Amazon 4-star in New York, Soho neighborhood Spring Street between Crosby and Lafayette on 27 September 2018. The store carries 4-star and above-rated products from around New York.[60] The Amazon website searches for the most rated, highly demanded, frequently bought, and most wished for products which are then sold in the new Amazon store under separate categories. Along with the paper price tags, the online review cards will also be available for the customers to read before buying the product.[61][62]

Mergers and acquisitions[edit]

Amazon has grown through several mergers and acquisitions. The company has also invested in a number of growing firms, both in the United States and internationally.[63][64] In 2014, Amazon purchased top level domain .buy in auction for over $4 million.[65][66] The company has invested in brands that offer a wide range of services and products, including Engine Yard, a Ruby-on-Rails platform as a service company,[67] and Living Social, a local deal site.[68]

Timeline[edit]

Overview[edit]

Time periodKey developments at Amazon
1994–1998Amazon started off as an online bookstore selling books, primarily competing with local booksellers and Barnes & Noble. It IPOs in 1997.
1998–2004Amazon starts to expand its services beyond books. It also starts offering convenience services, such as Free Super Savers Shipping.
2005–2011Amazon moves into the cloud computing area with Amazon AWS, as well as the crowdsourcing area with Amazon Mechanical Turk. By being an early player, it eventually dominates the cloud computing scene, allowing it to control much of the physical infrastructure of the Internet.[69] Amazon also offers the Amazon Kindle for people to purchase their books as eBooks, and by 2010, more people buy ebooks than physical books from Amazon.
2011–2015Amazon starts offering streaming services like Amazon Music and Amazon Video. By 2015, its market capitalization surpassed that of Walmart.

Full timeline[edit]

YearMonth and dateEvent typeDetails
1994July 5CompanyAmazon founded.[70]
1997May 15CompanyAmazon IPOs at $18.00/share, raising $54 million.[70]
1998April 27AcquisitionsAmazon acquires the Internet Movie Database, a comprehensive repository for movie information on the Internet.[71]
1998August 5Company DirectionAmazon announces that it will move beyond books.[72]
1998DecemberCompetitionJack Ma launches Alibaba in China, which would later grow to dominate the Chinese online retail market, and provide an obstacle to Amazon's attempts to expand in China.[73][74]
2002JanuaryProductAmazon launches Free Super Saver Shipping, which allows customers to get free shipping for orders above $99.[70]
2002MarchLegal, CompetitionAmazon settles its October 1999 patent infringement suit against Barnes & Noble (over its 1-Click checkout system, which it received a patent for in September 1999). It originally charged that Barnes&Noble.com had essentially copied Amazon's 1-Click technology.[75]
2003OctoberProductAmazon launches A9.com, a subsidiary of Amazon.com based in Palo Alto, California that develops search and advertising technology.[76]
2003 December Company First profit announced.[77]
2004August 19InternationalAmazon acquires Joyo, an online bookstore in China, for $75 million, which then becomes the 7th regional website of Amazon.com. joyo later becomes Amazon China.[78]
2005FebruaryProductAmazon launches Amazon Prime, a membership offering free two-day shipping within the contiguous United States on all eligible purchases for a flat annual fee of $79.[70]
2005NovemberProductAmazon launches Amazon Mechanical Turk, an application programming interface (API) allowing any Internet user to perform "human intelligence" tasks such as transcribing podcasts, often at very low wages.[70]
2006August 25ProductAmazon launches Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2), a virtual site farm allowing users to use the Amazon infrastructure to run applications ranging from running simulations to web hosting.[79]
2006September 19ProductAmazon launches Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA), giving small businesses the ability to use Amazon.com's own order fulfillment and customer service infrastructure – and customers of Amazon.com shipping offers when buying from 3rd-party sellers.[80]
2006LegalAmazon agrees to settle a legal dispute with Toys R Us (over a partnership that gave Toys R Us exclusive rights to supply some toy products on Amazon's website) and pays $51 million.[81]
2006MarchProductAmazon launches Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), which allows other websites/developers to store computer files on Amazon's servers.[70]
2007AugustProductCreateSpace announces launch of Books on Demand service, which makes it easy for authors who want to self-publish their books to distribute them on Amazon.com.[82]
2007AugustProductAmazon launches AmazonFresh, a grocery service offering perishable and nonperishable foods.[83]
2007September 25ProductAmazon launches Amazon Music, an online music store and music locker.[84]
2007November 19ProductAmazon launches the Amazon Kindle.[70]
2009July 22Acquisitions, CompetitionAmazon acquires Zappos for $850 million.[85]
2009October 20CompetitionBarnes & Noble announces the Nook, an eReader.[86]
2010JanuaryCompetitionApple introduces its own virtual bookstore, called iBooks, and then partners with five major book publishers. It later convinces them to raise the price of ebooks (using the agency pricing model that gives publishers full control over ebook prices).
2010February 1CompetitionMicrosoft launches Microsoft Azure, a cloud computing platform that will compete with Amazon AWS over cloud services.
2010JulyProductAmazon announced that e-book sales for its Kindle reader outnumbered sales of hardcover books for the first time ever.[88]
2011JanuaryAcquisitions, InternationalAmazon acquires Lovefilm, a DVD rental service known as the Netflix of Europe.[89]
2011February 16CompetitionBorders Group, outcompeted by Amazon, applies for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.[90]
2011February 22ProductAmazon rebrands its Amazon Video service as Amazon Instant Video and adds access to 5,000 movies and TV shows for Amazon Prime members.[91][92]
2011March 22ProductAmazon launches the Amazon Appstore for Android devices and the service was made available in over 200 countries.[93]
2011July 1LegalCalifornia starts collecting sales taxes on Amazon.com purchases.[94]
2011SeptemberProductAmazon launches Amazon Locker, a delivery locker system that allows users to get items delivered at specially-designed lockers.[95]
2011September 28ProductAmazon announces the Kindle Fire, a tablet computer that takes aim at Apple's iPad with a smaller device that sells at $199, compared with the $499 value of Apple's cheapest iPad.[96]
2012AprilLegalThe Department of Justice files suit against Apple Inc and five major publishing houses (the "Big Five"), alleging that they colluded in 2010 to raise the price of ebooks (using the agency pricing model that gives publishers full control over ebook prices).[97] Amazon had originally set the price of ebooks at $9.99 (using the wholesale pricing model giving Amazon full control over ebook prices).
2012March 19AcquisitionsAmazon acquires Kiva Systems for $775 million, a robotics company that creates robots that can move items around warehouses.[98]
2012AprilLegalAmazon agrees to allow collection of sales taxes in both Nevada and Texas (starting on July 1), and agrees to create 2,500 jobs and invest $200 million in new distribution centers in Texas.[99]
2012September 6ProductAmazon announces the Kindle Fire HD series of touchscreen tablet computers.[100]
2013MarchAcquisitionsAmazon acquires social reading and book-review site GoodReads.[101]
2013JuneInternationalAmazon launches in India.[102][103]
2014July 25ProductAmazon launches the Amazon Fire.[104]
2014August 25AcquisitionsAmazon announced its intent to acquire the video game streaming website Twitch for $970 million.[105]
2014OctoberLegalAmazon reaches agreement with Simon & Schuster, allowing the publisher to adopt the agency pricing model and set prices on its books sold on Amazon.
2014November 6 (announcement), actual rollout occurs through 2015ProductAmazon unveils Amazon Echo, a wireless speaker and voice command device that can take commands and queries, and be used to add items to the Amazon.com shopping cart, among other things.[107][108] The Alexa Voice Service that is built into Amazon Echo can also be added to other Amazon devices.[109]
2014NovemberLegalAmazon resolves dispute with Hachette, allowing Hachette to adopt the agency-pricing model and set prices on Hachette books sold on Amazon.[110]
2015JulyCompetition, InternationalAlibaba announces that it will invest $1 billion into its Aliyun cloud computing arm, some of which would go into new Aliyun international data centers. This would allow Aliyun to compete with Amazon Web Services outside of China.[111]
2015August 26ProductAmazon launches Amazon Underground, an Android app through which users can get gaming and other apps for free that they would otherwise have to pay for, and also get in-app purchases for free. App creator participation is voluntary. App creators are paid $0.002 for every minute a user spends in the app.[112][113][114]
2015September 8ProductAmazon launches its Amazon Restaurants service that delivers food from nearby restaurants, for Amazon Prime customers in Seattle.[115][116] The service would subsequently be rolled out to many other cities.
2015November 2ProductAmazon opened its first physical retail store, a bookstore in the University Village shopping center in Seattle. The store, known as Amazon Books, has prices matched to those found on the Amazon website and integrate online reviews into the store's shelves.[117]
2015December 14CompanyAmazon begins moving into their new headquarters campus in the Denny Triangle neighborhood of Seattle, beginning with the 38-story Amazon Tower I (nicknamed "Doppler" after the codename for Amazon Echo).[118] The three towers are scheduled to be completed by 2020.
2016December 7DeliveryAmazon Prime Air (Amazon's drone-based delivery system) makes its first delivery in Cambridge in the United Kingdom. The successful delivery is announced a week later, on December 14, along with video.[119][120]
2017 June 15 Acquisitions Amazon acquires Whole Foods for $13.7 billion, a grocery-store chain located throughout the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada.[121]
2017 September 7 Company Amazon began search for Amazon HQ2, a second company headquarters to house up to 50,000 employees.[122][123]
2018 January 18 Company Amazon narrows down the choices of its second headquarters location to 20 places.[124]
2018 January 22 Company Amazon opens a cashier-less grocery store (Amazon Go) to the public.[125]
2018 September 19 International Amazon launches in Turkey.[126]
2018 October 2 Company After widespread criticism, Amazon raises its minimum wage for all U.S. and U.K. employees to $15 an hour, including Whole Foods and seasonal employees, beginning November 1, 2018.[127][128]
2018 November 13 Company Jeff Bezos announces that the new headquarters HQ2 will be split between New York City and Northern Virginia.[129]
2019 February 14 Company Amazon cancels plans to open new HQ2 in New York City after massive backlash from local politicians and community members. Plans in Northern Virginia remain unchanged.[130]

References[edit]

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  31. ^"Amazon donates space in headquarters to Seattle nonprofit

    ‘The Wheel Of Time’ Boss Says Dónal Finn Taking Over As Mat Cauthon Will Be “Seamless”, Sees Series Going Eight Seasons

    EXCLUSIVE: The Wheel of Time boss Rafe Judkins has revealed how the Amazon drama series will handle the recasting of core character Mat Cauthon from Barney Harris to Dónal Finn in Season 2. Deadline confirmed in September that Harris was departing after the first season of the series, which scored a Season 2 renewal ahead of its November 19 premiere.

    Judkins, in the midst of shooting the new season, declined comment on the reason for the swap.

    “It’s always hard but we’re really lucky that Barney is so great in the first season; I love him in the show,” Judkins told Deadline. “And Dónal Finn, who is playing Mat in Season 2, is amazing. I have seen him up on set doing his scenes now and they’re incredible and they fully capture the character. I think it’s a testament to this character and how great the character of Mat is that it really feels seamless between the two actors.”

    Related Story

    'The Wheel Of Time': Ceara Coveney, Natasha O'Keeffe & Meera Syal Join Season 2 Cast; Amazon Drops Clip

    Judkins took on the massive project because of his love of the Robert Jordan book series on which the show is based, which he read fervidly growing up. It’s that love of the world that drove him to stay as true to the original stories as possible while treating the characters with respect.

    “The pressure is unbelievable from all sides at all times,” he said. “I feel the personal pressure because I love this series. I fought to get it made for TV and that fight was so hard. It’s a success we’re getting it made but now I face the additional pressure to do everyone proud. So many people love these books so much. And nobody is a tougher critic than my mom. I send the scripts to her to get an opinion and she always tells me the truth. ‘You screwed up on this and you gotta fix it.’ I tell her, ‘Ok, mom. I’m going to fix it.’ My mom should get a consulting fee.”

    He continued, “I think that’s the thing we do, above all else is respect the characters. I love these characters, even the bad guys. So every change that we make in the show, the thing we try never to change is these characters in the core of who they are and the actors captured that so perfectly. If that’s the thing that fans are really looking for, I think they will like this show. If they’re looking for us to stick to every single detail of the machinations of the plot or the places that they go or the people that they’ve talked to, they will more likely be disappointed. But if they’re looking for us to get these characters to screen, the heart of who they are alive, then I think we’re doing that.”

    The Wheel of Time is set in a sprawling, epic world where magic exists and only certain women are allowed to access it. The series follows Moiraine (Rosamund Pike), a member of the incredibly powerful all-female organization called the Aes Sedai, as she arrives in Two Rivers. There, she embarks on a dangerous, world-spanning journey with five young men and women, one of whom is prophesied to be the Dragon Reborn, who will either save or destroy humanity. Mat Cauthon is one of the five from the Two Rivers who, along with lead Moiraine, are considered the main characters in the books.

    Josha Stradowski, Marcus Rutherford, Zoë Robins, Madeleine Madden and Daniel Henney also star in the ensemble.

    Judkins understands fans were hoping Season 1 would focus more on the Dragon Reborn storyline, but he’s hoping fans will understand his plans to keep that a mystery. But he does promise the answer will be revealed before the end of the first season.

    “One thing we’re trying to hide from the audience is who the Dragon Reborn is, it’s the mystery of the show as we start to unravel this story,” he said. “People who have read the books will know, of course. The first book is told from the Dragon Reborn’s perspective but the whole book series is an ensemble piece. One of the defining things about the book series is the different POV characters, [which we leaned into]. This show is the first fantasy series to have half of those POVs from women, so this is a really incredible ensemble piece in the way the book series does in its entirety.”

    He added, “For me, I always have to approach it as if we’re going to get to tell the whole story that’s in the books. If we don’t approach it that way, then we’d set ourselves up to not stick the landing and these books have such a good ending. I really need to set us up to get there if we’re able to. That’s not up to me ultimately. If people watch it and Amazon wants to keep doing more, I’d love to continue to expand this world further.”

    Judkins is also aware that fans of the book series are a bit disappointed that the Amazon series has probably halted plans for the story to be adapted for the big screen. But he believes the books will work better as a series, one he imagines could run for about eight seasons.

    “I think that’s probably true. I think Wheel of Time lends itself better to a television series,” he said. “That’s why I think now is the right moment for it to finally exist because people who know that books know it’s just a story about the characters and the journeys each of them is on. The amount you’d have to compress it to turn it into a series of movies is too much. It would take away the heart of what’s good about it.”

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    Источник: https://deadline.com/2021/11/the-wheel-of-time-mat-cauthon-role-donal-finn-rafe-jenkins-plans-amazon-series-1234870995/

    Can Amazon Self-Publishing Make You Money?

    The internet has revolutionized so many industries and businesses.

    In the publishing world, in particular, Amazon self-publishing, it has leveled the playing field, allowing authors to take control and publish their work without having to go through the “gatekeepers,” i.e. traditional publishers like Random House.

    There are several ways to publish your work online… and make money, too! But one service, in particular, has become the go-to resource for authors because of the profit potential and ease of use: Amazon self-publishing.

    Regardless of your experience level, Amazon has democratized the publishing business so anybody with an interest and desire to write and publish a book can do it. You don’t have to be a professional writer… or have been previously published… or have any internet business experience at all to start with Amazon self-publishing. Anybody can use this platform to get their work out into the world and into the hands of waiting audiences.

    As the world's largest online bookstore there's an opportunity to get your book self-published on Amazon and reach your target audience regardless of your topic. You can write about something you’re passionate about. Fiction. Nonfiction. Biographies. History. Children's books. Popular categories on Amazon include self-help, health and fitness, cooking, hobbies, romance, travel, young adult… the list goes on. You can bet there is an audience for just about any topic out there.

    You might already have a topic or topics in mind. If you don’t, that’s fine too. In both cases, you should check out Amazon and scan all the different categories and bestseller lists. This will give you an idea of what themes or subjects sell and have profit potential. If you see your idea often when doing this search — run with it. If not, you might want to try a more popular topic with a built-in audience. Books that are in the top rankings or have a lot of customer reviews and feedback are signals that there is an audience for your topic on Amazon.

    You can also spot the “gaps” when doing your Amazon search. This means looking for popular and trending topics out in the world that are not covered well already by Amazon books. You can bet there are plenty of people who would love the buy the book you produce.

    Of course, to have Amazon self-publishing create a steady income for you, you do need to take some steps. Your books aren’t going to sell themselves. Because you are the publisher, you’re also the marketer. You have to get the word out about your book. And you won’t be an overnight success. But you can make money… and the opportunity is growing.

    One of the authors that is an example of this growing opportunity is Adam Croft, who writes and then puts out his mystery novels through Amazon self-publishing. He started in 2011 and was on track to make $1.4 million in 2016.

    One other key thing to note, when self-publishing books on Amazon you don't have to write long books that can be time-consuming and labor-intensive. You can start off by writing shorter books that are very focused on a singular topic and charge a lower price for those books. As a matter of fact, Amazon Kindle books priced between $2.99 and $9.99 tend to generate the most amount of sales revenue per book sold. This is good news for those who suffer from writer's block and don't feel they have the time or focus to put out a larger traditional book.

    Types of Self-Publishing Options on Amazon

    The most cost-effective and efficient way to do Amazon self-publishing is through ebooks, which allows people to download your work directly to their devices, like the Kindle ebook reader. And Amazon has facilitated this process with Kindle Direct Publishing program, which has no fees to use — it’s self-publishing with no upfront costs. (You do need an Amazon account.)

    This program has several advantages:

    1. You can upload your book on the platform in just a few minutes. And your book will be on sale in a couple of days at most.
    2. You retain the rights to your books and can set your own prices.
    3. For every book sold, you get to keep up to 70 percent of the sale price. Amazon keeps the rest.
    4. You can make changes to your book and upload changes at any time.

    If you’d like to have a print book out there too, you can use a feature to do that. This option, with paperbacks, is also available in the Kindle Direct Publishing program. You can easily have your ebook converted into a print book which is an easy way to sell more books as there are many people who still prefer physical print books.

    There are some differences. For example, with paperback Amazon self-publishing you get up to 60 percent royalties, instead of 70 percent. Also, because this is print on-demand, Amazon subtracts publishing costs from each sale too.

    If you are publishing a with Amazon Kindle then you should surely take the extra step to offer a print version of your book as well. This will increase your overall sales and profits without doing any extra work.

    Once you have a good handle on the Kindle Direct Publishing program, you could take it to the next level with the KDP Select program, which allows you to reach more readers and make more money, although there are important guidelines to follow.

    Start with the standard program first, experience some success, then check out the Select version.

    Marketing Your Amazon Self-Publishing Products

    One key thing to sell your book is to create an attention-grabbing page for your Amazon self-publishing listing. A detailed description will “convert” more casual book browsers into buyers. And, when you use keywords related to your topic, people searching Amazon or Google will see your book high in the search results. Keywords also come into play when you pick your book title. Most people write very short descriptions on Amazon, but you have plenty of space to write a very long thourough description that can really sell people on the benefits of your book and why they shouod buy it.

    Reviews are also vital in selling your book. People want to see what previous readers thought before committing to buying. So, as a new author, where do you get reviews? Send the book to people in the industry or experts in the topic covered in the book, co-workers, friends, and family… then ask them to submit an honest review. The key here is to be diligent in your follow up with getting reviews. Most people are extremely busy and even writing a short book review is something they are not likely to do without a little nudging.

    You should also put out in the word out on your social media like Facebook and Twitter. Put up a website. Create an email list. Join forums related to the topic of your book and join the conversation… and casually mention your book. Comment on blogs in the niche, with links back to your book website or Amazon page.

    Another option is to run ads though Amazon Advertising. You can run ads every time someone does a keyword search on Amazon and also show ads for your books when visitors are looking at other books related to your book. This is one of the most cost effective ways of doing paid advertising for an inexpensive book and still make a profit doing it.

    This is a very powerful tool to get your book in front of the people who are most likely to buy it.

    How You Make Money With Amazon Self-Publishing

    The first step here: get your books online on the Kindle platform! And get the word out through intensive marketing. Don't be shy about telling the world about your book.

    It’s also important you know that putting out just one book through Amazon self-publishing probably won’t bring in a lot of income. Those self-publishers who do make four figures per month — or more — have multiple books for sale. This gives you two important advantages.

    First, this gives you more of a chance to write in a popular category and catch the audience’s eye.

    Second, you’re more likely to have one of your books “cross advertised” with another — you know, when the Amazon site lists other products similar to the one you just bought or have been browsing? Many people click on those links to find out more about those related products, in this case books, and buy them too.

    Again, you could easily accomplish this by having two shorter books rather than one longer book on Amazon. Aim for having a goal of having at least two books on Amazon for best results. It's a lot easier to get someone who bought one of your books to buy a second and third book than to get a new buyer.

    How to Create Your Book

    The first step here, of course, is to actually write the text of your book. A few tips here:

    Once you have a topic create an outline, do your research… then start writing. Don’t put it off!

    It can be tough to think about writing a whole book. But it’s not so bad once you break it into steps. Write a bit each day and before you know it your book will be done.

    If you’ve already written a book — you could use that. Although you should read it over before proceeding. And if you write a blog or a journal, you could collect those writings into a book, if appropriate.

    Next step — show it to a trusted friend or family member (or even better somebody you know who has experience or an interest in the topic you’ve written about) to get their feedback on the content. Based on what they say you might edit or tweak your book.

    Once you have the content of your book sorted out, there are a few more steps before you can submit it for Amazon self-publishing.

    You want your book to be presentable and look good. So first, you should hire a proofreader to make sure there are no typos or grammar mistakes. Mistakes are a big turn-off to readers. You can find affordable proofreaders on sites like Upwork.com. If you know someone who’s a stickler for grammar, hire him or her.

    Next, you should hire a graphic designer to create a cover (based on your specifications) and lay out the text into book format.

    For Amazon self-publishing, you need to follow certain specifications that they’ll give you once you join the KDP program.

    Great design and error free copy — plus, compelling content that readers find valuable — is key to getting positive reviews. And those are worth their weight in gold when it comes to increasing your sales.

    Next Steps for Amazon Self-Publishing Success

    Find a winning theme. Write the text. Get it designed. Join the Kindle Direct Publishing program. Upload your book… and start selling.

    It’s a simple process. But that’s what Amazon self-publishing is all about.

    As you go through these steps, you should take care not to spend too much time. You won’t be able to make any money unless your book is online and for sale. So get it as close to perfect as you can, then get it out there.

    Источник: https://www.thebalancesmb.com/can-amazon-self-publishing-make-you-money-4148145

    First book sold on amazon -

    You're reading Entrepreneur United States, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

    Some people view self-publishing as a failure, chosen only when no other options remain. But the simple truth is that traditional gatekeepers -- literary agents and editors at publishing houses -- simply don’t have the bandwidth to determine the value of every story. Hundreds of thousands of books are self-published every year, and there’s no way to keep up with them all. Unless you already have a built-in audience or previous experience in publishing, it can be difficult to get your work in front of decision-makers.

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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Amazon

How many books are sold on Amazon each year?

How Many Kindle Books Has Amazon Sold? About 22 Million This Year.

What year did Amazon start selling more than books?

Amazon is an internet behemoth today. But where did it all begin? In terms of revenue, Amazon is the biggest internet-based company in the world. When it started out selling books online in 1994, Jeff Bezos had an idea that the best way to succeed online was to grow big and fast.

How many books are sold on Amazon?

Amazon is the largest book retailer in the world. They carry over 33 million titles and ship them pretty much anywhere in the world.

Why did Amazon start selling more than just books?

Online bookstore and IPO Bezos finally decided that his new business would sell books online, because of the large worldwide demand for literature, the low unit price for books, and the huge number of titles available in print. Amazon was founded in the garage of Bezos’ rented home in Bellevue, Washington.

Will Amazon go out of business?

“Amazon will go bankrupt. If you look at large companies, their lifespans tend to be 30-plus years, not a hundred-plus years,” he said. Bezos said it was his job to delay that date by as long as possible. Amazon turned 27 years old Monday, so it is fast approaching Bezos’s 30-year benchmark.

Has there ever been a Quadrillionaire?

For just a few glorious minutes an American man was the first ever quadrillionaire. That is if you were taking his Paypal balance into account… “This was obviously an error and we appreciate that Mr Reynolds understands this was the case,” PayPal said in a statement to the BBC.

What is above a Centillionaire?

Novemdecillionaire (60 zeros) Vigintillionaire (63 zeros) Undecillionaire (60 zeros) Centillionaire (303 zeros) * All of the numbers above are based on the modern “Short scale” used by the US, Canada and the UK.

Who is the richest black woman on earth?

Folorunsho Alakija is ranked by Forbes as the richest woman in Nigeria with an estimated net worth of $1 billion as of 2020….

Folorunso Alakija
NationalityNigerian
OccupationBusinesswoman
Net worthUS$1.0 billion (January 2020)
TitleManaging director, Rose of Sharon Group Vice chairman, Famfa Oil
Источник: https://www.mvorganizing.org/how-many-books-are-sold-on-amazon-each-year/

On July 16, 1995, Amazon officially opens for business as an online bookseller. Within a month, the fledgling retailer had shipped books to all 50 U.S. states and to 45 countries. Founder Jeff Bezos’s motto was “get big fast,” and Seattle-based Amazon eventually morphed into an e-commerce colossus, selling everything from groceries to furniture to live ladybugs, and helping to revolutionize the way people shop.

Bezos earned an undergraduate degree in computer science and electrical engineering from Princeton University in 1986 then worked in the financial services industry in New York City. In 1994, after realizing the commercial potential of the Internet and determining that books might sell well online, he moved to Washington state and founded Amazon. 

He initially dubbed the business Cadabra (as in abracadabra) but after someone misheard the name as “cadaver,” Bezos decided to call his startup Amazon, after the enormous river in South America, a moniker he believed wouldn’t box him into offering just one type of product or service.

In the spring of 1995, Bezos invited a small group of friends and former colleagues to check out a beta version of Amazon’s website, and the first-ever order was placed on April 3 of that year, for a science book titled Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies. When Amazon.com went live to the general public in July 1995, the company boldly billed itself as “Earth’s biggest bookstore,” although sales initially were drummed up solely by word of mouth and Bezos assisted with assembling orders and driving the packages to the post office. 

By the end of 1996 Amazon had racked up $15.7 million in revenues, and in 1997 Bezos took the company public with an initial public offering that raised $54 million. That same year, Bezos personally delivered his company’s one-millionth order, to a customer in Japan who had purchased a Windows NT manual and a Princess Diana biography. In 1998, Amazon extended beyond books and started selling music CDs, and by the following year it had added more product categories, such as toys, electronics and tools.

By December 1999, Amazon had shipped 20 million items to 150 countries around the globe. That same month, Bezos was named Time magazine’s Person of the Year. In 2000, the company introduced a service allowing individual sellers and other outside merchants to peddle their products alongside Amazon’s own items. Meanwhile, Amazon continued to spend heavily on expansion and didn’t post its first full-year profit until 2003.

In 2007, Amazon debuted its Kindle e-reader; four years later, the company announced it was selling more e-books than print books. Also in 2011, Amazon’s tablet computer, the Kindle Fire, was released. Among a variety of other ventures, Amazon launched a cloud computing and video on demand services in 2006; a studio that develops movies and TV series, in 2010; and an online marketplace for fine art, in 2013, which has featured original works by artists including Claude Monet and Norman Rockwell. 

Additionally, Amazon has acquired a number of companies, including Zappos and Whole Foods. In 2015, Amazon surpassed Walmart as the world’s most valuable retailer. Two decades after its founding and with Bezos still at the helm, Amazon’s market value was $250 billion. In 2017, Bezos was named the richest man in the world. On July 5, 2021, Bezos stepped down as CEO of Amazon to focus on his aerospace company Blue Origin. 

Источник: https://www.history.com
Getty Images

Self-publishing allows you to show off your ideas in front of the true decision-makers, the readers. Whether you’ve decided to use your book as a top-of-funnel marketing and branding opportunity, or whether you simply have a story you need to tell, self-publishing makes your book available to the masses. 

While we’re not making an endorsement of which method or company you should use to self-publish your book, Amazon is probably the best-known and most commonly used marketplace. This piece will walk you through some of the important questions and answers about self-publishing on Amazon to help you decide whether it’s the right place for your book.

Related: How to Write a Book (and Actually Finish It) in 5 Steps

1. Does self-publishing on Amazon mean I can only make digital copies?

When you think about Amazon publishing, the first thought that comes to mind might be Kindle. Ebooks can be great tools -- they’re cheap to make and according to the Amazon website, you can publish your book digitally on its Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) platform in just five minutes.

However, a physical copy can also come in handy. If you are giving a keynote speech, or introducing someone to your ideas for the first time, it’s more straightforward to hand them a hard copy of your work than to share a link and hope they click. 

That’s before you even consider the emotional, irrational feeling that comes with seeing your work bound and printed. I have always preferred to write by hand, so I can feel and experience the progress I’m making. 

Fortunately, Amazon does give you the option to create multiple formats of your book. Those formats are:

  1. Publish to Kindle. You ought to be able to get started here.
  2. Publish to Print. Amazon’s KDP platform is the place to publish your new paperback books, not Createspace (the company merged with KDP in 2018).
  3. Publish to Audio. This is the link Amazon offers to authors looking to create an audiobook.

2. Can I sell my book elsewhere if I self-publish it on Amazon first?

It depends on which format you choose. When using ACX, Amazon’s recommended audiobook production website, you will not be able to sell or create other versions of the book elsewhere. The company’s website specifies, “You will not produce, or authorize the production of, an audio recording of the Book in the Language for distribution in the Territory other than through ACX until you remove the Book from ACX so that the Book no longer has a Title Profile on ACX and is no longer listed as available for production on ACX.”

“Further,” state ACX’s guidelines, “if you enter into an ACX Audiobook Production Agreement with a Producer [the company allows authors to pair with Producers, who will put together the actual audio file of the book], you will not produce, or authorize the production of, an audio recording of the Book in the Language for distribution in the Territory other than through ACX until the date that is 7 years from the date the completed Audiobook is delivered to Audible in accordance with the terms set forth in the ACX Audiobook Production Agreement, unless no Audiobook is produced within 4 months after the date the Audiobook must be completed, as set forth in the ACX Audiobook Production Agreement, for reasons other than your failure to abide by your obligations under the agreement.”

More simply:

  1. If you create the audio file yourself, you must first have removed the book from ACX before publishing elsewhere.
  2. If you partnered with a Producer who created the audio file, you must wait at least seven years from the date the completed audiobook is delivered to Audible.

However, if you’re using KDP to create a Kindle or paperback version, you will retain publishing rights. For eBooks, Amazon says authors can “keep control of your rights and set your own list prices. Make changes to your books at any time.” For paperbacks, you can “Maintain creative control and own your copyright with our non-exclusive agreement.”

3. How much does it cost?

The KDP website states that even when creating a paperback book, “You don't have to pay any costs upfront or carry any inventory. Your book is printed on demand when customers purchase it.” Obviously, this can be a huge asset if you have a limited budget or minimal space to hold your copies. You don’t need to print 1,000 copies, with all the costs that come with it, and hope you can sell them all to recoup your investment -- the very last thing you want to do is invest so much time into a book, only to lose money on the project. 

Amazon does calculate a printing cost, based upon variables like the length of the book and whether it’s printed in color or black and white. This number is typically used to subtract from the total price of each book before royalties are calculated, but as the author of the book, you can also choose to buy copies of the work at cost (plus shipping).

Amazon offers a calculator to help you determine how much it would cost them to print a copy of your book, but I found it quite confusing. Fortunately, Amazon also offers a fairly basic table for the American market:

  • Black ink with 24 to 108 pages: $2.15 per book
  • Black ink with 110 to 828 pages: $0.85 per book + $0.012 per page
  • Color ink with 24 to 40 pages: $3.65 per book
  • Color ink with 42 to 500 pages: $0.85 per book + $0.07 per page

So, a 300-page book with black ink would cost $0.85 + $0.012 * (300) = $4.45 total. A 300-page book with color ink would be $0.85 + $0.07 * (300) = $21.85.

If you choose to create an audiobook through ACX, and you decide to partner with a producer, you can choose whether you would prefer to retain full royalties and pay the producer an upfront fee, or whether you’d like to split royalties equally. 

Related: How to Write a Book to Build Your Brand

4. What is my cut of the profits?

It depends. 

One of the great things about self-publishing with Amazon is that you have lots of options, but that also means there are several different ranges of royalties you can earn from book sales. Here’s a quick overview of what you might expect from your digital, print and audio versions.

Books made on KDP basically follow the following formula: 

  • eBook royalties. You can choose between two options, either earning 35 percent royalties or 70 percent. In order to qualify for the 70 percent option, Amazon says the author must satisfy list price requirements, the title price must be at least 20 percent below the list price on Amazon for the physical book, and titles must be made available for sale in all geographies for which the author or publisher has rights. 
  • Paperback royalties. Amazon offers a 60 percent royalty rate for paperbacks sold on Amazon marketplaces where KDP supports paperback distribution. The company subtracts printing costs, as described above.

There are scenarios where you might make a smaller royalty rate for certain sales, given Amazon rules about distribution, so it’s good to familiarize yourself with the exceptions to these rules before making a decision. However, the rates above should hold for the majority of book sales.

Books made using ACX are more complex, given the fact that you may choose to use a producer. However, generally, you have two options here, as with eBook royalties. 

  • 40 percent royalties, in exchange for exclusive distribution rights.
  • 25 percent royalties, in exchange for non-exclusive distribution rights.

You can choose either to split those royalties with a producer or pay them a flat fee upfront. Or, you can simply create the audiobook yourself and keep the royalties for yourself.

5. Do I need to know coding to produce an eBook?

No. Amazon has a bunch of tools that can help you turn your manuscript into a well-formatted Kindle version. Likewise, KDP offers tools to design your paperback cover and producers to help you create your audiobook.

Related: The DNA of the Successful Amazon Seller

6. Will Amazon help me promote the book?

Amazon offers a few tricks and tips you can use to generate leads to your book. They include: 

  • Amazon advertising, which is fairly straightforward.
  • Free promotions, where your eBook is available at no charge for a limited time.
  • Kindle countdown deals, where you offer a limited-time discount.
  • Sample chapters, where readers can read a portion of the book for free. 

Of course, you’re welcome to promote the book on other channels, as well. Just make sure you aren’t intentionally trying to manipulate Amazon’s data and services, or the company can terminate its partnership with you.

7. Should I self-publish my book on Amazon?

I have no idea. Amazon does provide a bevy of services for writers who want the world to see their work, but this story isn’t meant to change your mind. If you’ve always envisioned your book in hardcover, well, Amazon does not offer that service. If you’re holding out hope for a traditional publisher to fall in love with your book, who am I to say you’re wrong?

Picking the right way to publish your book shouldn’t be that much different from writing the thing -- it will take time, dedication and patience to find the best way forward. Hopefully, this guide can help you get started.

Matthew McCreary

Written By

Matthew McCreary

Entrepreneur Staff

Matthew McCreary is the associate editor for contributed content at Entrepreneur.com.

Источник: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/341595
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This story is part of Holiday Gift Guide 2021, our list of ideas, by topic, by recipient and by price, to help you discover the perfect gift.

You're not imagining it: you have been blasted with Black Friday deals for weeks. Retailers turned the once one-day shopping event into a month-long shopping experience, for better or worse. The Black Friday deals usually come in waves, and the first few have passed, but the best ones are typically held until the big day. Which is now a few hours away.  Sifting through all of those sales can get overwhelming, but that's where CNET comes in! We've been poring over newspaper ad scans, scouring retailer websites (Amazon, Target, Walmart and Best Buy, just to name a few), and found the deals you won't want to miss, as well as keeping you abreast of our newest finds on the fly via our live blog. You'll even find good streaming deals, like Hulu offering yearlong subscriptions for 99 cents per month.

We've got a section-by-section breakdown below to help you find what you're looking for, but first, here's what you should know as you prepare to start shopping:

  • Macy's Black Friday sale started Tuesday.
  • Many Amazon device sales (Echo, Fire tablets, Fire TVs, Ring security systems) started last Friday.
  • Best Buy's sale started last Friday, including the lowest price ever on Apple Watch SE.
  • Target's Black Friday sale started Sunday.
  • Staples' Black Friday sale started Sunday.
  • Walmart's Black Friday sale started Monday and includes possible access to PlayStation 5 and Xbox consoles for Walmart Plus members. Initial PS5 and Xbox console availability is already sold out.
  • More Amazon Black Friday sales started today.

Best Black Friday deals so far

TCL 6-Series Roku TV: $699 and up

Save $100 to $700

David Katzmaier/CNET

The TCL 6-Series Roku TV is the best TV for the money overall that we've tested, and every size in the series is down to its lowest price of the year. The 6-Series features excellent picture quality thanks to mini-LED backlight technology, QLED color and full-array local dimming. Though this TV technically debuted in 2020, the 6-Series is still a current model for 2021. 

All three sizes are on sale but the largest savings is on the 65-inch model. The new $800 price is $98 less than the previous sale price of just a few days ago, and the best price ever.

Read our TCL 6-Series Roku TV review.

AirPods 3: $150

Save $30

David Carnoy/CNET

Amazon has Apple's newest AirPods, the AirPods 3, on sale for just $150. That's $30 less than the Apple Store and their lowest price to date. Note that at Amazon, you get an extra $5 off at checkout -- it's listed in green under the larger red price. If you don't see "Save $5 at checkout," the deal has expired. The AirPods 3 have been in and out of stock at this price.

Fire HD 8 Tablet: $45

Save $45

Amazon last refreshed the Fire HD 8 tablet in 2020 by doubling the onboard storage, enhancing the processor inside and adding USB-C charging instead of Micro-USB. It comes in four different colors and if you want to upgrade to the 64GB model you can for an extra $30.

Those aren't the only terrific discounts we've found. Among the deals that jump out at us the most are a variety of offers on AirPods. In addition to the AirPods 3 above, the new AirPods Pro with MagSafe charging casefor $159 at Walmart hits at $90 less than you'll pay at the Apple Store and the lowest price we've seen for them yet. 

Walmart also slashed the price of the 2nd-gen Google Nest Hub down first bank highlands ranch colorado just $50, another tempting offer. This Google Assistant smart display offers a 7-inch screen that you can watch videos on, read recipes, host video chats and so much more. At this price, you may want to just grab two of them since you're going to want them around the house.

This is also a great time of year to stock up on essentials, like light bulbs. The Kasa Smart bulb is just $10 at Amazon, $12 off its usual price. You control it with the free Kasa Home app on your phone or by chatting with Alexa or Google Assistant, to change the colors, automate its on/off cycle and more.

Amazon has also knocked $50 off of the price of the Bose Quiet Comfort 45 (QC45) wireless noise cancelling headphones, bringing the cost down to $279. Those headphones come with a strong recommendation from CNET's David Carnoy and would make a terrific gift (even if it's a gift for yourself).

Another timeless gift candidate: a KitchenAid stand mixer. Target's got some pretty tempting deals, including a 5-quart model marked down to $220, saving you $210. Look for additional color options at the same Black Friday price over at Best Buy. 

It's hard to cough up the change for a robot vacuum when it's not on sale, but lucky rockland golf course tee times us that's what Black Friday's for. One of the most notable deals we've seen is for the map of jacksonville jaguars stadium iRobot Roomba i3 Plus at $400 (model 3350), $200 off its normal price. Its sensors can distinguish between carpet and hardwood, and can even detect the dirtiest part of your home, so it knows where to concentrate its efforts. It will even empty itself, so you hardly have to think about it.

After letting the vacuum do all the hard work, it's time to sit your tired bones down to take advantage of Hulu's 99 cent per month deal for a year of its ad-supported plan, open to new or lapsed (for more than a month) subscribers. After that the price returns to its normal $7 per month (at which point you can cancel). Sadly, anyone who took advantage of last year's Black Friday $1.99 deal is excluded.

Sometimes it's just easier to stick with a single retailer for all your shopping, especially if you do it in person. So here are some of the best you can find at them.

Best Best Buy Black Friday deals

It's a little late to the game, but Best Buy has finally revealed the details of its sales happening the week of Black Friday. It's not quite as cut-and-dried as some other retailers' sales, which have clear start and end dates, but essentially Best Buy's sale has already started and will be adding more items in the coming days. There have already been a number of drops, including great deals like the first sale of the season on the Apple Watch SE. 

Here's what you can expect from each wave of deals: cape ann savings bank login

Read more:Best Black Friday deals at Best Buy

Best Target Black Friday deals

Target's Black Friday sale has already begun and runs through Saturday, Nov. 27. Target is offering big savings on everything from tech to toys to home goods. This sneak peek circular also advertises the Nintendo Switch OLED, which has been notoriously difficult to snag since it was released this October, so keep an eye on the deal page and your local Target's stock if you've been hoping to get your hands on one. 

Here are some of the best Target deals currently available: birdee stephens More:Target's Black Friday sales

Best Walmart Black Friday deals

Walmart's Black Friday sales started Monday, Nov. 22 at 4 p.m. PT (7 p.m. ET). Early access to some deals started four hours earlier for Walmart Plus members. Walmart is noting that it will be making the PS5 and Xbox Series X available online during Black Friday week, but details on times aren't yet available. Here are some of the deals we're most excited about.

Read more:Walmart's Black Friday 2021

Best Amazon Black Friday deals

Amazon's Black Friday deals are now in full swing, with some great new ones on Apple AirPods and Beats headphones. Amazon also has the Switch bundle in stock at the time of this writing. Some of the highlights include up to 40% off Instant brand kitchen appliances, up to 50% on select Fire HD tablets, and up to 30% on select TVs from Samsung, Sony and LG. Here are some of our favorites.

Read more:Best Black Friday TV deals

Best Black Friday headphone deals

You can always find headphones on sale during Black Friday events, but finding the right balance between a good deal and a good set of headphones can be a challenge. Here's the best sales on headphones and earbuds.

Read more: Best early Black Friday 2021 headphones deals available right now

Best Black Friday TV deals

Televisions frequently fill out Black Friday sale pages, but it's not always easy to tell which sales are actually worthwhile. Here are some of the best TV deals you'll see for Black Friday.

Read more:Best TV deals for Black Friday 2021 so far

Best Black Friday laptop deals

And some of the best laptop deals this week:

Read more:Best Black Friday laptop deals

Best Black Friday tablet deals

It's never hard to find a cheap tablet, but it can occasionally be challenging to find a good tablet at a reasonable price. Here are all of the worthwhile tablet deals now and around the corner. find open houses near me today

Best Black Friday smart home deals

Smart home gadgets can help you automate things like lights and appliances around the house, and Black Friday week is a great time to catch them on sale. Here are some of the better offers we've spotted thus far:

Read more:Black Friday's best smart home deals

Best Black Friday kitchen deals

Kitchen tech can totally change the way you cook, and a great sale on kitchen tech makes that exploration even more enjoyable. Here are the best Black Friday kitchen deals included in this week's sales.

Источник: https://www.cnet.com/tech/computing/incredible-black-friday-deals-are-already-live/

A Very Brief History of Amazon: The Everything Store

In terms of revenue, Amazon is the biggest internet-based company in the world. When it started out selling books online in 1994, Jeff Bezos had an idea that the best way to succeed online was to grow big and fast.

Today, the company sells everything from books to groceries to shipping container houses. It has become a one-stop-shop and has many ambitions for its future. 

Here we explore Amazon's earliest days and highlight some of the company's most important milestones. We will also attempt to explore why the company became so popular. 

When did Amazon start and when was Amazon founded?

Amazon, or more correctly Amazon.com, was first incorporated by Jeff Bezos in July of 2005. At the time, he was a Wall Street hedge fund executive.

Amazon was originally to be called Cadabra (from Abracadabra). But Bezos' lawyer advised him that the reference to magic might be a bit too obscure.  

Also, when people heard the name on the phone, they all too often heard "Cadaver" instead — not ideal. 

So, Bezos and his then-wife MacKenzie Tuttle started to register some domain names for their potential new venture. 

Bezos soon registered the domain names Awake.com, Browse.com, and Bookmall.com. He also registered the domain name Relentless.com and kept it. In fact, if you type that into your browser today, you'll be redirected to Amazon.com.

After scrolling through a dictionary for some inspiration, he hit on the word Amazon. Bezos thought this was particularly fitting as he envisaged his online store becoming the biggest in the world — much like the Amazon is one of the biggest rivers on the planet. 

This is the philosophy behind why Amazon is commonly called the everything store today. 

Amazon.com was registered on the 1st of November 1994. Name sorted, but what to sell?

At the time he knew he wanted to build some form of an online retailer but wasn't sure what to sell. After some research, he settled on books.

They were relatively easy to source, package, and distribute. 

Amazon was not the first company to hit on this business strategy. Another company, Computer Literacy (a Silicon Valley bookstore) began selling its own wares online as early as 1991.

The difference that Amazon.com had to offer was its greater convenience. It, from the off, was based on a model of delivering online orders directly to the customer's address anywhere in the world. 

As we all know now, Amazon.com is about a lot more than just books today. This was always the plan, according to Bezos. 

He contended from the company's very beginnings that Amazon was not just an online retailer selling consumer products. Bezos envisaged the company being a technology company at heart whose real business was to simplify online transactions for its customers. 

When did Amazon start selling things other than books?

As we have already seen, Amazon started out selling books online. This was groundbreaking for the time and very few companies were providing the level of convenience that Amazon.com had to offer. 

But, when did it start selling other products?

After following Bezos' initial business first book sold on amazon, the company expanded into selling computer games and music in 1998. At about the same time, Amazon also expanded its services internationally by purchasing other online bookstores in the UK and Germany. 

By the turn of the Millenium, Amazon had further expanded into selling consumer electronics, video games, software, home-improvement items, toys, games, and much more.

By the mid-2000s, Amazon had launched its Amazon Web Services (AWS). This innovation fitted well with Bezos' initial ambition to make Amazon a tech company rather than an online retailer exclusively. 

By 2006, Amazon expanded its AWS portfolio with its Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). This was followed up by their Simple Storage Service (S3) soon after. 

The company's expansion into digital services like EC2 and S3 would boost the company's revenues significantly. Today, they remain the bulk of the income for Amazon Web Services.

2007 saw the unveiling of the first Kindle e-readers. These relatively low-cost handheld tablets would invigorate the e-book market, and by 2012 the Kindle would constitute around 50% of all Android-operated tablet sales. 

The Kindle's success led to Amazon entering the e-book publishing market in 2011 with its Amazon Publishing service. That same year Amazon announced that e-book sales on its site were outselling traditional printed books. 

Since then Amazon has continued to expand into many other services. These include shipping fresh produce, drone delivery, and many more innovations. 

Amazon has even recently begun operations at their very own airport.

When did Amazon start becoming popular and when did Amazon go public?

At the time of its founding, many of Bezos' peers and other critics voiced their skepticism about his proposed business model. Financial journalists were some of the most vitriolic and often disparaged the company by referring to it as Amazon.bomb. 

Many of them claimed that Amazon.com would ultimately lose out to more established bookstores. Especially those that were already following suit and starting their own e-commerce sites. 

The very fact that Amazon.com didn't become profitable until the final quarter of 2001 didn't help things. But Bezos stayed firm and dismissed his naysayers as people who simply didn't understand the potential for the business. 

Bezos argued that in order to succeed as an online retailer, Amazon would need to "Get Big Fast." And grow it did.

By December of 1996, the company's customer base had grown to first book sold on amazon impressive 180,000. By October of the following year, this figure had leaped to around 1,000,000 registered accounts. 

Revenues had reached around $148 million in 1997, a significant jump from around $16 million in 1996. 

Up until this point, Amazon had remained a private company. But Bezos soon realized that he would need more than just private investment to sustain the company's growth.

And so, in 1997, Amazon.com went public and managed to raise an eye-watering $54 million on the NASDAQ exchange. In addition to the cash, the company was able to use its stock sales to fund its aggressive growth and acquisition strategy.

By 1998, Amazon's revenues had reached an impressive $600 million. 

Amazon's meteoric rise in such a short time frame catapulted Bezos into the public eye. He was also chosen to be Time magazine's 1999 Person of the Year. 

At around the same time, Amazon launched its now highly lucrative Affiliate program. 

By joining the program, other companies advertised Amazon's merchandise for sale on their own platforms. Amazon would then fulfill the order and pay a commission — win, win. 

The program proved to be a savvy business decision. It grew from one Associate in 1996 to well over 350,000 by the close of 1999. 

How does Amazon use technology to increase efficiency?

Apart from its near-universal appeal as a kind of one-stop-shop, Amazon has also taken advantage of the latest technological innovations to increase its efficiency and service to its customers. 

From the use of AI to handle and process orders or recruit to experimenting with drones and robots for order fulfillment and delivery, Amazon is certainly not afraid of testing out the latest innovation in tech. 

This approach, however, been both good and bad. 

For example, a machine-learning recruitment tool the company adopted, though apparently was not used in the final decision process, was later shown to have an apparent bias against certain groups of people for software developers and other technical positions. Once the issue was discovered, Amazon duly canceled the product.

Amazon has also adopted automated processes for firing, as well as hiring. Such systems have been criticized for making decisions without being able to take into consideration all factors — like issues in someone's personal life, etc. Software solutions, like Amazon's "Anytime Feedback Tool", for example, enable staff to either praise or criticize their coworkers. 

This same software also tracks an employee's performance against set Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) whilst handling orders from customers. While mistakes do happen and are expected, Amazon has been criticized for the pressure it appears to be putting some of its warehouse staff under — even claims that staff can be automatically fired should their performance be deemed unacceptable. 

However, it is important to note that Amazon wholeheartedly denies such practice. 

"It is absolutely not true that employees are terminated through an automatic system. We would never dismiss an employee without first ensuring that they had received our fullest support, including dedicated coaching to help them improve and additional training," an Amazon representative told MIT Technology Review

Amazon has also been adopting more and more automated solutions to increase efficiency in its fulfillment centers, like the use of robots to find and retrieve items. However, for the time being, at least, human workers are still a key part of Amazon's delivery service — especially when it comes to packing items and dealing with customer service.  

What made Amazon so popular?

The main appeal of Amazon in its early days was one of pure convenience. No longer did a potential customer need to visit a physical bookstore to get the book they were looking for.

The ability to search, select and purchase a book from the comfort of your own home was an amazing innovation at the time. Not only that, but Amazon would deliver your purchase to your front door within days.

The very fact that they began to offer more and more different products only broadened its appeal to more and more customers. But it wasn't really about the goods they were selling. 

Amazon's success owed, like many other successful companies, to the service that they offered. This gained them significant customer loyalty, and as a result, big profits in the long run. 

Another innovation Amazon made for its customers was its recommended product function. By offering other products to upsell, based on the customer's previous purchases, Amazon was able to increase its revenue even more.

The addition of customer reviews of products also helped to foster a kind of "customer community" that made the site, and its wares, more appealing to potential new customers. 

In recent years, Amazon has reached new heights, like becoming the second-ever $1 trillion market cap company in history (Apple got there first, believe it or not). After announcing, and then canceling plans to build its second HQ in New York following political pressure, Amazon would see record growth during 2020.

With many people stuck at home during the pandemic, Amazon, and other online retailers enjoyed something of a field day. 

The most recent major news in Amazon's more than 25 years in business, was the announcement that Bezos has decided to step down as the company's CEO as of fall 2021. How the company will perform with Bezos not behind the wheel is yet to be seen, but if past performance is anything to go by, it is bound to be a highly successful one. 

That is, of course, unless calls to break up Amazon gain serious traction in the public eye. As they say, time will tell. 

Interesting Engineering is a participant of the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and various other affiliate programs, and as such there might be affiliate links to the products in this article. By clicking the links and shopping at partner sites, you do not only get the materials you need but also are supporting our website.

Источник: https://interestingengineering.com/a-very-brief-history-of-amazon-the-everything-store

‘The Wheel Of Time’ Boss Says Dónal Finn Taking Over As Mat Cauthon Will Be “Seamless”, Sees Series Going Eight Seasons

EXCLUSIVE: The Wheel of Time boss Rafe Judkins has revealed how the Amazon drama series will handle the recasting of core character Mat Cauthon from Barney Harris to Dónal Finn in Season 2. Deadline confirmed in September that Harris was departing after the first season of the series, which scored a Season 2 renewal ahead of its November 19 premiere.

Judkins, in the midst of shooting the new season, declined comment on the reason for the swap.

“It’s always hard but we’re really lucky that Barney is so great in the first season; I love him in the show,” Judkins told Deadline. “And Dónal Finn, who is playing Mat in Season 2, is amazing. I have seen him up on set doing his scenes now and they’re incredible and they fully capture the character. I think it’s a testament to this character and how great the character of Mat is that it really feels seamless between the two actors.”

Related Story

'The Wheel Of Time': Ceara Coveney, Natasha O'Keeffe & Meera Syal Join Season 2 Cast; Amazon Drops Clip

Judkins took on the massive project because of his love of the Robert Jordan book series on which the show is based, which he read fervidly growing up. It’s that love of the world that drove him to stay as true to the original stories as possible while treating the characters with respect.

“The pressure is unbelievable from all sides at all times,” he said. “I feel the personal pressure because I love this series. I fought to get it made for TV and that fight was so hard. It’s a success we’re getting it made but now I face the additional pressure to do everyone proud. So many people love these books so much. And nobody is a tougher critic than my mom. I send the scripts to her to get an opinion and she always tells me the truth. ‘You screwed up on this and you gotta fix it.’ I tell her, ‘Ok, mom. I’m going to fix it.’ My mom should get a consulting fee.”

He continued, “I think that’s the thing we do, above all else is respect the characters. I love these characters, even the bad guys. So every change that we make in the show, the thing we try never to change is these characters in the core of who they are and the actors captured that so perfectly. If that’s the thing that fans are really looking for, I think they will like this show. If they’re looking for us to stick to every single detail of the machinations of the bank of america prepaid card application or the places that they go or the people that they’ve talked to, they will more likely be disappointed. But if they’re looking for us to get these characters to screen, the heart of who they are alive, then I think we’re doing that.”

The Wheel of Time is set in a sprawling, epic world where magic exists and only certain women are chase credit card fraud number to access it. The series follows Moiraine (Rosamund Pike), a member of the incredibly powerful all-female organization called the Aes Sedai, as she arrives in Two Rivers. There, she embarks on a dangerous, world-spanning journey with five young men and women, one of whom is prophesied to be the Dragon Reborn, who will either save or destroy humanity. Mat Cauthon is one of the five from the Two Rivers who, along with lead Moiraine, are considered the main characters in the books.

Josha Stradowski, Marcus Rutherford, Zoë Robins, Madeleine Madden and Daniel Henney also star in the ensemble.

Judkins understands fans were hoping Season 1 would focus more on the Dragon Reborn storyline, but he’s hoping fans will understand his plans to keep that a mystery. But he does promise the answer will be revealed before the end of the first season.

“One thing we’re trying to hide from the audience is who the Dragon Reborn is, it’s the mystery of the show as we start to unravel this story,” he said. “People who have read the books will know, of course. The first book is told from the Dragon Reborn’s perspective but the whole book series is an ensemble piece. One of the defining things about the book series is the different POV characters, [which we leaned into]. This show is the first fantasy series to have half of those POVs from women, so this is a really incredible ensemble piece in the way the book series does in its entirety.”

He added, “For me, I always have to approach it as if we’re going to get to tell the whole story that’s in the books. If we don’t approach it that way, then we’d set ourselves up to not stick the landing and these books have such a good ending. I really need to set us up to get there if we’re able to. That’s not up to me ultimately. If people watch it and Amazon wants to keep doing more, I’d love to continue to expand this world further.”

Judkins is also aware that fans of the book series are a bit disappointed that the Amazon series has probably halted plans for the story to be adapted for the big screen. But he believes the books will work better as a series, one he imagines could run for about eight seasons.

“I think that’s probably true. I think Wheel of Time lends itself better to a television series,” he said. “That’s why I think now is the right moment for it to finally exist because people who know that books know it’s just a story about the characters and the journeys each of them is on. The amount you’d have to compress it to turn it into a series of movies is too much. It would take away the heart of what’s good about it.”

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Источник: https://deadline.com/2021/11/the-wheel-of-time-mat-cauthon-role-donal-finn-rafe-jenkins-plans-amazon-series-1234870995/
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