bank of america fraud department email address

Employment Development Department. Bank of America and EDD never text message people to reactivate a debit card. Make sure any website links take you to. File a complaint with Bank of America customer service department. the fraud and said I should just contact my bank but the provided an address to where. Your bank will then contact you by email or text message when certain activity occurs on your accounts, such as a withdrawal exceeding an amount you specify. bank of america fraud department email address

Bank of america fraud department email address -

More victims of Bank of America, Zelle scams come forward; here's how to protect yourself

CONCORD, Calif. (KGO) -- The imposters struck just as nurse Page Pollack was running to catch a flight. At the airport she got a text saying, "Bank of America fraud alert. Did you just attempt a Zelle transaction of $3,500? Please reply yes or no."

"So I thought, 'Oh my gosh I didn't authorize a $3,500 transfer through Zelle,'" Pollack recalled. "So I typed 'no.'"

Then her phone rang. The caller ID said Bank of America. She answered and was told the only way to stop the fraud was to make another Zelle transaction. Boarding the plane, she grew more suspicious and opened the B of A app on her phone.

RELATED: Victim of the Bank of America, Zelle scam? Here are your rights

"Sure enough, I looked at my account and $3,500 was gone, right then and there, you see that $3,500 and your heart just sinks," Pollack said.

That is a sinking feeling Trista Beauchamp from Concord felt too. She was conned in exactly the same way.

"We were pretty well convinced that there was no way we were getting that money back, so we did nothing," she told 7 On Your Side. "But I started seeing your pieces and the people describing exactly what we went through, including having it be a Zelle transaction specifically, so I reached out to you."

Beauchamp says she was caught at a bad moment too, and the scam is complex.

"It's very confusing and you're sort of going, 'This doesn't quite seem right,' and at the same time... It's -- they just 'smoke and mirrors' and they got me," she said.

ABC7's 7 On Your Side team have received quite a few complaints -- and these scams aren't just happening here in the Bay Area.

RELATED: School nurse falls victim to scam targeting Bank of America and Zelle customers


Our Chicago ABC station, WLS, found victims too.

Nausheen Brooks was taken for $3,500. "You save your hard-earned money, to just be taken away from you. You just don't know what to do, you feel lost," Brooks said.

New victim, old scam: texts, phone calls and fake phone numbers. Consumer Action's Linda Sherry has seen it all before.

"It's a false sense of urgency; it's always about, you know, act now, act quickly, hurry up... you know, the sky is falling," she said. "Guard against getting too excited in the moment... step back and think, is this really realistic? Could this possibly be true?"

After 7 On Your Side got involved, Pollack got a call from Bank of America.

"I said, 'So that means I get my money back?' She says, 'Yes', so I just started crying! I am just beyond grateful, beyond appreciative. And I thank you from the bottom of my heart," Pollack told 7 On Your Side.

Beauchamp got her money back, too.

"My advice is first of all, wait a beat, because it's easy to react when someone tells you that there's fraud on your account but taking just, you know, take a moment and remember that you've seen this story, and you know, these things are happening," she says.

Bank of America has posted a warning about this on its website, and for this report told us in part:

It's important that viewers understand that the bank and other companies would not ask customers to transfer money between accounts in this manner or request sensitive account information.

Zelle's network operator, Early Warning Services, LLC, agrees and added:

This is likely an example of a phishing scam where the scammer spoofed the bank phone number and attempted to convince the individual to provide their personal information, not a breach of the bank's or Zelle security.

7 On Your Side's best advice here is never respond to unsolicited emails, texts or phone calls, and be cautious even if the caller ID says the name of your bank or another financial institution. Look up the contact information online and reach out to the bank directly.

Take a look at more stories and videos by Michael Finney and 7 On Your Side.

Have a question for Michael and the 7 On Your Side team? Fill out the form HERE!

7OYS's consumer hotline is a free consumer mediation service for those in the San Francisco Bay Area. We assist individuals with consumer-related issues; we cannot assist on cases between businesses, or cases involving family law, criminal matters, landlord/tenant disputes, labor issues, or medical issues. Please review our FAQ here. As a part of our process in assisting you, it is necessary that we contact the company / agency you are writing about. If you do not wish us to contact them, please let us know right away, as it will affect our ability to work on your case. Due to the high volume of emails we receive, please allow 3-5 business days for a response.

Источник: https://abc7news.com/7-on-your-side-7oys-michael-finney-bank-of-america/11069122/

Report Suspicious Activity

Have a problem?

Have a problem?

Relax.
We're here to help

Your security is our top priority

Here are some important things to know and do if you have concerns about fraud:

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What to do when your credit or debit card has been lost or stolen
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First things first

Sign in to Online Banking to report your lost or stolen card.
We'll cancel your card and send you a replacement immediately.

Remember, you're covered by our $0 Liability Guarantee, so you won't be liable for any unauthorized charges or activity.

Additional steps you can take

  • Notify any merchants who automatically charge your card and provide them with your new card information.
  • Review your transaction history for suspicious activity, and contact us immediately if there are transactions that you did not make.

Note: You can also report a lost or stolen card by phone. For credit cards, call 800-732-9194 (outside the continental U.S. call international collect 1-757-677-4701). For ATM or debit cards, call 800-432-1000 (outside the continental U.S. call international collect 1-315-724-4022).

What to do when you lose your checkbook
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First things first

Call 800-432-1000 (outside the continental U.S. call international collect 1-315-724-4022) to report a lost or stolen checkbook. If possible, provide the number of the last check that was written or the name of the person or business to whom it was written.

Additional steps you can take

  • Sign in to Online Banking to view digital copies of your checks and to see if any unauthorized checks have been written to your account.
  • Schedule an appointment to visit a financial center so you can close your current account and open up a new one (if you have any recurring charges set up to your checking account, be sure to update those charges with your new account number once you receive it).
  • If checks you wrote haven't been cashed at the time your checkbook was lost or stolen, you may need to contact the payees and send them checks from your new account.
What to do if you've become a victim of ID Theft
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Here are some important steps you can take right away if you believe your identity has been compromised:

1. Contact your financial institutions and creditors.
Speak with their fraud departments and explain that someone has stolen your identity.

2. Check your credit reports and place a fraud alert on your file.
Initiate a fraud alert by contacting one of the three credit bureaus (when you contact one credit bureau, the other two bureaus are notified automatically):

  • Experian: 888-397-3742
  • TransUnion: 800-680-7289
  • Equifax: 888-766-0008

3. File an identity theft report and retain it for your records.
Complete a report online at the Federal Trade Commissions (FTC) identity theft website layer and contact your local law enforcement to report the crime.

4. Watch out for suspicious emails, phone calls or text messages asking you for your personal information.
Always verify that the communication is legitimate by calling the organization back through an official phone number.

5. Review our Fraud Prevention Checklist.
Learn simple steps you can take to better protect yourself against fraud and scams.

What to expect if you're notified of a merchant compromise
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A merchant compromise is an organized theft of ATM, debit card or credit card information.

We continuously monitor transactions for suspicious activity. If we detect that your Bank of America card may have been part of a merchant compromise, this does not necessarily mean that fraud has occurred (or will occur) on your account. Still, as part of our concern for your security, we may deactivate your current card and issue you a new one as a precaution to help keep your account safe.

Your security is our top priority. Please visit our merchant compromise page to learn how we protect you and to see what you need to do next in the event we notified you that a new card is on the way.

What to do when you receive a suspicious email, text message or phone call
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First things first

Forward any suspicious email or text message to us at abuse@bankofamerica.com (please note that we will only reply to your message if we require additional information). If you received a suspicious phone message and provided personal or financial information, contact us immediately at 800-432-1000.

Additional steps you can take

Phishing emails (fraudulent emails that appear to be legitimate) usually contain features that reveal their true intent - if you know what to look for:

  • Often the message doesn't address you by name. It also implies urgency, attempting to get you to act quickly before you have time to carefully read the message or examine it thoroughly.
  • If you hover over a link in a phishing email, it will usually show you that it's pointing to a site different from the one stated in the message. The goal is to get you to click through to a web page where you'll be asked to provide personal information or open an attachment that may be malicious.
  • Phishing messages often contain grammar and/or spelling errors.

Voice phishing is an attempt by a fraudulent source to obtain your identity, credit card details or money by phone. Be suspicious when receiving a phone call if the Caller ID or automated voice appears to be from Bank of America and asks you to confirm account details. We will never contact you asking you for your bank or credit card numbers.

How to report a potential security concern
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We value our relationship with you. Our products and services are designed with your best interests in mind. Our employees place the highest importance on protecting your information and preventing data loss.

If you believe you've discovered a potential security concern on any Bank of America product, application, service or affiliated site, contact us by emailing security@bankofamerica.com and a member of the Bank of America Security Team will reach out to you.

Please provide the following information in your email:

  • Your preferred method of contact and your contact details to discuss your concern.
  • A general high-level description of the issue and concern (do not include specific details of your concern until the Bank of America Security team has established a secure communication channel with you)

We ask our employees and customers to look for opportunities to do the right thing in every aspect of their daily lives. Please note submissions are not eligible for compensation.

Contact your financial institutions and creditors

  • Speak with the fraud department and explain that someone has stolen your identity.
  • Request to close or freeze any accounts that may have been tampered with or fraudulently established.
  • Make sure to change your online sign-in credentials, passwords and PINs.

Check your credit reports and place a fraud alert on them

  • Receive a free copy of your credit report at annualcreditreport.com layer (you can also call 877-322-8228).
  • Review your credit report to ensure that unauthorized accounts are not opened in your name.
  • Report any fraudulent accounts to the appropriate financial institutions.
  • Place a fraud alert by contacting one of the three credit bureaus (that company must tell the other two): Experian layer (888-397-3742), TransUnion layer (800-680-7289) or Equifax layer (888-766-0008).

Contact relevant authorities

  • Contact ChexSystems (888-478-6536) to place a security alert on any compromised checking and savings accounts when a deposit account has been impacted.
  • Contact the Federal Trade Commission layer (877-438-4338) to report an ID theft incident.
  • File a report with your local law enforcement. Be sure to get a copy of the report to submit to your creditors and others that may require proof of the crime.

Replace your stolen identification

Know fraud when you see it

  • Recognize the red flags that signal scams
  • Understand phishing techniques
  • Know what to do when there’s a data breach

See how to better identify fraud

Increase your security

  • See what to do (and why it matters)
  • Help protect yourself and your accounts
  • Minimize fraud and ID theft opportunities

Start increasing your security now

Источник: https://www.bankofamerica.com/security-center/report-suspicious-communications/

Contact Us

For general customer service click the blue schedule appointment button, or browse our customer services and resources below to schedule an appointment with one of our specialized professionals.

Schedule Appointment
    • Investor Relations

      Lisa Constantine, Senior Financial Analyst

      InvestorRelations@fnb-corp.com

    • Advertising Inquiries

      MarketingSupport@fnb-corp.com

    • Media Inquiries

      Jennifer Reel, Director of Corporate Communications

      reel@fnb-corp.com

      724.983.4856

    • Legal Service

      Legal documents related to or directed to First National Bank of Pennsylvania should be served on or sent to the following address:

      First National Bank of Pennsylvania
      Attn: Legal Dept.
      3015 Glimcher Blvd.
      Hermitage, PA 16148

    • To report a lost or stolen Credit Card call 1-844-BANK-FNB (1-844-226-5362).

    • If you use Online or Mobile Banking you should log in immediately to block your card using CardGuard. After that, contact your local branch or our Customer Service Center (1-800-555-5455) as quickly as possible to report the loss or theft of your card. Monitor your account statement for unauthorized transactions – charges may be disputed by visiting your branch or calling our Customer Service Center.

    • You can find your routing number at the bottom of your checks on the left side. First National Bank Routing Number: 043318092

      Example of Routing, Account, and Check Numbers

    • Please contact your local branch or our Customer Service Center (1-800-555-5455) as quickly as possible during regular business hours to report fraudulent transactions. The Customer Service Center is available to assist you Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 9 PM, on Saturdays and Sundays from 8 AM – 5 PM. You can report a lost or stolen ATM or Debit Card 24 hours a day by calling 1-800-555-5455. To report a lost or stolen Credit Card call 1-844-BANK-FNB (1-844-226-5362).

    • You can update your mailing address using Online Banking or you can contact your local branch or our Customer Service Center (1-800-555-5455).
    • Please contact your local branch or log in to Online Banking to order your checks from the “Preferences” screen.

    • For General Correspondence:
      4140 E. State Street
      Hermitage, PA 16148-3487

      For Loan Payments:
      P.O. Box 6122
      Hermitage, PA 16148-0900

      For Deposits:
      P.O. Box 1540
      Hermitage, PA 16148-0540

    • EE, I and E bonds can be cashed at any FNB branch. Non-customers can cash up to $1,000 per day. There is no limit for current FNB customers.

    • No, savings bonds can no longer be purchased at a financial institution. All new bonds issued must be issued through the Federal Reserve website at www.TreasuryDirect.gov.Redirect icon*

    • In most cases, a valid photo ID (issued by a State or Federal authority) will suffice. However, please check with your local branch for confirmation if you have questions.

    • You need a valid photo ID (issued by a State or Federal authority) and your Social Security number.

    • Euros can be cashed in for U.S. dollars. Certain fees and exchange rates apply.

    • Most FNB branches do not have coin machines to complete these transactions. Please contact our Call Center (1-800-555-5455) to determine if your branch has this ability.

    Notices & Disclosures

    Redirect icon - For your convenience, First National Bank (FNB) provides links to third party service providers. By clicking this link you agree to leave FNB’s website and will be routed to a third party site outside the control of FNB. FNB does not provide, and is not responsible for, the products, services, or overall website content available at a third-party site. FNB does not endorse or guarantee the product, information or service on any third party’s website. FNB’s privacy policy does not apply to the linked website; we encourage you to read and evaluate the privacy and security policies of the site you are entering.

    Источник: https://www.fnb-online.com/Contact-Us

    How you can protect yourself

    This information might look different depending on the browser you’re using. When a third party has verified the site you're trying to access, you'll see a message on the site letting you know you're on a verified website.

    Think you’ve shared your personal information?

    Sign in to chase.com and check your account information. If you notice suspicious activity in your accounts, let us know right away using one of numbers on How to Report Fraud. If you think you've mistakenly given out personal information (such as your account number, password or PIN) in an email, text or website that might be fraudulent, call us right away. We’ll help secure your account.

    And, if you’ve shared your username or password with a person or a service you don’t feel secure about, change them anytime in “Profile & settings.”

    You can also forward a suspicious email message to us at phishing@chase.com. We'll send you an automated response to let you know we got the message.

    Protect yourself

    You can protect yourself and your accounts by recognizing and preparing for online banking threats. Here are a few ways to keep yourself and your information safe:

    Be careful about giving out your username and passwords.

    Giving anyone access to your accounts can put your financial information and your money at risk. This includes financial websites and apps that offer tools to help you manage your accounts, invest or prepare your taxes.

    We work with some companies that allow you to enter your chase.com username and password directly into a secure chase.com window from their website or app. Once you’ve linked to these companies, you can see them under Linked Apps and Websites on chase.com, and remove access if you change your mind.

    We continue to work with additional companies to provide that secure access. If you have given your Chase password to a company, but don’t see it under Linked Apps and Websites, you should:

    • Know and trust the company that’s asking for your credentials
    • Learn about their security practices
    • Know what they plan to do with your information
    • Change your chase.com password if you want to remove their access.

    Be creative with your password

    It's important to use a highly secure password for all your financial accounts. The most secure passwords combine letters, numbers and special characters. Never use your pet's name, your child's name or anything else that a fraudster could easily find out, like your address, phone number or birth date. For added security, remember to change your password regularly, and avoid using the same password for multiple sites or financial institutions.

    We also recommend using an email provider that asks you to verify your identity in multiple steps.

    For more information, sign in and go to the “Passwords & Other Sensitive Information” section of the Digital Services Agreement. To change your username or password anytime, sign in and go to “Profile & settings” on chase.com.

    Be careful on social media

    It’s better to be cautious about the information you share on social media. Don't use information from your social media account for your password.

    Take control

    We make our products and services secure, but there are things you can do to keep your accounts safe, too:

    • Don't give your account numbers or any personal or financial information on the phone unless you initiate the conversation and you know the person or organization.
    • Don't give personal information to any stranger, even someone claiming to be from Chase.
    • Don't print your driver's license, phone or Social Security number on your checks.
    • Report lost or stolen checks immediately, and we’ll stop payment on the check numbers you report. When you get new checks, look through them to make sure none of them were stolen in the mail.
    • Store your new and canceled checks in a safe place.
    • Tell us right away if you get any suspicious phone inquiries asking for your personal or account information, or if you see anything suspicious in your account activity or on your statement.
    • To help keep thieves from stealing your identity, destroy or store financial information securely (including bank statements, invoices, ATM and credit card receipts).
    • Guard your PINs and passwords (hint: Don’t store them on your phone or write them on your card).
    • Create secure PINs and passwords. Don't use birth dates, your Social Security or driver's license numbers, your address or any family names. Someone trying to steal your identity may have this information.
    • If you use chase.com or one of our apps in public or on a public or shared computer, make sure you sign out when you’re done, and delete all cookies.
    • Be careful when you use your device in public areas. Watch out for anyone looking to see what you’re doing.

    Don't be fooled

    Phishing is when an imposter tries to trick you into providing your personal information. They might impersonate us in an email, phone call or text, asking you to confirm your information or saying you’ve won something—and it might look legitimate. A few examples:

    • You get an email that appears to be from a reputable company you know or do business with, like us. The email asks you to reply or go to a website that looks like chase.com, where you’ll be asked to give your username, password, account number, personal identification number (PIN), Social Security number or other personal information.
    • You get a voice mail or text message telling you your bank account will be closed, frozen or terminated unless you call or go to a website, where you’ll be asked to give personal information.

    Scams often try to create a feeling of urgency or alarm, by threatening to close off an account, or offering a security update—as soon as you provide your personal information. A few more common culprits are emails, phone calls or text messages that:

    • Require you to give personal or account information directly on the email or on a website; some fraudsters use pop-up windows to ask for confidential information.
    • Threaten to close or suspend your account if you don’t take immediate action.
    • Invite you to answer a survey that asks for personal or account information.
    • Say your account has been hacked, then asks for personal or account information.
    • Tell you there are unauthorized charges on your account, then asks for personal or account information.
    • Ask you to confirm, verify or update your account or billing information.
    • Ask you to provide account information because someone wants to send you money.
    • Claim you’re getting a refund.
    • Say you’ve won a contest.

    If you think you've received a suspicious email but you haven't acted on it, please forward it to phishing@chase.com.

    Learn how to spot suspicious emails

    Think before you open

    Don't open an email attachment, even if it appears to be from a friend or co-worker, unless you're expecting it or you’re absolutely sure you know what it contains.

    Watch out for email subject lines or emails with a generic message like "check this out" or "thought you'd be interested in this." Make sure you know who sent the email before you open an attachment or click any links.

    Set up free Account Alerts

    We're always looking for ways to help you keep your accounts safe. Free Account Alerts are a great way to keep track of your finances to detect withdrawals you didn’t authorize or other suspicious account activity. You can sign up to get all types of alerts by text, phone or email. Set up Account Alerts

    Get paperless statements

    Paperless statements are an easy way to stay clutter-free and avoid losing statements in the mail. If you go paperless, you’ll get an email alerting you that a new statement is available on chase.com. You can see these statements anytime, from virtually anywhere. Go paperless now

    Look over your credit reports

    At least once a year, read through your credit reports carefully. You can request a free annual credit report from each of the 3 national credit reporting agencies, even if you don’t suspect any unauthorized activity on your account.

    For your free annual report, go to AnnualCreditReport.com or call 1-877-FACTACT (1-877-322-8228). Or, request the reports directly from each agency:

    • Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    • Experian: 1-888-397-3742
    • TransUnion: 1-800-680-7289

    Look out for credit inquiries from unfamiliar companies, accounts you never opened and unexplained debts. This can be a warning sign of fraud or identity theft.

    Protect your equipment

    Install anti-virus and firewall software on your computer and keep it up to date.

    Be cautious about offers for free anti-virus software; make sure you get your software from a reputable company. Look for anti-virus software that scans incoming communications and files for viruses, removes or quarantines viruses and updates automatically.

    A firewall is software or hardware designed to block unauthorized access to your computer. It's especially important to run a firewall if you have a cable modem or DSL line or other broadband connection, because they’re targeted often. Many current operating systems come with a built-in firewall, which you have to turn on.

    Safeguard your business

    If you own a business, it's important to:

    • Maintain appropriate internal controls, including separation of duties. For example, be sure that the people who reconcile accounts are different than the people who make payments.
    • Periodically assess your risk and evaluate your internal controls, including reviewing your users and the permissions you give them. Your system administrator can establish user permissions and online transaction limits for each of your users.
    • Regularly check your transactions and statements for any unauthorized activity. We post your transaction details on Chase Commercial Online so you can monitor and control them—including transactions that originate online and through other channels, such as checks you've written or withdrawals you've made.
    • Take advantage of our online Positive Pay and Reverse Positive Pay Services to help you monitor and control checks clearing against your accounts.
    • Customize your Account Alerts so you’ll get notified when certain account activity takes place.
    Источник: https://www.chase.com/digital/resources/privacy-security/security/how-you-can-protect

    Protecting yourself from scams

    Recognizing a scam

    As Canada’s central bank, the Bank of Canada:

    • does not accept deposits from or on behalf of individuals
    • does not request the transfer of funds or payments from individuals
    • does not get involved in or partner with companies or individuals in investment schemes
    • does not collect personal or financial information from individuals through email or by telephone
    • does not request personal or financial information through social media messaging applications

    The Bank’s employees and officers:

    • do not request personal or financial information by telephone, email or through social media messaging applications
    • do not participate in any internet-based communications that request information or payment for services

    Reporting a scam

    Take the following steps if you have concerns about the contents of any call or internet-based communication that purports to be from the Bank or about the Bank’s involvement in any investment scheme or suspicious activity:

    • Delete the email or message after contacting your local authorities.
    • Do not follow links. Access the Bank’s website by typing the URL yourself—https://www.bankofcanada.ca—and look for references to the program identified in the email.
    • Call our Public Information Office at 1-800-303-1282 (toll-free in North America), or send us an with details of the scam.
    • Optionally, contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.
    Источник: https://www.bankofcanada.ca/2020/07/protecting-yourself-from-scams/

    More victims of Bank of America, Zelle scams come forward; here's how to protect yourself

    CONCORD, Calif. (KGO) -- The imposters struck just as nurse Page Pollack was running to catch a flight. At the airport she got a text saying, "Bank of America fraud alert. Did you just attempt a Zelle transaction of $3,500? Please reply yes or no."

    "So I thought, 'Oh my gosh I didn't authorize a $3,500 transfer through Zelle,'" Pollack recalled. "So I typed 'no.'"

    Then her phone rang. The caller ID said Bank of America. She answered and was told the only way to stop the fraud was to make another Zelle transaction. Boarding the plane, she grew more suspicious and opened the B of A app on her phone.

    RELATED: Victim of the Bank of America, Zelle scam? Here are your rights

    "Sure enough, I looked at my account and $3,500 was gone, right then and there, you see that $3,500 and your heart just sinks," Pollack said.

    That is a sinking feeling Trista Beauchamp from Concord felt too. She was conned in exactly the same way.

    "We were pretty well convinced that there was no way we were getting that money back, so we did nothing," she told 7 On Your Side. "But I started seeing your pieces and the people describing exactly what we went through, including having it be a Zelle transaction specifically, so I reached out to you."

    Beauchamp says she was caught at a bad moment too, and the scam is complex.

    "It's very confusing and you're sort of going, 'This doesn't quite seem right,' and at the same time. It's -- they just 'smoke bank of america fraud department email address mirrors' and they got me," she said.

    ABC7's 7 On Your Side team have received quite a few complaints -- and these scams aren't just happening here in the Bay Area.

    RELATED: School nurse falls victim to scam targeting Bank of America and Zelle customers


    Our Chicago ABC station, WLS, found victims too.

    Nausheen Brooks was taken for $3,500. "You save your hard-earned money, to just be taken away from you. You just don't know what to do, you feel lost," Brooks said.

    New victim, old scam: texts, phone calls and fake phone numbers. Consumer Action's Linda Sherry has seen it all before.

    "It's a false sense of urgency; it's always about, you know, act now, act quickly, hurry up. you know, the sky is falling," she said. "Guard against getting too excited in the moment. step back and think, is this really realistic? Could this possibly be true?"

    After 7 On Your Side got involved, Pollack got a call from Bank of America.

    "I said, 'So that means I get my money back?' She says, 'Yes', so I just started crying! I am just beyond grateful, beyond appreciative. And I thank you from the bottom of my heart," Pollack told 7 On Your Side.

    Beauchamp got her money back, too.

    "My advice is first of all, wait a beat, because it's easy to react when someone tells you that there's fraud on your account but taking just, you know, take a moment and remember that you've seen this story, and you know, these things are happening," she says.

    Bank of America has posted a warning about this on its website, and for this report told us in part:

    It's important that viewers understand that the bank and other companies would not ask customers to transfer money between accounts in this manner or request sensitive account information.

    Zelle's network operator, Early Warning Services, LLC, agrees and added:

    This is likely an example of a phishing scam where the scammer spoofed the bank phone number and attempted to convince the individual to provide their personal information, not a breach of the bank's or Zelle security.

    7 On Your Side's best advice here is never respond to unsolicited emails, texts or phone calls, and be cautious even if the caller ID says the name of your bank or another financial institution. Look up the contact information online and reach out to the bank directly.

    Take a look at more stories and videos by Michael Finney and 7 On Your Side.

    Have a question for Michael and the 7 On Your Side team? Fill out the form HERE!

    7OYS's consumer hotline is a free consumer mediation service for those in the San Francisco Bay Area. We assist individuals with consumer-related issues; we cannot assist on cases between businesses, or cases involving family law, criminal matters, landlord/tenant disputes, labor issues, or medical issues. Please review our FAQ here. As a part of our process in assisting you, it is necessary that we contact the company / agency you are writing about. If you do not wish us to contact them, please let us know right away, as it will affect our ability to work on your case. Due to the high volume of emails we receive, please allow 3-5 business days for a response.

    Источник: https://abc7news.com/7-on-your-side-7oys-michael-finney-bank-of-america/11069122/

    Bank of America Survey Phishing Email

    Woman using phone

    Tips to recognize if that Bank of America email is bogus: Internet ScamBusters #227

    Today we have two important topics for you:

    • Bank of America Survey Phishing Email
    • The PayPal Security Center: Tips for Fighting Phishing and Fraud.

    You'll find out about a new round of phishing emails, and some useful resources to prevent phishing, fraud and identity theft.

    On to today's topics.


    Bank of America Survey Phishing Email


    Last week we received a Bank of America phishing email that was supposed to look like it was sent by Bank of America to survey their customers. This email had the Bank of America logo on top. Here's the email:

    --- Begin Bank of America Survey Phishing Email --

    Dear customer!

    As you know, Bank of America always cares first of all for comfort and safety of the users. To make our service even more convenient and to improve results of mutual partnership we have made a decision to specify some features by asking our users.

    The most convenient way is, certainly, to do it online. We suggest you to go to the link

    https://www.bankofamerica.com/customers/service/promo/survey/

    and to answer some questions. The opinion of each user will be considered individually. We respect bank of america fraud department email address we appreciate you and your free time, therefore we offer you for some minutes, required for bank of america fraud department email address in the questioning, compensation in amount of $15 that will be sent to your personal account.

    We ask you not to neglect the opportunity to make your presence among the clients of Bank of America even more comfortable and convenient and to treat it seriously, not to hurry with answers, to consider them thoroughly. If the experience of this questioning becomes successful, we shall continue a similar practice, and the clients who have participated in this, the very first, survey will receive bonuses. Which bonuses? You will learn it from our circulars. Also you can follow the updating of the information on our official site.

    Don't put off our questioning, take part in it right now.

    Customer Service
    Bank of America
    http://www.bankofamerica.com/

    --- End Bank of America Survey Phishing Email --

    Naturally, the actual link in the email did not go to the (non-existent) page on the Bank of America website shown above, but instead went to a bogus phishing website.

    This bogus site used the information victims entered for stealing money, identities or perhaps both.

    Here are some tips you can use to recognize this Bank of America email is bogus:

    • It's addressed to "Dear customer!" rather than to me personally.
    • It was sent to an email address I'd never use for banking.
    • The email is poorly written.
    • It offers a reward for participation but then asks for the account number on the bogus website.

    And obviously, if you don't have an account with Bank of America, that's a dead giveaway. 😉

    Action: Delete all phishing emails. If you think an email may be legitimate, type the address of the company directly into your browser.


    The PayPal Security Center: Tips for Fighting Phishing and Fraud


    In an age where you can instantly send and receive money through an online payment service such as PayPal, it truly pays to know how safe your transactions are -- bank of america fraud department email address what you can do to protect yourself from online fraud.

    PayPal has set up the PayPal Security Center, which has some excellent information and tools. You can access it from the left nav bar when you log into your account.

    PayPal has also set up a few security features that every user should be aware of to avoid phishing, fraud, and identity theft.

    Protection from Identity Theft

    With PayPal, you can shop online without ever directly sharing your personal banking information (credit card numbers or checking account numbers) with a merchant.

    To keep a close eye on your credit, PayPal has teamed up with Equifax to give all U.S. customers free Equifax Credit Alerts. These email alerts notify you if anything on your credit report changes, giving you an early warning if someone tries to open an account in your name. This service is not inexpensive for non-members.

    (Note: When you sign up, there is a charge if you want this service from the other credit bureaus -- only Equifax is free. We have not tried to sign up for this PayPal Activate cash card in app service to verify how it works or that it is, in fact, free.)

    You can find out more about how to bank of america fraud department email address up by clicking on "Free Tools" from the PayPal Security Center, and then selecting "Equifax Credit Alerts(tm) for PayPal users."

    Protection from Phishing

    If you receive email from PayPal that asks for any of the following personal information, it is a fraud:

    • Bank account information
    • Credit/Debit card information
    • Driver's license information
    • Email addresses
    • PINs or passwords
    • Your full name.

    Fraudulent email often looks legitimate, but if you receive email with any of these telltale signs of phishing, PayPal advises you NOT to click on any of the links in the email:

    • The "From" line in the email may have a legitimate-looking address, but this does not ensure that PayPal actually sent the email.
    • If the greeting says something like "Dear Member," chances are the email is fraudulent. All PayPal emails will greet you by your full name.
    • Any email that says your account information must be updated immediately or it will be suspended is a phishing email.
    • Many phishing emails will contain a link that looks real, such as paypal.com, but to check its validity, hover over the link with your mouse and look at the URL. If the link looks suspicious, don't click on it. Even better, go directly to your browser and type in paypal.com, and log into your account directly from the browser.
    • PayPal never sends attachments, so if the email contains an attached file, don't click on it. Phishing emails often send attachments that contain spyware.

    If you suspect an email of phishing, forward the entire email to spoof@paypal.com and then delete it.

    Protection from Fraud

    In addition to protecting buyers from online fraud, PayPal also protects sellers. Just click on "Selling Safely" when you're at the PayPal Security Bank of america fraud department email address. You'll find information on many security measures, including:

    • Secure data encryption
    • Antifraud risk models
    • Address Verification System (for processing credit cards)
    • Card Security Code (for processing credit cards)
    • Verification
    • PayPal Antifraud specialists to help you resolve issues.

    Conclusion

    There is no question that there are important benefits of online buying and selling. However, be careful to reduce the related costs associated with identity theft, fraud, and phishing.

    It is important to know that although services such as PayPal try to protect you from fraud, you must be careful and keep a watchful eye on your credit report, as well as your PayPal and other financial accounts.

    And as a ScamBusters subscriber, we'll help you stay aware of the new and ongoing threats posed by online and offline scammers.

    Time to close -- we're off to take a walk. See you next week.

    Источник: https://scambusters.org/bankofamerica.html

    How you can protect yourself

    This information might look different depending on the browser you’re using. When a third party has verified the site you're trying to access, you'll see a message on the site letting you know you're on a verified website.

    Think you’ve shared your personal information?

    Sign in to chase.com and check your account information. If you notice suspicious activity in your accounts, let us know right away using one bank of america fraud department email address numbers on How to Report Fraud. If you think you've mistakenly given out personal information (such as your account number, password or PIN) in an email, text or website that might be fraudulent, call us right away. We’ll help secure your account.

    And, if you’ve shared your username or password with a person or a service you don’t feel secure about, change them anytime in “Profile & settings.”

    You can also forward a suspicious email message to us at phishing@chase.com. We'll send you an automated response to let you know we got the message.

    Protect yourself

    You can protect yourself and your accounts by recognizing and preparing for online banking threats. Here are a few ways to keep yourself and your information safe:

    Be careful about giving out your username and passwords.

    Giving anyone access to your accounts can put your financial information and your money at risk. This includes financial websites and apps that offer tools to help you manage your accounts, invest or prepare your taxes.

    We work with some companies that allow you to enter your chase.com username and password directly into a secure chase.com window from their website or app. Once you’ve linked to these companies, you can see them under Linked Apps and Websites on chase.com, and remove access if you change your mind.

    We continue to work with additional companies to provide that secure access. If you have given your Chase password to a company, but don’t see it united first class change fee Linked Apps and Websites, you should:

    • Know and trust the company that’s asking for your credentials
    • Learn about their security practices
    • Know what they plan to do with your information
    • Change your chase.com password if you want to remove their access.

    Be creative with your password

    It's important to use a highly secure password for all your financial accounts. The most secure passwords combine letters, numbers and special characters. Never use your pet's name, your child's name or anything else that a fraudster could easily find out, like your address, phone number or birth date. For added security, remember to change your password regularly, and avoid using the same password for multiple sites or financial institutions.

    We also recommend using an email provider that asks you to verify your identity in multiple steps.

    For more information, sign in and go to the “Passwords & Other Sensitive Information” section of the Digital Services Agreement. To change your username or password anytime, sign in and go to “Profile & settings” on chase.com.

    Be careful on social media

    It’s better to be cautious about the information you share on social media. Don't use information from your social media account for your password.

    Take control

    We make our products and services secure, but there are things you can do to keep your accounts safe, too:

    • Don't give your account numbers or any personal or financial information on the phone unless you initiate the conversation and you know the person or organization.
    • Don't give personal information to any stranger, even someone claiming to be from Chase.
    • Don't print your driver's license, phone or Social Security number on your checks.
    • Report lost or stolen checks immediately, and we’ll stop payment on the check numbers you report. When you get new checks, look through them to make sure none of them were stolen in the mail.
    • Store your new and canceled checks in a safe place.
    • Tell us right away if you get any suspicious phone inquiries asking for your personal or account information, or if you see anything suspicious in your account activity or on your statement.
    • To help keep thieves from stealing your identity, destroy or store financial information securely (including bank statements, invoices, ATM and credit card receipts).
    • Guard your PINs and passwords (hint: Don’t store them on your phone or write them on your card).
    • Create secure PINs and passwords. Don't use birth dates, your Social Security or driver's license numbers, your address or any family names. Someone trying to steal your identity may have this information.
    • If you use chase.com or one of our apps in public or on a public or shared computer, make sure you sign out when you’re done, and delete all cookies.
    • Be careful when you use your device in public areas. Watch out for anyone looking to see what you’re doing.

    Don't be fooled

    Phishing is when an imposter tries to trick you into providing your personal information. They might impersonate us in an email, phone call or text, asking you to confirm your information or saying you’ve won something—and it might look legitimate. A few examples:

    • You get an email that appears to be from a reputable company you know or do business with, like us. The email asks you to reply or go to a website that looks like chase.com, where you’ll be asked to give your username, password, account number, personal identification number (PIN), Social Security number or other personal information.
    • You get a voice mail or text message telling you your bank account will be closed, frozen or terminated unless you call or go to a website, where you’ll be asked to give personal information.

    Scams often try to create a feeling of urgency or alarm, by threatening to close off an account, or offering a security update—as soon as you provide your personal information. A few more common culprits are emails, phone calls or text messages that:

    • Require you to give personal or account information directly on the email or on a website; some fraudsters use pop-up windows to ask for confidential information.
    • Threaten to close or suspend your account if you don’t take immediate action.
    • Invite you to answer a survey that asks for personal or account information.
    • Say your account has been hacked, then asks for personal or account information.
    • Tell you there are unauthorized charges on your account, then asks for personal or account information.
    • Ask you to confirm, verify or update your account or billing information.
    • Ask you to provide account information because someone wants to send you money.
    • Claim you’re getting a refund.
    • Say you’ve won a contest.

    If you think you've received a suspicious email but you haven't acted on it, please forward it to phishing@chase.com.

    Learn how to spot suspicious emails

    Think before you open

    Don't open an email attachment, even if it appears to be from a friend or co-worker, unless you're expecting it or you’re absolutely sure you know what it contains.

    Watch out for email subject lines or emails with a generic message like "check this out" or "thought you'd be interested in this." Make sure you know who sent the email before you open an attachment or click any links.

    Set up free Account Alerts

    We're always looking for ways to help you keep your accounts safe. Free Account Alerts are a great way to keep track of your finances to detect withdrawals you didn’t authorize or other suspicious account activity. You can sign up to get all types of alerts by text, phone or email. Set up Account Alerts

    Get paperless statements

    Paperless statements are an easy way to stay clutter-free and avoid losing statements in the mail. If you go paperless, you’ll get an email alerting you that a new statement is available on chase.com. You can see these statements anytime, from virtually anywhere. Go paperless now

    Look over your credit reports

    At least once a year, read through your credit reports carefully. You can request a free annual credit report from each of the 3 national credit reporting agencies, even if you don’t suspect any unauthorized activity on your account.

    For your free annual report, go to AnnualCreditReport.com or call 1-877-FACTACT (1-877-322-8228). Or, request the reports directly from each agency:

    • Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    • Experian: 1-888-397-3742
    • TransUnion: 1-800-680-7289

    Look out for credit inquiries from unfamiliar companies, accounts you never opened and unexplained debts. This can be a warning sign of fraud or identity theft.

    Protect your equipment

    Install anti-virus and firewall software on your computer and keep it up to date.

    Be cautious about offers for free anti-virus software; make sure you get your software from a reputable company. Look for anti-virus software that scans incoming communications and files for viruses, removes or quarantines viruses and updates automatically.

    A firewall is software or hardware designed to block unauthorized access to your computer. It's especially important to run a firewall if you have a cable modem or DSL line or other broadband connection, because they’re targeted often. Many current operating systems come with a built-in firewall, which you have to turn on.

    Safeguard your business

    If you own a business, it's important to:

    • Maintain appropriate internal controls, including separation of duties. For example, be sure that the people who reconcile accounts are different than the people who make payments.
    • Periodically assess your risk and evaluate your internal controls, including reviewing your users and the permissions you give them. Your system administrator can establish user permissions and online transaction limits for each of your users.
    • Regularly check your transactions and statements for any unauthorized activity. We post your transaction details on Chase Commercial Online so you can monitor and control them—including transactions that originate online and through other channels, such as checks you've written or withdrawals you've made.
    • Take advantage of our online Positive Pay and Reverse Positive Pay Services to help you monitor and control checks clearing against your accounts.
    • Customize your Account Alerts so you’ll get notified when certain account activity takes place.
    Источник: https://www.chase.com/digital/resources/privacy-security/security/how-you-can-protect

    Protecting yourself from scams

    Recognizing a scam

    As Canada’s central bank, the Bank of Canada:

    • does not accept deposits from or on behalf of individuals
    • does not request the transfer of funds or payments from individuals
    • does not get involved in or partner with companies or individuals in investment schemes
    • does not collect personal or financial information from individuals through email or by telephone
    • does not request personal or financial information through social media messaging applications

    The Bank’s employees and officers:

    • do not request personal or financial information by telephone, email or through social media messaging applications
    • do not participate in any internet-based communications that request information or payment for services

    Reporting a scam

    Take the following steps if you have concerns about the contents of any call or internet-based communication that purports to be from the Bank or about the Bank’s involvement in any investment scheme or suspicious activity:

    • Delete the email or message after contacting your local authorities.
    • Do not follow links. Access the Bank’s website by typing the URL yourself—https://www.bankofcanada.ca—and look for references to the program identified in the email.
    • Call our Public Information Office at 1-800-303-1282 (toll-free in North America), or send us an with details of the scam.
    • Optionally, contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.
    Источник: https://www.bankofcanada.ca/2020/07/protecting-yourself-from-scams/
    ExpandDetecting fraud

    You can avoid fraud if you know how to detect it. There are several different types of card fraud to avoid:

    • Card not present fraud: fraudsters can obtain your credit bank of america fraud department email address details from such things as discarded receipts. They can then use this information to purchase high value or desirable goods online, by phone or mail order. For transactions online or by phone the retailer does not need to see the card (or require the PIN), hence the name "card not present fraud".
    • Identity theft/account takeover fraud: fraudsters can obtain your personal details from various sources including: discarded or intercepted mail, phishing

      phishing

      Phishing - an attempt at identity theft using a fake website or email that looks identical or similar to the genuine website that a user is used to seeing.

      , vishing

      vishing

      Vishing - is the criminal practice of using social bank of america fraud department email address and Voice over IP (VoIP) to gain access to private personal and financial information for the purpose of financial reward. The term is a combination of "voice" and phishing. When you answer a phone call, an automated recording, often generated with a text to speech synthesizer, is played to alert you that your credit card has had fraudulent activity and you should call a designated number immediately. Moreover, that same phone number is often shown in the spoofed caller ID with the same name as the financial company they are pretending to represent. If you receive this type of call, you are advised to contact your bank or credit card company directly to verify its validity.

      , smishing

      smishing

      Smishing - is a form of criminal activity using social engineering techniques similar to phishing. With smishing, you may receive SMS messages through your mobile device that may ask you to register for an online service and then try to sneak a virus onto your device. Other types of messages may warn that you will be charged unless you cancel a supposed order by going to a website that will attempt to extract credit card information and other private data.

      , spoofing

      spoofing

      Spoofing - forging and distributing emails to acquire a valid password to gain unauthorized access to a computer.

      , hoax calls, social networking websites, public records, hacking

      hacking

      Hacking - an attempt by an accomplished technical computer operator to break into computers or networks for illegal purposes.

      genuine websites and listening in on telephone calls. Once they have your personal details they can use this to access your account, order cards, change your address, complete a balance transfer or deposit and assume the identity of a genuine customer in order to purchase goods or obtain funds fraudulently.
    • Application fraud: this is another form of identity theft

      identity theft

      Identity Theft - the crime of impersonating someone for a financial or criminal gain.

      . In this case, the fraudster uses your personal details to apply for a brand new credit card or bank account rather than taking over an existing account. This often happens when the genuine customer has moved from their previous address.
    • Counterfeit fraud: this is the manufacture of a fake credit card using genuine card details. The card details are copied from the magnetic strip of the genuine card using a device called a skimmer

      skimmer

      Skimmer - a tool that aids the process of copying card details from the magnetic strip on the back of the card to be transferred on to a counterfeit card for the purpose of fraudulent use.

      . This information is then transferred to the magnetic strip on a fake credit card that can be used to purchase goods online or in countries where Chip & PIN has not yet been introduced.
    • Malware fraud: short for "malicious software", malware refers to software programs that are distributed in the form of innocent-looking popups, emails or spam

      Spam

      Spam - junk email that you have not requested from the distributor.

      but are designed to damage, capture information or do other unwanted actions to your computer. Common examples include viruses

      viruses

      Viruses - a code written to spread from one computer to the next, damaging hardware or used to access a computer for criminal intent.

      , worms

      worms

      Worms - a self-replicating virus that does not alter files, but resides in active memory and duplicates itself for the purpose of malicious intent (like shutting systems down).

      , trojan horses

      trojan horses

      Trojan Horses - a computer program or email attachment that appears to be useful but is actually harmful and may include a virus.

      , adware

      adware

      Adware: advertisements that "pop up" in a separate browser window. Some look like they come from respectable financial institutions and ask for personal financial information. Others might have a link that downloads spyware. Please note that most financial institutions will never request personal financial information or that you download from a pop-up.

      and spyware

      spyware

      Spyware - a software that spies on your computer to capture information like web browsing habits, email messages, user names and passwords and credit card information.

      .
    ExpandPreventing fraud

    Fraud can happen to you at any time and through a number of different sources. It is important that you quickly recognize it and know what to do to help mitigate the risk of you being impacted.

    • If your credit card bank of america fraud department email address lost or stolen or you do not recognize a transaction on your credit card account statement, please contact our Customer Service department, toll-free, at 1-800-404-1319. The sooner you report it, the sooner we can block your account from further use and issue you a new credit card account number.
    • If you suspect that you have received a fraudulent MBNA email, requesting account information or asking you to click on a link, please attach the email to the Email Fraud form below.
    • If we believe your credit card device (i.e. card plastic) may have been lost, stolen or compromised, we will try to contact you to ensure that you still have your credit card and to verify any recent transactions.
    • It is important to keep your personal details up-to-date. If you move or your personal details change, please let us know so that we can update our records. We will contact you as soon as possible if we suspect fraudulent activity. Also, remember to stop or divert your mail when you are away from home for an extended period of time.
    • Fraud Alert emails from MBNA will always address you by your first and last name, and will contain the last 4 digits of your credit card number. This will help you verify that the email originated from a trusted source. We will always require you to log in to our secure Online Banking service in order to share personal information, if required. We will never ask for your credit card account number or any other personal information to be sent to us via email.
    • If we contact you by phone, we will always ask you to confirm your identity with information we have on file. If you are concerned that the caller may not be an MBNA agent, then we bank of america fraud department email address you to call the toll-free number on the back of your card for greater peace of mind.
    ExpandEmail fraud

    Report fraud now

    If your card is lost or stolen or you don't recognize a transaction on your account, call us immediately.

    1-800-404-1319
    24 hours, 7 days

    If you are travelling and plan to use your MBNA Credit Card, you no longer need to advise us in advance! 

    Our Fraud detection systems detect suspicious and potentially fraudulent transactions 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

    You can call us anytime if you have any questions or concerns about your MBNA credit card at 1- 888-876-6262 (in North America) or collect at 613-907-3505 ** Les numéros français sont 1-800-870-3675 ou recueillis au 613-907-3506

    Источник: https://www.mbna.ca/help-centre/security-and-fraud/fraud-prevention/index.jsp

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    5 Replies to “Bank of america fraud department email address”

    1. I will never use this bank again. My twins had accts. with them while in college, nicer here, but this is not acceptable. This guy is very patient and respectful, no reason for this treatment, but racism.

    2. Wow super thank you so much all 🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏👁👁👍👍👍👍👍👍👍👍🙏

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