at home leg and core workouts

Or you think legs aren't as important to focus on when you only have so much time at the gym or home to get your workout in. Well, we're here today to make. Some individuals, however, find that these compound movements can create lower back pain, stiffness, and soreness; leaving them at a loss for how to train their. Mountain climbers are total body workouts, building strength in your core, back, arms and legs — not to mention your heart. Modify it: If this exercise puts too.

At home leg and core workouts -

Pumping iron isn’t the only way to strengthen your legs. Weight training typically targets the big guns—the quads, hamstrings, and glutei maximi—and neglects the smaller muscles critical for balance and joint stability, such as the hip abductors and adductors, the flexors, and the obliques. Training with resistance bands is one of the best ways to work every muscle in the lower body, and you can do it anywhere.

Kate Ligler, a National Academy of Sports Medicine–certified personal trainer and an endurance coach with MindBody, and Brian Slaman, the director of precision training at Flywheel Sports, use and coach with resistance bands all the time. So we reached out to them for a sampling of the best leg-specific resistance-band exercises.

Read on for ten resistance-bands moves for the lower body.

The Workout

Do these exercises as a circuit. Complete one set of each with a one-minute rest between rounds. For a total leg day, start with three to four rounds of four to six exercises (try to balance out the target muscle groups, cycling through exercises that work different parts of the leg). If paired with upper-body exercises, pick three or four moves. Add more exercises and rounds as you get stronger. All you’ll need is a set of looped resistance bands (also known as mini bands).

Focus on proper form and not the number of repetitions. “For all of the exercises,” Slaman says, “keep your core engaged so your back stays supported.”

How to Choose the Right Resistance Band

Resistance bands come in different weights, typically ranging from extralight to ultraheavy. Some exercises are harder than others, and you’ll likely need to switch between different bands. The right band is the one that lets you complete 12 to 15 reps, working to get in those last reps but all with good form. If your form breaks before 12 reps, pick a lighter band. If you can easily complete 15 or more reps, move to the next level of resistance. You can double or triple up on bands if you don’t have a wide range of weights or if you need the extra resistance.

The Moves

Lateral-Band Steps

What they do: Strengthen the hip-abductor muscles (the gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and tensor fasciae latae) and quads.

How to do them: Place a resistance band around both legs, and position it just above the knees (easier) or around the ankles (harder). Assume a quarter-squat position, with your feet pointed forward, hip width apart. With the right foot, step right roughly 12 inches, and then, with control, step in with the left foot the equivalent distance so that your feet are back to a hip-width distance apart. Repeat in the opposite direction, and continue alternating steps side to side.

Maintain an athletic stance (don’t stand up between steps) and keep tension in the band throughout the exercise. You should feel this on the outside of your hips and thighs. For an extra quad workout, perform the exercise from a deeper squat (knees bent to around 90 degrees) without standing up between steps.

Reps: 12 to 15 on each side. Alternate directions every rep.

One and One-Quarter Squats

What they do: Strengthen the glutes, quads, and hamstrings, while engaging the hip-abductor muscles to train correct knee position and stability.

How to do them: Place the band above your knees and enter an athletic stance, with your feet shoulder width apart, your chest upright, and your core engaged. Squat until your knees are bent to around 90 degrees (for more difficulty, go lower if you have the hip mobility and can maintain good form). From the bottom of the squat, stand up one-quarter of the total distance, and then lower once again, like a mini squat within the squat, before standing all the way up to complete one repetition. Drive your knees outward against the band throughout the movement.

Reps: 12 to 15.

Single-Leg Stands

What they do: Strengthen the quads and glutei maximi, while engaging the glutei medii to train correct knee position and stability.

How to do them: Place the band above your knees. Sit on the edge of a bench or chair, ideally one at a height where your knees are bent to 90 degrees when sitting (the higher the seat, the easier). Tilt your torso forward slightly so that your chest is in front of your hips. Then lift one foot off the floor by an inch or so, and with the opposite foot firmly planted on the ground, stand up on that one leg until it is fully extended. Slowly return to a seated position for one repetition. Keep a consistent hip-width space between your knees throughout the movement.

Knee position is key. On the standing leg, focus on keeping your knee in line with your leg by pushing out against the band instead of allowing it to collapse or dip inward. “In general, when your knee collapses inward, that is because your quad and inner thigh are overcompensating for a weak gluteus medius,” says Ligler. That can stress the knee joint over time. This exercise activates the gluteus medius to train knee stabilization during a single-leg stand—a common movement pattern when hiking, running hills, or climbing—and it’s a great way to prevent knee pain.

Reps: 12 to 15 on each side. Either alternate legs every rep (easier), or complete all reps on the same leg, lightly touching the seat but not fully sitting down, before switching sides (harder).

Standing Glute Kickbacks

What they do: Strengthen the glutes and hamstrings.

How to do them: Place the band around your ankles, and stand with your feet hip width apart. Engage your core muscles, shift your weight onto one leg, and with the opposite leg, slowly kick backward about six to eight inches. Reverse the movement with control, and with your raised foot, gently tap the ground just behind your planted foot. This equals one repetition.

Focus on balance and form. Stable, level hips are key. If your hips dip or twist, or if your lower back arches in compensation, you’re likely kicking back too far or using too heavy a resistance band. Your glutes and hamstrings should be doing all of the work here.

Reps: 12 to 15 on each side. Complete all reps on one leg, then switch to the other.

Clamshells

What they do: Strengthen the glutei medii and obliques.

How to do them: Place the band above your knees, and lie on your side, with your knees bent to 90 degrees. Prop your head up on your hand, rest it on your biceps, or support yourself with your lower arm. Engage your core, keep your feet pressed together, and drive your top knee toward the ceiling as far as you can without compensating form. Slowly bring it down again for one repetition.

Keep your hips stacked and perpendicular to the floor throughout the exercise. “If you tilt your pelvis back, it’s an indication that you’ve done too many reps or you need a lighter resistance,” says Slaman.

Reps: 12 to 15 on each side. Complete all reps on one side first before doing the other side.

Runner’s Extensions

What they do: Strengthen the abdominals, hip flexors, and quads.

How to do them: Lie on your back, and loop the band around the center of both feet. Then lift your feet off the ground so that your knees and hips are bent to 90-degree angles and your shins are parallel to the ceiling. Keep your feet and knees hip width apart to maintain tension in the band. Tighten your core, and hold one leg firmly in place (the anchor leg) while you press against the band to fully extend the opposite leg. Slowly reverse the movement for one repetition. Flex your foot on the anchor leg to prevent the band from sliding off.

The anchor leg does all the work here, and your goal is to keep it perfectly stabilized while it holds the tension created by the band and the extension leg. “When the anchor leg breaks, meaning you’re not able to continue to hold a 90-degree angle at your hip and behind your knee, that’s when you’re done on this exercise,” says Ligler.

Reps: 12 to 15 on each side. Alternate sides every rep.

Side-Lying Leg Lifts

What they do: Strengthen the hip-abductor muscles.

How to do them: Place the band above your knees (easier) or around your ankles (harder). Lie on your side with your legs straight and stacked. Prop your head up on your hand, rest it on your biceps, or support yourself with your lower arm. Lift your upper leg toward the ceiling as high as you can without hiking your hip, then slowly lower it for one repetition. Keep your upper leg in line with your bottom leg throughout the movement. Focus on tempo—slow and steady—and good form.

Reps: 12 to 15 on each side. Complete all reps on one side first before doing the other side.

Squat Jacks

What they do: Target the glutei medii, quads, and calves.

How to do them: Place the band above your knees (easier) or around your ankles (harder). Assume a quarter-squat position, with your feet pointed forward, hip width apart—like you would for lateral-band steps. Jump your feet out to each side, approximately four to six inches, and immediately back to the starting position for one repetition. Continue as quickly as you can while keeping good form. Maintain a still upper body throughout the exercise. Your torso and head should essentially remain in place while your legs do all the work.

Reps: 12 to 15.

Monster Walk

What it does: Targets the glutei maximi.

How to do it: Place the band around your ankles. Stand with your feet hip width apart, engage your core, bend your knees slightly, and hinge forward at the hips to enter an athletic stance. Then take alternating steps backward (each step should be roughly eight to ten inches in length) while maintaining an equal distance between your feet and tension in the band. Focus on your hips: they should stay square (facing forward) and level throughout the exercise.

If your hips begin to twist, you’re likely fatigued or taking too large of steps. If that’s the case, take smaller steps or switch to a lighter resistance band.

Reps: 12 to 15 on each side.

Hip Bridges

What they do: Target the glutes and hamstrings.

How to do them: Place the band above your knees. Lie on your back, with your feet flat on the floor, hip width apart. Engage your abs and squeeze your glutes as you press down through your heels to lift your pelvis off the floor, until your knees reach a 90-degree bend. Slowly reverse the movement for one repetition. Push your knees out against the band to keep them in line with your shoulders and feet throughout the movement.

Make it harder by lifting one foot off the ground an inch and pushing solely with the opposite leg. Alternate reps.

Reps: 12 to 15.

Источник: https://www.outsideonline.com/health/training-performance/best-resistance-bands-exercises-legs/

10-minute legs, bums and tums home workout - Exercise

Tone up, firm up and burn fat from your tummy, hips, thighs and bottom with this 10-minute legs, bums and tums (LBT) home workout.

This LBT exercise routine counts towards your recommended weekly activity target for strength.

Before you begin, warm up with a 6-minute warm-up. After your workout, cool down with a 5-minute stretch.

Squats: great for firm bums and thighs

Do 2 sets of 15 to 24 repetitions (reps).

Squats starting position
Squats lowered position

Tip: Keep your back straight and don't let your knees extend over your toes.

Lunges: great for firm bums and thighs

Do 1 set of 15 to 24 reps with each leg.

Lunge starting position
Lunge lowered position

Tip: Keep your back straight and don't let your knees extend over your toes.

Calf raises: great for shapely legs and calves

Do 2 sets of 15 reps.

Calf raises front view
Calf raises side view

Tip: For more of a challenge, do these calf raises away from the wall and with a weight in each hand, such as 2 water bottles.

Bridges: great for firm bums

Do 2 sets of 15 to 20 reps.

Bridge raised position

Tip: Don't let your knees point outwards.

Stomach crunches: great for strong abs

Do 2 sets of 15 to 24 reps.

Stomach crunches

Tip: Don't tuck your neck into your chest as you rise and don't use your hands to pull your neck up.

Obliques: great for toning love handles

Do 1 set of 12 to 24 reps on each side.

Oblique crunches

Back raises: great for good posture

Do 2 sets of 15 to 24 reps.

Back raises

Tip: Keep a long neck and look down as you perform the exercise.

Now cool down with this 5-minute stretch and cool-down routine.

Information:

Try these other 10-minute workouts:

Page last reviewed: 28 September 2018
Next review due: 28 September 2021

Источник: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/10-minute-legs-bums-tums-home-workout/

Beginner Ab & Core Exercises to Increase Stability and Mobility

If you are beginning an exercise program, you have probably heard that developing core strength is important. Although true, your goal at the start of an exercise program should be to reestablish stability and mobility in your body, which begins at the center of mass and the core. Thus, you want to develop stabilization throughout the core and spinal column muscles and then progress to training the core by mobilizing the limbs and incorporating movement. 

Following are two phases of core exercises. The first trains stability while the second phase focuses on mobility. It is best to develop stability before progressing to mobility. Start by performing each exercise for 20 seconds and gradually increase to 30 or more seconds as your fitness level improves. If the exercise involves movement, start with eight repetitions and progress to 12 as your core strength improves. Finally, start with two sets and eventually increase to three sets of each exercise. 

Stability

Core Bracing

This exercise teaches you how to stabilize your core throughout the exercises that follow. Stand tall with your feet hip-distance apart and your arms by your sides with palms facing forward. Contract the abdominal muscles for 10 seconds and continue to breathe deeply. You can progress this exercise by bracing the core and slowly lifting your right leg to 90 degrees in front of the body. Continue to alternate. The goal is to brace the core so that you are only moving the hip joint. You do not want to compensate with the torso or swing the leg with momentum. The slower the movement, the deeper you will brace the core. 

Bird Dog

Assume an all-fours position, with hands shoulder-width apart and knees hip-distance apart. Brace the core and extend your right leg behind you. Keep the foot level with the hip. Next, extend your left arm forward with the thumb facing upward. Keep the hand level with the shoulder. Hold and repeat on the opposite side. 

Plank

Assume an all-fours position, with hands shoulder-width apart and knees hip-distance apart. Extend the legs and place your weight on the balls of the feet. Keep the core braced and breathe deeply. To make the plank easier, keep the feet hip-distance apart; place the feet together to make the move more challenging. 

Hip Bridge

Lie on your back and place the feet onto the floor, hip-distance apart. Keep the arms by your sides with palms facing the floor. Lift the hips upward to feel the contraction into the hamstrings, glutes and lower back. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds and slowly release back to the floor, one vertebrae at a time. 

Side Plank

Lie on your right side and place your right forearm on the floor. Bend the right knee to 90 degrees and lift the hips off the ground. Reach the left arm above the shoulder, with the palm facing forward.  Keep the right shoulder blade “down” and away from the ear. Hold and repeat on the other side. 

Supine Toe Taps

Lie on your back and bend the knees 90 degrees. Activate and brace the core. Exhale and, while keeping the right knee at 90 degrees, lower the leg to “tap” toward the floor. Return to center and switch to the other leg. Alternate legs while maintaining core stability. Don’t let the spine pop on and off the floor. 

Mobility

Bird Dog With Elbow to Knee

Assume an all-fours position, with hands shoulder-width apart and knees hip-distance apart. Brace the core and extend your right leg behind you. Keep the foot level with the hip. Next, extend your left arm forward with the thumb facing upward. Keep the hand level with the shoulder. Draw the left elbow and the right knee toward each other (most likely they will not touch) and then extend to the starting position. Complete one set on the first side and repeat on the opposite side. 

Plank With Knee Drive

Assume an all-fours position, with hands shoulder-width apart and knees hip-distance apart. Extend the legs and place your weight on the balls of the feet. Keep the core braced and breathe deeply. Slowly, draw the right knee in toward the chest and release the foot back to the starting position. Alternate between driving the right and then the left knee forward.  

Moving Hip Bridge

Lie on your back and place the feet onto the floor, hip-distance apart. Keep the arms by your sides with palms facing the floor. Lift the hips upward to feel the contraction into the hamstrings, glutes and lower back. Hold for three seconds and slowly release the spine and hips back to the floor. Continue lifting and lowering for your set. 

Side Plank with Rotation

Lie on your right side and place your right forearm on the floor. Bend the right knee to 90 degrees and lift the hips off the ground. Reach the left arm above the shoulder, with the palm facing forward.  Keep the right shoulder blade “down” and away from the ear. Rotate your ribcage toward the floor and draw the left arm under the ribs. Rotate back to center and extend the left arm. Continue your set and switch sides. 

Supine Leg Extension

Lie on your back and bend the knees 90 degrees. Activate and brace the core. Exhale and push your right foot “away” to extend the right leg. Return to center and switch to the other leg. Alternate legs while maintaining core stability; don’t let the spine to pop on and off the floor.

ACE Fitness on Instagram
Источник: https://www.acefitness.org/education-and-resources/lifestyle/blog/5807/beginner-ab-core-exercises-to-increase-stability-and-mobility/

Leg Workouts for Runners

Focused strength training will make you a better runner by increasing your endurance, power and efficiency. Since your legs propel you forward as you run, it’s critical that you develop leg strength, balance and proper movement patterns.

While running seems simple, it puts lots of force and load onto your muscles and joints, so it requires practiced and precise movement. Building up your leg strength will reduce your risk for injury by making muscles and joints stronger and reinforcing proper form.

One of the best parts about doing these leg workouts (aside from faster, easier running) is you don’t need an expensive gym membership. There are plenty of bodyweight exercises that you can do at home to improve your strength for running.

With any training, it’s crucial to start with the basics and take the time to dial in your form. Bad form can cause pain and injury. Practicing proper movement in your strength exercises will improve neuromuscular coordination to improve your running form and power.

Here are some of the best leg exercises for runners to build strength and endurance:

  1. Squats
  2. Squat to Hydrant
  3. Sumo Squat
  4. Bulgarian Split Squat
  5. Pistols (Single Leg Squats)
  6. Calf Raises with Eccentric Drop
  7. Single Leg Calf Raises with Eccentric Drop
  8. Reverse Lunges
  9. Jumping Lunges
  10. Box Jumps
  11. Single Leg Deadlift
  12. Good Mornings
  13. Wall Sits
  14. Skater Jumps

[Looking for more strength training for runners? Check out our guide to core workouts.]

Источник: https://www.fleetfeet.com/strength-training/leg-workouts

Abdominal exercise

Abdominal exercises are a type of strength exercise that affect the abdominal muscles (colloquially known as the stomach muscles or "abs"). Human abdominal consist of four muscles which are the rectus abdomens, internal oblique, external oblique, and transversus abdominis. [1] When performing abdominal exercises it is important to understand the effects, functions, the types of exercises, and think about how to perform this exercise safely.

Effects[edit]

Abdominal exercises are useful for building abdominal muscles. This is useful for improving performance with certain sports, back pain, and for withstanding abdominal impacts (e.g., taking punches). According to a 2011 study, abdominal muscle exercises are known to increase the strength and endurance of the abdominal muscles.[2]

It has been highly disputed whether or not abdominal exercises have any reducing effect on abdominal fat. The aforementioned 2011 study found that abdominal exercise does not reduce abdominal fat; to achieve that, a deficit in energy expenditure and caloric intake must be created—abdominal exercises alone are not enough to reduce abdominal fat and the girth of the abdomen.[2] Early results from a 2006 study found that walking exercise (not abdominal exercise specifically) reduced the size of subcutaneous abdominal fat cells; cell size predicts type 2 diabetes according to a lead author. Moderate exercise reduced cell size by about 18% in 45 obese women over 20 weeks; diet alone did not appear to affect cell size.[3]

Functions of abdominal muscles[edit]

Abdominal muscles have many important functions, including breathing, coughing, and sneezing, and maintaining posture and speech in a number of species.[4] Other abdominal functions are that it helps "in the function of support, containment of viscera, and help in the process of expiration, defecation, urination, vomiting, and also at the time of childbirth."[5][6] The anterior abdominal wall is made up of four muscles—the rectus abdominis muscle, the internal and external obliques, and the transversus abdominis."The two internal muscles, the internal oblique, and the transverse abdominis, respond more to increases in chemical or volume-related drive than the two external muscles, the rectus abdominis and external oblique; the basis for this differential sensitivity is unknown".[4]

Core training[edit]

Further information on Core: Core (anatomy)

Not only can a one-sided preference for abdominal muscles (lack of exercise focused on other core muscles) result in creating muscle imbalances, but the effectiveness of exercise is also far from what could be achieved with a balanced workout planning. Core training frequently utilizes balance exercises, such as training of transverse abdomens and multifidus, training of diaphragm, and training of pelvic floor muscles.[7] Core strength exercises that are performed are to help influence core stability.

The goal of core training is definitely not to develop muscle hypertrophy but to improve functional predispositions of physical activity. This particularly involves improving intermuscular coordination or synchronization of participating muscles.[8]

The involvement of the core means more than just compressing abdominal muscles when in crouching or seated position. The role of the core muscles is to stabilize the spine. Resisting expansion or rotation is as important as the ability to execute the movement.

Abdominal exercises[edit]

This image shows an abdominal exercise crunch using a stability ball.

There are multiple ways to work on our abdominals but here are various abdominal exercises someone can do that are effective.

One of the most popular exercise is what is known as the abdominal crunch. It activates the four abdominal muscles because it flexes the spine while laying down with their feet on the ground while raising their upper body up and then back down. For those who are new to this exercise, it can help perform this exercise by crossing their arms and putting them crossed on their chest. Another effective exercise is an abdominal plank because it is used when strengthening their trunk and their inner and outer oblique of their core. This exercise is performed by being facedown, legs straight with their elbows bent, and holding the exercise in place by putting their weight on their forearms. [9]

Moving forward, another exercise people can begin doing is to lie on their back and putting their feet at a 45° angle while moving their legs as if they were riding a bicycle. In addition, people can lay down with their hands on their side of their body and position a book on their stomach while raising their stomach up and down to feel the burn in their core. People may also lay down and position their feet at a 45° angle and lift them straight and bend them back down to the 45° angle then repeat. Once people have completed those they can stand straight with both of their arms opened and straight and bend down to the left then to the right by using one hand at a time. While standing people can also stand straight and position their hands on their hips and rotate their bodies from right to left and vice versa while bending forward and backward. Another way someone can work on their abdominals is by sitting on top of their legs in a bed while bending their chest forward until it touches the bed then coming back up to their normal position. Also, people can sit down on a bed with their legs straight and they will lie back and come back up without using their hands. While using a chair they can place their arms on the side of a chair and with their legs backward they will push down until their abdominal touches the chair. Finally, people can lay down with their feet straight and raise their legs to a right angle and then back down. For a better visual understanding, all these exercises were obtained from an Abdominal Exercise Journal. [10]

Momentaneous activity[edit]

One way to estimate the effectiveness of any abdominal exercise is in measuring the momentaneous[jargon] activity by electromyography (EMG), with the activity generally being compared to that of the traditional crunch. However, an exercise of lower activity performed during a long time can give at least as much exercise as a high-activity exercise, with the main difference being that a prolonged duration results in more in aerobic exercise than strength training.

The following tables rank abdominal exercises from highest to lowest in terms of activity as determined by the EMG measures:[11]

exercise mean
activity1
Captain's chair310%
Bicycle crunch290%
Reverse crunch240%
Hover 230%
Vertical leg crunch 216%
Exercise ball 147%
Torso track 145%
Crunch with heel push 126%
Long arm crunch 126%
Ab roller 101%
Traditional crunch 100%
Exercise tubing pull 77%
Ab rocker 74%

1Compared to traditional crunch (100%)

Bicycle crunch[edit]

The bicycle targets the rectus abdominals and the obliques. Also, the rectus abdominals can be worked out with the basic crunch, the vertical crunch, the reverse crunch, and the full vertical crunch, and when at a low enough body fat percentage (10-12% for males, 15-18% for females) the individual parts of the muscle become visible; many refer to this visible separation as a six-pack. By exercising the internal and external obliques the stomach can be flattened.[12] The long arm crunch, in which arms are straightened behind, adds a longer lever to the move and emphasizes the upper part of the abs. The plank exercise not only strengthens the abs but also the back and stabilizes the muscles.[13]

Gadgets[edit]

Abdominal exercises can also be performed with the help of some machines and the captain's chair is one of the most popular machines used in gyms and health clubs. Other machines are the Ab Roller, the Ab Rocket Twister, the Chin-up bar in conjunction with Ab Straps, and the Torso Track. An exercise ball is also a tool that helps strengthen the abs. It may be more effective than the crunches on the floor because the abs do more work as the legs are not involved in the exercise.[14] With respect to the Ab-Slide, the study performed by Bird et al. showed greater muscle activation in the upper rectus abdominis, lower rectus abdominis, and external oblique when compared to the standard abdominal crunch. The Ab-Slide has proven to be an effective tool in strengthening the abdominal muscles from a concentric muscle action perspective. However, this research does not support replacing the traditional crunch exercise with the Ab-Slide gadget due to the lack of proven effectiveness in the eccentric loading of the abdominal muscles and the greater postural control.[15][16] Potentially the most effective equipment for abdominal strengthening is those that offer the least stability. Examples include the CoreFitnessRoller, bodyweight suspension training such as TRX, and stability balls with or without the Halo.

Safety of abdominal exercises[edit]

Abdominal exercises also put some degree of compressive force on the lumbar spine, putting unwanted stress on the lower back. In addition, exaggerated abdominal exercise can cause respiratory problems.[17] A study of twelve exercises concluded that no single exercise covered all abdominal muscles with high intensity and low compression.[18]

  • High challenge-to-compression ratio
    • Crunch with feet anchored
    • Crunch with feet free
    • Bicycle crunch
    • Hanging straight leg raise
  • Low compression, lower challenge
    • Crunch with feet anchored
    • Crunch with feet free
  • High challenge, higher compression
    • Straight-leg sit-up
    • Bent-leg sit-up
  • Low challenge-to-compression ratio
    (not recommended!)
    • Supine straight-leg raise
    • Supine bent-leg raise
    • Hanging bent-leg raise
    • Static cross-knee crunch

The benefit of focused training on the "deep core" muscles such as the transversus abdominis has been disputed, with some experts advocating a more comprehensive training regimen.[19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Norris, C M (March 1993). "Abdominal muscle training in sport". British Journal of Sports Medicine. 27 (1): 19–27. doi:10.1136/bjsm.27.1.19. ISSN 0306-3674. PMC 1332101. PMID 8457806.
  2. ^ abVispute, Sachin S; Smith, John D; Lecheminant, James D; Hurley, Kimberly S (2011). "The Effect of Abdominal Exercise on Abdominal Fat". Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 25 (9): 2559–64. doi:10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181fb4a46. PMID 21804427. S2CID 207503551.
  3. ^You, T; Murphy, K M; Lyles, M F; Demons, J L; Lenchik, L; Nicklas, B J (2006). "Addition of aerobic exercise to dietary weight loss preferentially reduces abdominal adipocyte size". International Journal of Obesity. 30 (8): 1211–6. doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0803245. PMID 16446745. Lay summary – ScienceDaily (August 7, 2006).
  4. ^ abIscoe, S (1998). "Control of abdominal muscles". Progress in Neurobiology. 56 (4): 433–506. doi:10.1016/S0301-0082(98)00046-X. PMID 9775401. S2CID 34220852.
  5. ^Fidale, Thiago Montes; Borges, Felipe Farnesi Ribeiro; Roever, Leonardo; Souza, Gilmar da Cunha; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Chacur, Eduardo Paul; Pimenta, Cristhyano; Haddad, Eduardo Gasparetto; de Agostini, Guilherme Gularte; Gregório, Fábio Clemente; Guimarães, Fabrício Cardoso Ribeiro (2018-04-27). "Eletromyography of abdominal muscles in different physical exercises". Medicine. 97 (17): e0395. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000010395. ISSN 0025-7974. PMC 5944552. PMID 29702987.
  6. ^Di Dio, Liberato John A. (September 1999). "The Importance of Anatomy". Annals of Anatomy - Anatomischer Anzeiger. 181 (5): 455–465. doi:10.1016/s0940-9602(99)80024-7. ISSN 0940-9602. PMID 10560011.
  7. ^Hsu, Shih-Lin; Oda, Harumi; Shirahata, Saya; Watanabe, Mana; Sasaki, Makoto (August 2018). "Effects of core strength training on core stability". Journal of Physical Therapy Science. 30 (8): 1014–1018. doi:10.1589/jpts.30.1014. ISSN 0915-5287. PMC 6110226. PMID 30154592.
  8. ^Sports., Medicine, American College of (2017). ACSM's Complete Guide to Fitness & Health, 2E. Human Kinetics. ISBN . OCLC 972290029.
  9. ^"Abdominal Exercises: A Review Study For Training Prescription". ResearchGate. Retrieved 2020-11-03.
  10. ^Mayers, May R. (1928). "Abdominal Exercises". The American Journal of Nursing. 28 (4): 363–364. doi:10.2307/3409357. ISSN 0002-936X. JSTOR 3409357.
  11. ^Anders, Mark (2001). "New Study Puts the Crunch on Ineffective Ab Exercises"(PDF). ACE Fitnessmatters: 9–11. Archived from the original(PDF) on August 15, 2007.
  12. ^"Abdominal Muscle Anatomy". Archived from the original on 27 July 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-13.
  13. ^"Top 10 Most Effective Ab Exercises". Archived from the original on 11 August 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-13.
  14. ^"Top 10 Most Effective Ab Exercises". Archived from the original on 11 August 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-13.
  15. ^Michael Bird, Kate M. Fletcher, and Alex J. Koch. Electromyographic Comparison of the Ab-Slide and Crunch Exercises. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 20(2), 436–440, 2006.
  16. ^"Top 10 Most Effective Ab Exercises". Archived from the original on 11 August 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-13.
  17. ^Verges, Samuel; Lenherr, Oliver; Haner, Andrea C.; Schulz, Christian; Spengler, Christina M. (2006). "Increased fatigue resistance of respiratory muscles during exercise after respiratory muscle endurance training"(PDF). American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 292 (3): R1246–53. doi:10.1152/ajpregu.00409.2006. PMID 17068160. INIST:18626671.
  18. ^CT Axler; SM McGill (1997). "Low back loads over a variety of abdominal exercises: Searching for the safest abdominal challenge". Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 29 (6): 804–810. doi:10.1097/00005768-199706000-00011. PMID 9219209.
  19. ^Reynolds, Gretchen (2009-06-17). "Is Your Ab Workout Hurting Your Back?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 20 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-19.
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdominal_exercise

So maybe you aren’t in good enough shape to get down and give us 50 crunches. But we know you’re not looking to ignore your core either. Well here’s no small truth: A strong midsection isn’t all about six-pack abs. Every time you carry groceries, laundry, or even your kids, you’re relying on your core as a foundation of strength, explains Justin Rubin, Daily Burn’s True Beginner trainer.

“Lots of beginners have upper back tension or lower back issues,” says Rubin. “Your core is located in your posterior chain and strengthening it will help keep your chest up and your spine strong,” which can correlate to some back pain relief.

Whether you’re getting back into fitness after a lapse or you’re an exercise newbie, developing a solid core will increase your stability and balance. Translation: You’ll be able to perform more advanced moves with confidence as you regain your strength.

Ab Workout: 6 Beginner Core Exercises

If you think you need to use a fancy machine to target those inner belly muscles, think again. We asked Rubin to demonstrate six easy-to-follow core exercises for beginners, which don’t require any equipment. Follow along with the GIFs below to bring variety to your next core workout. And for more beginner-friendly workouts you can do anytime, anyplace, head to Daily Burn to try the complete True Beginner program.

Core Exercises for Beginners: Bird-Dog-Exercise

1. Bird-Dog Crunch

Targets: Abs, hamstrings, glutes and shoulders
Stronger abs don’t develop overnight — you’ll have to first learn how to activate your core. For this essential True Beginner core exercise, start on the floor on all fours, hands placed directly underneath your shoulders, hips in line with your knees. This is your starting position. Lift your right hand and extend your arm straight out in on you, keeping it shoulder height, while simultaneously lifting your left leg and extending it straight back (a). Your whole body should be in a straight line from right fingertips to left toes. Bring your left leg to touch your right elbow under your stomach. Extend your leg and arm out again. Return to starting position (b). Repeat on the other side (c). Do five reps on each side.

Modification: If you’re unable to maintain form, simplify this movement by forgoing the crunch. Instead, extend your arm and opposite leg out and hold for three seconds, then switch sides.

RELATED: The Truth About How to Lose Belly Fat

Core Exercises for Beginners: Standing Bicycle Crunches

2. Standing Bicycle Crunches

Targets: Obliques, rotational muscles
Do traditional crunches cause discomfort? Rubin suggests this True Beginner variation instead. Stand with your feet hip-width apart, hands placed behind your head. With a tight core, straight back and relaxed shoulders lift your right leg and simultaneously raise your right knee and lower your left elbow towards each other (a). Return to the starting position (b). Repeat on the opposite side. Do five reps on each side.

Modification: If rotating your upper body downwards is too difficult, simply lift your knee to your chest while keeping your upper body still, alternating legs.

RELATED:5 Standing Ab Exercises for People Who Hate Crunches

Core Exercises for Beginners: Seated Leg Lifts

3. Seated Leg Lifts

Targets: Abs, hamstrings
Don’t be fooled by this basic-looking leg lift: Beginners to even more advanced folks will start feeling the burn after a few reps. Sit on the floor, legs extended straight out in front of you. Keeping your core engaged, lean back slightly, so you’re able to place your hands on either side of your glutes. Take a deep breath and lift one leg six inches off the ground (a). Hold for five seconds, and then put it down. Repeat with the other leg (b). Continue alternating for one-minute straight, then take a 20 second break. Repeat for five rounds.

Modification: To make this exercise easier, lift one leg at a time without stopping to hold each one extended for five seconds. Need more of a challenge? After lifting a heel, bring your knee into your chest, then extend your heel back out and lower down. Repeat on the opposite side.

RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Ab Workout

Core Exercises for Beginners: Sit-Ups

4. Sit-Ups

Targets: Abs, possibly hip flexors depending on range of motion
If performed incorrectly, sit-ups can cause more pain than they’re worth. Rubin breaks down how to safely and effectively perform the move. To start, sit on the floor with your knees bent, heels touching the floor, hands on either side of your head, shoulders dropped and relaxed to avoid tension in the neck. Keeping your feet on the ground, lay back until your back is flat on the floor, or as far as you’re able (a). Rise back up (b). Continue for one-minute straight, then take a 20 second break. Repeat for five rounds.

Modification: Having trouble keeping your core and back engaged? Slowly lower yourself as far as you can, and work up to lowering completely down to the floor. There’s no need to go all the way back until you can maintain perfect form, says Rubin.

RELATED: The Kickboxing Workout That’s All About Abs

Core Exercises for Beginners: Modified Bicycle Crunch

5. Modified Bicycle Crunch

Targets: Obliques, rotational muscles
Start in the same neutral position as the sit-up, sitting with knees bent, heels flat on the floor, hands on either side of your head (a). Bring the right knee and left elbow towards one another, with a simple and gentle twist(b). Return to the start position (c). Complete the movement with the left knee and right elbow. Continue for one-minute straight, then take a 20 second break. Repeat for five rounds.

Modification: This is a major progression from the sit-up, so if this movement is tough for you, keep practicing sit-ups (above).

RELATED:3 Quick HIIT Workouts for Beginners

Core Exercises for Beginners: Spider Plank Crunch

6. Spider Plank Crunch

Targets: Lower abs, glutes
Still have fuel left in the tank? Rubin challenges True Beginners to tap into their Spidey sense. Start in a push-up position, hands on the ground directly underneath your shoulders, legs extended backwards with your toes on the ground, so your body is in a straight line. Lift your right leg and bring your knee towards the outside of your right elbow (a). Return to plank position (b). Repeat the movement with the other leg. Do five reps with each leg.

Modification: If this is too challenging, simply hold a plank on your elbows or hands for 30 seconds at a time, for three rounds. (If you have a wrist issue, Rubin recommends doing this movement on your elbows.)

To try True Beginner free for 30 days, head to dailyburn.com/truebeginner.

Note to reader: The content in this article relates to the core service offered by Daily Burn. In the interest of editorial disclosure and integrity, the reader should know that this site is owned and operated by Daily Burn. Originally published March 2015. Updated September 2017 and August 2021. 

Read More
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All images except for the cover one via Daily Burn. Cover image via Shutterstock

Источник: https://dailyburn.com/life/db/beginner-core-exercises-for-ab-workouts/
at home leg and core workouts

youtube video

15 MIN AT HOME LEG/BUTT/THIGH WORKOUT (No Equipment)

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