home remedies for heartburn and indigestion

Seek Natural Indigestion Remedies. Another way to treat your indigestion is to try traditional methods – something your grandmother may have done back in the. Baking soda works to neutralize stomach acid and temporarily relieve some symptoms of indigestion and acid reflux. Just add ½ teaspoon to four. Natural remedies for GERD. Feeling the burn? That painful sensation in your chest or throat — acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux.

: Home remedies for heartburn and indigestion

Home remedies for heartburn and indigestion
Home remedies for heartburn and indigestion
Home remedies for heartburn and indigestion
Home remedies for heartburn and indigestion
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Home and natural remedies for upset stomach

When to see a doctor

An upset stomach and indigestion should not usually cause concern. For most people, symptoms should go away within a few hours. As older adults and children can become dehydrated much more quickly, they should seek medical attention for vomiting and diarrhea that lasts for more than a day.

People with severe, frequent, or persistent stomach problems should talk to a doctor. It is also best to seek medical attention if the following symptoms are present:

  • continual or uncontrollable vomiting or diarrhea
  • chronic constipation
  • fever
  • bloody stool or vomit
  • inability to pass gas
  • dizziness or lightheadedness
  • arm pain
  • unintentional weight loss
  • a lump in the abdomen or stomach
  • difficulty swallowing
  • history of iron-deficiency anemia or associated conditions
  • pain when urinating

Read this article in Spanish.

Источник: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322047

Top 15 Heartburn Remedies

Just because heartburn is common doesn’t mean you have to suffer with it. Left untreated, frequent acid reflux can develop into more serious health problems. Here are the top 15 heartburn remedies.

Despite humorous commercials touting heartburn remedies with funny words like “plop-plop” and “fizz-fizz,” heartburn is no joke. More than 60 million Americans suffer from it at least occasionally, according to the American College of Gastroenterology.Heartburn, also known as acid indigestion, occurs when acidic stomach juices flow backward into the esophagus, irritating the esophageal lining. The resulting pain can be uncomfortable, annoying or excruciating. “It can hurt as much as a heart attack,” says Paige Hastings, a certified nurse practitioner at Home remedies for heartburn and indigestion Little Clinic in Nashville, Tenn.But not everyone has such pain; you could also feel a bitter or acidic taste in the back of your throat or the awful sensation of food or liquid washing back into your mouth and down the gullet.In fact, frequent heartburn (two or more times a week) and food sticking in the throat are signs of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).Untreated, these problems can lead more serious problems, including strictures (narrowing or obstruction of the esophagus), ulcers, cancer and pneumonia, explains Patricia Raymond, MD, a gastroenterologist based in Virginia Beach, Va.

Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/gerd/top-15-heartburn-remedies/

8 Natural Remedies for Indigestion

Your instinct might be to reach for a bottle of that familiar pink liquid or an antacid pill when indigestion or heartburn hits, but there are natural home remedies that may ease your symptoms without home remedies for heartburn and indigestion side effects that are possible with many over the counter medications.

Next time you have an upset stomach or a bout of heartburn, try ayurvedic supplements for acid reflux or these natural home remedies.

1: Ginger

Ginger has been used for centuries to settle the stomach and improve digestion. Try taking one or two 250-milligram capsules of ginger with meals or drink ginger tea. You can save money by filling capsules yourself with ginger powder or grating fresh ginger for tea.

2: Fennel

Like ginger, fennel has been used for centuries for indigestion. Fennel seeds contain oils that relieve nausea and help control gas. Fennel is a common ingredient in digestive health supplements, which is an easy way to ingest the herb. Also, try chewing and swallowing a spoonful of fennel seeds to ease indigestion.

3: Chamomile

You probably know chamomile is a popular nighttime tea—maybe it’s even part of your bedtime routine. Chamomile is also excellent for indigestion, helping calm the stomach and soothe spasms in the intestinal tract. You can home remedies for heartburn and indigestion chamomile in tea or in a tincture.

4: Peppermint

pouring black tea into glass cup on wooden table

Soothing and cooling, peppermint is widely used to relieve nausea and settle upset tummies. For digestion and upset stomach relief, peppermint tea is a good choice. You can also take peppermint oil capsules between meals. People with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or frequent heartburn should avoid peppermint, however, as it can make symptoms worse or trigger heartburn.

5: Licorice

Licorice contains substances that coat the lining of the stomach, helping prevent inflammation. This coating can help soothe stomach pain and indigestion. Many digestive health supplements today contain licorice. You can also drink licorice tea or take deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), which may help relieve acid reflux symptoms.

6: Hot Water

Many people find that drinking plain hot water eases indigestion. Hot water breaks down food faster and supports healthy bowel movements. It also expands the blood vessels, which improves circulation. These things may explain why hot water can ease an upset stomach and reduce gas and bloating.

7: Apple Cider Vinegar

People with low stomach acid production (which can be a side effect of taking proton pump inhibitors, such as omeprazole) may find relief from apple cider vinegar. Try drinking a mixture of ½ a cup of water and one teaspoon of apple cider vinegar to help your body digest food after meals.

8: Baking Soda

Another inexpensive and effective way to ease indigestion is to drink a solution of one cup of water and one tablespoon of baking soda. The solution helps neutralize stomach acid and can relieve gas and bloating. To reduce the chance of a chemical reaction in the stomach, add a few drops of lemon juice to the mixture before drinking.

Avoid Foods that Trigger Symptoms

Certain foods are known to cause heartburn and indigestion, including:

  • Fatty foods and fried foods

Try reducing or eliminating these foods or adopt an acid reflux diet and see if your symptoms improve.

Indigestion and acid reflux can cause uncomfortable symptoms, but natural remedies and lifestyle changes can help. Also, take good care of your digestive system with a high-quality digestive health supplement.


Источник: https://www.athreyaherbs.com/blogs/news/8-natural-remedies-for-indigestion

GERD Diet: Foods That Help with Acid Reflux (Heartburn)

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Getting a case of acid reflux (heartburn) once in a while isn't unusual, but some people suffer from burning discomfort, bloating and belching almost every time they eat. About 20% of the population has gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a chronic acid reflux condition that's diagnosed by a doctor.

Normally, the esophageal sphincter (a muscular tube that lets food pass into the stomach and then cinches shut to block it from coming back up) protects the esophagus from stomach acid. However, if the sphincter relaxes, food can push upward through the loosened opening and cause acid reflux.

"Diet plays a major role in controlling acid reflux symptoms and is the first line of therapy used for people with GERD," says Ekta Gupta, M.B.B.S., M.D., gastroenterologist with Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Foods That May Cause Heartburn

Foods commonly known to be heartburn triggers cause the esophageal sphincter to relax and delay the digestive process, letting food sit in the stomach longer, says Gupta. The worst culprits? Foods that are high in fat, salt or spice such as:

  • Fried food
  • Fast food
  • Pizza
  • Potato chips and other processed snacks
  • Chili powder and pepper (white, black, cayenne)
  • Fatty meats such as bacon and sausage
  • Cheese

Other foods that can cause the same problem include:

  • Tomato-based sauces
  • Citrus fruits
  • Chocolate
  • Peppermint
  • Carbonated beverages

"Moderation is key since many people may not be able to or want to completely eliminate these foods," says Gupta. "But try to avoid eating problem foods late in the evening closer to bedtime, so they're not sitting in your stomach and then coming up your esophagus when you lay down at night. It's also a good idea to eat small frequent meals instead of bigger, heavier meals and avoid late-night dinners and bedtime snacks."

Foods That Help Prevent Acid Reflux

Good news: There are plenty of things you can eat to help prevent acid reflux. Stock your kitchen with foods from these three categories:

a bowl of banana oatmeal

High-fiber foods

Fibrous foods make you feel full so you're less likely to overeat, which may contribute to heartburn. So, load up on healthy fiber from these foods:

  • Whole grains such as oatmeal, couscous and brown rice.
  • Root vegetables such as sweet potatoes, carrots and beets.
  • Green vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli and green pge bill pay options.
a bowl of mixed nuts

Alkaline foods

Foods fall somewhere along the pH scale (an indicator of acid levels). Those that have a low pH are acidic and more likely to cause reflux. Those with higher pH are alkaline and can help offset strong stomach acid. Alkaline foods include:

  • Bananas
  • Melons
  • Cauliflower
  • Fennel
  • Nuts
a bowl of cut watermelon

Watery foods

Eating foods that contain a lot of water can dilute and weaken stomach acid. Choose foods such as:

  • Celery
  • Cucumber
  • Lettuce
  • Watermelon
  • Broth-based soups
  • Herbal tea

Heartburn Home Remedies

People with heartburn commonly reach for antacids, over-the-counter medications that neutralize stomach acid. But eating certain foods may also offer relief from symptoms. Consider trying the following:

milk pouring from a pitcher into a glass

Milk

Does milk help with heartburn? "Milk is often thought to relieve heartburn," says Gupta. "But you have to keep in mind that milk comes in different varieties — whole milk with the full amount of fat, 2% fat, and skim or nonfat milk. The fat in milk can aggravate acid reflux. But nonfat milk can act as a temporary buffer between the stomach lining and acidic stomach contents and provide immediate relief of heartburn symptoms." Low-fat home remedies for heartburn and indigestion has the same soothing qualities along with a healthy dose of probiotics (good bacteria that enhance digestion).

a cup of ginger tea

Ginger

Ginger is one of home remedies for heartburn and indigestion best digestive aids because of its medicinal properties. It's alkaline in nature and anti-inflammatory, which eases irritation in the digestive tract. Try sipping ginger tea when you feel heartburn coming on.

Apple cider vinegar and apples

Apple cider vinegar

While there isn't enough research to prove that drinking apple cider vinegar works for acid reflux, many people swear that it helps. However, you should never drink it at full concentration because it's a strong acid that can irritate the esophagus. Instead, put a small amount in warm water and drink it with meals.

a cup of lemon water with honey

Lemon water

Lemon juice is generally considered very acidic, but a small amount of lemon juice mixed with warm water and honey has an alkalizing effect that neutralizes stomach acid. Also, honey has natural antioxidants, which protect the health of cells.

How a Doctor Can Help

If you have heartburn two or more times a week and changes to your diet or eating pattern haven't helped, consult a doctor. A gastroenterologist (a doctor who specializes in the digestive system) can perform tests to measure the acidity in your stomach and see if frequent acid reflux has damaged your esophagus.

GERD is often treatable through a combination of lifestyle changes and medication. But persistent symptoms of reflux need thorough evaluation by a gastroenterologist who can find the underlying cause and discuss pay my amazon credit card treatment options.

The Johns Hopkins Heartburn Center

GERD is an ongoing condition that often requires more attention than over-the-counter treatments can offer. The Heartburn Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine provides personalized care to help patients find relief.

Learn more about The Heartburn Center

Источник: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/gerd-diet-foods-that-help-with-acid-reflux-heartburn

Heartburn and acidity in pregnancy (natural remedies)

What causes heartburn in pregnancy?

Heartburn, indigestionand acid reflux are common in pregnancy.

These symptoms are due to the hormone progesterone, which relaxes the valve at the top of your stomach. This causes a small amount of stomach acid, sometimes with partially digested food, to surge upwards into your food pipe (oesophagus).

In early pregnancy, heartburn or indigestion may make your pregnancy sicknessworse. In late pregnancy, your symptoms might get worse as your baby takes up more space in your abdomen.

Your heartburn may be worse if:

How can I prevent heartburn?

Eating small mealsfrequently, rather than large meals which are hours apart, will prevent your stomach from becoming too full and pushing up under your diaphragm.

Try to eat your main home remedies for heartburn and indigestion the day at lunchtime. Have your dinner early in the evening, so your body has time to digest it before you go to bed. Avoid spicy, rich, fatty and fried foods, and anything else that triggers your symptoms. Sugar, tea, coffeeand certain food additives may also make your heartburn worse.

Don't drink liquids home remedies for heartburn and indigestion your food, as this dilutes your digestive juices, making them less effective. Instead, stay hydratedby drinking water between meals.

Herbal teas, such as peppermint, may help your digestion. But don't drink other teas that are reputed to aid digestion, such as fennel (saunf), in pregnancy, as these contain chemicals which may make the uterus (womb) contract.

If you have a lot of meat and fizzy drinks, you may be more likely to develop heartburn than vegetariansand those who don't have fizzy drinks.

Foods high in polyunsaturated fatty acids such as nuts, seeds, sardines (pedvey), tuna(chura machli), salmon (ravaas machli), soy beans, and wholegrain wheat (atta) may increase your chances of developing heartburn.

Try to stay sitting upright after eating, as lying down may cause you to regurgitate your food. Sleeping home remedies for heartburn and indigestion up on two or three pillows in later pregnancy may help.

Heartburn may also be worse home remedies for heartburn and indigestion you smoke. It's another reason to stop, as smoking is bad for youand harmful to your baby.

What can I try to ease heartburn?

Try eating a clove or two of raw garlic (lehsun) every day, or use whole cloves in cooking.

If you are taking iron tabletswhich make your heartburn worse, talk to your doctor about changing to a liquid supplement instead.

Herbal remedies
Ginger (adrak), chamomile and dandelion herbal teamay help to relieve heartburn. However drink dandelion tea with caution, particularly if you have gestational diabetes, or if you are taking tablets for high blood pressure.

Aromatherapy
Try adding four drops of lemon, orange or neroli (orange blossom) essential oilsto a teaspoonful of grapeseed base oil. Massagethis into your chest and upper back, or put the blend in your bath so you can inhale the vapours.

Acupressure
Pressing an acupuncturepoint (pericardium point 6) on your wrist may help to relieve your heartburn.

To locate this point:
  • Use one hand on the inside of your opposite wrist, measuring up three finger widths from the crease between your hand and arm.
  • At the point where your third finger is, lift the pressure off until you are just touching the skin, and feel lightly for a slight dip. Press into this dip quite deeply and it will feel bruised.
  • When your heartburn is severe, press this point on each wrist for about 20 to 30 times at about one-second intervals.

Homeopathy
Though there's no evidence that homeopathic treatments work, if you want to try them, consult a qualified homeopathic doctor who has experience in treating pregnant women. Many do say that it helps them. Also there is no known harm or side effects from having the right homeopathic medicine in prescribed doses. So you can try it and if your symptoms do not improve, you can opt for another therapy.

Yoga
The modified thunderbolt posecan be done after a meal to improve digestion and help relieve heartburn, acidity and indigestion. This is safe to do in your second and third trimesters.

Remember to always practise yoga under the supervision of an expert who can help you choose the right asanasfor your stage of pregnancy.

Read more about prenatal yoga.

Which complementary therapies could help me?

Complementary therapies which aim to realign your posture may help to treat heartburn, including osteopathy, chiropractic or the Alexander technique. Apart from yoga relaxation therapies which focus on posture can also help, for example tai chior qi gong.

If you have backache, as well as heartburn, chiropractic may be particularly effective in helping to relieve the symptoms.

You could also try acupuncture or shiatsu by a qualified practitioner, peoples state bank rhinelander wisconsin reflexology by a therapist who is qualified to treat pregnancy problems.



Read more on:

References

Bryner P, Staerker PG. 1996. Indigestion and heartburn: a descriptive study of prevalence in persons seeking care from chiropractors. J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 19(5): 317-23

Chittumma P, Kaewkiattikun K, Wiriyasiriwach B. 2007. Comparison of the effectiveness of ginger and vitamin B6 for treatment of nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy: a randomized double-blind controlled trial. J Med Assoc Thai. 90(1): 15-20

Dall'Alba V, Fornari F, Krahe C, et al. 2010. Heartburn and regurgitation in pregnancy: the effect of fat ingestion. Dig Dis Sci. 55(6): 1610-4

Maliakal PP, Wanwimolruk S. 2001. Effect of herbal teas on hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes in rats. J Pharm Pharmacol. 53: 1323-9

McKenna D, Spence D, Haggan SE, et al. 2003. A randomized trial investigating an iron-rich natural mineral water as a prophylaxis against iron deficiency in pregnancy Clin. Lab. Haem. 25: 99-103

NHS Choices. 2010. Indigestion (Dyspepsia) in pregnancy. Health A-Z.
Ramu B, Mohan P, Rajasekaran MS, et al. 2011. Prevalence and risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux in pregnancy. Indian J Gastroenterol. 30(3): 144-7

Tiran D. 2004. Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: an Integrated Approach to Care. Edinburgh: Elsevier Science

Show referencesHide references

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Home remedies for heartburn and indigestion -

Top 15 Heartburn Remedies

Just because heartburn is common doesn’t mean you have to suffer with it. Left untreated, frequent acid reflux can develop into more serious health problems. Here are the top 15 heartburn remedies...

Despite humorous commercials touting heartburn remedies with funny words like “plop-plop” and “fizz-fizz,” heartburn is no joke. More than 60 million Americans suffer from it at least occasionally, according to the American College of Gastroenterology.Heartburn, also known as acid indigestion, occurs when acidic stomach juices flow backward into the esophagus, irritating the esophageal lining. The resulting pain can be uncomfortable, annoying or excruciating. “It can hurt as much as a heart attack,” says Paige Hastings, a certified nurse practitioner at The Little Clinic in Nashville, Tenn.But not everyone has such pain; you could also feel a bitter or acidic taste in the back of your throat or the awful sensation of food or liquid washing back into your mouth and down the gullet.In fact, frequent heartburn (two or more times a week) and food sticking in the throat are signs of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).Untreated, these problems can lead more serious problems, including strictures (narrowing or obstruction of the esophagus), ulcers, cancer and pneumonia, explains Patricia Raymond, MD, a gastroenterologist based in Virginia Beach, Va.

Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/gerd/top-15-heartburn-remedies/

How to Get Rid of Indigestion

Indigestion (also called dyspepsia, heartburn, or GERD) affects up to one in four Americans each year.

Indigestion can be experienced in different ways, causing a wide array of disruptive gastrointestinal symptoms.

Thankfully, there are many treatment options for indigestion. Treatment of indigestion depends on the cause, but may entail over-the-counter (OTC) medications, prescription medications, or at-home lifestyle changes. 

In this article, I’ll describe what indigestion is, and the different treatment options available.

I’ll also cover what you should avoid if you experience symptoms, and which home remedies can be effective at treating or preventing indigestion.

Finally, I’ll explain when you should see a healthcare provider for more personalized care.

Suffering from Indigestion? Chat with a doctor today about potential treatment options for just $23.

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What is Indigestion?

Indigestion is a general term that describes a group of gastrointestinal symptoms that typically occur after eating or drinking.

Common symptoms of indigestion include: 

  • Feeling full soon after you start eating a meal
  • Uncomfortable fullness after a meal
  • Pain, a burning feeling, or discomfort in the upper abdomen 
  • Bloating
  • Nausea
  • Burping up food or liquid
  • Growling or gurgling in your stomach
  • Gas
  • Heartburn
  • Chronic cough or hoarseness
  • A sour taste in your mouth
  • Stomach pain when lying down at night or waking in the morning

Anyone can get indigestion and there are many causes. For some, indigestion is triggered by lifestyle behaviors or diet.

You are more at risk for developing indigestion if you:

  • Drink alcohol
  • Drink caffeinated or carbonated beverages
  • Eat quickly
  • Eat spicy, fatty, or greasy foods
  • Eat acidic foods, such as tomatoes or citrus
  • Experience stress
  • Smoke

Indigestion is not a disease. Most cases are mild, and go away on their own. But indigestion may also be a sign of another, underlying condition.

These include:

  • Anxiety or depression
  • Acid reflux (GER and GERD)
  • Peptic ulcers
  • Inflammation of the stomach (gastritis)
  • Celiac disease
  • Gallstones
  • Constipation
  • Pancreas inflammation (pancreatitis)
  • Stomach cancer
  • Intestinal blockage
  • Reduced blood flow in the intestine (intestinal ischemia)
  • Diabetes
  • Thyroid disease
  • Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying)
  • Pregnancy
  • Hiatal hernia

If you’re unsure about the cause of your indigestion, or if you have chronic or recurring symptoms, reach out to your doctor or healthcare provider for an evaluation.

If you experience any severe symptoms like black stool, painful swallowing, shortness of breath, or bloody vomit, reach out to your provider immediately.

Medication for Indigestion

Depending on the cause of your indigestion, your provider may recommend either over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription medications to help treat indigestion symptoms.

Examples of medications your doctor may recommend are:

  • Antacids: For most types of indigestion, these are the first-line recommendation. Antacids work by neutralizing acids in your stomach. Common antacids include calcium carbonate (Tums), loperamide (Imodium), simethicone (Mylanta), and sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer).
  • Antibiotics: If the cause of your indigestion is an infection of the bacteria H. pylori, your provider may recommend a course of at least two antibiotics, such as amoxicillin (Amoxil), clarithromycin (Biaxin), metronidazole (Flagyl), tetracycline (Sumycin), ortinidazole (Tindamax). This type of infection requires a lab test to diagnose correctly.   
  • H2 receptor blockers: These medicines reduce the amount of acid your stomach produces, which can help to alleviate symptoms of indigestion. H2 blockers don’t work as quickly to reduce heartburn as antacids, but the effect can last longer. Examples of these medications include famotidine (Pepcid AC), nizatidine (Axid AR), and ranitidine (Zantac 75). 
  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs): PPIs are especially effective at reducing stomach acid to treat symptoms of indigestion and heartburn. Your doctor may recommend PPIs if antacids or H2 blockers have failed to resolve your symptoms. Recently, some PPIs have become available OTC, including esomeprazole (Nexium) and omeprazole (Prilosec). Other PPIs, like rabeprazole (AcipHex), are only available with a prescription.
  • Prokinetics: If your provider identifies that delayed stomach emptying is the cause of your symptoms, they may prescribe prokinetics, medications to help your stomach empty faster by stimulating the muscles in your stomach. Examples of prokinetics include bethanechol (Urecholine) and metoclopramide (Reglan). 

Home Remedies for Indigestion

In many cases, your provider may recommend lifestyle changes to help alleviate your symptoms or prevent future bouts of indigestion—these changes may be avoiding certain substances or habits, or adding other foods, beverages, and habits into your daily life.

What to Avoid

Smoking

Quitting smoking is an umbrella health recommendation for preventing many conditions and diseases, including hypertension, cancer, and even premature death. But evidence shows that it may be helpful in preventing indigestion, too.

Nicotine may relax the lower esophageal sphincter—the bottom end of your esophagus, which meets your stomach. This relaxation can cause symptoms of indigestion and heartburn. 

Tight Clothing

Wearing tight clothing that puts pressure on your belly can make symptoms of indigestion caused by acid reflux worse.

Similarly, exercises that put pressure on your stomach, like sit-ups, leg lifts, and crunches, can also exacerbate symptoms.

If acid reflux is the cause of your indigestion, try wearing loose, non-restrictive clothing to ease your symptoms.

Laying Down Right After Meals

To give your body time to digest, aim to finish your meal at least three hours before laying down in bed.

Spicy Foods

One study found that regular consumption of spicy foods can trigger symptoms of indigestion, especially in people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

If you think spicy foods may exacerbate your symptoms, try eliminating them from your diet to see if your symptoms improve.

Citrus

Citrus is another possible trigger for symptoms of indigestion.

Researchers believe that citrus juice, including the juice of oranges, lemons, and grapefruit, irritates the lining of the esophagus.

One study found that orange or grapefruit juice worsened the acid reflux symptoms of 72% of GERD patients.

Mint

Research is mixed on whether mint worsens symptoms of indigestion.

However, one study found that consuming large amounts of spearmint can worsen symptoms of acid reflux. 

Alcohol

Several studies show that drinking alcohol, even in moderate amounts, can worsen symptoms of indigestion by increasing stomach acid, relaxing the lower esophageal sphincter, and impairing the ability of the esophagus to clear itself of acid.

Other Foods to Avoid

Additional foods that may trigger your indigestion symptoms are carbonated drinks, coffee and other caffeinated beverages, tomatoes, chocolate, and fatty or greasy foods.

Drinking liquids at the same time as meals can also make symptoms worse if you suffer from acid reflux.

What to Do 

Mix Baking Soda and Water

Some OTC antacids, like Alka-Seltzer, contain baking soda (also known as sodium bicarbonate).

Baking soda works to neutralize stomach acid and temporarily relieve some symptoms of indigestion and acid reflux. Just add ½ teaspoon to four ounces of water and drink the solution.

But be careful not to use too much. One study found that adults should have no more than seven ½ teaspoons of baking soda in one day, and no more than three ½ teaspoons if over the age of 60.

Sip Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar has recently become a popular at-home remedy for many ailments.

Because of its high acetic acid content, it may help to aid digestion and break down food.

Unfortunately, there is little to no evidence that it is a safe and effective treatment for indigestion or heartburn.

To be safe, talk with your doctor or healthcare provider before using.  

Use Ginger

Ginger has long been used as a home remedy to soothe stomach ailments, including indigestion.

Research has found that ginger increases the rate of gastric emptying in patients with indigestion.

Just be sure to limit your consumption to three to four grams per day to avoid gas, heartburn, and throat burn.

Take Licorice Supplements

A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study found that licorice supplements are safe and effective at managing symptoms of indigestion.

Eat Healthy Fats

Fatty and greasy foods are linked to worsening indigestion symptoms (including symptoms of acid reflux).

However, evidence suggests that replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats —like those from plants, fish, and some nuts and seeds—may help to relieve the symptoms of acid reflux.

Maintaina Healthy Weight

Carrying excess pounds can put pressure on your stomach, causing acid to back up into your esophagus.

Experts recommend maintaining a healthy weight, which can help manage symptoms of indigestion. 

Suffering from Indigestion? Chat with a doctor today about potential treatment options for just $23.

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When to See a Doctor

Many cases of mild indigestion can be managed at home. But if you experience any of the below symptoms, reach out to your doctor or healthcare provider immediately:

  • Unintentional weight loss or loss of appetite
  • Bloody vomit
  • Frequent vomiting
  • Black, tarry stool
  • Severe, constant stomach pain 
  • Difficulty swallowing that gets progressively worse
  • Fatigue or weakness
  • Shortness of breath, sweating, or chest pain that radiates to the neck, jaw, or arm
  • Chest pain on exertion or with stress
  • Yellowing of the skin or eyes

Additionally, if any of your symptoms of indigestion last longer than two weeks, reach out to your provider.

How K Health Can Help

Did you know you can get affordable primary care with the K Health app?

Download K to check your symptoms, explore conditions and treatments, and if needed text with a provider in minutes. K Health’s AI-powered app is HIPAA compliant and based on 20 years of clinical data.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does indigestion feel like?
People can experience indigestion in different ways. The most common symptoms include pain or discomfort in the upper abdomen, feeling too full while eating or as soon as you finish a meal, bloating, and burping.
How long does indigestion last?
Mild indigestion can last for two hours or longer, but chronic cases may cause symptoms that persist for longer.
What is the difference between indigestion and GERD/acid reflux?
Indigestion is a general term used to describe a group of gastrointestinal symptoms that can have a wide array of causes. Acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is a condition where stomach acid frequently flows back into the esophagus and it can cause symptoms of indigestion.
K Health articles are all written and reviewed by MDs, PhDs, NPs, or PharmDs and are for informational purposes only. This information does not constitute and should not be relied on for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment.

K Health has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We avoid using tertiary references.

Sarah Malka, MD

Dr. Sarah Malka is a board certified emergency medicine physician with K Health. She completed her residency at Harvard Medical School.

Источник: https://www.khealth.com/learn/indigestion/home-remedies/

5 of the best home remedies for acid reflux

  • Home remedies for acid reflux include taking deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), eating smaller meals, and avoiding drinking coffee.
  • You should also avoid trigger foods that slow down digestion, like cheese, fried foods, processed snacks, and fatty meats.
  • Eating smaller meals throughout the day, rather than three large meals, may also help relieve the symptoms of acid reflux.
  • Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice.

Acid reflux occurs when stomach acid flows upward into your esophagus, the pipe that connects your mouth to your stomach, causing pain in your chest and throat. It is a common condition – 1 in 5 people in the US experience acid reflux.

Acid reflux can be uncomfortable, but lifestyle changes and home remedies can help ease your symptoms without medication. Here are a few steps you can take to treat acid reflux at home.

What is acid reflux?

Normally, when you eat or drink, food travels down your esophagus to a muscle known as the esophageal sphincter, which opens to let food into your stomach.

Acid reflux happens when this sphincter becomes weak or relaxes at the wrong time, allowing stomach acid to splash back up into your esophagus. This can cause symptoms like:

  • Pain or burning feeling in your chest
  • Pain or discomfort in your throat
  • Regurgitation of acidic liquid into your mouth or throat

Though you may be more likely to experience acid reflux if you are pregnant or obese, there are many reasons it could occur. Some of the most common causes of acid reflux include:

  • Eating an especially large meal
  • Eating late at night
  • Certain foods or drinks like spicy food, fried food, alcohol, or coffee
  • Smoking cigarettes 

"Lifestyle changes are the first treatment if the acid reflux is bothersome," says Jacqueline Wolf, MD, a gastroenterologist and professor at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. This may involve avoiding some of the causes listed above, but there are also several proven at-home treatments to help control acid reflux.

1. Elevate your upper body while sleeping

Acid reflux often gets worse at night, because when you lie down, it is easier for stomach acid to flow into your esophagus. You can improve nighttime symptoms by changing the angle of your body during sleep.

Specifically, it is helpful to raise your head and shoulders above your stomach and keep your esophagus tilted downward. For example, you can elevate the head of your bed or prop yourself up on a slanted pillow. "This lets gravity help clear anything that comes into the esophagus at night," says Wolf.

A small study of 20 people published in 2011 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology found that people who elevated the head of their beds with an 8-inch block for one week saw significant improvements in their heartburn symptoms and had less disturbed sleep.

And a 2016 review of four studies found that even for people already taking acid reflux medications, adding an elevated sleeping position helped symptoms more than just taking medication alone.

To elevate your bed, you can use bed risers under the top two feet of your bed frame, or if this isn't possible, you can buy a sloped pillow to help angle your head and shoulders upward while sleeping.

2. Try taking Deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL)

Licorice is an herb that has long been used to help soothe stomach ailments. DGL is an altered type of licorice that has had its glycyrrhizin compound removed, as this can raise blood pressure.

DGL works to treat acid reflux because it helps to reduce inflammation in your esophagus. Inflammation, a reaction caused by your immune system, can be helpful when you need to heal a wound or fight an infection, but it can also worsen health problems like acid reflux for some people. This is because your immune system releases inflammatory cells called cytokines that can damage the lining of your esophagus.

Although DGL has been proven to work when combined with other acid reflux treatments, more research is needed to see how it works on its own.

DGL generally comes as a chewable tablet and can come in multiple flavors for people who don't like the taste of licorice. To use DGL for acid reflux, you should take one 400 mg tablet 20 minutes before you eat a meal or 20 minutes before going to bed if you have nighttime symptoms.

Other herbal remedies that may also help with acid reflux are as follows:

3. Eat smaller meals

Eating large meals puts greater pressure on the sphincter that separates your esophagus from your stomach. This makes the sphincter more likely to open and allow acid to flow upward into your esophagus. Swapping out big meals for more frequent smaller meals can help ease your symptoms. 

For example, instead of eating three large meals, try spreading out those portions into five smaller meals.

4. Limit coffee intake

If you are a coffee drinker, cutting down or cutting out your daily cups could help reduce acid reflux. This is because when you drink coffee, your stomach is triggered into creating more stomach acid, which can become backed up and flow into your esophagus. The caffeine in coffee also causes your esophageal sphincter to relax, allowing stomach contents to travel upward.

5. Avoid trigger foods

Certain foods may intensify your acid reflux. You want to avoid foods that slow down digestion and sit in your stomach for longer — because the longer they sit, the more likely they are to increase stomach pressure and force open your esophageal sphincter. 

Some foods that are likely to trigger acid reflux are:

  • Cheese
  • Fried food
  • Processed snacks like potato chips
  • Fatty meats like bacon
  • Chocolate
  • Chili powder
  • Pizza

When to see a doctor

If home remedies aren't enough to control your acid reflux symptoms, you should see a doctor for medical treatment. Over time, untreated acid reflux can lead to more serious illnesses like Barrett's esophagus, in which esophagus damage makes it harder for you to swallow food. In rare cases, you can even develop esophageal cancer. 

The bottom line

 Acid reflux is a common problem that can cause daily discomfort, particularly at nighttime.

There are many over-the-counter remedies and lifestyle changes you can use to improve your acid reflux symptoms. "However, if the symptoms persist or cause trouble swallowing or are associated with other symptoms you should call your doctor," Wolf says.

Related articles from Health Reference:

Источник: https://www.insider.com/home-remedies-for-acid-reflux

How Heartburn Is Treated

Most people experience heartburn occasionally, usually after a meal, but some people have more frequent or serious heartburn. You can use a variety of home remedies, lifestyle changes, and over-the-counter products to relieve this symptom.

Heartburn is also called acid reflux because it occurs when stomach acid comes into contact with the lining of the esophagus, causing irritation. This can happen when the lower esophageal sphincter (LES)—the muscle that opens and closes between your esophagus and stomach—is weakened or relaxed and doesn't do its job properly. Some treatments aim to avoid substances that weaken the LES and physical impairment of its function. Other treatments aim to reduce stomach acid production, buffer it, or avoid irritation of the esophagus.

If you experience heartburn and need to use a heartburn remedy more than twice a week, you should see your healthcare provider. You may have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and your healthcare provider will be able to recommend more effective treatment, including prescription medications.

Home Remedies and Lifestyle

You can alleviate heartburn by avoiding food that causes heartburn and making lifestyle choices that can minimize heartburn.

Don't Smoke

Nicotine relaxes the esophageal sphincter. Smoking also stimulates the production of stomach acid. Stop smoking and avoid secondhand smoke.

Lose Weight If Overweight

Being overweight or obese places pressure on the abdomen and increases the risk of heartburn. Reducing heartburn is one of many health reasons you should aim for a body mass index of 30 or lower.

Loosen Your Waistband

Tight clothing around the waist increases abdominal pressure. Belts, pantyhose, and compression garments such as Spanks are common sources.

Avoid Food and Drink Triggers

Some heartburn triggers are common while others will vary for each individual.

  • Drinking alcohol before, during, or after meals can worsen heartburn because alcohol weakens the LES muscle. In addition, drinking alcohol can result in eating more than you intended and making poorer food choices.
  • Avoid foods and beverages that weaken the LES muscle. These foods include chocolate, peppermint, caffeinated beverages, carbonated beverages, alcohol, fatty foods, and greasy or fried foods.
  • Avoid foods and beverages that may irritate the esophagus. These include citrus fruits and juices, tomatoes and tomato-based products, chili peppers, and black pepper.
  • Create a heartburn-friendly diet by keeping a food diary to record which foods are safer for you and which are more likely to trigger heartburn. You may be able to enjoy some foods occasionally or in smaller amounts, while you will find others need to be avoided most of the time.

Eating Habits

Beyond what you eat and drink, how and when you do so may also trigger heartburn.

  • Eat smaller, more frequent meals. Eating large meals increases pressure in the stomach and on the LES muscle. Eating five or six small meals instead of three larger ones is better. Remember not to eat too quickly. Putting your fork or spoon down between bites can help you do this.
  • Don't lie down for two to three hours after eating. If you like relaxing on the sofa reading or watching TV or videos, do so sitting up or at least with your head and shoulders elevated.
  • Don't eat within two to three hours of going to bed. Nighttime heartburn is common and having food still in the stomach can provoke it. You may also eat a smaller meal for supper and you should avoid late-night snacking.
  • Foods and drinks that have been used as natural antacids include bananas and chamomile tea. Fresh ginger and turmeric have also been used traditionally to aid digestion.
  • Chewing gum or sucking on a lozenge or hard candy for 30 minutes after a meal is known to stimulate the production of saliva, which may help relieve heartburn symptoms. Since saliva is alkaline, it can help neutralize the acid. Saliva bathes the esophagus and washes refluxed acid back down to the stomach. However, this solution does not work for everyone as it can result in swallowing excess air, which can result in bloating and an increase in flatulence.
  • Drinking warm liquids or herbal tea after a meal can dilute and flush stomach acid from the esophagus.

Sleeping Habits

Nearly 80% of people with heartburn experience heartburn at night. Besides avoiding eating too soon before bedtime, there are ways to calm that burn to get a good night's sleep. Some of these methods include:

  • Sleep with your head and shoulders elevated. Lying down flat presses the stomach's contents against the LES. With the head higher than the stomach, gravity helps reduce this pressure. You can elevate your head a few inches in a couple of ways. Place bricks, blocks, or anything that's sturdy securely under the legs of your bed at the head. You can also use an extra pillow, or a wedge-shaped pillow, to elevate your head.
  • Lie on your left side
  • Wear loose-fitting pajamas

Baking Soda

Baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate, is a natural antacid.

If you dissolve a teaspoon of baking soda into 8 ounces of water and drink it, it can neutralize stomach acid and temporarily alleviate heartburn caused by acid reflux.

There are some drawbacks to this method. When you add baking soda to water, it releases carbon dioxide, causing it to fizz. This fizz can open the LES, letting you burp and helping relieve the pressure from bloating. Unfortunately, opening the LES can also allow the contents of your stomach to reflux up into the esophagus. While many people have used baking soda, there haven't been any clinical trials to support baking soda's effect on heartburn.

Unproven or Disproved Home Remedies

Fans of apple cider vinegar theorize that heartburn occurs because there isn't enough stomach acid. They think taking apple cider vinegar brings the stomach acid level up, allowing the stomach to digest food properly and causing heartburn to subside. However, this is the opposite of what medical experts believe. Healthcare providers recommend taking antacids and medications to reduce stomach acid and control acid reflux symptoms.

There are no published clinical trials that support using apple cider vinegar for heartburn, and one master's degree thesis found no difference in using vinegar or a placebo for heartburn.

Taking apple cider vinegar undiluted could irritate your mouth and esophagus and erode your tooth enamel as it is very acidic. Dilute it with water if you plan to use it, such as 1-3 teaspoons of vinegar to a cup of water. Vinegar may interact with other medications you are taking at the same time. Instead of relieving heartburn, the vinegar may actually make it worse. If you are considering using apple cider vinegar as a treatment for heartburn, it is important that you talk to your healthcare provider first.

Heartburn Doctor Discussion Guide

Get our printable guide for your next doctor's appointment to help you ask the right questions.

Download PDF

Drinking cool milk may ease the burn of acid reflux initially. But there may be a rebound action later when this same drink of milk triggers the production of stomach acid or slows down stomach emptying (which also plays a role in heartburn and GERD). This appears to be especially true of whole-fat milk. In GERD diets, skim milk is typically recommended—not as a cure for heartburn, but as part of a heartburn-friendly meal plan.

Over-the-Counter Therapies

You have several options today for OTC remedies for heartburn, some of which were only available by prescription a few years ago.

Note:

Over-the-counter therapies are meant for short-term relief and you should see your healthcare provider for continuing heartburn symptoms.

Antacids

Antacids are commonly used heartburn medications. They may relieve occasional heartburn and indigestion. The active ingredients in antacids neutralize stomach acid, which is what is causing the pain.

Antacids are sold under the following brand names, and each may have different formulations that can have the same or different ingredients:

  • Rolaids: Rolaids is available over the counter in different strengths including Ultra Strength, Extra-Strength, and Regular as well as in different forms, such as soft chews and liquid. All formulations contain calcium carbonate and magnesium hydroxide.
  • Mylanta: Mylanta is an antacid containing aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide. Mylanta ultra tabs, chewable tablets, and gelcaps contain the antacid calcium carbonate.
  • Tums: The active ingredient in Tums is calcium carbonate, which tends to be stronger and work slightly longer than some antacid products, Calcium carbonate may also increase motility (movement) in the esophagus, lessening the exposure to acid.
  • Gaviscon: Gaviscon contains alginic acid and sodium bicarbonate in addition to the acid-neutralizing ingredients found in most antacids (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate). The combination creates a foam barrier which floats on the stomach acid. This gel-like barrier displaces the acid pocket present at the junction of the esophagus and stomach and may help reduce the number of reflux episodes. It may also provide longer lasting action against heartburn in people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
  • Chooz: This is a sugar-free gum with calcium carbonate antacid. You chew one to two pieces after each meal.

Note:

Women who are pregnant should not use antacids that contain sodium bicarbonate or magnesium trisylicate. Discuss any antacid use during pregnancy with your healthcare provider and what you should use for heartburn relief instead.

Antacids are not meant for long-time use. If you're taking antacids for longer than two weeks, then the heartburn may be caused by a more serious medical problem. Consult your healthcare provider for a further evaluation. You should see your healthcare provider even sooner if you're experiencing any symptoms severe enough to interfere with your lifestyle.

Report to your healthcare provider immediately if you experience:

  • A skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue (which may indicate an allergic reaction)
  • Confusion
  • Headache
  • Irritability
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Unexplained weakness or tiredness

8 Best Antacids to Buy

H2 Blockers

H2 blockers (also called H2-receptor antagonists) are medicines that reduce the amount of acid in the stomach. Histamine-2 stimulates parietal cells in the stomach lining to produce acid. H2 blockers reduce acid production by blocking signals from histamine that tell the stomach to make acid.

H2 blockers are sold as the following brands:

  • Axid (nizatidine)
  • Pepcid (famotidine)
  • Tagamet (cimetidine)
  • Zantac (ranitidine)

April 1, 2020 Update: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the recall of all medications containing the ingredient ranitidine, known by the brand name Zantac. The FDA also advised against taking OTC forms of ranitidine, and for patients taking prescription ranitidine to speak with their healthcare provider about other treatment options before stopping medication. For more information, visit the FDA site.

Side effects when taking H2 blockers are rare. Most people tolerate H2 blockers well when they are taken as directed. Other medical conditions or medications could increase the risks of experiencing side effects.

Side effects that you should report to your healthcare provider or healthcare professional:

  • Allergic reactions like a skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue
  • Agitation, nervousness, depression, hallucinations
  • Breast swelling, tenderness
  • Redness, blistering, or peeling of the skin, including inside the mouth
  • Dark urine
  • Diarrhea
  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes

If you have been taking a maximum OTC dose of an H2 blocker for two weeks and you still have heartburn, you should see your healthcare provider.

Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI)

The proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) work by completely blocking the production of stomach acid. They do this by shutting down a system in the stomach known as the proton pump. In this system, a non-acidic potassium ion is taken out the stomach and replaced with an acidic hydrogen ion. By stopping the action of the pump, acid secretion into the stomach is stopped.

These PPIs are available in nonprescription as well as prescription strength:

  • Nexium 24H (esomeprazole)
  • Prilosec OTC (omeprazole)
  • Prevacid 24H (lansoprazole)
  • Zegerid OTC (omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate)

PPIs are generally taken in a two-week regimen and should not be taken for an extended period. If you need to do this more than once every four months, you should see your healthcare provider.

Side effects of taking PPIs may occur. See your healthcare provider if you experience any of these possible side effects:

  • Headache
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Upset stomach
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach pain
  • Cough
  • Cold symptoms
  • Dizziness
  • Mild rash

Report to your healthcare provider immediately if you experience:

  • Severe skin rash with swelling or peeling
  • Hives
  • Swelling of the face, mouth, lips, or tongue
  • Swelling of hands, feet, or ankles
  • Severe diarrhea
  • Hoarseness

Prescriptions

Heartburn is a symptom of GERD. If you see your healthcare provider for frequent heartburn you may be given a prescription for medications used for GERD.

Prescription H2 Blockers

Besides the OTC strength H2 blocker products, you may be prescribed a stronger dosage. Axid (nizatidine), Pepcid (famotidine), and Tagamet (cimetidine) are available in prescription strength.

Prescription Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs)

Healthcare providers prescribe PPIs to treat people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcer disease, or other digestive disorders that may cause excess stomach acid.

Prescription proton pump inhibitors are available under the following brand names and may have generic formulations:

  • Prilosec (omeprazole)
  • Prevacid (lansoprazole)
  • Protonix (pantoprazole)
  • Nexium (esomeprazole)
  • Aciphex (rabeprazole)
  • Dexilant (dexlansoprazole)

Prescription PPIs are meant to be taken under a healthcare provider's supervision and only for a limited amount of time. Chronic use of PPIs has been associated with heart attacks, kidney disease, and bone fractures.

Complementary Medicine (CAM)

There are a couple of types of CAM that have some evidence to support their use for heartburn.

Aloe Vera Syrup Products

Aloe vera juice has been used in traditional medicine to heal irritation of the esophagus. It is unwise to use unprocessed aloe vera sap as it contains laxative compounds, but some products are formulated for internal use. AloeCure contains organic aloe juice and is marketed as an all-natural remedy for digestive disorders, including heartburn. Some trials, including a 2015 study, have found aloe vera syrup to be effective for heartburn symptoms. Note that consuming aloe can lower your blood sugar levels. Discuss the use of aloe with your healthcare provider if you have diabetes, hypoglycemia, thyroid disorders, kidney disease, heart disease, or electrolyte abnormalities.

Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice

Deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) is a natural remedy that is sometimes recommended to soothe the symptoms of heartburn and other digestive ailments.

Licorice can raise blood pressure and have undesirable effects; as a result, deglycyrrhizinated licorice is sometimes used, since this form of licorice does not seem to have the same side effects.

However, you should not use DGL if you have been diagnosed with hypertension and/or are receiving treatment for hypertension. You will find DGL or licorice marketed in chewable tablets, powder, or tea. Scientific studies are few and don't provide enough evidence that licorice is effective against heartburn. However, there are some small studies like one in 2012 that show some positive results.

Keep in mind that supplements and herbal products are not regulated or monitored for purity, safety, or effectiveness.

Side effects from using antacids are more likely to occur when taken for longer periods or at higher doses than recommended. Side effects such as constipation or stomach gas usually do not require medical attention unless they continue or become bothersome.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • The symptoms of heartburn may include:

    • Burning feeling in your upper chest or throat
    • Trouble swallowing
    • Sour or bitter taste in your mouth
    • Chronic cough
    • Wheezing or other asthma-like symptoms
  • Heartburn may last anywhere from just a few minutes to several hours. For some it's an occasional occurrence, whereas for others, it may occur more frequently. Be sure to make an appointment with your healthcare provider if you experience heartburn more than twice per week.

  • Over-the-counter antacids, like Tums, Mylanta, or Rolaids, which work by neutralizing stomach acid, are a good option for fast, short-term relief of mild heartburn. However, antacids, along with other over-the-counter medications like H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), are not meant to be used for long-term support.

  • Home remedies for heartburn may include:

    • Drinking 1 teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in 8 ounces of water
    • Incorporating foods and teas rich in fresh ginger or turmeric
    • Drinking hot herbal teas after a meal, such as chamomile or slippery elm
    • Keeping your upper body upright for two to three hours after eating
    • Wearing loose-fitting clothing
    • Deep-belly breathing
    • Chewing sugarless gum
  • Over-the-counter antacids that contain calcium carbonate are the best choice. Some other ingredients in antacids are not recommended during pregnancy as they may not be safe for your baby, such as aspirin or magnesium trisilicate. Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) can cause fluid retention in pregnancy.

  • When over-the-counter treatments don't seem to help, talk to your healthcare provider about using prescription-strength acid-suppressing therapies for a short period of time. Prescription-strength H2 blockers can reduce the amount of acid in the stomach while PPIs can block it altogether. However, PPIs are not without side effects, and it's important to only take them for only short courses.

  • The following lifestyle changes can help stave off heartburn:

    • Quitting smoking
    • Wearing clothes with looser waistbands
    • Managing your weight
    • Eating smaller, more frequent meals
    • Sleeping with your head and shoulders elevated
    • Avoiding food and drink triggers like alcohol, caffeine, chocolate, peppermint, fried or greasy foods, citrus, tomatoes, and spicy peppers

How to Prevent Heartburn

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Cleveland Clinic. Laparoscopic Antireflux Surgery. Updated May 21, 2019.

  2. InformedHealth.org [Internet]. Cologne, Germany: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG); 2006-. Heartburn and GERD: Treatment options for GERD. 2012 Jul 19. Updated December 13, 2018.

  3. Harvard Health Publishing, Harvard Medical School. What to eat when you have chronic heartburn. Updated: October 22, 2019.

  4. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Treatment for GER & GERD. November 2014.

  5. Harmon RC, Peura DA. Evaluation and management of dyspepsia. Therap Adv Gastroenterol. 2010;3(2):87-98. doi:10.1177/1756283X09356590

  6. Gupta E. GERD Diet: Foods That Help with Acid Reflux (Heartburn). John Hopkins Medicine.

  7. Kaiser Permanente. Nonprescription Antacids for Heartburn. Updated August 12, 2019.

  8. Panahi Y, Khedmat H, Valizadegan G, Mohtashami R, Sahebkar A. Efficacy and safety of aloe vera syrup for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: A pilot randomized positive-controlled trial. Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine. 2015;35(6):632-636. doi:10.1016/s0254-6272(15)30151-5.

  9. Raveendra KR, Jayachandra, Srinivasa V, et al. An extract of glycyrrhiza glabra(GutGard) alleviates symptoms of functional dyspepsia: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2012;2012:1-9. doi:10.1155/2012/216970.

  10. National Institute of Health. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Symptoms and causes of GER & GERD. Updated July 2020.

  11. Cleveland Clinic. Heartburn. Updated January 22, 2020.

  12. Ong AM, Chua LT, Khor CJ, Asokkumar R, Wang YT. Diaphragmatic breathing reduces belching and proton pump inhibitor refractory gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2018 Mar 1;16(3):407-16. doi;10.1016/j.cgh.2017.10.038

  13. Kaiser Permanente. Nonprescription antacids for heartburn. Updated August 12, 2019.

  14. Nehra AK, Alexander JA, Loftus CG, Nehra V. Proton pump inhibitors: review of emerging concerns. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2018 Feb 1 (Vol. 93, No. 2, pp. 240-246). Elsevier.

  15. InformedHealth.org [Internet]. Cologne, Germany: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG); 2006-. Heartburn and GERD: Treatment options for GERD. 2012 Jul 19. Updated December 13, 2018.

Additional Reading
Источник: https://www.verywellhealth.com/heartburn-treatments-1742754

8 Natural Remedies for Indigestion

Your instinct might be to reach for a bottle of that familiar pink liquid or an antacid pill when indigestion or heartburn hits, but there are natural home remedies that may ease your symptoms without the side effects that are possible with many over the counter medications.

Next time you have an upset stomach or a bout of heartburn, try ayurvedic supplements for acid reflux or these natural home remedies.

1: Ginger

Ginger has been used for centuries to settle the stomach and improve digestion. Try taking one or two 250-milligram capsules of ginger with meals or drink ginger tea. You can save money by filling capsules yourself with ginger powder or grating fresh ginger for tea.

2: Fennel

Like ginger, fennel has been used for centuries for indigestion. Fennel seeds contain oils that relieve nausea and help control gas. Fennel is a common ingredient in digestive health supplements, which is an easy way to ingest the herb. Also, try chewing and swallowing a spoonful of fennel seeds to ease indigestion.

3: Chamomile

You probably know chamomile is a popular nighttime tea—maybe it’s even part of your bedtime routine. Chamomile is also excellent for indigestion, helping calm the stomach and soothe spasms in the intestinal tract. You can take chamomile in tea or in a tincture.

4: Peppermint

pouring black tea into glass cup on wooden table

Soothing and cooling, peppermint is widely used to relieve nausea and settle upset tummies. For digestion and upset stomach relief, peppermint tea is a good choice. You can also take peppermint oil capsules between meals. People with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or frequent heartburn should avoid peppermint, however, as it can make symptoms worse or trigger heartburn.

5: Licorice

Licorice contains substances that coat the lining of the stomach, helping prevent inflammation. This coating can help soothe stomach pain and indigestion. Many digestive health supplements today contain licorice. You can also drink licorice tea or take deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), which may help relieve acid reflux symptoms.

6: Hot Water

Many people find that drinking plain hot water eases indigestion. Hot water breaks down food faster and supports healthy bowel movements. It also expands the blood vessels, which improves circulation. These things may explain why hot water can ease an upset stomach and reduce gas and bloating.

7: Apple Cider Vinegar

People with low stomach acid production (which can be a side effect of taking proton pump inhibitors, such as omeprazole) may find relief from apple cider vinegar. Try drinking a mixture of ½ a cup of water and one teaspoon of apple cider vinegar to help your body digest food after meals.

8: Baking Soda

Another inexpensive and effective way to ease indigestion is to drink a solution of one cup of water and one tablespoon of baking soda. The solution helps neutralize stomach acid and can relieve gas and bloating. To reduce the chance of a chemical reaction in the stomach, add a few drops of lemon juice to the mixture before drinking.

Avoid Foods that Trigger Symptoms

Certain foods are known to cause heartburn and indigestion, including:

  • Fatty foods and fried foods

Try reducing or eliminating these foods or adopt an acid reflux diet and see if your symptoms improve.

Indigestion and acid reflux can cause uncomfortable symptoms, but natural remedies and lifestyle changes can help. Also, take good care of your digestive system with a high-quality digestive health supplement.


Источник: https://www.athreyaherbs.com/blogs/news/8-natural-remedies-for-indigestion

GERD Diet: Foods That Help with Acid Reflux (Heartburn)

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Getting a case of acid reflux (heartburn) once in a while isn't unusual, but some people suffer from burning discomfort, bloating and belching almost every time they eat. About 20% of the population has gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a chronic acid reflux condition that's diagnosed by a doctor.

Normally, the esophageal sphincter (a muscular tube that lets food pass into the stomach and then cinches shut to block it from coming back up) protects the esophagus from stomach acid. However, if the sphincter relaxes, food can push upward through the loosened opening and cause acid reflux.

"Diet plays a major role in controlling acid reflux symptoms and is the first line of therapy used for people with GERD," says Ekta Gupta, M.B.B.S., M.D., gastroenterologist with Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Foods That May Cause Heartburn

Foods commonly known to be heartburn triggers cause the esophageal sphincter to relax and delay the digestive process, letting food sit in the stomach longer, says Gupta. The worst culprits? Foods that are high in fat, salt or spice such as:

  • Fried food
  • Fast food
  • Pizza
  • Potato chips and other processed snacks
  • Chili powder and pepper (white, black, cayenne)
  • Fatty meats such as bacon and sausage
  • Cheese

Other foods that can cause the same problem include:

  • Tomato-based sauces
  • Citrus fruits
  • Chocolate
  • Peppermint
  • Carbonated beverages

"Moderation is key since many people may not be able to or want to completely eliminate these foods," says Gupta. "But try to avoid eating problem foods late in the evening closer to bedtime, so they're not sitting in your stomach and then coming up your esophagus when you lay down at night. It's also a good idea to eat small frequent meals instead of bigger, heavier meals and avoid late-night dinners and bedtime snacks."

Foods That Help Prevent Acid Reflux

Good news: There are plenty of things you can eat to help prevent acid reflux. Stock your kitchen with foods from these three categories:

a bowl of banana oatmeal

High-fiber foods

Fibrous foods make you feel full so you're less likely to overeat, which may contribute to heartburn. So, load up on healthy fiber from these foods:

  • Whole grains such as oatmeal, couscous and brown rice.
  • Root vegetables such as sweet potatoes, carrots and beets.
  • Green vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli and green beans.
a bowl of mixed nuts

Alkaline foods

Foods fall somewhere along the pH scale (an indicator of acid levels). Those that have a low pH are acidic and more likely to cause reflux. Those with higher pH are alkaline and can help offset strong stomach acid. Alkaline foods include:

  • Bananas
  • Melons
  • Cauliflower
  • Fennel
  • Nuts
a bowl of cut watermelon

Watery foods

Eating foods that contain a lot of water can dilute and weaken stomach acid. Choose foods such as:

  • Celery
  • Cucumber
  • Lettuce
  • Watermelon
  • Broth-based soups
  • Herbal tea

Heartburn Home Remedies

People with heartburn commonly reach for antacids, over-the-counter medications that neutralize stomach acid. But eating certain foods may also offer relief from symptoms. Consider trying the following:

milk pouring from a pitcher into a glass

Milk

Does milk help with heartburn? "Milk is often thought to relieve heartburn," says Gupta. "But you have to keep in mind that milk comes in different varieties — whole milk with the full amount of fat, 2% fat, and skim or nonfat milk. The fat in milk can aggravate acid reflux. But nonfat milk can act as a temporary buffer between the stomach lining and acidic stomach contents and provide immediate relief of heartburn symptoms." Low-fat yogurt has the same soothing qualities along with a healthy dose of probiotics (good bacteria that enhance digestion).

a cup of ginger tea

Ginger

Ginger is one of the best digestive aids because of its medicinal properties. It's alkaline in nature and anti-inflammatory, which eases irritation in the digestive tract. Try sipping ginger tea when you feel heartburn coming on.

Apple cider vinegar and apples

Apple cider vinegar

While there isn't enough research to prove that drinking apple cider vinegar works for acid reflux, many people swear that it helps. However, you should never drink it at full concentration because it's a strong acid that can irritate the esophagus. Instead, put a small amount in warm water and drink it with meals.

a cup of lemon water with honey

Lemon water

Lemon juice is generally considered very acidic, but a small amount of lemon juice mixed with warm water and honey has an alkalizing effect that neutralizes stomach acid. Also, honey has natural antioxidants, which protect the health of cells.

How a Doctor Can Help

If you have heartburn two or more times a week and changes to your diet or eating pattern haven't helped, consult a doctor. A gastroenterologist (a doctor who specializes in the digestive system) can perform tests to measure the acidity in your stomach and see if frequent acid reflux has damaged your esophagus.

GERD is often treatable through a combination of lifestyle changes and medication. But persistent symptoms of reflux need thorough evaluation by a gastroenterologist who can find the underlying cause and discuss available treatment options.

The Johns Hopkins Heartburn Center

GERD is an ongoing condition that often requires more attention than over-the-counter treatments can offer. The Heartburn Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine provides personalized care to help patients find relief.

Learn more about The Heartburn Center

Источник: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/gerd-diet-foods-that-help-with-acid-reflux-heartburn

Heartburn and acidity in pregnancy (natural remedies)

What causes heartburn in pregnancy?

Heartburn, indigestionand acid reflux are common in pregnancy.

These symptoms are due to the hormone progesterone, which relaxes the valve at the top of your stomach. This causes a small amount of stomach acid, sometimes with partially digested food, to surge upwards into your food pipe (oesophagus).

In early pregnancy, heartburn or indigestion may make your pregnancy sicknessworse. In late pregnancy, your symptoms might get worse as your baby takes up more space in your abdomen.

Your heartburn may be worse if:

How can I prevent heartburn?

Eating small mealsfrequently, rather than large meals which are hours apart, will prevent your stomach from becoming too full and pushing up under your diaphragm.

Try to eat your main mealof the day at lunchtime. Have your dinner early in the evening, so your body has time to digest it before you go to bed. Avoid spicy, rich, fatty and fried foods, and anything else that triggers your symptoms. Sugar, tea, coffeeand certain food additives may also make your heartburn worse.

Don't drink liquids with your food, as this dilutes your digestive juices, making them less effective. Instead, stay hydratedby drinking water between meals.

Herbal teas, such as peppermint, may help your digestion. But don't drink other teas that are reputed to aid digestion, such as fennel (saunf), in pregnancy, as these contain chemicals which may make the uterus (womb) contract.

If you have a lot of meat and fizzy drinks, you may be more likely to develop heartburn than vegetariansand those who don't have fizzy drinks.

Foods high in polyunsaturated fatty acids such as nuts, seeds, sardines (pedvey), tuna(chura machli), salmon (ravaas machli), soy beans, and wholegrain wheat (atta) may increase your chances of developing heartburn.

Try to stay sitting upright after eating, as lying down may cause you to regurgitate your food. Sleeping propped up on two or three pillows in later pregnancy may help.

Heartburn may also be worse if you smoke. It's another reason to stop, as smoking is bad for youand harmful to your baby.

What can I try to ease heartburn?

Try eating a clove or two of raw garlic (lehsun) every day, or use whole cloves in cooking.

If you are taking iron tabletswhich make your heartburn worse, talk to your doctor about changing to a liquid supplement instead.

Herbal remedies
Ginger (adrak), chamomile and dandelion herbal teamay help to relieve heartburn. However drink dandelion tea with caution, particularly if you have gestational diabetes, or if you are taking tablets for high blood pressure.

Aromatherapy
Try adding four drops of lemon, orange or neroli (orange blossom) essential oilsto a teaspoonful of grapeseed base oil. Massagethis into your chest and upper back, or put the blend in your bath so you can inhale the vapours.

Acupressure
Pressing an acupuncturepoint (pericardium point 6) on your wrist may help to relieve your heartburn.

To locate this point:
  • Use one hand on the inside of your opposite wrist, measuring up three finger widths from the crease between your hand and arm.
  • At the point where your third finger is, lift the pressure off until you are just touching the skin, and feel lightly for a slight dip. Press into this dip quite deeply and it will feel bruised.
  • When your heartburn is severe, press this point on each wrist for about 20 to 30 times at about one-second intervals.

Homeopathy
Though there's no evidence that homeopathic treatments work, if you want to try them, consult a qualified homeopathic doctor who has experience in treating pregnant women. Many do say that it helps them. Also there is no known harm or side effects from having the right homeopathic medicine in prescribed doses. So you can try it and if your symptoms do not improve, you can opt for another therapy.

Yoga
The modified thunderbolt posecan be done after a meal to improve digestion and help relieve heartburn, acidity and indigestion. This is safe to do in your second and third trimesters.

Remember to always practise yoga under the supervision of an expert who can help you choose the right asanasfor your stage of pregnancy.

Read more about prenatal yoga.

Which complementary therapies could help me?

Complementary therapies which aim to realign your posture may help to treat heartburn, including osteopathy, chiropractic or the Alexander technique. Apart from yoga relaxation therapies which focus on posture can also help, for example tai chior qi gong.

If you have backache, as well as heartburn, chiropractic may be particularly effective in helping to relieve the symptoms.

You could also try acupuncture or shiatsu by a qualified practitioner, or reflexology by a therapist who is qualified to treat pregnancy problems.



Read more on:

References

Bryner P, Staerker PG. 1996. Indigestion and heartburn: a descriptive study of prevalence in persons seeking care from chiropractors. J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 19(5): 317-23

Chittumma P, Kaewkiattikun K, Wiriyasiriwach B. 2007. Comparison of the effectiveness of ginger and vitamin B6 for treatment of nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy: a randomized double-blind controlled trial. J Med Assoc Thai. 90(1): 15-20

Dall'Alba V, Fornari F, Krahe C, et al. 2010. Heartburn and regurgitation in pregnancy: the effect of fat ingestion. Dig Dis Sci. 55(6): 1610-4

Maliakal PP, Wanwimolruk S. 2001. Effect of herbal teas on hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes in rats. J Pharm Pharmacol. 53: 1323-9

McKenna D, Spence D, Haggan SE, et al. 2003. A randomized trial investigating an iron-rich natural mineral water as a prophylaxis against iron deficiency in pregnancy Clin. Lab. Haem. 25: 99-103

NHS Choices. 2010. Indigestion (Dyspepsia) in pregnancy. Health A-Z.
Ramu B, Mohan P, Rajasekaran MS, et al. 2011. Prevalence and risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux in pregnancy. Indian J Gastroenterol. 30(3): 144-7

Tiran D. 2004. Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: an Integrated Approach to Care. Edinburgh: Elsevier Science

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