food downtown la

Enjoy the ultimate dining experience in the heart of downtown LA with 360º breathtaking views, a romantic atmosphere, and vibrant modern American cuisine. Sep 5, 2018 - The LA Girl's Guide to Downtown Los Angeles will show you the best of DTLA, from the contemporary cuisine to the art scene, and everything in. Guide to the best gluten free friendly restaurants in Downtown Los Angeles, California with reviews and photos from the gluten free community.

Food downtown la -

5 Restaurants That Have Made Downtown Los Angeles A Destination

Food Republic has partnered with premier hospitality technology platform Reserve to bring its readers new content from the restaurant world. Love to eat? Check out Reserve’s blog, where this post first appeared, for the latest food trends and U.S. restaurant tips.

Whether you’re a visitor or a local, downtown LA has transformed from taco carts and ramen joints into a progressive food scene worth sinking your fork into. Check out this list of great downtown LA restaurants to try next time you’re scoping out where to eat in the neighborhood.

Downtown L.A. Restaurants

simbal LA

Simbal
For the bold vacationer looking to eat like a local, Simbal — tucked away in Little Tokyo — is the place to try. A Southeast Asian kitchen and bar, Simbal (simple + balanced) offers small plates, dim sum–style service and eccentric cocktails with subtle Vietnamese flair, plus a story behind every dish. You’re guaranteed to leave this trendy dinner spot with Instagram-worthy food photos worth gawking at (not to mention a satisfied belly). It’s also just a 10-minute walk from the famous Bradbury Building, where a scoop (or two) of McConnell’s Fine Ice Cream awaits.

Bäco Mercat LA

Bäco Mercat
For the up-to-speed foodie fan, Bäco Mercat by celebrity chef Josef Centeno is the spot to visit. Best for brunch or dinner, this modern Spanish-style restaurant in the historic district is known for the bäco sandwich, a complex and cleverly composed flatbread-pita-taco hybrid. As if the intrigue of the bäco sandwich isn’t enough, the laundry list of special awards and recognitions, including LA Weekly’s 20 Best Restaurants 2015 and Jonathan Gold’s 101 Best Restaurants for three consecutive years, speaks for itself.

1810 LA

1810
For the social butterfly looking to send his or her taste buds on a trip to Buenos Aires, 1810 is a casual Argentinean restaurant with a lively atmosphere that’s sure to deliver good times. The grilled meats are melt-in-your-mouth tender, and the traditional flan and crêpes will leave you licking your plate. Couple the classic flavors of Argentina with the contemporary dining atmosphere, and you’ve got yourself a winning dining experience.

Preux & Proper LA

Preux & Proper
For the hopeless romantic or downtown fashionista, Preux & Proper is the perfect refuge for dinner and drinks. This two-story Cajun/New Orleans–style restaurant in the fashion district gives you two distinct dining atmospheres for the price of one. Whether you’re downstairs casually sipping frozen daiquiris or upstairs enjoying elegant craft cocktails, one thing is for sure: The soul food and warm hospitality will transport you to the American South.

Redbird LA

Redbird
For the career-savvy individual looking for somewhere to dine with colleagues, the smart-casual, modern American cuisine of Redbird is a perfect business-dinner choice. Nestled in a historic downtown cathedral, Redbird offers both small and large plates that are quintessentially L.A. Between the unique opportunities for private dining experiences on the third floor, the retractable roof that reveals an ethereal patio and the ongoing list of impressive accolades earned by chef Neal Fraser, you’re guaranteed to enjoy any occasion here.


Reserve is the country’s premier hospitality technology platform, helping restaurants and guests connect. Reserve helps guests discover restaurants, make reservations, get personalized service and seamlessly pay the bill.

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Источник: https://www.foodrepublic.com

This Wednesday, November 4, Downtown Los Angeles's first-ever Whole Foodswill open to the public. Excitement's been building since the summer of 2013, when it was first announced that the famously upscale market would be setting up shop in grocery-store-poor DTLA. The 41,000-square-foot store will have a bar/restaurant, a coffee bar, and an interior design that will "emulate the art deco style popular in historic downtown Los Angeles buildings, but with a contemporary twist," a release from WF says. The store occupies part of the ground floor of the 700-unit Eighth & Grand luxury apartment complex, which has a special entrance into the classy supermarket from the resident parking garage.

The first move-ins began over the weekend at Eighth & Grand, though the building is still a work in progress; it's shooting for full completion in April or May, a rep for the project tells Curbed. Among the enviable amenities (rooftop pool!) that tenants of the fancy and pricey apartments will have access to will be food delivery from Whole Foods (via third-party provider Instacart) and "front-of-the-line" passes to the restaurant in the WF. Curbed visited the site to see how it's developing, and we've got all the photos.


· Whole Foods Will Open in Downtown LA on November 4 [Curbed LA]
· How Much Will It Cost to Live in DTLA's Whole Foods Building? [Curbed LA]

Eighth & Grand

770 South Grand Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90017

Источник: https://la.curbed.com/2015/11/2/9904732/downtown-los-angeles-whole-foods-opening

Downtown Los Angeles

Neighborhood of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California

Downtown Los Angeles (DTLA) is the central business district of Los Angeles, California. In addition, it contains a diverse residential area of some 85,000 people, and covers 5.84 sq mi (15.1 km2).[3] A 2013 study found that the district is home to over 500,000 jobs.[4] It is also part of Central Los Angeles.

Downtown Los Angeles is divided into neighborhoods and districts, some overlapping. Most districts are named for the activities concentrated there now or historically, e.g. the Arts, Civic Center, Fashion, Banking, Theater, Toy, and Jewelry districts. It is the hub for the city's urban rail transit system plus the Pacific Surfliner and Metrolink commuter rail system for Southern California.

Banks, department stores, and movie palaces at one time drew residents and visitors of all socioeconomic classes downtown, but the area declined economically especially after the 1950s. It remained an important center—in the Civic Center, of government business; on Bunker Hill, of banking, and along Broadway, of retail and entertainment for Hispanic Angelenos, especially immigrants. Now Downtown has been experiencing a renaissance that started in the early 2000s. The Staples Center anchors downtown's south end, and along Broadway, pre-war buildings are being restored for new uses, such as a luxury condos, co-working spaces, and high-end retail.

History[edit]

See also: History of Los Angeles

The Tongva village of Yaanga was located in what is now downtown Los Angeles, possibly near or underneath where the Bella Union Hotel was located (now Fletcher Bowron Square).[5][6]

Spanish and Mexican era[edit]

Main article: Pueblo de Los Ángeles

Father Juan Crespí, a Spanish Franciscan missionary charged with exploring sites for Catholicmissions in California, noted in 1769 that the region had "all the requisites for a large settlement".[7] On September 4, 1781, Los Angeles was founded by a group of settlers who trekked north from present-day Mexico. Like most urban centers in the Spanish Empire, the town grew in a grid-like street patern around a central plaza which faced the first church. The area passed to American control in 1847,[8] and the small town grew to 11,000 by 1880,[9] The business district was centered along Main Street between the Plaza and First Street.[10][11]

Victorian-era Downtown[edit]

Looking northeast on Spring Street from First Street, 1880s. Asher Hamburger's Peoples Store at center. Towers of the Baker Block are visible in the distance.

Main article: Victorian Downtown Los Angeles

Land speculation increased in the 1880s, which saw the population of the city explode from 11,000 in 1880 to nearly 100,000 by 1896.[12] Infrastructure enhancements and the laying of a street grid eventually brought development south of the Plaza: Victorian Downtown Los Angeles in the 1800s and 1890s along Main, Spring and Broadway south to Third Street – all of which was razed to make way for today's Civic Center. After 1900, larger buildings were constructed along Broadway and Spring from Third to Ninth streets in what is now called the Historic Core.

Downtown's golden age[edit]

By 1920, the city's private and municipal rail lines were the most far-flung and most comprehensive in the world in mileage, even besting that of New York City. By this time, a steady influx of residents and aggressive land developers had transformed the city into a large metropolitan area, with DTLA at its center. Rail lines connected four counties with over 1,100 miles (1,800 km) of track.[13]

During the early part of the 20th century, banking institutions clustered around South Spring Street, forming the Spring Street Financial District. Sometimes referred to as the "Wall Street of the West,"[14] the district held corporate headquarters for financial institutions including Bank of America, Farmers and Merchants Bank, the Crocker National Bank, California Bank & Trust, and International Savings & Exchange Bank. The Los Angeles Stock Exchange was also located on the corridor from 1929 until 1986 before moving into a new building across the Harbor (110) Freeway.[15]

Commercial growth brought with it hotel construction—during this time period several grand hotels, the Alexandria (1906), the Rosslyn (1911), and the Biltmore (1923), were erected—and also the need for venues to entertain the growing population of Los Angeles. Broadway became the nightlife, shopping and entertainment district of the city, with over a dozen theater and movie palaces built before 1932.

Department stores, most that had grown from local dry goods businesses, moved from Spring and Main streets around Temple and 1st, to much larger stores along Broadway, including The Broadway, Hamburger's, which became May Co., Robinson's, Bullock's, Coulter's, Desmond's, Silverwoods, Harris & Frank, and the Fifth Street Store/Walker's, serving a variety of socioeconomic groups from across the city and suburbs. All but Coulter's would, in the 1920s–1950s, launch branches dotting shopping centers across a growing Southern California. Numerous specialty stores also flourished including those in the jewelry business which gave rise to the Downtown Jewelry District. Among these early jewelers included the Laykin Diamond Company (later becoming Laykin et Cie [8]) and Harry Winston & Co., both of which found their beginnings in the Hotel Alexandria at Fifth and Spring streets.

The Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal (Union Station) opened in May 1939, unifying passenger service among various local, regional, and long-distance passenger trains. It was built on a grand scale and would be one of the "last of the great railway stations" built in the United States.

Decline and redevelopment[edit]

Following World War II, suburbanization, the development of the Los Angeles freeway network, and increased automobile ownership led to decreased investment downtown. Many corporate headquarters slowly dispersed to new suburbs or fell to mergers and acquisitions. As early as the 1920s once-stately Victorian mansions on Bunker Hill were dilapidated, serving as rooming houses for 20,000 working-class Angelenos.[16]

From about 1930 onward, numerous more-than-100-year-old buildings in the Plaza area were demolished to make way for street-level parking lots, the high demand for parking making this more profitable than any other options allowing preservation. The drastic loss of local downtown residents further reduced the viability of streetfront, pedestrian-oriented businesses. For middle- and upper-income Angelenos, downtown became a drive-in, drive-out destination.

In an effort to combat blight and lure businesses back downtown, the city's Community Redevelopment Agency undertook the Bunker Hill Redevelopment Project in 1955, a massive clearance project that leveled homes and cleared land for future commercial skyscraper development. This period saw the clearing and upzoning of the entire neighborhood, as well as the shuttering of the Angels Flight funicular railway in 1969. Angels Flight resumed operation in 1996 for a period of five years, shutting down once again after a fatal accident in 2001. On March 15, 2010, the railway once again opened for passenger service following extensive upgrades to brake and safety systems.

With Class A office space becoming available on Bunker Hill, many of DTLA's remaining financial corporations moved to the newer buildings, leaving the former Spring Street Financial District devoid of tenants above ground floor. Following the corporate headquarters' moving six blocks west, the large department stores on Broadway shuttered, culminating in the 1980s.

However, the Broadway theaters saw much use as Spanish-language movie houses during this time, beginning with the conversion of the Million Dollar Theater in the 1950s to a Spanish-language theater.[17]

Recent years[edit]

In the early 2000's, the neighborhood became popular with Artists and Creatives due to low rent, open loft space, and many vacancies. In mid-2013, downtown was noted as "a neighborhood with an increasingly hip and well-heeled residential population".[18]

Because of the downtown area's office market's migration west to Bunker Hill and the Financial District, many historic office buildings have been left intact, simply used for storage or remaining empty during recent decades. In 1999, the Los Angeles City Council passed an adaptive reuseordinance, making it easier for developers to convert outmoded, vacant office and commercial buildings into renovated lofts and luxury apartment and condo complexes.

As of early 2009, 14,561 residential units[19] have been created under the adaptive reuse ordinance, leading to an increase in the residential population. With 28,878 residents in 2006,[20] 39,537 in 2008,[21] and over 60,000 in 2017,[22] Downtown Los Angeles is seeing new life and investment.[23]

  • Staples Center, which opened in 1999, has contributed immensely to the revitalization plans, adding 250 events and nearly 4 million visitors per year to the neighborhood.[24] Since the opening of the Staples Center, the adjacent L.A. Live complex was completed, which includes the Microsoft Theatre and the Grammy Museum.
  • Los Angeles Metro Rail, a rail transit network centered on the downtown area, facilitates access to the city center, especially from the congested West Side.
  • Real estate developers and investors planned a $1.8 billion revitalization project along Grand Avenue, which included the development of Grand Park, a large city park,[25] and the construction of major city landmarks, including the Frank Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall and contemporary art museum The Broad, which opened in 2015.
  • On August 7, 2007, the Los Angeles City Council approved sweeping changes in zoning and development rules for the downtown area.[26] Strongly advocated by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, the changes allow larger and denser developments downtown; developers who reserve 15% of their units for low-income residents are now exempt from some open-space requirements and can make their buildings 35% larger than current zoning codes allow.[26]
  • In 2009 Bottega Louie opened on the first floor of the historic Brockman Building on Grand Avenue and Seventh Street. It contributed to the revitalization of DTLA by creating Restaurant Row, which has since brought numerous new restaurants and retail shops to the area.[27] In 2012, the upper 11 floors of the Brockman Building were bought with the intention of being sold as luxury lofts.[28]
  • In October 2015, an outdoor lifestyle center, The Bloc Los Angeles, replaced the old enclosed Macy's Plaza.
  • Several labels of Warner Music moved into the Los Angeles Arts District in 2019 where the company had purchased a former Ford Motor Company assembly plant.[29]
  • Broadway retail is transitioning from a broad mix of stores catering mostly to Hispanic immigrants and a burgeoning sneaker and streetwear retail cluster has emerged from 4th to 9th streets: Sneaker Row.[30]

Multiple Olympic and Paralympic events will be held in DTLA during the 2028 Summer Olympics and Paralympics.[31][32]

Geography[edit]

Downtown Los Angeles is flanked by Echo Park to the north and northwest, Chinatown to the northeast, Boyle Heights to the east, Vernon to the south, Historic South Central and University Park to the southwest, and Pico-Union and Westlake to the west.[33][34][35]

Downtown is bounded on the northeast by Cesar Chavez Avenue, on the east by the Los Angeles River, on the south by the Los Angeles city line with Vernon, on the southwest by East Washington Boulevard and on the west by the 110 Freeway or Beaudry Avenue, including the entire Four Level Interchange with the 101 Freeway.[34][35]

Districts[edit]

The neighborhood includes these districts:

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Los Angeles (USC, Downtown), 1991–2020 normals, extremes 1877–present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 95
(35)
95
(35)
99
(37)
106
(41)
103
(39)
112
(44)
109
(43)
106
(41)
113
(45)
108
(42)
100
(38)
92
(33)
113
(45)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 83.0
(28.3)
82.8
(28.2)
85.8
(29.9)
90.1
(32.3)
88.9
(31.6)
89.1
(31.7)
93.5
(34.2)
95.2
(35.1)
99.4
(37.4)
95.7
(35.4)
88.9
(31.6)
81.0
(27.2)
101.5
(38.6)
Average high °F (°C) 68.0
(20.0)
68.0
(20.0)
69.9
(21.1)
72.4
(22.4)
73.7
(23.2)
77.2
(25.1)
82.0
(27.8)
84.0
(28.9)
83.0
(28.3)
78.6
(25.9)
72.9
(22.7)
67.4
(19.7)
74.8
(23.8)
Daily mean °F (°C) 58.4
(14.7)
59.0
(15.0)
61.1
(16.2)
63.6
(17.6)
65.9
(18.8)
69.3
(20.7)
73.3
(22.9)
74.7
(23.7)
73.6
(23.1)
69.3
(20.7)
63.0
(17.2)
57.8
(14.3)
65.8
(18.8)
Average low °F (°C) 48.9
(9.4)
50.0
(10.0)
52.4
(11.3)
54.8
(12.7)
58.1
(14.5)
61.4
(16.3)
64.7
(18.2)
65.4
(18.6)
64.2
(17.9)
59.9
(15.5)
53.1
(11.7)
48.2
(9.0)
56.8
(13.8)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 41.4
(5.2)
42.9
(6.1)
45.4
(7.4)
48.9
(9.4)
53.5
(11.9)
57.4
(14.1)
61.1
(16.2)
61.7
(16.5)
59.1
(15.1)
53.7
(12.1)
45.4
(7.4)
40.5
(4.7)
39.2
(4.0)
Record low °F (°C) 28
(−2)
28
(−2)
31
(−1)
36
(2)
40
(4)
46
(8)
49
(9)
49
(9)
44
(7)
40
(4)
34
(1)
30
(−1)
28
(−2)
Average rainfall inches (mm) 3.29
(84)
3.64
(92)
2.23
(57)
0.69
(18)
0.32
(8.1)
0.09
(2.3)
0.02
(0.51)
0.00
(0.00)
0.13
(3.3)
0.58
(15)
0.78
(20)
2.48
(63)
14.25
(362)
Average rainy days (≥ 0.01 in)6.1 6.3 5.1 2.8 1.9 0.5 0.4 0.1 0.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 34.1
Mean monthly sunshine hours225.3 222.5 267.0 303.5 276.2 275.8 364.1 349.5 278.5 255.1 217.3 219.4 3,254.2
Percent possible sunshine71 72 72 78 64 64 83 84 75 73 70 71 73
Source: NOAA (sun 1961–1977)[37][38][39][40]

Population[edit]

Downtown Los Angeles at night

The 2000 U.S. census found that just 27,849 residents lived in the 5.84 square miles of downtown—or 4,770 people per square mile, among the lowest densities for the city of Los Angeles but about average for the county. The Southern California Association of Governments estimates that downtown's daytime population is 207,440.[41] The population increased to 34,811 by 2008, according to city estimates. As of the end of 2019, the population of the district had grown to 85,000 residents, and 7,956 residential units were under construction.[42] The median age for residents was 39, considered old for the city and the county.[34]

Downtown Los Angeles is almost evenly balanced among the four major racial and ethnic groups—Asian Americans (23%), African Americans (22%), Latinos (25%) and non-Hispanic whites (26%)—according to an analysis of 2010 census data made by Loyola Marymount University researchers.[43]

A study of the 2000 census showed that downtown was the second–most diverse neighborhood in Los Angeles, its diversity index being 0.743, outrated only by Mid-Wilshire.[44] The ethnic breakdown in 2000 was Latinos, 36.7%; blacks, 22.3%; Asians, 21.3%; whites, 16.2%, and others, 3.5%. Mexico (44.7%) and Korea (17%) were the most common places of birth for the 41.9% of the residents who were born abroad, about the same ratio as in the city as a whole.[34]

The median household income in 2008 dollars was $15,003, considered low for both the city and the county. The percentage of households earning $20,000 or less (57.4%) was the highest in Los Angeles County, followed by University Park (56.6%) and Chinatown (53.6%). The average household size of 1.6 people was relatively low. Renters occupied 93.4% of the housing units, and home or apartment owners the rest.[34][45]

In 2000, there were 2,400 military veterans living downtown, or 9.7% of the population, considered a high rate for the city but average for the county overall.[34]

In 2010, census data concluded that 40,227 people lived in Downtown Los Angeles.[46]

In 2013, a study by Downtown Center Business Improvement District showed that of the 52,400 people resided in Downtown Los Angeles. The demographic breakdown was 52.7% Caucasian, 20.1% Asian, 17.0% Latino, and 6.2% African-American; 52.9% female, 47.1% male; and 74.8% of residents were between the ages of 23–44. The median age for residents was 34. The median household income was $98,700. The median household size was 1.8. In terms of educational attainment, 80.1% of residents had completed at least 4 years of college. The study was a self-selecting sample of 8,841 respondents across the DTLA area. It was not a "census" but rather a comprehensive survey of Downtown LA consumers.[47]

An additional study by the Downtown Center Business Improvement District showed that by 2017 the population has reached 67,324.[48] As of early 2020 the population is estimated to have exceeded 80,000 at the end of 2019.[49]

Public transportation[edit]

Local and regional service[edit]

Downtown Los Angeles is the center of the region's growing rail transit system, with six commuter lines operated by Metrolink, as well as five rapid-transit rail lines and local and regional bus service operated by Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro).

Major Metro stations in the district include Los Angeles Union Station, Civic Center/Grand Park station, Pershing Square station, 7th Street/Metro Center station, Pico station, and Little Tokyo/Arts District station.

  • The Los Angeles Metro Rail System has five rail lines that serve Downtown Los Angeles: the A Line, B Line, D Line, E Line, and the L Line.
  • In late 2009, the Metro J Line bus rapid transit project opened, replacing two unconnected bus rapid transit lines with through service at street level through the downtown area.
  • In 2006, a portion of the Metro Red Line (now the B Line) was rebranded by Metro as the Metro Purple Line (now the D Line), a heavy-rail subway line which runs from Union Station to Wilshire/Western station in Koreatown. A westward extension of the line to Westwood is currently under construction.
  • Metro operates an extensive bus network,[50] including Metro Local, Metro Express commuter lines, and Metro Rapid[51] buses with signal priority and limited stops.
  • Los Angeles Department of Transportation operates seven local DASH shuttle lines downtown on weekdays: Lines A, B, C, D, E and F.[52] Weekend service is operated on lines DD (Downtown Discovery), E and F.[53]

Amtrak[edit]

Amtrak operates intercity passenger train service on five routes through Los Angeles Union Station: the Coast Starlight, Pacific Surfliner, Southwest Chief, Sunset Limited, and Texas Eagle.[citation needed]

Greyhound[edit]

Greyhound Lines operates a major bus terminal in Downtown Los Angeles at the intersection of Seventh and Alameda streets.[54]

Service to Los Angeles International Airport[edit]

Los Angeles World Airports operates a direct shuttle, LAX FlyAway Bus,[55] every 30–60 minutes between Union Station and Los Angeles International Airport.[56]

Transit expansion[edit]

Parks and open space[edit]

Pershing Square during the park's Summer Concert Series

Downtown Los Angeles is home to several public parks, plazas, gardens and other open space:

Several future park proposals for the district make use of public-private partnerships between developers and the city of Los Angeles, including a public park at the proposed Nikkei Center development in Little Tokyo;[64] a 1-acre (4,000 m2) park at the Medallion development in the Historic Core; and a pocket park at the Wilshire Grand Hotel replacement project, currently under construction.[65]

Additionally, the city recently completed a new park located on the 400 block of South Spring Street in the Historic Core neighborhood.[66]

Skyline[edit]

Main article: List of tallest buildings in Los Angeles

The modern skyline of Los Angeles resulted from the termination of severe height restrictions in 1957
Ritz-Carlton Hotel, with distinctive street lamps in foreground, 2012

Despite its relative decentralization and comparatively new high-rises (until 1958, the city did not permit any structures taller than the 27-story City Hall building[67]), Los Angeles has one of the largest skylines in the United States, and its development has continued in recent years.

The skyline has seen rapid growth due to improvements in seismic design standards, which has made certain building types highly earthquake-resistant. Many of the new skyscrapers contain a housing or hotel component.

Some current and upcoming examples of skyscraper construction include:

  • 705 Ninth Street, a 35-story residential tower, was completed in 2009.[68]
  • 717 Olympic, a 26-story residential tower, was completed in mid-2008.[69]
  • 888 Olive, a 32-story apartment tower by Vancouver-based Omni Group, opened in 2015.[70]
  • Concerto, a 28-story residential tower, was completed in early 2009. A second phase (Tower II) is currently under construction.
  • The Grand Avenue Project, designed by architect Frank Gehry, is a multi-phase project on four parcels and will include a 39-story hotel tower at the corner of First Street and Grand Avenue and a civic park.[71] The project has been delayed due to funding issues but is now back on track and progressing.[72][73]
  • L.A. Live, a multi-phased dining, entertainment and hotel development that includes a Ritz-Carlton and JW Marriott Hotel hybrid as well as Ritz-Carlton-branded condominiums, was completed in February 2010.[74]
  • Marriott International completed a 24-story Courtyard and Residence Inn tower near L.A. Live, which opened in July 2014, and plans to build a 20+ story Renaissance hotel to open in 2016.[75][76]
  • Metropolis, a mixed-use four-tower project (60, 50, 38, and 19 stories) at Francisco and Ninth streets, is currently under construction.[77]
  • South, a three-tower complex called Elleven, Luma, and Evo, spans the block from 11th Street and Grand Avenue to 12th Street and Grand Avenue, and was completed in phases ending in early 2009.
  • The Wilshire Grand Tower redevelopment, a 900-room hotel and office project built in 2017, is the tallest tower west of the Mississippi River, at 1,100 feet (340 m).[78]
  • Figueroa Centre, a 975-foot residential and hotel tower proposed across from The Original Pantry restaurant on the Figueroa Corridor. The tower proposed will become the third tallest building in Los Angeles when completed.
  • Angels Landing, a proposed super tall tower at 1020 ft. Currently in the funding stage. Approved by the city council in 2017.

Building height limits: 1904–1957[edit]

The first height limit ordinance in Los Angeles was enacted following the completion of the 13-story Continental Building, located at the southeast corner of Fourth and Spring streets. The purpose of the height limit was to limit the density of the city. There was great hostility to skyscrapers in many cities in these years, mainly due to the congestion they could bring to the streets, and height limit ordinances were a common way of dealing with the problem. In 1911, the city passed an updated height limit ordinance, establishing a specific limit of 150 feet (46 m). Exceptions were granted for decorative towers such as those later built on the Eastern Columbia Building and United Artists Theatre, as well as the now-demolished Richfield Tower.[79]

The 1911 ordinance was repealed in 1957. The first private building to exceed the old limit was the 18-story United California Bank Building, located at the southeast corner of Sixth and Spring streets.[citation needed]

Flat Roof Ordinance[edit]

The pattern of buildings in Los Angeles to feature these "flat roofs" was the result of a 1974 fire ordinance which required all tall buildings in the city to include rooftop helipads in response to the devastating 1974 Joelma Fire in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in which helicopters were used to effect rescues from the flat rooftop of the building.[80] The Wilshire Grand Center was the first building granted an exception by the Los Angeles City Fire Department in 2014. However, as the building was under construction, L.A. City Council removed the flat roof ordinance as of 2015.[81]

Government and infrastructure[edit]

The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services operates the Central Health Center in Downtown Los Angeles.[82]

The Southern California Liaison of the California Department of Education has its office in the Ronald Reagan State Building in Downtown Los Angeles.[83]

The Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Los Angeles Branch is located in Downtown Los Angeles.[84]

Economy[edit]

DTLA is a node in the tech economy that extends beyond Silicon Beach. A venture capital firm counted 78 tech-oriented firms in DTLA in 2015. This included mobile apps, hardware, digital media and clean-tech companies plus co-working spaces, start-up incubators, and other related businesses.[85]

The Arts District has become a popular spot for companies seeking out something different from typical modern offices. The central location is accessible from various parts of the Los Angeles Basin. The cultural life has also made the area attractive to young tech employees.[85]

Anschutz Entertainment Group has its corporate headquarters in Downtown Los Angeles.[86]

BYD Company, a Chinese technology firm, has its North American headquarters in Downtown Los Angeles.[87]

Cathay Bank has its headquarters in the Los Angeles Chinatown.[88]

Skid Row is one of the poorest part of LA; Crime here is high and there are many homeless people too.[89]

Education[edit]

Colburn School on Grand Boulevard
Ramon C. Cortines High School for the Visual and Performing Arts

Downtown residents aged 25 and older holding a four-year degree amounted to 17.9% of the population in 2000, about average in the city and the county, but there was a high percentage of residents with less than a high school diploma.[34]

These are the elementary or secondary schools within the neighborhood's boundaries:[90]

  • Ramon C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts, LAUSD high school, 450 N. Grand Ave.
  • Downtown Business High School, LAUSD alternative, 1081 W. Temple St.
  • California Academy for Liberal Studies Early College High School, LAUSD charter, 700 Wilshire Blvd.
  • Alliance Dr. Olga Mohan High School, LAUSD charter, 644 W. 17th St.
  • Abram Friedman Occupational School, LAUSD adult education, 1646 S. Olive St.
  • Metropolitan Continuation School, LAUSD, 727 S. Wilson St.
  • Para Los Ninos Middle School, LAUSD charter, 1617 E. Seventh St.
  • Jardin de la Infancia, LAUSD charter elementary, 307 E. Seventh St.
  • Saint Malachy Catholic Elementary School, private, 1200 E. 81st St.
  • Tri-C Community Day School, LAUSD, 716 E. 14th St.
  • City of Angels School, LAUSD alternative school, 1449 S. San Pedro St. (formerly Central High School)[35]
  • San Pedro Street Elementary School, LAUSD, 1635 S. San Pedro St.
  • Saint Turibius Elementary School, private, 1524 Essex St.
  • American University Preparatory School, private, 345 S. Figueroa St.

The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising is at 800 S. Hope St.,[35][91] and the Colburn School for music and the performing arts is at 200 S. Grand Ave.[92]

Emergency services[edit]

Hospitals[edit]

Dignity Health-California Hospital Medical Center is located in the South Park district of Downtown LA at 1401 S. Grand Ave. The 318-bed community hospital has been providing high-quality care to residents of the district and its neighboring communities for over 126 years. Dignity Health-California Hospital Medical Center is known for its wide range of medical services, from women's health and maternal child to orthopedics and cardiology. The hospital also operates the only Level II Trauma Center in Downtown Los Angeles, and its emergency room treats over 70,000 patients each year. The hospital's neighbors include Staples Center, L.A. Live, Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising and the Fashion District.[citation needed]

Fire services[edit]

The Los Angeles Fire Department operates the following fire stations in Downtown Los Angeles:

Police services[edit]

The Los Angeles Police Department operates the Central Area Community Police Station in Downtown Los Angeles.[97]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Downtown_Los_Angeles

Best Gluten Free Restaurants in Downtown Los Angeles, California (2021)

  • 1.Sushi Katsu-Ya

    4 ratings$$

    800 West Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Sushi Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Soy Sauce, Sushi

    0% of 3 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 2.Smashburger

    1 rating$

    1011 S Figueroa St Ste B101, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Bread/Buns, Burgers

  • 3.Fleming's

    5 ratings$$$

    800 W Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Restaurant, Steakhouse

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Appetizers, Dessert

    50% of 2 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 4.Yard House

    3 ratings$$

    800 W Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Cider

  • 5.Rock'n Fish

    9 ratings$$

    800 W Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Restaurant

    GF Menu

    50% of 6 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 6.El Cholo

    7 ratings$$

    1037 Flower St, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Mexican Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Tacos

    66% of 3 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 7.Broken Spanish

    3 ratings$$$

    1050 Flower St, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Mexican Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    100% of 2 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 8.The Capital Grille

    1 rating$$$

    700 W 9th St Unit B, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Dessert

  • 9.Mrs Winston's Green Grocery

    1 rating$

    888 S Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Cookies, Dessert

  • 10.Faith & Flower

    3 ratings$$$

    705 W 9th St, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    50% of 2 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 11.Trimana

    1 rating$

    888 S Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Burgers, Salad

  • 12.Firehouse Subs

    0 ratings$

    992 W 8th St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Deli, Sandwiches

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Bread/Buns, Sandwiches

  • 13.Pizza Sociale

    2 ratings$

    448 W Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Pizza Place

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Pizza

  • 14.Jersey Mike's Subs

    1 rating$

    801 S Hope Street, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Fast Food Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Bread/Buns, Sandwiches

  • 15.Pizza Studio

    3 ratings$$

    735 S Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Pizza Place

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Pizza

  • 16.California Pizza Kitchen

    2 ratings$

    735 S. Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Pizza Place

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Pizza, Salad

  • 17.Seasalt Fish Grill

    2 ratings$$

    812 W 7th St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Tacos

  • 18.Wokcano

    5 ratings$$$

    800 W 7th St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Chinese Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Sushi

    25% of 4 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 19.Tocaya

    3 ratings$$

    801 S Olive St Suite B, Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Mexican Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Tacos

    50% of 2 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 20.Sweetfin

    3 ratings$$

    735 W 7th St Suite G, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Restaurant

    dedicated gluten-free badgeReported to be dedicated gluten-free

    GF menu options include: Poke, Rice Bowls

  • 21.The Counter

    26 ratings$$

    725 W 7th St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Fast Food Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Beer, Bread/Buns, Burgers, Fries

    100% of 3 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 22.Cafe Integral

    1 rating$$$

    416 W 8th St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Cafe

    No GF Menu

  • 23.SUGARFISH by sushi nozawa

    1 rating$$$

    600 W 7th St #150, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Sushi Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Soy Sauce, Sushi

  • 24.QDOBA Mexican Eats

    1 rating$

    655 South Hope Street, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Rice Bowls

  • 25.Chipotle

    2 ratings$

    601 W 7th St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Quick Service Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Rice Bowls, Tacos, Tortilla Chips

  • 26.Shake Shack

    2 ratings$

    400 W 8th St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Fast Food Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Bread/Buns, Burgers, Ice Cream

  • 27.H&H Brazilian Steakhouse

    1 rating$$$$

    518 W 7th St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Brazilian Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Beer, Bread/Buns, Dessert, Fries

  • 28.Dune Downtown

    1 rating$

    199 W Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Cafe

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Falafel

  • 29.SAJJ Mediterranean Downtown LA

    1 rating$

    630w W 6th St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Mediterranean Restaurant

    GF Menu

  • 30.Pizza Hut

    0 ratings$$

    1562 W Pico Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Pizza Place

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Pizza

  • 31.WOODSPOON

    1 rating$$

    107 W 9th St, Los Angeles, CA 90015

    Brazilian Restaurant

    No GF Menu

  • 32.Border Grill

    4 ratings$$$

    445 S Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90071

    Mexican Restaurant

    No GF Menu

    50% of 2 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 33.Wild Living Foods

    12 ratings$$

    760 S Main St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Restaurant

    dedicated gluten-free badgeReported to be dedicated gluten-free

    GF menu options include: Pasta, Pies, Smoothies

  • 34.Asian Box

    25 ratings$

    445 S Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90071

    Thai Restaurant

    dedicated gluten-free badgeReported to be dedicated gluten-free
  • 35.Mendocino Farms

    6 ratings$

    444 S Flower St, Los Angeles, CA 90071

    Deli, Sandwiches

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Bread/Buns, Salad, Sandwiches

    25% of 4 votes say it's celiac friendly

  • 36.Localita & The Badasserie

    0 ratings$$

    817 S Los Angeles St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Restaurant

    GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Bread/Buns

  • 37.Little Damage

    1 rating$

    700 S Spring St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Ice Cream Shop

    No GF Menu

    GF menu options include: Dessert, Ice Cream

  • 38.Broken Mouth

    Over a decade since its initial revitalization in the late aughts, Downtown’s dining scene shows no signs of slowing down. Over the years, the number of restaurants and bars in the neighborhood has snowballed, growing in size and diversity with redevelopment in Downtown’s historic core that spread to the once all-industrial Arts District—now home to some of the best restaurants in the entire city. 

    Walkability and better public transit access across greater Downtown makes it easy to hop from the Fashion District for L.A.’s best tacos to classic sushi in Little Tokyo, before doubling back to pick up a takeout chicken pot pie from one of the best Brazilian restaurants in L.A. Whether you’re looking to splurge or save for a rainy day, here’s where you should be eating the next time you head Downtown.

    RECOMMENDED: See more in our guide to Downtown L.A.

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    The 20 best restaurants in Downtown L.A., ranked

    1. Bestia

    A decade after opening, the Arts District’s Bestia still turns tables—and typically requires reservations several weeks out. It shouldn’t be surprising, given chef-owner Ori Menashe’s penchant for nailing straightforward yet innovative Italian food, which arrives hot from a wood-burning oven, the kitchen’s centerpiece. Some of Bestia’s menu highlights have become modern icons of L.A.’s dining scene: the spaghetti rustichella—a small pyramid of noodles under dungeness crab, citrus, Calabrian chili, Thai basil and onion seed—is synonymous with this hard-to-land reservation. Plus, god help anyone who tries to get in between us and a forkful of Bestia’s chocolate budino tart.

    2. Grand Central Market

    Downtown’s cultural food epicenter might as well be the historic Grand Central Market, which has been serving the neighborhood since 1917. Today, GCM is  a glimpse into the city’s past, as well as a contemporary hotbed for some of the best dining L.A. has to offer. Our favorites: Shiku, a Korean dosirak (lunchbox) spot with an array of unique, must-try banchan; Sari Sari Store, from the team behind République and Bicyclette, which offers vibrantly flavored Filipino rice bowls; buckets of Lucky Bird’s signature light and crispy crusted fried chicken; and the chow mein plate stalwart China Cafe, a GCM veteran for over 60 years. Earlier in the day, stop by G&B Coffee for a latte and The Donut Man for a sweet treat, including the Glendora shop’s famous, seasonal fruit-filled donuts (we love the strawberry).

    3. Hayato

    Tucked behind traditional noren that hang over the door, chef-owner Brandon Go artfully tweezers a multicourse, traditional kaiseki dinner each night of service. The space is intimate, the ceramics are handcrafted and imported from Japan, and Go’s precision and technique have earned his restaurant not one, but two Michelin stars (as of 2021). There is something almost criminally understated here; Hayato’s delicate flavors and Go’s humble nature could lead Angelenos to overlook some of the most beautiful cooking happening in the city. We hope they don’t. They’d be missing out on phenomenal dishes such as steamed abalone with an unctuous liver sauce; an owan course of delicate crab meatball soup; and fresh fruit coated in a salted sake jelly.

    4. Orsa & Winston

    Orsa & Winston is the crown jewel of chef Josef Centeno’s L.A. restaurant empire, and for good reason. This Japanese-Italian fine dining den has a hyper-creative, genre-bending Michelin-starred tasting menu. At $125 a pop, it’s certainly not cheap, but Centeno’s emphasis on seasonal, locally sourced produce shines in artfully plated dishes like a honey nut squash braised in sake, Okinawa brown sugar and shiso leaves. A more sustainably raised bluefin toro served with calamansi, apricot and finger limes captures the essence of the cooking going on at Orsa & Winston, where the best seafood and produce combine into an elegant symphony worthy of your next date night or other special occasion.

    5. Bavel

    Brought to you by husband-and-wife team Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis, the same folks behind Bestia, the pan-Mediterranean Bavel is a sheer delight drawing on the couple’s shared cultural heritage. Here, you’ll find some of the city’s best hummus and pita served in an upscale shabby-chic atmosphere alongside a sumptuous large-format lamb neck shawarma and spiced harissa prawns. There’s a profound kind of cozy elegance in the cuisine at Bavel, which winds its way through Israel, Egypt, Morocco and Turkey. At the end of the day, however, the space livens up its already-exciting menu: Though the more intimate patio sets a perfect scene on date night, inside, near the kitchen and under the waterfall of hanging vines, is where you’ll find most of the action is at.

    6. Smorgasburg LA

    Taking place every Sunday outside of the outdoor mall ROW DTLA, Smorgasburg L.A. is a cornucopia of food and retail stalls that happens to serve as an incubator for some of L.A.’s best up-and-coming small food businesses. Veterans include Tacos 1986 (also on this list), which now operates brick-and-mortar locations across the city, and Koreatown’s Love Hour, both of whom still head to Smorgasburg every week. Recent additions like Bridgetown Roti, chef Rashida Holmes’ ultra-popular Caribbean pop-up, and buzzy flautas specialist Los Dorados, have kept the crowds coming at Smorgasburg. You’ll also find much-loved regulars like travel-inspired ice cream hotspot, Wanderlust Creamery, and the açai specializing Amazebowls, who also have a shop in the Arts District.

    Read more

    7. Mariscos Jalisco

    One of L.A.’s most iconic budget-friendly eats might be known for its deep-fried shrimp tacos—TACOS DE CAMARON is painted on its Fashion District and Boyle Heights trucks in giant letters, for good reason—but Mariscos Jalisco also serves market fresh, often fiery ceviches, tostadas and oysters on the half shell. Their signature tacos live up to the hype, with flavorful and fresh shrimp folded into a corn tortilla that is then fried to a golden brown and topped with thick slices of avocado and a vibrant and complex salsa roja. You’ll also want to save room for tostadas like the Poseidon, a fiery red aguachile that comes with shrimp ceviche, octopus and shrimp.

    Read more

    8. Petite Peso

    Housed in a tiny Downtown storefront, this casual Filipino takeout shop by chef Ria Dolly Barbosa (formerly of Sqirl) serves both Filipino classics like chicken adobo and sinigang as well as dishes inspired by L.A.’s diverse cuisines, like their sisig salad. Made with yuzu vinaigrette, chicken livers and fried garlic, it’s a crispy, citrusy, funky delight. Petite Peso’s juicy, deep-fried lumpia can be made meat-free (via Impossible Foods), and their pinakbet bowl uses vegan shrimp paste for a wholly plant-based version of the classic Filipino kabocha squash dish. Stop by earlier for one of Barbosa’s many show-stopping traditional pastries, particularly the ensaymada, which we consider a cut above other iterations available in SoCal. Topped with sugar, cheese and a smidge of cream, one bite of Petite Peso’s gourmet version will more than justify its price point.

    9. Sushi Gen

    Nestled in Downtown’s Little Tokyo neighborhood since 1980, Sushi Gen has turned into a cult favorite for L.A.’s sushi aficionados. The main draw? A modestly priced sashimi lunch special, complete with a rainbow of sashimi, soup, salad and rice. You can reward your taste buds with fresh halibut, fatty tuna, sea urchin, monkfish liver, scallops and oysters throughout the day, of course—just mind the rules: no cell phone or laptop usage while dining, your whole party must be present to be seated, and don’t even try to skirt around the host stand (or that giant line out front). At this top-notch spot, be prepared to wait; the lines can get massive.

    10. Badmaash

    A modern Indian restaurant marrying Toronto-style swagger and South Asian spice, Badmaash offers a delicious, carefully thought-out menu of Indian classics and more playful dishes, like a chicken tikka poutine and chili cheese naan. Run by the Mahendro brother-and-father trio, this isn’t your average Indian takeout-style fare. Take their double-fried chicken: Dusted with paprika masala, each piece is craggy, crunchy and out-of-this-world good when dipped into their side of serrano-cream sauce. No meal would be complete, however, without one of their poutines, which can be also topped with vegetarian-friendly channa masala. Time Out tip: Order the vegan-friendly oat milk chai, available by the bottle for takeout purchase as well.

    11. Holy Basil DTLA

    The Santee Passage food court probably isn’t where you’d expect to find some of the most delicious, unapologetically spicy Thai food in Los Angeles, but that’s exactly where you’ll find Downtown’s Holy Basil. Using high-quality, locally sourced ingredients, chef Wedchayan “Deau” Arpapornnopparat and partner Tongkamal “Joy” Yuon regularly inspire revelations in Southeast Asian flavor and spice with their version of takeout favorites like pad kee mao and green curry. However, we’re also partial to Holy Basil’s small bites, like a vegan-friendly larb made with mushrooms and their dry-aged salmon. Billed as a Thai-style ceviche, this super-spicy raw dish is worth temporarily melting your tastebuds. 

    12. Bar Amá

    When it comes to puffy tacos so crunchy and a queso dip so silky you crave it for weeks on end, it can only mean one thing: You need a Bar Amá fix, stat. Josef Centeno’s casual ode to Tex-Mex cuisine is a declaration and celebration of the chef’s roots, and it’s a casual, comfy dive into the most satisfying of guacamoles and deeply flavorful salsas. It’s impossible to go wrong with just about anything here (even the vegan queso), and we’ve yet to have a bad meal at Downtown’s little slice of Texas.

    13. Q

    From the moment you enter Q’s doors, refinement is all you can hear, see, and taste. Classical music drifts through the elegant space, a formal dining room with a handful of tables and the center of the action—a 10-seat sushi bar where Q’s chef, Hiroyuki Naruke, quietly steals the spotlight. It’s hard to say which is more of a treat: the expertly cut fish sourced from around the world, or the chef’s artfully precise one-man show. The focus here is Edomae sushi, a style that highlights vinegar-seasoned rice and high-quality, fresh cuts of fish, and at Q’s omakase dinner—at $300 per person—you’ll also receive a smattering of Japanese small plates, like torched toro with shishito relish. Of course, if you’d like to make rent next month, Q also offers a lunch track for $150. Whichever option you pick, day or night, just be sure to make a reservation.

    14. Philippe the Original

    In business since 1908, Philippe the Original claims to have invented the French dip sandwich. Whether or not you believe them, there’s no denying the eatery has an exemplary sandwich. Savvy customers make their way across the sawdust-covered floor to select a traditional lamb, beef or turkey filling, then ask their server to double-dip the bread in the meaty juice; add some of the sinus-clearing house mustard and you’re golden. A bevy of sides include coleslaw, macaroni and potato salad, hard-boiled eggs and pickles—all to be eaten in the midst of friendly strangers, whom you’ll inevitably wind up talking to, especially during Dodger game season.

    15. Cole's

    Whether you’re a Philippe’s fan or Cole’s believer, the real question is—do you dip? DTLA’s other originator of the French dip (or at least they claim to be), Cole’s sits in the same location as it did in 1908, when it opened its doors as a public house inside the Pacific Electric railway station. Today, thanks to a revamp from Pouring With Heart, the booze is still flowing—both up front in the restaurant, and in back at speakeasy the Varnish. Diners can order hearty, beef-jus–dipped sandwiches in a setting that’s much darker and moodier than Philippe’s, which is just down the road. You just need to ask yourself: Do you want a congenial, Dodgers fan atmosphere at one spot, or the darkened bar where mobsters and Charles Bukowski used to frequent?

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    16. Woodspoon

    Above all else, order the chicken pot pie at Woodspoon, a homey, Black-owned casual Brazilian eatery in Downtown’s Historic Core that’s been around since 2006. Here, chef Natalie Pereira draws on African, European and Indian influences that characterize the region of Minas Gerais, where she grew up without running water or electricity, like Woodspoon’s moqueca, a traditional seafood stew made with black cod and coconut sauce. Though Pereira also offers delectable pick-your-own-protein lunch plates, the favorites and regional specialties menu section are where Woodspoon shines brightest in our book.

    17. Tacos 1986

    Owners Victor Delgado and Jorge “Joy” Alvarez-Tostado didn’t catch lighting in a bottle with their Tijuana-style tacos; they worked tirelessly popping up on street corners and at Smorgasburg, and with equal parts perfect product and showmanship, the duo created one of L.A.’s most viral taco stands. Catch their team dressed in all red and tossing adobada from the trompo for tacos and a show that can’t be beat. And while the adobada is the star, we’re also partial to the mushroom taco—order it as “perron” for cheese and beans—and the vampiros.

    18. Rice Box

    This Chinese takeout spot in the Spring Arcade Building chops, steams, grills and sears its way to the top of the food hall’s restaurant pile, offering outstanding rice bowls topped with pasture-raised meats, not to mention curry, tofu and sides of some of L.A.’s most fun bao. Run by a husband-and-wife team, this fast-casual spot combines Leo Lee’s culinary school background with both his and Lydia Lee’s family recipes for a truly destination-worthy, casual Chinese BBQ joint that’s just as much about the succulent meats as it is the more vegan-friendly, vermicelli and mushroom packed bao (or those phenomenal char siu egg rolls stuffed with monterey jack cheese).

    19. Sonoratown

    How do we love Sonoratown? Let us count the ways. This humble taqueria has become so much of a welcoming cornerstone of our dining scene that it feels like home the second you walk through the door. Well that, or a party. The staff are lively, open and fun-loving, and their mood is infectious. Patrons from all walks smile, laugh and even dance, all to the scent of char-grilled meats that get slid into handmade, award-winning flour tortillas made with imported Mexican flour. Dishes get brightened by cabbage and a rainbow of house salsas, and topped by entire strands of grilled green onions. Sonoratown specializes in—you guessed it—Sonoran-style fare, which means tacos, quesadillas and chivis (think: soft chimichangas oozing cheese) all packed with fresh ingredients that will have you planning a Northern Mexico vacation with every bite.

    20. Majordōmo

    Located on the edge of Chinatown, David Chang’s first Los Angeles restaurant weaves Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Mexican and other local flavors in an ever-evolving menu that’s impossible to fully pin down. Here, Chang turns Chinese tradition on its head with bing pancakes, which come served with roe, lamb, caviar and anything else the kitchen might be into lately. Served with fermented bean paste, pickled vegetables and kimchi, Majordomo’s large-format plates like the smoked half bo ssam and whole plate short rib are worthy of your next group outing. At its heart, this restaurant is an ode to L.A.’s cultural and culinary diversity, and Chang’s rendition is a welcome one to the vast collection of poetry the city already has.

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    Источник: https://www.timeout.com/los-angeles/restaurants/the-best-restaurants-in-downtown-los-angeles

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    10 BEST Restaurants in Downtown Los Angeles

    The 21 Best Places to Eat in Downtown L.A. Every Dedicated Foodie Needs to Try Once

    What I love about the food in Downtown Los Angeles is the same thing I enjoy about L.A. as whole: uniqueness, variety, and a delicate coexistence between gourmet and grit.

    Not long ago fine dining in Downtown meant heading to Patina on the outskirts of Grand Ave or dining on a fancy rooftop of a hotel where you’re probably paying more for the view than the entree.

    After a couple years of new developments, luxury housing projects, and gentrification (for better or worse) of a few blocks, DTLA is now home to some of the best restaurant in Los Angeles. Where the money goes, so will the food.

    A new wave of cutting-edge chefs are making a name for themselves on a national level in neighborhoods ranging from the Historic Core to Little Tokyo and beyond.

    With so many options (even your Yelp won’t be able to help you) we decided to compile a list of 21 places you need to try at least once. Although, I’m pretty sure you will keep coming back for more.

    List starts after the jump, in no particular order.

    (Keep in mind for purposes of this article we’ve focused on the downtown region enclosed by the 110, 101, and 10 freeways, thereby excluding Chinatown and other DTLA adjacent neighborhoods. We’ll definitely follow-up with a Chinatown-centric list soon!)

    Short Rib Taquitos Bar Ama

    Short rib taquitos at Bar Ama. Credit: Brian Champlin / We Like L.A.

    1. Bar Amá

    Josef Centeno owns three of the best restaurants in DTLA, all within a short walk from one another. Located in the Historic Core of DTLA, Centeno serves homestyle Tex Mex inspired by his childhood. The dishes are elevated by quality ingredients and his approach to the shells of items like the chalupa and puffy taco are a hit with all diners. Shrimp chalupas are filled with shrimp, topped with a mountain of tangy cabbage and sprinkled with vibrant pickled onions- the shell is a combination of crispy and chewy. The short rib taquitos bring a great crunch, but without the grease, and squash blooms are fried and drizzled with honey, showcasing Centeno’s flair for cooking vegetables. In fact a sizable portion of the dinner menu is dedicated to vegetables in season. Take advantage of their Super Nacho Hour aka Happy Hour it might be the best in town, offering giant $5 chicken tacos, $7 shrimp chalupas and $5 Micheladas.

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    2. Sticky Rice

    Dave Tewasart’s beloved Sticky Rice inside Grand Central Market serves Thai “comfort food” with an emphasis on organic, free-range and locally sourced seasonal ingredients. Highlights include the gai yang a BBQ chicken that’s prepared sous vide before being placed on a grill and served with a salad and sticky rice. The best noodle in broth dish would have to go to the khao soi, egg noodles in a spicy curry broth- it has layers upon layers of flavor and the chicken in the broth is nice and tender. Place your order at the counter and don’t forget the mango with sticky rice, a tasty way to end a good meal.

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    3. Bestia

    Tucked away in the Arts District near the L.A. River is one of the hottest restaurants in town. Opened in 2012, Chef Ori Menashe’s rustic Italian concept Bestia focuses on made-from-scratch cuisine like handmade pastas, wood fired pizzas, house made charcuterie and even taking on, roasting a suckling pig. With praise from J. Gold, LA Weekly, LA Mag, Food & Wine it is no wonder, Bestia is still one of the toughest reservations to get in town.

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    4. Gelateria Uli

    Founded by Uli Nasibova in Downtowns Historic Core, this gelato spot is a wonderful addition to the Spring Arcade building. Small batches of gelato and sorbets are made fresh daily with flavors like salted caramel, stracciatella, yogurt rose along with some rotating flavors that include maple pecan, coconut lemongrass, saffron and stone fruit sorbets. 16 flavors are available daily and they love hearing flavor ideas from customers, make a suggestion on their website and win a pint of your creation!

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    5. Bronzed Aussie

    Aussie meat pies, sweets, coffee and even Vegemite toast have landed in L.A. thanks to The Bronzed Aussie. The small shop tucked away in a courtyard bakes oven fresh meat pies every morning. Filling of lamb, ground beef, chunky beef, pepper steak, chicken, “vegie brekkie” and some vegan options make it on the roster daily. Sausage rolls and Vegemite toast are also served here, along with Australian coffee like flat whites-  a latte with no foam, long blacks- a variation of an Americano and cappuccino. Pavlova’s can be found on the weekends and Lamington squares, a yellow cake, coated in chocolate and desiccated coconut (one of the most popular cakes in Australia) are served daily.

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    6. Mexicali Taco & Co

    If you haven’t been to Mexicali you are truly missing out. The Baja style Mexican food being served here has been converting taco fans since 2011. Aside from their tacos, the Vampiro might be the most popular thing on the menu, it’s a crispy, quesadilla-ish creation filled with meat and infused in a special garlic sauce. The lunch deal combo is a good pick and the salsa bar is outstanding. Fresh horchata and frescas can be seen sitting on the counter daily if you need to quench your thirst. Mexicali is cash only so come prepared.

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    7. Wurstkuche

    Sausages for the adventurous type, Wurstkuche offers an exotic sausage menu which include rabbit, buffalo, and even rattlesnake. Of course they also serve more conventional sausages like veal, pork and bratwurst. Be sure to order some Belgian fries with curry ketchup and a tall glass of beer to round out your meal. Grabbing a seat at this hotspot might be tough and lines out the door are a daily thing here.

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    8. Faith & Flower

    Anything goes at Faith & Flower! Located food downtown la the WaterMarke Tower in DTLA’s South Park district, F&F is a modern expression of Californian rustic cuisine drawing flavor profiles from East Asia, Latin America, Mediterranean, and North Africa. This popular eatery serves up unique dishes like the Huy’s “Pho Gras” a spiced ox tail soup with foie gras and rice noodles and oxtail agnolotti made with bone marrow butter,stone fruit conserva and beef tendon chicharrones. If you are a Star Wars fan, Pastry Chef Josh Graves developed one amazing Star Wars inspired mignardise board. The board features a chocolate Millennium Falcon, a white chocolate Storm Trooper, Han Solo, frozen in a block of dark chocolate “carbonite” and more.

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    9. BadmaashLA

    The cheeky father and son duo of Badmaash is cooking up some mouthwatering Indian street food with a twist. Think a spiced lamb burger on a brioche bun, chicken tikka poutine and spiced mango pork belly. They also serve traditional Indian fare, the father, Chef Pawan has over 40 years of experience in the kitchen. This Indian gastro-pub is definitely a unique spot with it’s own flair.

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    10. Guisados

    Now in four locations (Boyle Heights, DTLA, Echo Park and West Hollywood) local taco maker Guisados has been serving amazing homestyle stews and braised meats inside of handmade corn tortillas since 2010. Steak picado taco is a popular pick and the six taco sampler is awesome for those who can’t make up their minds. The horchata with stumptown’s cold brew is the best of both worlds and a must order.

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    11. Hama Sushi

    This intimate sushi spot located in Little Tokyo is shockingly affordable for the quality of fish they serve. We love the warning sign at the door stating “No tempura, no teriyaki, no noodles, only sushi and sashimi” these guys mean business here. Their hand rolls, albacore sashimi and sweet shrimp are all fan favorites. The fresh uni, tuna belly, halibut and mackerel are top notch if you want to try something out of the ordinary. A line and wait list start to form pretty early on for dinner, so come early.

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    12. Salt & Straw Ice Cream Truck

    Salt & Straw, the Portland-based, ice cream purveyor known for its artisanal approach to ice cream making, has touchdown in DTLA, in truck form for now, as they gear up for their winter 2016 opening. Located at 829 East 3rd Street in the hip Arts District, the truck is giving Downtowners a taste of what’s to come, think Sea Salt with Caramel Ribbons and Stumptown Coffee & Compartes Love Nuts. Check their schedule often since they are also gearing up for a Venice location to be opened this year.

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    13. The Oyster Gourmet

    Maitre Écailler (Shellfish Master) and owner of The Oyster Gourmet, Christophe Happillon shucks up some of the best oysters in town at his Grand Central Market stall. Like his website claims – oysters are a religion to Happillon, you will be in good hands here. Patrons are treated on a journey to the sea, as Happillon presents each oyster like a fine wine sommelier all within a bar inside a busy open air market.

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    14. Shojin

    Shojin gives vegans, vegetarians and general sushi lovers a unique take on utilizing vegetables and special grains in replacement of fish. The Japanese vegan and macrobiotic menu of fish-less sushi rolls include ingredients like barbecue seitan, enoki mushroom, lotus root and burdock. With a focus on “organic and natural” cuisine Shojin’s inventive interpretations are a delight to omnivore and carnivores alike. Instead of wheat-based faux meats, the restaurant chooses the healthier option of utilizing tofu and tempeh as meat substitutions. Highlights include the spicy “tuna” on crispy rice made with spicy tofu, dynamite roll and a buttery eggplant dish on a asparagus carrot roll.

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    15. The Pie Hole

    No one does pie like the Arts District’s Pie Hole. Part coffee shop, part place for free wifi, you can’t find a single person without a slice of pie in front of them. All pies are baked fresh daily and come in the form of savory pot pies, whole sweet pies sliced on order and hand pies for folks on the go. The sliced sweet pies are definitely the main attraction here with intriguing flavors like earl grey, Mexican chocolate and Mai Tai- it’s hard not to try them all in one sitting.

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    16. Cole’s

    Cole’s is renowned for their French Dip sandwiches, and the happy hour also doesn’t disappoint with their $5 French dip slider trio and $1 tots. Claiming to be the originators of the French Dip, they do make a pretty good one here. A bit more dressed up than the other French dip establishment Philippe The Original (who’s also claiming of creating the French dip.) Cole’s is a happening spot with good food, heavy handed drinks and even a secret room where bands and stand up comedy shows happen frequently. Come for the food stay for the party.

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    17. Tacos Tombras a Tomas

    Talk about a bang for your buck, when you order a single taco, the expectation would be that the taco would to be fairly small, but, no, not here. A taco is served with a mountain of meat, so massive, they give you two additional tortillas to makeshift more tacos. The carnita, asada, chicken, birria (goat meat), lengua (beef cheek) and cabeza (head) are all spiced to perfection. If you want a burrito, order the half and half with both pollo and asada it’s the best of both worlds. The line might be long but with the quality of flavors and an unbeatable value, no one leaves hangry. Pro-tip: order your burrito with two kinds of meat (asade and pollo work nicely) for a truly massive serving.

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    18. Sugarfish

    Where do you get some of the best sushi in DTLA? Sugarfish. Mr. Nozawa’s talent in preparing some of the best sushi and most revered hand rolls in town come from decades of experience. Order one of the pre fixes it’s worth the price and makes for a great introduction to what Nozawa has to offer. Sugarfish is a different dining experience from other sushi places, they serve each plate of individual sushi like a tasting menu would and encourages you to eat the sushi right away, before the warm vinegary rice cooks the fish. Whatever you decide to order, make sure to include a blue crab hand roll, it’s kind of a big deal. For those looking for a more casual setting try KazuNori, a spin-off hand roll bar of Nozawa’s which is a great place to grab a quick meal of toro, scallop, and blue crab hand rolls and select sashimi items.

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    19. Daikokuya

    The wait can be intimidating for this Japanese ramen spot in Little Tokyo but it lives up to the hype. Get the Daikoku ramen with their famous Tonkutsu soup served with Chijeri style egg noodles, Kurobuta pork belly, a marinated boiled egg and bamboo shoots, the ingredients enhance the well balanced of flavor of the broth. If you opt for a half order of ramen, order the shredded pork bowl too, a pork belly dish grilled and served over rice with green onions, pink ginger and a sweet glaze- it’s a fan favorite. This place is cash only so plan accordingly.

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    20. Eggslut

    Alvin Cailan’s popular stall at DTLA’s Grand Central Market serves breakfast like no one else, hell they even make a runny yolk burger that’s quickly becoming as famous as the egg sandos. The cheeseburger is made with American Wagyu, caramelized onions, pickles and cheddar cheese, served with a over-medium egg on a brioche bun. This lunch time hit is attracting even more folks to the already long line at Eggslut. Come early, it’s totally well wroth the trouble.

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    21. Church & State

    Located in the old Nabisco Biscuit Co. building in DTLA’s Arts District, French bistro Church & State remains one of the best restaurants in DTLA. After Walter Manzke, of now Republique fame, left the bistro a shuffling of chefs went on for several years until Chef Tony Esnault came along.  Esnault delivers on French bistro style dishes that include roasted bone marrow, steak frites, and coq au vin. We are happy to see such a great restaurant rise up once again. For more convincing, in a 2014 review by J. Gold of the L.A. Times, Gold states Church & State is “The closest thing to a first-rate French bistro that Los Angeles has seen in years.” All we have to say is oui oui.

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    Where are your favorite places to eat in Downtown Los Angeles? Let us know in the comments below!

    Christina Champlin

    Christina is the co-founder of We Like LA. She covers arts & culture, lifestyle, and food for the site. Christina is also the in-house photographer. When not working you can find her sipping on a spicy margarita or exploring something from the mid-century modern era. Follow her on Instagram @Chrissy.Stardust

    Источник: https://www.welikela.com/best-places-to-eat-downtown-los-angeles/

    Downtown Los Angeles

    Neighborhood of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California

    Downtown Los Angeles (DTLA) is the central business district of Los Angeles, California. In addition, it contains a diverse residential area of some 85,000 people, and covers 5.84 sq mi (15.1 km2).[3] A 2013 study found that the district is home to over 500,000 jobs.[4] It is also part of Central Los Angeles.

    Downtown Los Angeles is divided into neighborhoods and districts, some overlapping. Most districts are named for the activities concentrated there now or historically, e.g. the Arts, Civic Center, Fashion, Banking, Theater, Toy, and Jewelry districts. It is the hub for the city's urban rail transit system plus the Pacific Surfliner and Metrolink commuter rail system for Southern California.

    Banks, department stores, and movie palaces at one time drew residents and visitors of all socioeconomic classes downtown, but the area declined economically especially after the 1950s. It remained an important center—in the Civic Center, of government business; on Bunker Hill, of banking, and along Broadway, of retail and entertainment for Hispanic Angelenos, especially immigrants. Now Downtown has been experiencing a renaissance that started in the early 2000s. The Staples Center anchors downtown's south end, and along Broadway, pre-war buildings are being restored for new uses, such as a luxury condos, co-working spaces, and high-end retail.

    History[edit]

    See also: History food downtown la Los Angeles

    The Tongva village of Yaanga was located in what is now downtown Los Angeles, possibly near or underneath where the Bella Union Hotel was located (now Fletcher Bowron Square).[5][6]

    Spanish and Mexican era[edit]

    Main article: Pueblo de Los Ángeles

    Father Juan Crespí, a Spanish Franciscan missionary charged with exploring sites for Catholicmissions in California, noted in 1769 that the region had "all the requisites for a large settlement".[7] On September 4, 1781, Los Angeles was founded by a group of settlers who trekked north from present-day Mexico. Like most urban centers in the Spanish Empire, the town grew in a grid-like street patern around a central plaza which faced the first church. The area passed to American control in 1847,[8] and the small town grew to 11,000 by 1880,[9] The business district was centered along Main Street between the Plaza and First Street.[10][11]

    Victorian-era Downtown[edit]

    Looking northeast on Spring Street from First Street, 1880s. Asher Hamburger's Peoples Store at center. Towers of the Baker Block are visible in the distance.

    Main article: Victorian Downtown Los Angeles

    Land speculation increased in the 1880s, which saw the population of the city explode from 11,000 in 1880 to nearly 100,000 by 1896.[12] Infrastructure enhancements and the laying of a street grid eventually brought development south of the Plaza: Victorian Downtown Los Angeles in the 1800s and 1890s along Main, Spring and Broadway south to Third Street – all of which was razed to make way for today's Civic Center. After 1900, larger buildings were constructed along Broadway and Spring from Third to Ninth streets in what is now called the Historic Core.

    Downtown's golden age[edit]

    By 1920, the city's private and municipal rail lines were the most far-flung and most comprehensive in the world in mileage, even besting that of New York City. By this time, a steady influx of residents and aggressive land developers had transformed the city into a large metropolitan area, with DTLA at its center. Rail lines connected four counties with over 1,100 miles (1,800 km) of track.[13]

    During the early part of the 20th century, banking institutions clustered around South Spring Street, forming the Spring Street Financial District. Sometimes referred to as the "Wall Street of the West,"[14] the district held corporate headquarters for financial institutions including Bank of America, Farmers and Merchants Bank, the Crocker National Bank, California Bank & Trust, and International Savings & Exchange Bank. The Los Angeles Stock Exchange was also located on the corridor from 1929 until 1986 before moving into a new building across the Harbor (110) Freeway.[15]

    Commercial growth brought with it hotel construction—during this time period several grand hotels, the Alexandria (1906), the Rosslyn (1911), and the Biltmore (1923), were erected—and also the need for venues to entertain the growing population of Los Angeles. Broadway became the nightlife, shopping and entertainment district of the city, with over a dozen theater and movie palaces built before 1932.

    Department stores, most that had grown from local dry goods businesses, moved from Spring and Main streets around Temple and 1st, to much larger stores along Broadway, including The Broadway, Hamburger's, which became May Co., Robinson's, Bullock's, Coulter's, Desmond's, Silverwoods, Harris & Frank, and the Fifth Street Store/Walker's, serving a variety of socioeconomic groups from across the city and suburbs. All but Coulter's would, in the 1920s–1950s, launch branches dotting shopping centers across a growing Southern California. Numerous specialty stores also flourished including those in the jewelry business which gave rise to the Downtown Jewelry District. Among these early jewelers included the Laykin Diamond Company (later becoming Laykin et Cie [8]) and Harry Winston & Co., both of which found their beginnings in the Hotel Alexandria at Fifth and Spring streets.

    The Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal (Union Station) opened in May 1939, unifying passenger service among various local, regional, and long-distance passenger trains. It was built on a grand scale and would be one of the "last of the great railway stations" built in the United States.

    Decline and redevelopment[edit]

    Following World War II, suburbanization, the development of the Los Angeles freeway network, and increased automobile ownership led to decreased investment downtown. Many food downtown la headquarters slowly dispersed to new suburbs or fell to mergers and acquisitions. As early as the 1920s once-stately Victorian mansions on Bunker Hill were dilapidated, serving as rooming houses for 20,000 working-class Angelenos.[16]

    From about 1930 onward, numerous more-than-100-year-old buildings in the Plaza area were demolished to make way for street-level parking lots, the high demand for parking making this more profitable than any other options allowing preservation. The drastic loss of local downtown residents further reduced the viability of streetfront, pedestrian-oriented businesses. For middle- and upper-income Angelenos, downtown became a drive-in, drive-out destination.

    In an effort to combat blight and lure businesses back downtown, the city's Community Redevelopment Agency undertook the Bunker Hill Redevelopment Project in 1955, a massive clearance project that leveled homes and cleared land for future commercial skyscraper development. This period saw the clearing and upzoning of the entire neighborhood, as well as the shuttering of the Angels Flight funicular railway in 1969. Angels Flight resumed operation in 1996 for a period of five years, shutting down once again after a fatal accident in 2001. On March 15, 2010, the railway once again opened for passenger service following extensive upgrades to brake and safety systems.

    With Class A office space becoming available on Bunker Hill, many of DTLA's remaining financial corporations moved to the newer buildings, leaving the former Spring Street Financial District devoid of tenants above ground floor. Following the corporate headquarters' moving six blocks west, the large department stores on Broadway shuttered, culminating in the 1980s.

    However, the Broadway theaters saw much use as Spanish-language movie houses during this time, beginning with the conversion of the Million Dollar Theater in the 1950s to a Spanish-language theater.[17]

    Recent years[edit]

    In the early 2000's, the neighborhood became popular with Artists and Creatives due to low rent, open loft space, and many vacancies. In mid-2013, downtown was noted as "a neighborhood with an increasingly hip and well-heeled residential population".[18]

    Because of the downtown area's office market's migration west to Bunker Hill and the Financial District, many historic office buildings have been left intact, simply used for storage or remaining empty during recent decades. In 1999, the Los Angeles City Council passed an adaptive reuseordinance, making it easier for developers to convert outmoded, vacant office and commercial buildings into renovated lofts and luxury apartment and condo complexes.

    As of early 2009, 14,561 residential units[19] have been created under the adaptive reuse ordinance, leading to an increase in the residential population. With 28,878 residents in 2006,[20] 39,537 in 2008,[21] and over 60,000 in 2017,[22] Downtown Los Angeles is seeing new life and investment.[23]

    • Staples Center, which opened in 1999, has contributed immensely to the revitalization plans, adding 250 events and nearly 4 million visitors per year to the neighborhood.[24] Since the opening of the Staples Center, the adjacent L.A. Live complex was completed, which includes the Microsoft Theatre and the Grammy Museum.
    • Los Angeles Metro Rail, a rail transit network centered on the downtown area, facilitates access to the city center, especially from the congested West Side.
    • Real estate developers and investors planned a $1.8 billion revitalization project along Grand Avenue, which included the development of Grand Park, a large city park,[25] and the construction of major city landmarks, including the Frank Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall and contemporary art museum The Broad, which opened in 2015.
    • On August 7, 2007, the Los Angeles City Council approved sweeping changes in zoning and development rules for the downtown area.[26] Strongly advocated by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, the changes allow larger and denser developments downtown; developers who reserve 15% of their units for low-income residents are now exempt from some open-space requirements and can make their buildings 35% larger than current zoning codes allow.[26]
    • In 2009 Bottega Louie opened on the first floor of the historic Brockman Building on Grand Avenue and Seventh Street. It how to find my routing number citizens bank to the revitalization of DTLA by creating Restaurant Row, which has since brought numerous new restaurants and retail shops to the area.[27] In 2012, the upper 11 floors of the Brockman Building were bought with the intention of being sold as luxury lofts.[28]
    • In October 2015, an outdoor lifestyle center, The Bloc Los Angeles, replaced the old enclosed Macy's Plaza.
    • Several labels of Warner Music moved into the Los Angeles Arts District in 2019 where the company had purchased a former Ford Motor Company assembly plant.[29]
    • Broadway retail is transitioning from a broad mix of stores catering mostly to Hispanic immigrants and a burgeoning sneaker and streetwear retail cluster has emerged from 4th to 9th streets: Sneaker Row.[30]

    Multiple Olympic and Paralympic events will be held in DTLA during the 2028 Summer Olympics and Paralympics.[31][32]

    Geography[edit]

    Downtown Los Angeles is flanked by Echo Park to the north and northwest, Chinatown to the northeast, Boyle Heights to the east, Vernon to the south, Historic South Central and University Park to the southwest, and Pico-Union and Westlake to the west.[33][34][35]

    Downtown is bounded on the northeast by Cesar Chavez Avenue, on the east by the Los Angeles River, on the south by the Los Angeles city line with Vernon, on the southwest by East Washington Boulevard and on the west by the 110 Freeway or Beaudry Avenue, including the entire Four Level Interchange with the 101 Freeway.[34][35]

    Districts[edit]

    The neighborhood includes these districts:

    Climate[edit]

    Climate data for Los Angeles (USC, Downtown), 1991–2020 normals, extremes 1877–present
    Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
    Record high °F (°C) 95
    (35)
    95
    (35)
    99
    (37)
    106
    (41)
    103
    (39)
    112
    (44)
    109
    (43)
    106
    (41)
    113
    (45)
    108
    (42)
    100
    (38)
    92
    (33)
    113
    (45)
    Mean maximum °F (°C) 83.0
    (28.3)
    82.8
    (28.2)
    85.8
    (29.9)
    90.1
    (32.3)
    88.9
    (31.6)
    89.1
    (31.7)
    93.5
    (34.2)
    95.2
    (35.1)
    99.4
    (37.4)
    95.7
    (35.4)
    88.9
    (31.6)
    81.0
    (27.2)
    101.5
    (38.6)
    Average high °F (°C) 68.0
    (20.0)
    68.0
    (20.0)
    69.9
    (21.1)
    72.4
    (22.4)
    73.7
    (23.2)
    77.2
    (25.1)
    82.0
    (27.8)
    84.0
    (28.9)
    83.0
    (28.3)
    78.6
    (25.9)
    72.9
    (22.7)
    67.4
    (19.7)
    74.8
    (23.8)
    Daily mean °F (°C) 58.4
    (14.7)
    59.0
    (15.0)
    61.1
    (16.2)
    63.6
    (17.6)
    65.9
    (18.8)
    69.3
    (20.7)
    73.3
    (22.9)
    74.7
    (23.7)
    73.6
    (23.1)
    69.3
    (20.7)
    63.0
    (17.2)
    57.8
    (14.3)
    65.8
    (18.8)
    Average low °F (°C) 48.9
    (9.4)
    50.0
    (10.0)
    52.4
    (11.3)
    54.8
    (12.7)
    58.1
    (14.5)
    61.4
    (16.3)
    64.7
    (18.2)
    65.4
    (18.6)
    64.2
    (17.9)
    59.9
    (15.5)
    53.1
    (11.7)
    48.2
    (9.0)
    56.8
    (13.8)
    Mean minimum °F (°C) 41.4
    (5.2)
    42.9
    (6.1)
    45.4
    (7.4)
    48.9
    (9.4)
    53.5
    (11.9)
    57.4
    (14.1)
    61.1
    (16.2)
    61.7
    (16.5)
    59.1
    (15.1)
    53.7
    (12.1)
    45.4
    (7.4)
    40.5
    (4.7)
    39.2
    (4.0) food downtown la low °F (°C)
    28
    (−2)
    28
    (−2)
    31
    (−1)
    36
    (2)
    40
    (4)
    46
    (8)
    49
    (9)
    49
    (9)
    44
    (7)
    40
    (4)
    34
    (1)
    30
    (−1)
    28
    (−2)
    Average rainfall inches (mm) 3.29
    (84)
    3.64
    (92)
    2.23
    (57)
    0.69
    (18)
    0.32
    (8.1)
    0.09
    (2.3)
    0.02
    (0.51)
    0.00
    (0.00)
    0.13
    (3.3)
    0.58
    (15)
    0.78
    (20)
    2.48
    (63)
    14.25
    (362)
    Average rainy days (≥ 0.01 in)6.1 6.3 5.1 2.8 1.9 0.5 0.4 0.1 0.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 34.1
    Mean monthly sunshine hours225.3 222.5 267.0 303.5 276.2 275.8 364.1 349.5 278.5 255.1 217.3 219.4 3,254.2
    Percent possible sunshine71 72 72 78 64 64 83 84 75 73 70 71 73
    Source: NOAA (sun 1961–1977)[37][38][39][40]

    Population[edit]

    Downtown Los Angeles at night

    The 2000 U.S. census found that just 27,849 residents lived in the 5.84 square miles of downtown—or 4,770 people per square mile, among the lowest densities for the city of Los Angeles but about average for the county. The Southern California Association of Governments estimates that downtown's daytime population is 207,440.[41] The population increased to 34,811 by 2008, according to city estimates. As of the end of 2019, the population of the district had grown to 85,000 residents, and 7,956 residential units were under construction.[42] The median age for residents was 39, considered old for the city and the county.[34]

    Downtown Los Angeles is almost evenly balanced among the four major racial and ethnic groups—Asian Americans (23%), African Americans (22%), Latinos (25%) and non-Hispanic whites (26%)—according to an analysis of 2010 census data made by Loyola Marymount University researchers.[43]

    A study of the 2000 census showed that downtown was the second–most diverse neighborhood in Los Angeles, its diversity index being 0.743, outrated only by Mid-Wilshire.[44] The ethnic breakdown in 2000 was Latinos, 36.7%; blacks, 22.3%; Asians, 21.3%; whites, 16.2%, and others, 3.5%. Mexico (44.7%) and Korea (17%) were the most common places of birth for the 41.9% of the residents who were born abroad, about the same ratio as in the city as a whole.[34]

    The median household income in 2008 dollars was $15,003, considered low for both the city and the county. The percentage of households earning $20,000 or less (57.4%) was the highest in Los Angeles County, followed by University Park (56.6%) and Chinatown (53.6%). The average household size of 1.6 people was relatively low. Renters occupied 93.4% of the housing units, and home or apartment owners the rest.[34][45]

    In 2000, there were 2,400 military veterans living downtown, or 9.7% of the population, considered a high rate for the city but average for the county overall.[34]

    In 2010, census data concluded that 40,227 people lived in Downtown Los Angeles.[46]

    In 2013, a study by Downtown Center Business Improvement District showed that of the 52,400 people resided in Downtown Los Angeles. The demographic breakdown was 52.7% Caucasian, 20.1% Asian, 17.0% Latino, and 6.2% African-American; 52.9% female, 47.1% male; and 74.8% of residents were between the ages of 23–44. The median age for residents was 34. The median household income was $98,700. The median household size was 1.8. In terms of educational attainment, 80.1% of residents had completed at least 4 years of college. The study was a self-selecting sample of 8,841 respondents across the DTLA area. It was not a "census" but rather a comprehensive survey of Downtown LA consumers.[47]

    An additional study by the Downtown Center Business Improvement District showed that by 2017 the population has reached 67,324.[48] As of early 2020 the population is estimated to have exceeded 80,000 at the end of 2019.[49]

    Public transportation[edit]

    Local and regional service[edit]

    Downtown Los Angeles is the center of the region's growing rail transit system, with six commuter lines operated by Metrolink, as well as five rapid-transit rail lines and local and regional bus service operated by Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro).

    Major Metro stations in the district include Los Angeles Union Station, Civic Center/Grand Park station, Pershing Square station, 7th Street/Metro Center station, Pico station, and Little Tokyo/Arts District station.

    • The Los Angeles Metro Rail System has five rail lines that serve Downtown Los Angeles: the A Line, B Line, D Line, E Line, and the L Line.
    • In late 2009, the Metro J Line bus rapid transit project opened, replacing two unconnected bus rapid transit lines with through service at street level through the downtown area.
    • In 2006, a portion of the Metro Red Line (now the B Line) was rebranded by Metro as the Metro Purple Line (now the D Line), a heavy-rail subway line which runs from Union Station to Wilshire/Western station in Koreatown. A westward extension of the line to Westwood is currently under construction.
    • Metro operates an extensive bus network,[50] including Metro Local, Metro Express commuter lines, and Metro Rapid[51] buses with signal priority and limited stops.
    • Los Angeles Department of Transportation operates seven local DASH shuttle lines downtown on weekdays: Lines A, B, C, D, E and F.[52] Weekend service is operated on lines DD (Downtown Discovery), E and F.[53]

    Amtrak[edit]

    Amtrak operates intercity passenger train service on five routes through Los Angeles Union Station: the Coast Starlight, Pacific Surfliner, Southwest Chief, Sunset Limited, and Texas Eagle.[citation needed]

    Greyhound[edit]

    Greyhound Lines operates a major bus terminal in Downtown Los Angeles at the intersection of Seventh and Alameda streets.[54]

    Service to Los Angeles International Airport[edit]

    Los Angeles World Airports operates a direct shuttle, LAX FlyAway Bus,[55] every 30–60 minutes between Union Station and Los Angeles International Airport.[56]

    Transit expansion[edit]

    Parks and open space[edit]

    Pershing Square during the park's Summer Concert Series

    Downtown Los Angeles is home to several public parks, plazas, gardens and other open space:

    Several future park proposals for the district make use of public-private partnerships between developers and the city of Los Angeles, including a public park at the proposed Nikkei Center development in Little Tokyo;[64] a 1-acre (4,000 m2) park at the Medallion development in the Historic Core; and a pocket park at the Wilshire Grand Hotel replacement project, currently under construction.[65]

    Additionally, the city recently completed a new park located on the 400 block of South Spring Street in the Historic Core neighborhood.[66]

    Skyline[edit]

    Main article: List of tallest buildings in Los Angeles

    The modern skyline of Los Angeles resulted from the termination of severe height restrictions in 1957
    Ritz-Carlton Hotel, with distinctive street lamps in foreground, 2012

    Despite its relative decentralization and comparatively new high-rises (until 1958, the city did not permit any structures taller than the 27-story City Hall building[67]), Los Angeles has one of the largest skylines in the United States, and its development has continued in recent years.

    The skyline has seen rapid growth due to improvements in seismic design standards, which has made food downtown la building types highly earthquake-resistant. Many of the new skyscrapers contain a housing or hotel component.

    Some current and upcoming examples of skyscraper construction include:

    • 705 Ninth Street, a 35-story residential tower, was completed in 2009.[68]
    • 717 Olympic, a 26-story residential tower, was completed in mid-2008.[69]
    • 888 Olive, a 32-story apartment tower by Vancouver-based Omni Group, opened in 2015.[70]
    • Concerto, a 28-story residential tower, was completed in early 2009. A second phase (Tower II) is currently under construction.
    • The Grand Avenue Project, designed by architect Frank Gehry, is a multi-phase project on four parcels and will include a 39-story hotel tower at the corner of First Street and Grand Avenue and a civic park.[71] The project has been delayed due to funding issues but is now back on track and progressing.[72][73]
    • L.A. Live, a multi-phased dining, entertainment and hotel development that includes a Ritz-Carlton and JW Marriott Hotel hybrid as well as Ritz-Carlton-branded condominiums, was completed in February 2010.[74]
    • Marriott International completed a 24-story Courtyard and Residence Inn tower near L.A. Live, which opened in July 2014, and plans to build a 20+ story Renaissance hotel to open in 2016.[75][76]
    • Metropolis, a mixed-use four-tower project (60, 50, 38, and 19 stories) at Francisco and Ninth streets, is currently under construction.[77]
    • South, a three-tower complex called Elleven, Luma, and Evo, spans the block from 11th Street and Grand Avenue to 12th Street and Grand Avenue, and was completed in phases ending in early 2009.
    • The Wilshire Grand Tower redevelopment, a 900-room hotel and office project built in 2017, is the tallest tower west of the Mississippi River, at 1,100 feet (340 m).[78]
    • Figueroa Centre, a 975-foot residential and hotel tower proposed across from The Original Pantry restaurant on the Figueroa Corridor. The tower proposed will become the third tallest building in Los Angeles when completed.
    • Angels Landing, a proposed super tall tower at 1020 ft. Currently in the funding stage. Approved by the city council in 2017.

    Building height limits: 1904–1957[edit]

    The first height limit ordinance in Los Angeles was enacted following the completion of the 13-story Continental Building, located at the southeast corner of Fourth and Spring streets. The purpose of the height limit was to limit the density of the city. There was great hostility to skyscrapers in many cities in these years, mainly due to the congestion they could bring to the streets, and height limit ordinances were a common way of dealing with the problem. In 1911, the city passed an updated height limit ordinance, establishing a specific limit of 150 feet (46 m). Exceptions were granted for decorative towers such as those later built on the Eastern Columbia Building and United Artists Theatre, as well as the now-demolished Richfield Tower.[79]

    The 1911 ordinance was repealed in 1957. The first private building to exceed the old limit was the 18-story United California Bank Building, located at the southeast corner of Sixth and Spring streets.[citation needed]

    Flat Roof Ordinance[edit]

    The pattern of buildings in Los Angeles to feature these "flat roofs" was the result of a 1974 fire ordinance which required all tall buildings in the city to include rooftop helipads in response to the devastating 1974 Joelma Fire in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in which helicopters were used to effect rescues from the flat rooftop of the building.[80] The Wilshire Grand Center was the first building granted an exception by the Los Angeles City Fire Department in 2014. However, as the building was under construction, L.A. City Council removed the flat roof ordinance as of 2015.[81]

    Government and infrastructure[edit]

    The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services operates the Central Health Center in Downtown Los Angeles.[82]

    The Southern California Liaison of the California Department of Education has its office in the Ronald Reagan State Building in Downtown Los Angeles.[83]

    The Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Los Angeles Branch is located in Downtown Los Angeles.[84]

    Economy[edit]

    DTLA is a node in the tech economy that extends beyond Silicon Beach. A venture capital firm counted 78 tech-oriented firms in DTLA in 2015. This included mobile apps, hardware, digital media and clean-tech companies plus co-working spaces, start-up incubators, and other related businesses.[85]

    The Arts District has become a popular spot for companies seeking out something different from typical modern offices. The central location is accessible from various parts of the Los Angeles Basin. The cultural life has also made the area attractive to young tech employees.[85]

    Anschutz Entertainment Group has its corporate headquarters in Downtown Los Angeles.[86]

    BYD Company, a Chinese technology firm, has its North American headquarters in Downtown Los Angeles.[87]

    Cathay Bank has its headquarters in the Los Angeles Chinatown.[88]

    Skid Row is one of the poorest part of LA; Crime here is high and there are many homeless people too.[89]

    Education[edit]

    Colburn School on Grand Boulevard
    Ramon C. Cortines High School for the Visual and Performing Arts

    Downtown residents aged 25 and older holding a four-year degree amounted to 17.9% of the population in 2000, about average in the city and the county, but there was a high percentage of residents with less than a high school diploma.[34]

    These are the elementary or secondary schools within the neighborhood's boundaries:[90]

    • Ramon C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts, LAUSD high school, 450 N. Grand Ave.
    • Downtown Business High School, LAUSD alternative, 1081 W. Temple St.
    • California Academy for Liberal Studies Early College High School, LAUSD charter, 700 Wilshire Blvd.
    • Alliance Dr. Olga Mohan High School, LAUSD charter, 644 W. 17th St.
    • Abram Friedman Occupational School, LAUSD adult education, 1646 S. Olive St.
    • Metropolitan Continuation School, LAUSD, 727 S. Wilson St.
    • Para Los Ninos Middle School, LAUSD charter, 1617 E. Seventh St.
    • Jardin de la Infancia, LAUSD charter elementary, 307 E. Seventh St.
    • Saint Malachy Catholic Elementary School, private, 1200 E. 81st St.
    • Tri-C Community Day School, LAUSD, 716 E. 14th St.
    • City of Angels School, LAUSD alternative school, 1449 S. San Pedro St. (formerly Central High School)[35]
    • San Pedro Street Elementary School, LAUSD, 1635 S. San Pedro St.
    • Saint Turibius Elementary School, private, 1524 Essex St.
    • American University Preparatory School, private, 345 S. Figueroa St.

    The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising is at 800 S. Hope St.,[35][91] and the Colburn School for music and the performing arts is at 200 S. Grand Ave.[92]

    Emergency services[edit]

    Hospitals[edit]

    Dignity Health-California Hospital Medical Center is located in the South Park district of Downtown LA at 1401 S. Grand Ave. The 318-bed community hospital has been providing high-quality care to residents of the district and its neighboring communities for over 126 years. Dignity Health-California Hospital Medical Center is known for its wide range of medical services, from women's health and maternal child to orthopedics and cardiology. The hospital also operates the only Level II Trauma Center in Downtown Los Angeles, and its emergency room treats over 70,000 patients each year. The hospital's neighbors include Staples Center, L.A. Live, Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising and the Fashion District.[citation needed]

    Fire services[edit]

    The Los Angeles Fire Department operates the following fire stations food downtown la Downtown Los Angeles:

    Police services[edit]

    The Los Angeles Police Department operates the Central Area Community Police Station in Downtown Los Angeles.[97]

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

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    59. ^"Why High-Speed Trains?". Cahighspeedrail.ca.gov. Archived from the original on April 29, 2009. Retrieved June 13, 2009.
    60. ^"California high speed rail: Wobbling on its tracks". The Economist. April 1, 2014. Archived from the original on October 2, 2015. Retrieved September 25, 2015.
    61. ^"Streetcar". Bringing Back Broadway. Archived from the original on June 3, 2009. Retrieved June 13, 2009.
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    68. ^
    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Downtown_Los_Angeles
    RE:Her is a charitable organization for female-owned restaurants in <i>Food downtown la</i> Angeles, created amidst the COVID-19 pandemic by women who own restaurants in LA. In collaboration with Meals By Genet, we are providing comfort meals to the unhoused, food-ins…

    Click above to view our interview with the James Beard Foundation, where the co-owners of Nickel Diner were recently showcased as part of the James Beard Awards: Stories of Resilience and Leadership, and as RE:HER Grant Recipients.

    RE:HERis a charitable organization for female-owned restaurants in Los Angeles, created amidst the COVID-19 pandemic by women who own restaurants in Los Angeles. food downtown la Contributions to the "Pay It Forward" Meal Program with RE:HER have helped provide hot meals to the homeless and support consistent employment at Nickel Diner.

    By producing monthly breakfast and weekly lunch meals, we’ve been able to feed the neighborhood and keep it safe by limiting exposure to the missions where risks to COVID-19 are increased. Working with Skid Row Housing, John Wesley Health Care Centers, the Downtown Women’s Center, and LA County Supervisor Hilda Solis - Nickel Diner has provided over 10,000 meals to the Downtown community.

    THANK YOU to all our loyal customers for joining usto provide comfort meals to the unhoused, food-insecure folks living on the streets of Downtown LA.

    featured on  Diners, Drive-In's and Dives, the Cooking Channel and Jonathan Golds 101 List

     

    Источник: https://www.nickeldiner.com/

    This Wednesday, November 4, Downtown Los Angeles's first-ever Whole Foodswill open to the public. Excitement's been building since the summer of 2013, when it was first announced that the famously upscale market would be setting up shop in grocery-store-poor DTLA. The 41,000-square-foot store will have a bar/restaurant, a coffee bar, and an interior design that will "emulate the art deco style popular in historic downtown Los Angeles buildings, but with a contemporary twist," a release from WF says. The store occupies part of the ground floor of the 700-unit Eighth & Grand luxury apartment complex, which has a special entrance into the classy supermarket from the resident parking garage.

    The first move-ins began over the weekend at Eighth & Grand, though the building is still a work in progress; it's shooting for full completion in April or May, a rep for the project tells Curbed. Among the enviable amenities (rooftop pool!) that tenants of the fancy and pricey apartments will have access to will be food delivery from Whole Foods (via third-party provider Instacart) and "front-of-the-line" passes to the restaurant in the WF. Curbed visited the site to see how it's developing, and we've got all the photos.


    · Whole Foods Will Open in Downtown LA on November 4 [Curbed LA]
    · How Much Will It Cost to Live in DTLA's Whole Foods Building? [Curbed LA]

    Eighth & Grand

    770 South Grand Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90017

    Источник: https://la.curbed.com/2015/11/2/9904732/downtown-los-angeles-whole-foods-opening

    5 Restaurants That Have Made Downtown Los Angeles A Destination

    Food Republic has partnered with premier hospitality technology platform Reserve to bring its readers new content from the restaurant world. Love to eat? Check out Reserve’s blog, where this post first appeared, for the latest food trends and U.S. restaurant tips.

    Whether you’re a visitor or a local, downtown LA has transformed from taco carts and ramen joints into a progressive food scene worth sinking your fork into. Check out this list of great downtown LA restaurants to try next time you’re scoping out where to eat in the neighborhood.

    Downtown L.A. Restaurants

    simbal LA

    Simbal
    For the bold vacationer looking to eat like a local, Simbal — tucked away in Little Tokyo — is the place to try. A Southeast Asian kitchen and bar, Simbal (simple + balanced) offers small plates, dim sum–style service and eccentric cocktails with subtle Vietnamese flair, plus a story behind every dish. You’re guaranteed to leave this trendy dinner spot with Instagram-worthy food photos worth gawking at (not to mention a satisfied belly). It’s also just a 10-minute walk from the famous Bradbury Building, where a scoop (or two) of McConnell’s Fine Ice Cream awaits.

    Bäco Mercat LA

    Bäco Mercat
    For the up-to-speed foodie fan, Bäco Mercat by celebrity chef Josef Centeno is the spot to visit. Best for brunch or dinner, this modern Spanish-style restaurant in the historic district is known for the bäco sandwich, a complex and cleverly composed flatbread-pita-taco hybrid. As if the intrigue of the bäco sandwich isn’t enough, the laundry list of special awards and recognitions, including LA Weekly’s 20 Best Restaurants 2015 and Jonathan Gold’s 101 Best Restaurants for three consecutive years, speaks for itself.

    1810 LA

    1810
    For the social butterfly looking to send his or her taste buds on a trip to Buenos Aires, 1810 is a casual Argentinean restaurant with a lively atmosphere that’s sure to deliver good times. The grilled meats are melt-in-your-mouth tender, and the traditional flan and crêpes will leave you licking your plate. Couple the classic flavors of Argentina with the contemporary dining atmosphere, and you’ve got yourself a winning dining experience.

    Preux & Proper LA

    Preux & Proper
    For the hopeless romantic or downtown fashionista, Preux & Proper is the perfect refuge for dinner and drinks. This two-story Cajun/New Orleans–style restaurant in the fashion district gives you two distinct dining atmospheres for the price of one. Whether you’re downstairs casually sipping frozen daiquiris or upstairs enjoying elegant craft cocktails, one thing is for sure: The soul food and warm hospitality will transport you to the American South.

    Redbird LA

    Redbird
    For the career-savvy individual looking for somewhere to dine with colleagues, the smart-casual, modern American cuisine of Redbird is a perfect business-dinner choice. Nestled in a historic downtown cathedral, Redbird offers both small and large plates that are quintessentially L.A. Between the unique opportunities for private dining experiences on the third floor, the retractable roof that reveals an ethereal patio and the ongoing list of impressive accolades earned by chef Neal Fraser, you’re guaranteed to enjoy any occasion here.


    Reserve is the country’s premier hospitality technology platform, helping restaurants and guests connect. Reserve helps guests discover restaurants, make reservations, get personalized service and seamlessly pay the bill.

    reserve-logo-black-2

    Источник: https://www.foodrepublic.com

    PERSIAN HOME

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    Since 1988 our family at DownTown Kabob has been serving our mouth watering fresh kabob’s throughout Downtown LA. DownTown Kabob is a very high quality, fast casual restaurant for lunch. Also, we cater for work, party, home and tonight. We provide a fresh and totally exotic taste for all ages that are searching for healthier and tastier foods. DownTown Kabob is dedicating a very delicious variety of BBQ chicken, steaks, fish and flavored rices and salads. At DownTown Kabob, we start everything from scratch. Everything is marinated for 24 hours in advance. All our special sauces are made fresh on a daily basis. We serve only Zabiha Halal meats. Our chickens are skinless and the steaks are hand trimmed. We use no preservatives or MSG. The focus is kabob’s and rices. Choices are endless. The food is fresh and hot. The atmosphere is cool. We invite you to try our food and judge for yourself. If you come once, you will come again! If you like us, tell a friend, if not tell us.

    WE DO NOT SERVE FAST FOOD,

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    Источник: https://www.downtownkabob.com/
    food downtown la

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  • 4 Replies to “Food downtown la”

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