bb king lucille instrumental

Buy a discounted Paperback of B.B. King's Lucille and the Loves Before the reader to every corner of B.B. King's instrumental travels. OROVILLE — Blues legend B.B. King is not just a musician, playing a long instrumental that gave everyone a chance to warm-up a little. We've already talked about “Lucille”, how she got her name and a little about what kind of guitar she was. B.B. King Instrumental Gear. bb king lucille instrumental

: Bb king lucille instrumental

Banks in milwaukee
TN DEPT OF REVENUE SALES TAX ONLINE
CAPITAL ONE SECURED MASTERCARD CREDIT LIMIT INCREASE
WWW H&R BLOCK TAX RETURN

B. B. King Fast Facts

Here's a look at the life of blues legend B.B. King.

Personal: Birth date: September 16, 1925

Death date: May 14, 2015

Birth place: Mississippi Delta cotton plantation between Indianola and what is now Itta Bena, Mississippi

Birth name: Riley B. King

Father: Albert Lee King, a sharecropper

Mother: Nora Ella (Pully) King

Marriages: Sue Carol Hall (1958-1966, divorced), Martha Lee Denton (1942-1950, divorced)

Children: Claims to have fathered 15 children with many different women

Military: US Army, 1943

Other Boney m christmas songs King sang with church choirs as a child. He learned basic guitar chords from his uncle, a preacher, td bank usa small business login only performed religious music at home.

King sang and played the blues on the corner of Church and Second in Indianola, and said he could earn more in one night singing on the corner than he could in one week working in the cotton field.

Enlisted in the Army during World War II but was released because he drove a tractor, an essential home front occupation.

His nickname, "BB" is short for Blues Boy, part of the name he used as a Memphis disc jockey, the Beale Street Blues Boy.

The first "Lucille" got her name after a fire broke out at a dance in Arkansas and King ran out forgetting his guitar and then risked his life to go back and get it. When he later found out that two men fighting over a woman named Lucille had knocked over a kerosene heater that had started the fire, he named the guitar Lucille, "to remind myself never to do anything that foolish."

King has used various models of Gibson guitars over the years and named them each Lucille. In the early 1980s, Gibson officially dropped the model number, ES-355, on the guitar King used and it became a custom-made signature model named Lucille, manufactured exclusively for the "King of the Blues."

King's daughter, Patty, was among the inmates at his concert at a Gainesville, Florida, correctional facility.

King has 30 Grammy nominations, 15 wins and a Lifetime Achievement award.

Timeline: 1937 - Receives his first guitar.

1947-1950 - Disc jockey for WDIA/AM Memphis.

1949 - Makes first recordings, "Miss Martha King/Take a Swing with Me" and "How Do You Feel When Your Baby Packs Up and Goes/I've Got the Blues."

December 1951 - His first hit record "Three O'clock Blues" is released. It stays on the top of the charts for four months.

1965 - Releases the album, "Live at the Regal."

June 6, 1968 - Plays the Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco and receives his first standing ovation.

December 1969 - His trademark song, "The Thrill is Gone," is released as a single. The song wins his first Grammy, for Best R&B Vocal Performance Male, in March 1970.

May 2, 1970 - King debuts an all-blues show at Carnegie Hall.

October 8, 1970 - Appears on the Ed Sullivan Show.

1971 - Co-founds, with attorney F. Lee Bailey, FAIRR - Foundation for the Advancement of Inmate Rehabilitation and Recreation - dedicated to the improvement of prison conditions.

1981 - Grammy winner for Best Ethnic or Traditional Recording for "There Must be a Better World Somewhere."

1983 and 1985 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Recording.

1987 - Is inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

1988 - Receives a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

1990 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Recording for "Live at San Quentin" and receives the National Medal of Arts from the National Endowment of the Arts.

1991 and 1993 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Album.

1994 - Performs at an invitation-only concert at Beijing's Hard Rock Caf.

1995 - Kennedy Center Honoree.

1996 - King wins the Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental Performance along with Art Neville, Bonnie Raitt, Buddy Guy, Dr. John, Eric Clapton, Jimmie Vaughan, and Robert Cray for "SRV Shuffle."

March 8, 1996 - "All Blues All Around Me," King's autobiography is published.

1999 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Album for "Blues on the Bayou."

2000 - Along with Eric Clapton wins the Grammy for Best Traditional Blues Album for "Riding with the King" and with Dr. John wins for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals for "Is You Is, or Is You Ain't (My Baby)."

2002 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Album for "A Christmas Celebration of Hope" and for Best Pop Instrumental Performance for "Auld Lang Syne."

2003 - Mississippi erects the First Mississippi Blues Trail historic site marker honoring its native son in Indianola.

2005 - Wins a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for "80."

December 15, 2006 - King is awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush.

September 13, 2008 - The B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center opens to the public. In its first year, the Center has more than 30,000 visitors.

February 2009 - Wins the Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for "One Kind Favor" (2008).

February 27, 2012 - In celebration of the blues, King performs in jose altuve jersey ebay East Room of the White House with Buddy Guy, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck and others.

December 11, 2012 - Documentary, "BB King: The Life of Riley," opens in the United Kingdom.

October 3, 2014 -King falls ill after a show at Chicago's House of Blues due to dehydration and exhaustion. The remainder of his tour is canceled.

April 2015 - Is hospitalized for dehydration.

April 7, 2015 - King posts a message on his official website saying he wants "to thank everyone for their concern and good wishes. I'm feeling much better and am leaving the hospital today."

May 14, 2015 - Dies at the age of 89.

May 25, 2015 - Two of King's adult children allege that he was poisoned to death by two individuals who worked for him.

July 14, 2015 - The Clark County Coroner tells CNN that there was no evidence of poisoning in the death of Blues legend B.B. King. Las Vegas Coroner, John Fudenberg, states that "Alzheimer's disease was the cause of death with other significant contributing factors."

Источник: https://www.actionnewsnow.com/content/national/474214163.html
Contact us

Lucille

As Burrows suggests, musicians can displace their own agency onto the instruments they play in ways that constitute those instruments as (semi-)autonomous entities to which they relate as performing partners rather than just tools. I once saw Judd Hughes, a virtuosic country guitarist who played lead in Patty Loveless’s band, hold and manipulate an acoustic guitar as if it were an unruly alter ego, like a barely trained Great Dane over which he had temporary control but that could get away from him at any moment. A more celebrated example is B.B. King, who in naming www people clothing com guitar Lucille encourages his audience to perceive it as a separate being, and implies that his relationship with it is fraught with the complexities attending heterosexual relationships between men and women.[1]

King’s relationship with Lucille is indeed complex, and I cannot hope to do it justice here. The guitar is said to be named for a woman over whom two men brawled at a juke joint in Arkansas where King played in the late 1940s, early in his career; the fight led to the immolation of the place, a story that itself could have been taken from a blues ballad. King consistently treats Lucille as an entity separate from himself, both discursively and in the way he performs with her. He frequently gives Lucille instructions, saying “One more, Lucille” when he wants to play another chorus, or “Take it easy” when he plays pianissimo. He confirms his ventriloquial relationship with Lucille in the way he seeks to make her sing in his displaced voice: “The one thing that I’m concerned about today, to make Lucille sound even more like singing, more in the style of my singing.”[2] King defers to Lucille at moments when he claims to find himself unable to speak, suggesting that his voice and Lucille’s are expressively interchangeable. In his recording of the song “Lucille,” one of the places where he has recounted the story of how the guitar got its name, King says at one point: “Sometimes I get to a place where I bb king lucille instrumental even say nothing.” This remark is followed immediately by guitar playing, to which King responds appreciatively, “Look out!” as if addressing the actions of another. At a different moment in the same song, he says, “Sorta hard to talk to you myself. I guess I’ll let Lucille say a few words, and then.” His voice trails off as the guitar takes over; when he resumes speaking at the end of the instrumental passage, he does not pick up where he left off—it is as if Lucille had completed the thought for

him.[3]

He also describes Lucille as a distinct individual, with her own sensibility, from whom he must coax musical sound:

It seems that it loves to be petted and played with. There’s also a certain way you hold it, the certain noises it makes, the way it excites me. and Lucille don’t want to play anything but the blues. Lucille is real, when I play her it’s almost like hearing words, and of course, naturally I hear cries. I’d be playing sometimes and as I’d play, it seems like it almost has a conversation with me.[4]

King’s rhetoric here is worth attending to. There is ambivalence in the way he refers to the guitar sometimes as “it” and sometimes as “her,” alternately personifying the instrument and acknowledging its status as an object. When he discusses his actions on Lucille (petting, playing, holding), he refers to the instrument as “it.” But when he discusses Lucille’s own musical contribution, he refers to the guitar either www santanderbank com login name or using feminine pronouns, thus clearly positioning Lucille as an active, gendered entity separate from himself.[5] This entity has human characteristics: she speaks, cries, engages in conversation. He implies that Lucille is autonomous: she is “real” and has specific ideas about what music she will perform. However, King does not characterize Lucille as “treacherous,” the word Godlovitch uses to describe the resistance the guitar offers its player. Lucille is King’s indispensable creative partner and alter ego, but it is clear that her cooperation is not guaranteed: she must be cajoled. King must do what she wants (“it loves to be petted and played with”) if she is to work willingly with him in playing the blues.

King dramatizes this aspect of his relationship with Lucille in performance. Like many other guitarists who are also vocalists, King often does not play when he is singing. When he sings, his guitar simply hangs against his torso on its strap while blackberry suits store near me uses his arms and hands to gesticulate in ways that underline the emotional states expressed in his songs’ lyrics (Fig. 1). While singing, he stands erect, his face toward his audience or directed what bank does chime use for zelle heavenward, his eyes often closed. When he plays Lucille, however, his posture changes. He hunches over the fretboard in his left hand, his head tilted downward toward the instrument. Even if his eyes are closed, his head is positioned as if he were looking at Lucille, giving her his full attention (Fig. 2). While he is playing, every movement of his body and every facial expression is a direct response to the sounds emanating from Lucille, often on a note-by-note basis. In conjunction with what he says about Lucille, veterans united phone number way of performing with her suggests that when King is singing, he is free to express his own feelings as conveyed through the lyrics. If he wants Lucille to participate, however, the focus must be entirely on her and what she has bb king lucille instrumental say.[6] In Burrows’s description, quoted earlier, ventriloquism “involves splitting the performer’s personality and displacing part of it onto an alter ego.” In King’s case, it is arguably not just his personality that is split and displaced, but also the two musical functions he performs: he sings as himself, but his guitar playing is displaced onto Lucille as

Fig. 1 B.B. King sings on Ralph Gleason’s Jazz Casual (National Educational Television 1968)

B.B. King communes with Lucille on Ralph Gleason’s Jazz Casual (National Educational Television 1968)

Fig. 2 B.B. King communes with Lucille on Ralph Gleason’s Jazz Casual (National Educational Television 1968)

his alter ego. In this respect, King may be said to be dramatizing the relationship between singer and instrumentalist posited by Cone. Cone describes the character portrayed by the singer as the music’s “vocal persona” (or protagonist) and the accompanying music as the “instrumental (or virtual) persona.” Cone treats these two personae as distinct voices in the performed composition and considers the dialogue between them to express the composer’s intentions. He also suggests that the relationship between them can take many forms (Cone 1974, pp. 18, 29). Gelbart proposes that in the performance of rock state bank southern utah cedar city, vocal and instrumental personae are fused into a single entity. By contrast, King, the blues singer, performs as the vocal protagonist while King, the blues guitarist, anthropomorphizes the instrumental persona in the “person” of Lucille.

In a discussion of a series of experiments intended to show the connections between the auditory and the visual in musical perception, a group of research psychologists describes King’s typical gestures and facial expressions, noting that

King frequently adopts an introspective demeanor, with eyes closed and a pained expression, yet stubbornly shaking his head. This affective display conveys an impression of stoically reflecting upon but not surrendering to difficult emotions. Periodically he stares open-eyed at the audience with an open mouth. The expression appears to convey a sense of wonder. Judge A [one of the experimental subjects] observed that King’s facial expressions often functioned to signal that certain passages were difficult but satisfying to play. (Thompson et al. 2005, pp. 207f, emphasis in original)

These authors also observe the direct relationship between King’s behavior and the music he plays:

It is notable that B.B. King’s facial expressions closely track his guitar sounds. In some cases his rapid head shaking movement mirrors vibrato on individual notes. This gesture has the effect of drawing the listeners’ attention to local aspects of music, specifically to B.

B. King’s nuanced treatment of individual notes. (ibid., p. 208)

I suggest that the ventriloquial paradigm for instrumental performance points toward a different reading of King’s performance, though not one that excludes the psychologists’ analysis. Whereas the psychologists take it as given that King’s behaviors express his feelings about his own playing and the music he is producing, it seems to me that the same gestures and expressions can equally well be read as his reactions to Lucille’s behavior. Perhaps the sounds Lucille produces arouse difficult emotions within him, and perhaps it is her ability to move him that stirs his sense of wonder. Perhaps it is Lucille’s prowess at rendering difficult passages rather than his own that he signals for the audience, and bb king lucille instrumental he is following “her” playing with his head movements. Constituting the guitar as a separate “person” (or persona) and acting toward it as such allows King to dramatize the ventriloquial relationship between instrumentalist and instrument, a relationship that is always enacted, though not usually foregrounded, in conventional musical performance.

Источник: https://ebrary.net/

B.B. King

American blues guitarist, singer, and songwriter (1925–2015)

Musical artist

Riley B. King (September 16, 1925 – May 14, 2015), known professionally as B.B. King, was an American blues singer-songwriter, guitarist, and record producer. He introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending, shimmering vibrato and staccatopicking that influenced many later blueselectric guitar players.[5][6]AllMusic recognized King as "the single most important electric guitarist of the last half of the 20th century".[6]

King was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, and is one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, earning the nickname "The King of the Blues", and is considered bb king lucille instrumental of the "Three Kings of the Blues Guitar" (along with Albert King and Freddie King, none of whom are related).[7][8][9] King performed tirelessly throughout his musical career, appearing on average at bb king lucille instrumental than 200 concerts per year into his 70s.[10] In 1956 alone, he appeared at 342 shows.[11]

King was born on a cotton plantation in Itta Bena, Mississippi, and later worked at a cotton gin in Indianola, Mississippi. He was attracted to music and the guitar in church, and began his career in juke joints and local radio. He later lived in Memphis, Tennessee and Chicago, and as his fame grew, toured the world extensively. King died at the age of 89 in Las Vegas, Nevada, on May 14, 2015.

Early bb king lucille instrumental B. King was born on September 16, 1925,[12] on the Berclair cotton plantation near the town of Itta Bena, Mississippi,[6][13] the son of sharecroppers Albert and Nora Ella King.[13] He considered the nearby city of Indianola, Mississippi to be his home.[14] When King was four years old, his mother left his father for another man, so he was raised by his maternal grandmother, Elnora Farr, in Kilmichael, Mississippi.[13]

While young, King sang in the gospel choir at Elkhorn Baptist Church in Kilmichael. King was attracted to the PentecostalChurch of God in Christ because of its music. The local minister performed with a Sears Roebuck Silvertone guitar during services. The minister taught King his first three chords.[15] It seems that at the age of 12 he purchased his first guitar for $15.00,[16][13] although another source indicates he was given his first guitar by Bukka White, his mother's first cousin (King's grandmother and White's mother were sisters).[17]

In November 1941, "King Biscuit Time" first aired, broadcasting on KFFA in Helena, Arkansas. It was a radio show featuring the Mississippi Delta blues. King listened to it while on break at a plantation. Bb king lucille instrumental self-taught guitarist, he then wanted to become a radio musician.[18]

In 1943, King left Kilmichael to work as a tractor driver and play guitar with the Famous St. John's Gospel Singers of Inverness, Mississippi, performing at area churches and on WGRM in Greenwood, Mississippi.[19][20]

Poster of B.B. King and Bill Harvey and Orchestra with photo of B.B. King holding his guitar and Evelyn Young playing saxophone

In 1946, King followed Bukka White to Memphis, Tennessee. White took him in for the next ten months.[13] However, King returned to Mississippi shortly afterward, where he decided to prepare himself better for the next visit, and returned to West Memphis, Arkansas, two years later in 1948. He performed on Sonny Boy Williamson's radio program on KWEM in West Memphis, where he began to develop an audience. King's appearances led to steady engagements at the Sixteenth Avenue Grill in West Memphis, and later to a ten-minute spot on the Memphis radio station WDIA.[21] The radio spot became so popular that it was expanded and became the Sepia Swing Club.[22]

He worked at WDIA as a singer and disc jockey, where he was given the nickname "Beale Street Blues Boy", later shortened to "Blues Boy", and finally to B.B.[23][24][25] It was there that he first met T-Bone Walker. King said, "Once I'd heard him for the first time, I knew I'd have to have [an electric guitar] myself. 'Had' to have one, short of stealing!"[26]

Career[edit]

1949–2005[edit]

King on stage in Hamburg 1971
King playing his favorite guitar, Lucille, in the 1980s

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, King was a part of the blues scene on Beale Street. "Beale Street was where it all started for me," King said. He performed with Bobby Bland, Johnny Ace and Earl Forest in a group known as the Beale Streeters.[27]

According to King and Joe Bihari, Ike Turner introduced King to the Bihari brothers while he was a talent scout at Modern Records.[28][17] In 1949, King began recording songs under contract with Los Angeles-based RPM Records, a subsidiary of Modern. Many of King's early recordings were produced by Sam Phillips, who later founded Sun Records. Before his RPM contract, King had debuted on Bullet Records by issuing the single, "Miss Martha King" (1949), which did not chart well. "My very first recordings [in 1949] were[sic] for a company out of Nashville called Bullet, the Bullet Record Transcription company," King recalled. "I had horns that very first session. I had Phineas Newborn on piano; his father played drums, and his brother, Calvin, played guitar with me. I had Tuff Green on bass, Ben Branch on tenor sax, his brother, Thomas, on trumpet, and a lady trombone player. The Newborn family were the house band at the famous Plantation Inn in West Memphis."[29]

King assembled his own band; the B.B. King Review, under the leadership of Millard Lee. The band initially consisted of Calvin Owens and Kenneth Sands (trumpet), Lawrence Burdin (alto saxophone), George Coleman (tenor saxophone),[30]Floyd Newman (baritone saxophone), Millard Lee (piano), George Joyner (bass) and Earl Forest and Ted Curry (drums). Onzie Horne was a trained musician enlisted as an arranger to assist King with his compositions. By his own admission, King could not play chords well and always relied on improvisation.[31]

King's recording contract was followed by tours across the United States, with performances in major theatres in cities such as Washington, D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit, and St. Louis, as well as numerous gigs in small clubs and juke joints of the southern United States. During one show in Twist, Arkansas, a brawl broke out between two men and caused a fire. He evacuated along with the rest of the crowd but went back to retrieve his guitar. He said he later found out that the two men were fighting over a woman named Lucille. He named the guitar Lucille, as a reminder not to fight over women or run into any more burning buildings.[32]

The story of a guitar named Lucille

Following his first BillboardRhythm and Blues charted number one, "3 O'Clock Blues" (February 1952),[33] B.B. King became one of the most important names in R&B music in the 1950s, amassing an impressive list of hits[25] including "You Know I Love You", "Woke Up This Morning", "Please Love Me", "When My Heart Beats like a Hammer", "Whole Lotta Love", "You Upset Me Baby", "Every Day I Have the Blues", "Sneakin' Around", "Ten Long Years", "Bad Luck", "Sweet Little Angel", "On My Word of Honor", and "Please Accept My Love". This led to a significant increase in his weekly earnings, from about $85 to $2,500,[34][35] with appearances at major venues such as the Howard Theater in Washington and the Apollo in New York, as well as touring the "Chitlin' Circuit". 1956 became a record-breaking year, with 342 concerts booked and three recording sessions.[36] That same year he founded his own record label, Blues Boys Kingdom, with headquarters at Beale Street in Memphis. There, among other projects, he was a producer for artists such as Millard Lee and Levi Seabury.[14] In 1962, King signed to ABC-Paramount Records, which was later absorbed into MCA Records (which itself was later absorbed into Geffen Records). In November 1964, King recorded the Live at the Regal album at the Regal Theater.[33] King later said that Regal Live "is considered by some the best recording I've ever had. . that particular day in Chicago everything came together".[37]

From the late 1960s, new manager Sid Seidenberg pushed King into a different type of venue as blues-rock performers like Eric Clapton (once a member of The Yardbirds, as well as Cream), and Paul Butterfield were popularizing an appreciation of blues music among white audiences.[38] King gained further usaa claims number hours among rock audiences as an opening act on the Rolling Stones' 1969 American Tour.[39] He won a 1970 Grammy Award for his version of the song "The Thrill Is Gone;"[40] which was a hit on both http www regions com login Pop and R&B charts. It also gained the number 183 spot in Rolling Stone magazine's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[41]

King was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1980, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, and the National Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame in 2014.[10][42] In 2004, he was awarded the international Polar Music Prize, given to artists "in recognition of exceptional achievements in the creation and advancement of music."[43]

From the 1980s to his death in 2015, he maintained a highly visible and active career, appearing on numerous television shows and sometimes performing 300 nights a year. In 1988, King reached a new generation of fans with the single "When Love Comes to Town," a collaborative effort between King and the Irish band U2 on their Rattle and Hum album.[33] In December 1997, he performed in the Vatican's fifth annual Christmas concert and presented his trademark guitar "Lucille" to Pope John Paul II.[44][45] In 1998, he appeared in The Blues Brothers 2000, playing the part of the lead singer of the Louisiana Gator Boys, along with Eric Clapton, Dr. John, Koko Taylor and Bo Diddley. In 2000, he and Clapton teamed up again to record Riding With the King, which won a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album.[46]

Discussing where he took the Blues, from "dirt floor, smoke in the air" joints to grand concert halls, King said the Blues belonged everywhere beautiful music belonged. He successfully worked both sides of the commercial divide, with sophisticated recordings and "raw, raucous" live performance.[37]

2006–2014: Farewell tour and later activities[edit]

In 2006, King went on a "farewell" world tour, although he remained active afterward.[47] The tour was partly supported by Northern Irish guitarist, Gary Moore, with whom King had previously toured and recorded. It started in the United Kingdom, and continued with performances at the Montreux Jazz Festival and in Zürich at the Blues at Sunset. During his show in Montreux at the Stravinski Hall, he jammed with Joe Sample, Randy Crawford, David Sanborn, Gladys Knight, Leela James, Andre Beeka, Earl Thomas, Stanley Clarke, John McLaughlin, Barbara Hendricks and George Duke.[48]

In June 2006, King was present at a memorial of his first radio broadcast at the Three Deuces Building in Greenwood, Mississippi, where an official marker of the Mississippi Blues Trail was erected. The same month, a groundbreaking was held for a new museum, dedicated to King,[49] in Indianola, Mississippi.[50] The B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center opened on September 13, 2008.[51]

In late October 2006, King recorded a concert album and video entitled B.B. King: Live at his B.B. King Blues Clubs in Nashville and Memphis. The video of the four-night production featured his regular B.B. King Blues Band and captured his show as he performed it nightly around the world. Released in 2008, they documented his first live performances in over a decade.[52]

In 2007, King played at Eric Clapton's second Crossroads Guitar Festival[53] and contributed the songs "Goin' Home", to Goin' Home: A Tribute to Fats Domino (with Ivan Neville's DumpstaPhunk)[54] and "One Shoe Blues" to Sandra Boynton's children's album Blue Moo, accompanied by a pair of sock puppets in a music video for the song.[55]

In the summer of 2008, King played at the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tennessee, where he was given a key to the city.[56] Also in 2008, he was inducted into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame.[57]

King performed at the Mawazine festival in Rabat, Morocco, on May 27, 2010.[58] In June 2010, King performed at the Crossroads Guitar Festival with Robert Cray, Jimmie Vaughan, and Eric Clapton.[59] He also contributed to Cyndi Lauper's album Memphis Blues, which was released on June 22, 2010.[60]

In 2011, King played at the Glastonbury Music Festival,[61] and in the Royal Albert Hall in London, where he recorded a concert video.[62]

Rolling Stone ranked King at No. 6 on its 2011 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.[63]

On February 21, 2012, King was among the performers of "In Performance at the White House: Red, White and Blues," during which President Barack Obama sang part of "Sweet Home Chicago".[64] King recorded for the debut album of rapper and producer Big K.R.I.T., who also hails from Mississippi.[65] On July 5, 2012, King performed a concert at the Byblos International Festival in Lebanon.[66]

On May 26, 2013, King appeared at the New Orleans Jazz Festival.[67]

On October 3, 2014, after completing his live performance at the House of Blues in Chicago, a doctor diagnosed King with dehydration and exhaustion, and the eight remaining shows of his ongoing tour had to be cancelled. King did not reschedule the shows, and the House of Blues show would prove to be the last before his death in 2015.[68][69]

Equipment[edit]

For more information about King's guitar, see Lucille (guitar).

When I sing, I play in my mind; the minute I stop singing orally, I start to sing by playing Lucille.[70]

B.B. King used equipment characteristic of the different periods he played in. He played guitars made by various manufacturers early in his career. He played a Fender Esquire on most of his recordings with RPM Records.[71] However, he was best known for playing variants of the Gibson ES-355.

In the September edition 1995 of Vintage Guitar magazine, early photos show him playing a Gibson ES-5 through a Fender tweed amp. In reference to the photo, B.B. King stated, "Yes; the old Fender amplifiers were the best that were ever made, in my opinion. They had a good sound and they were durable; guys would throw them in the truck and they’d hold up. They had tubes, and they’d get real hot, but they just had a sound that is hard to put into words. The Fender Twin was great, but I have bb king lucille instrumental old Lab Series amp that isn’t being made anymore. I fell in love with it, because its sound is right between the old Fender amps that we used to have and the Fender Twin. It’s what I’m using tonight."[72]

He later moved on from the larger Gibson hollow-bodied instruments which were prone to feedback when played at high volumes to various semi-hollow models beginning first with the ES-335 and then verizon fios pay bill over phone number deluxe version called the ES-355 which employed a stereo option.[72] In 1980, Gibson Guitar Corporation launched the B.B. King Lucille model, a ES-355 with stereo options, a varitone selector and fine tuners (neither of which were actually utilized by B.B.) and, at King's direct request, no f-holes to further reduce feedback. In 2005, Gibson made a special run of 80 Gibson Lucilles, referred to as the "80th Birthday Lucille", the first prototype of which was given as a birthday gift to King, and which he used thereafter.[73]

King used a Lab Series L5 2×12" combo amplifier and used this amplifier for a long time. It was made by Norlin Industries for Gibson in the 1970s and 1980s. Other popular L5 users are Allan Holdsworth and Ty Tabor of King's X. The L5 has an onboard compressor, parametric equalization, and four inputs. King also used a Fender Twin Reverb.[74]

He used his signature model strings "Gibson SEG-BBS B.B. King Signature Electric Guitar Strings" with gauges: 10–13–17p–32w–45w–54w and D'Andrea 351 MD SHL CX (medium 0.71mm, tortoiseshell, celluloid) picks.[74]

B.B. King's Blues Club[edit]

In 1991, Beale Street developer John Elkington recruited B.B. King to Memphis to open the original B.B. King's Blues Club, and in 1994, a second club was launched at Universal Citywalk in Los Angeles. A third club in New York City's Times Square opened cd rates east boston savings bank June 2000 but closed on April 29, 2018. Management is currently in the process of finding a new location in New York City.[75] Two rutgers student accounting office clubs opened, at Foxwoods Casino in Connecticut in January 2002,[76] and in Nashville in 2003.[77] Another club opened in Orlando in 2007.[78] A club in West Palm Beach opened in the fall of 2009[79] and an additional one, based in the Mirage Hotel, Las Vegas, opened in the winter of 2009.[80] Another opened in the New OrleansFrench Quarter in 2016.[81]

Television and other appearances[edit]

King made guest appearances in numerous popular television shows, including The Cosby Show, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, The Young and the Restless, General Hospital, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Sesame Street,[82]Married. with Children, Sanford and Son, and Touched by an Angel.

In 2000, the children's show Between the Lions featured a singing character named "B.B. the King of Beasts", modeled on the real King.[83]

B.B. King: The Life of Riley, a feature documentary about King narrated by Morgan Freeman and directed by Jon Brewer, was released on October 15, 2012.[84]

Commercials[edit]

King, who was diabetic, appeared in several television commercials for OneTouch Ultra, a blood glucose monitoring device, in the 2000s and early 2010s.[85] He appeared in 1995 in a McDonald's commercial with Australian guitarist Nathan Cavaleri, and then in a commercial for the Toyota Camry with his guitar Lucille.[86]

Personal life[edit]

Early publicity photo of B.B. King

King was married twice, to Martha Lee Denton, November 1946 to 1952, and to Sue Carol Hall, 1958 to 1966. The failure of both marriages has been attributed to the heavy demands made by King's 250 performances a year.[13][87] It is reported that he fathered 15 children with several different women.[13][12] After his death, three more have come forward, claiming King as their father as well.[88] Though neither of his marriages produced children, and biographer Charles Sawyer wrote that doctors found his sperm count too low to conceive children,[89] King never disputed paternity of any of the 15 who claimed it, and by all accounts was generous in bankrolling college tuitions and establishing trust funds.[88] In May 2016, the 11 surviving children initiated legal proceedings against King's appointed trustee over his estimated $30 million to $40 million estate. Several of them also went public with the allegation that King's business manager, LaVerne Toney, and his personal assistant, Myron Johnson, had fatally poisoned him. Autopsy results showed no evidence of poisoning. A defamation suit filed by Johnson against the accusing family members (including his own sister, Karen Williams) is pending. Other children have filed lawsuits targeting King's music estate, which remains in dispute.[88]

King was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1990.[90] He lived with diabetes for over 20 years, and was a high-profile spokesman in the fight against the disease.[48][91]

King was an FAA certified private pilot and learned to fly in 1963 at what was then Chicago Hammond Airport in Lansing, Illinois.[92][93] He frequently flew to gigs but in 1995 his insurance company and manager asked him to fly only with another certified pilot. As a result, he stopped flying around the age of 70.[94]

King's favorite singer was Frank Sinatra. In his autobiography he spoke about how he was a "Sinatra nut" and how he went to bed every night listening to Sinatra's classic album In the Wee Small Hours. During the 1960s Sinatra had arranged for King to play at the main clubs in Las Vegas. He credited Sinatra for opening doors to black entertainers who were not given the chance to play in "white-dominated" venues.[95]

B.B. King was among hundreds of artists whose recordings were reportedly destroyed in the 2008 Universal fire.[96]

Philanthropy and notable campaigns[edit]

In September 1970, King recorded Live in Cook County Jail, during a time in which issues of race[97] and class in the prison system were prominent in politics. King also co-founded the Foundation for the Advancement of Inmate Rehabilitation and Recreation, tying in his support for prisoners and interest in prison reform.[97] In addition to prison reform, King also wanted to utilize prison performances as a way to preserve music and songs in a similar way that Alan Lomax did.[98]

In 2002, King signed on as an official supporter of Little Kids Rock, a nonprofit organization that provides free musical instruments and instruction to children in underprivileged public schools throughout the United States. He sat on the organization's Honorary Board of Directors.[99]

In the 2000s to early 2010s, King[90] was also involved in a diabetes awareness campaign with American Idol contestant, Crystal Bowersox, with One Touch Ultra, starring in commercials promoting diabetes health management.[100][101]

Death and funeral[edit]

The last eight shows of his 2014 tour were cancelled because of health problems caused by complications from high blood pressure and diabetes.[69][102][103] King died in his sleep on May 14, 2015, at the age of 89,[18] from vascular dementia caused by a series of small strokes as a consequence of his type 2 diabetes.[104] Two of his daughters alleged that King was deliberately poisoned by two associates trying to induce diabetic shock,[105] however an ally financial bank phone number showed no evidence of poisoning.[102][106]

On May 27, 2015, King's body was flown to Memphis. A funeral procession went down Beale Street, with a brass band marching in front of the hearse, playing "When the Saints Go Marching In." Thousands lined the streets to pay their last respects. His body was then driven down Route 61 to his hometown of Indianola, Mississippi.[107] He was laid in repose at the B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center, in Indianola, for people to view his open casket.[108][109] The funeral took place at the Bell Grove Missionary Baptist Church in Indianola, on May 30.[110][111][112] He was buried at the B.B. King Museum.[109]

Discography[edit]

Main article: B.B. King discography

Studio albums[edit]

Accolades[edit]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Years reflect the year in which the Grammy was awarded, for music released in the previous year.

Other awards

Other honors[edit]

Commemorative guitar pickhonoring "B.B. King Day" in Portland, Maine

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Scapelliti, Christopher (May 15, 2015). "B.B. King Defined the Electric Blues on His Own Terms". Guitar World. Retrieved November 17, 2019.
  2. ^ abRoberts, Rabdall (May 15, 2015). "Appreciation: B.B. King built a bridge to the blues for the world". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 17, 2019.
  3. ^Neal, Mark Anthony (May 16, 2015). "B.B. King And The Majesty Of The Blues". NPR. Retrieved November 17, 2019.
  4. ^"Gospel and the Blues". msbluestrail.org.
  5. ^Komara, Edward M. Encyclopedia of the Blues, Routledge, 2006, p. 385.
  6. ^ abcDahl, Bill. "B.B. King". AllMusic.com. Retrieved May 31, 2015.
  7. ^Trovato, Steve. "Three Kings of Blues". Hal Leonard. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  8. ^Leonard, Michael. "3 Kings of the Blues". Gibson. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  9. ^"Happy Birthday to "The Velvet Bulldozer" Albert King". WCBS FM. CBS. April 25, 2011. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  10. ^ ab"B.B. King Biography". Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  11. ^"Blues Guitarist B.B. King Dies at 89". Los Angeles Times. May 14, 2015. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  12. ^ abHerzhaft, Gérard (1997). "B.B. King". Encyclopedia of the Blues. Translated by Brigitte Debord (2nd ed.). Fayetteville, Ark.: University of Arkansas Press. pp. 108–110. ISBN .
  13. ^ abcdefgTroupe, Quincy (June 4, 1958). "BB King: American Blues Musician, b. 1925". Jazzandbluesmasters.com. Retrieved February 17, 2010.
  14. ^ abSebastian Danchin, Blues Boy: The Life and Music of B.B. King, University Press of Mississippi, 1998, p. 1 ISBN 1-57806-017-6
  15. ^Silliman, Daniel (May 15, 2015). "How the church gave B.B. King the blues". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 2, 2015.
  16. ^"B.B. King Biography and Interview". www.achievement.org. American Academy of Achievement.
  17. ^ abKostelanetz, Richard (2005). Kostelanetz, Richard; Reiswig, Jesse (eds.). The B.B. King Reader: 6 Decades of Commentary (2nd ed.). Milwaukee, WI: Hal Leonard. pp. 4, 7. ISBN .
  18. ^ abWeiner, Tim (May 15, 2015). "B.B. King, Defining Bluesman for Generations, Dies at 89". The New York Times. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  19. ^"B.B. King: National Visionary". National Visionary Leadership Project. Retrieved June 3, 2011.
  20. ^"Historical marker placed on Mississippi Blues Trail". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press. January 25, 2007. Archived from the original on June 4, 2011. Retrieved June 3, 2011.
  21. ^"B.B. King – KWEM 1948". KWEM Radio. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  22. ^Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture. Edited by Jessie Carney Smith. ABC-CLIO, Santa Barbara, California. 2011. ISBN 978-0-313-35796-1, pp. 805–806.
  23. ^Note: "B.B." is normally written with periods and without a space between the letters.
  24. ^History of Rock & Roll. By Thomas E. Larson. Kendall/Hunt, Dubuque, Iowa. 2004. ISBN 978-0-7872-9969-9, p. 25.
  25. ^ abB.B. King interviewed on the Pop Chronicles (1969)
  26. ^Dance, Helen Oakley; and B.B. King. Stormy Monday, p. 164.
  27. ^Wharton, David (September 16, 1994). "King of the Hill : Up at CityWalk, blues and Delta cuisine spice up B.B. King's new Memphis-style club". Los Angeles Times.
  28. ^Farley, Charles (2011). Soul of the Man: Bobby "Blue" Bland. University Press of Mississippi. p. 31. ISBN .
  29. ^"Blues Access Interview". Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  30. ^"George Coleman: This Gentleman can PLAY". All About Jazz. Retrieved February 17, 2010.
  31. ^U2 Rattle and Hum DVD, 1988.
  32. ^Kerekes, Jim; O'Neill, Dennis (January 3, 1997). "B.B. King: Lucille Speaks". Archived from the original on November 16, 2011.
  33. ^ abcSawyer, Charles. "The Life of Riley". President and Fellows of Harvard College. Retrieved October 5, 2014.
  34. ^Kostelanetz 1997, p. 146.
  35. ^Lime, Harry (May 27, 2019). B.B. King : King of the Blues!. Lulu.com. p. 5. ISBN .
  36. ^"B.B. King Biography". BBKing.com. Archived from the original on August 28, 2008. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  37. ^ abGreg Kot (May 16, 2015). "King of the Blues". Chicago Tribune. pp. 1, 5.
  38. ^McArdle, Terence (May 15, 2015). "B.B. King, Mississippi-born master of the blues, dies at 89". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  39. ^McShane, Larry (May 15, 2015). "B.B. King Dead at 89: Blues guitarist whose sound defined music for generations passes away in sleep". New York Daily News. Retrieved May bb king lucille instrumental, 2015.
  40. ^Rees, Dafydd & Crampton, Luke (1991). Rock Movers & Shakers, ABC-CLIO, p. 287. ISBN 0-87436-661-5
  41. ^"Rolling Stone Magazine Lists 500 Greatest Songs of All Time". Sun Records. July 15, 2010. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  42. ^Rothman, Michael (May 15, 2015). "Blues Icon B.B. King Dead at Age 89". ABC News. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  43. ^ ab"B.B. King: Laureate of the Polar Music Prize 2004". Polar Music Prize. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  44. ^"B.B. King Gives His Prized Electric Guitar "Lucille" to Pope John Paul II During a Private Audience". ITN Source. December 18, 1997. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  45. ^"BB. King's "Lucille" to the Pope After Vatican Concert". MTV News. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  46. ^Ritter, Ken (May 15, 2015). "'King of the Blues' blues legend B.B. King dead at age 89". KUSI News. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  47. ^Brown, Mick (May 18, 2009). "BB King Interview: The Last of the Great Bluesmen". The Daily Telegraph. London. Archived from the original on May 19, 2009. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  48. ^ ab"B.B. King Farewells Montreux". The Sydney Morning Herald. July 5, 2006. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  49. ^"B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center". Bbkingmuseum.org. Archived from the original on February 6, 2010. Retrieved February 17, 2010.
  50. ^John F. Ross "B.B. Gets His Own Museum," American Heritage, Winter 2009.
  51. ^Melzer, Ashley (September 11, 2008). "B.B. King Museum to open bb king lucille instrumental Saturday". Paste Magazine. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  52. ^"B.B. King Live In Your Own Home". IGN. January 15, 2008. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  53. ^"28 July 2007 – Crossroads Guitar Festival". Where's Eric!. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  54. ^Chinen, Nate (September 22, 2007). "Stars Join Forces to Salute (and Support) a Rock Legend". The New York Times. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  55. ^"B.B. King – One Shoe Blues". Kaleidoscope Pictures. March 3, 2015. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  56. ^Coyle, Jake (June 14, 2008). "B.B. King Given Key to the City at Bonnaroo". USA Today. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  57. ^"Opening Night at the Bowl". Hollywood Bowl. Archived from the original on May 18, 2015. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  58. ^"Official Site". B.B. King. Archived from the original on January 2, 2012. Retrieved December 30, 2011.
  59. ^Dirks, Rebecca (June 27, 2010). "Reporting From Eric Clapton's Crossroads Guitar Festival 2010". Premier Guitar. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  60. ^Baca, Ricardo (September 23, 2010). "The Reverb Interview: Cyndi Lauper". Hey Reverb. Archived from the original on May 18, 2015. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  61. ^Goff, Dafydd (June 24, 2011). "B.B. King at Glastonbury 2011 – review". The Guardian. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  62. ^"Live at the Royal Albert Hall 2011". allMusic. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  63. ^"100 Greatest Guitarists". Rolling Stone. November 23, 2011. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  64. ^Compton, Matt (February 22, 2012). "President Obama Sings "Sweet Home Chicago"". whitehouse.gov. Retrieved May 15, 2015 – via National Archives.
  65. ^Kelley, Frannie. "First Listen: Big K.R.I.T., 'Live From The Underground'". NPR. Retrieved May 28, 2012.
  66. ^Mssawir, Elia (August 1, 2012). "Byblos Festival featured B.B. King among others in 2012". Demotix. Archived from the original on July 3, 2015. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  67. ^"B.B. King lived up to his legend at New Orleans Jazz Fest". NOLA.com. nola.com. Retrieved April 11, 2014.
  68. ^"B.B. King Cancels Remaining 8 shows". bbking.com. October 4, 2014. Archived from the original on May 7, 2015. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  69. ^ ab"Tour Update". bbking.com. October 8, 2014. Archived from the original on April 30, 2015. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  70. ^McMahon, Brian (November 19, 2014). "A Little Bit of Lefty Love". WIUX. Archived from the original on May 18, 2015. Retrieved May 14, 2015.
  71. ^Burrows, Terry, The Complete Book of the Guitar, p. 111. Carlton Books Limited, 1998, ISBN 1-85868-529-X
  72. ^ abWillie G. Moseley (September 1995). "Remembering B.B. King". Vintage Guitar.
  73. ^"One Customer's Pawnshop Treasure". Guitarcenterblog.com. December 3, 2009. Archived from the original on June 18, 2010. Retrieved May 16, 2011.
  74. ^ abCategory: Who Plays What. "B.B. King's Guitar Gear Rig and Equipment". Uberproaudio.com. Retrieved November 10, 2012.
  75. ^"B.B. King Blues Club & Grill". B.B. King Blues Club & Grill. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  76. ^"The Official Website". Bbking.com. September 16, 1925. Archived from the original on August 28, 2008. Retrieved February 17, 2010.
  77. ^"Bb King: King's Clubs: 'good Memories, Good Times'". Allbusiness.com. Archived from the original on January 7, 2010. Retrieved February 17, 2010.
  78. ^Abbott, Jim (November 30, 2007). "The Man Himself Opens New B.B. King's Blues Club". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  79. ^"West Palm Beach". Bbkingclubs.com. Retrieved February 17, 2010.
  80. ^"Job Fair at B.B. King's Blues Club". Lasvegassun.com. September 3, 2009. Retrieved February 17, 2010.
  81. ^Grunfeld, David (March 10, 2016). "B.B. and me: Remembering King of Blues though the years". www.nola.com. Retrieved April 8, 2019.
  82. ^Sesame Workshop. "Sesame Street Beat Newsletter Archive". Archived from the original on September 30, 2007. Retrieved June 8, 2007.
  83. ^Kiesewetter, John (April 2, 2000). "PBS Encourages Kids to Read Between the Lions". Enquirer. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  84. ^"Official Site". Bbking.com. Retrieved October 16, 2012.
  85. ^Finn, Natalie (April 7, 2015). "Blues Legend B.B. King Hospitalized in Las Vegas". E! Online. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  86. ^"Boldness, Branding and B.B. King: Toyota Launches 2015 Camry Campaign".
  87. ^"B.B. King (Blues Musician)". OnThisDay.com. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  88. ^ abcJohnson, S. Battle Over B.B. King's Fortune. The Hollywood Reporter, June 3, 2016 (No. 17), pp. 61–63.
  89. ^Sawyer, C. The Arrival of B.B. King: The Authorized Biography. Doubleday (1984), p. 221. ISBN 0385159293
  90. ^ abDoughty, R. (2002). "King of the Blues BB King has Now Been At the Top of the Blues Game for More than 50 years" – via Diabetes Forecast.
  91. ^Santilli, MJ (March 15, 2011). "Crystal Bowersox and BB King In New Diabetes Campaign". MJSBIGBLOG. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  92. ^West, Rebecca (April 20, 2000). "Interview with B.B. King". Blues on Stage. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  93. ^"You and Me with B.B. King." SIRIUS Channel 74. May 12, 2009.
  94. ^Mitchell, Gail (June 29, 2007). "On the road again, B.B. King preps new album". Reuters.
  95. ^King, B.B.; Ritz, David (2011). Blues All Around Me. It Books. p. 266. ISBN .
  96. ^Rosen, Jody (June 25, 2019). "Here Are Hundreds More Artists Whose Tapes Were Destroyed in the UMG Fire". The New York Times. Retrieved June 28, 2019.
  97. ^ abBack, Les. 2015. "How Blue can You Get? B.B. King, Planetary Humanism and the Blues Behind Bars." Theory, Culture & Society 32 (7): 274.
  98. ^Adelt, U. "Black, White, and Blue: Racial Politics in B.B. King's Music from the 1960s". Journal of Popular Culture. 2.
  99. ^"Honorary Board of Directors". Little Kids Rock. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  100. ^"How B.B. King Avoids the Diabetes Blues". Diabetes Health. November 1, 2005. Archived from the original on August 9, 2016. Retrieved October 20, 2016.
  101. ^"Crystal Bowersox: Striving to Live Without Limitations". Diabetes Health. January 17, 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2016.
  102. ^ ab"B.B. King Coroner's Report: No Evidence of Poisoning". Rollingstone.com. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  103. ^Ralph Ellis (May 2, 2015). "B.B. King "in home hospice care"". CNN. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  104. ^Oaklander, Mandy (May 16, 2015). "B.B. King Died From Mini Strokes, Coroner Says". Time. Retrieved May 26, 2015.
  105. ^Payne, Ed; Kyung Lah; Dave Alsup (May 27, 2015). "B.B. King was poisoned, two of his daughters claim". CNN. Retrieved May 26, 2015.
  106. ^"Coroner: No Evidence B.B. King Was Poisoned Before Death". The Huffington Post. July 13, 2015. Retrieved July 14, 2015.
  107. ^Charlotte Alter (May 30, 2015). "B.B. King Buried in Indianola, Mississippi". Time.com. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  108. ^"Music And Tears At BB King Memphis Procession". News.sky.com. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  109. ^ abWMCActionNews5.com Staff (May 15, 2015). "Beale Street says goodbye to B.B. King". Memphis, Tennessee: WMC Action News 5. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  110. ^"BB King's funeral draws hundreds as Obama says country 'has lost a legend' | US news". The Guardian. Associated Press in Indianola, Mississippi. January 1, 1970. Retrieved May 31, 2015.
  111. ^"Hundreds gather to farewell BB King". Melbourne: The Age. Retrieved May 31, 2015.
  112. ^"Community news from The Centre Daily Times in State College, PA". centredaily.com. Archived from the original on July 15, 2015. Retrieved May 31, 2015.
  113. ^
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B.B._King

Download B.b. King mp3 free

B.B. King - The Thrill Is Gone [Crossroads 2010] (Official Live Video)
Buy
B. B. King - The Thrill Is Gone (Live at Montreux 1993)
Источник: https://whatisthatsong.net/track/b.b.+king

Bb king lucille instrumental -

BB King’s 20 greatest guitar moments, ranked

From his beginnings on a cotton plantation in Mississippi in 1925 to duetting at the White House with President Obama in 2012, BB King certainly witnessed some changes in his lifetime. But one thing that remained largely unaltered during the course of his 70-plus years as a performer – a career that saw him release 59 albums, 138 singles and pick up countless awards (among them 18 Grammys) – was the essence of his music. If the ultimate goal of anyone who picks up a guitar is self-expression, then BB King is among a very select group of elite musicians who, through countless hours of work, not only perfected the art, but dug ever deeper without feeling the need for reinvention.

Eric Clapton said of him: “The character of any great musician is usually identifiable by the individuality of their vibrato. Most players are recognisable by that particular facet of their playing… I can tell BB from one note – most of us can, I think.” Carlos Santana echoed the sentiment: “I can hear BB King with the sound off on the TV, just by looking at his face.” Buddy Guy summed it up: “The way BB did it is the way we all do it now.”

Dynamics, phrasing, timing, improvisation, targetting chord notes, vibrato… BB King’s unique playing has influenced countless players and in its finer details, still holds innumerable lessons for guitarists. But the most important one is sadly the least-often heeded: “Notes are expensive,” King once said. “Spend them wisely.”

Our rundown of a mere 20 of BB King’s greatest guitar moments only scratches the surface of an exhaustive catalogue of playing; each entry aims to show a different facet of why the playing of the King Of The Blues will always have the power to excite and delight guitarists, regardless of genre and musical style.

20. Lucille

The title track from this 1968 album shows BB finally putting on musical record what his beloved guitar – or actually a succession of ES-family guitars, all with the same nickname – means to him. Every BB King song foregrounds an aspect of his musicality, and over this laid-back spoken-word blues, it’s how intertwined his voice and guitar playing are. Mixed with King’s crystal-clear tone way out front, rather than the forced showcase of fancy licks that 99 per cent of other players would have indulged in – although there are a few choice jazzy nods here and there and a masterclass in BB’s approach to bends – Lucille’s contribution here is that of the ever-faithful sidekick, purring like a kitten throughout.

Did you know?

The song’s off-the-cuff feel was captured when producer Bob Thiele ran tape as BB was telling him the story of his guitar: “He was idling through some runs and started to tell me the story of Lucille. I grabbed the switch, signalled the engineer, and flipped him on live”

19. The Blues Ain’t Nothing But A Woman Crying For Her Man (Live In Japan)

Two musical titans for the price of one on this 1990 guest appearance in Japan, which features Ray Charles, BB King and a ‘Super Band’ laying down a finale to an evening of perfectly crafted big-band schmaltz. Spectacular enough is Charles dusting off his keyboard’s pitch-bend wheel to skilfully imitate the character of King’s guitar, but when Gene Harris’ big band is eventually unleashed, King takes the spotlight, rolling off the tone control and letting rip over When I Get The Blues I Sit In My Rockin’ Chair with a series of cascading jazz-tinged improvisations that not only show his ability to morph his style to the occasion, but also offer an extended glimpse of the sophistication in his note choices that he would allude to throughout his career.

Did you know?

Charles and King often shared a stage during their careers; to hear them together in the studio, listen to the emotive jamming on Sinner’s Prayer on Charles’ final studio album before his death in 2004, Genius Loves Company

18. Instrumental (Live In Stockholm Konserthus)

With a minute of charming but starchy retrospective interview before the action, this clip from Swedish concert in 1974 is an absolute must for an appreciation of what made BB King’s playing so timeless. Over an extended three-minute solo, he creates mood by varying the dynamics of his solo from tender to strident, perfectly controlling the band’s accompaniment through the nuances of his playing and through subtle gestures: at one point, he unexpectedly silences them, embarks on a stunning jazzy exploration, then smoothly changes key, seemingly at random, before they come back in without missing a trick. Dynamic playing and musical telepathy with his fellow musicians are two qualities BB understood better than perhaps any other blues player before or since – and it’s all here.

Did you know?

At 7:00 in this Guitar Clinic, King explains how horn playing defined his approach to sustain in his phrasing

17. Japanese Boogie

A tireless tourer, King found time in his hectic schedule to record three albums in 1971 while also capitalising on the peak in his popularity – the unimpeachable Live At Cook County Jail, B.B. King In London, unfortunately lacklustre despite its stellar cast of musicians, and Live In Japan, recorded in Tokyo’s Sankei Hall – where this fiery up-tempo boogie is from. It’s a sprawling nine-minute instrumental that begins with a single-string take on the Chuck Berry lick before spending the majority of the rest of the song in the so-called BB box: having an area of the guitar neck named after you proves how much time BB spent in this territory, and this stomping instrumental, with its interlacing horns and piano, shows the endless variation King could summon out of the position on the fretboard he’d claimed as his own.

Did you know?

It’s not all down to BB – there’s even a rasping distorted bass solo, courtesy of King’s erstwhile low-end merchant Wilbert Freeman

16. Goin’ South (Calypso Blues)

1991 instrumental compilation Spotlight On Lucille is oft-lauded for illuminating King’s material from the Kent label vaults, from 1958-62, particularly the outstanding version of Louis Jordan’s Ain’t That Just Like A Woman which is an early tour-de-force of his jazz-inflected, horn-influenced and fluid lead style, and Jumpin’ With B.B., where he rides roughshod across an alternate time signature from the rhythm section in his phrasing. Yet its this shapeshifting Calypso instrumental that shows an undercelebrated side of King’s wide-ranging musical sensibilities. Listen out for the diminished runs and the outro, where he really loses himself in the tune, adding rare rhythmic doublestop stabs and controlling the song’s dynamics with a twist of his volume control.

Did you know?

King was an ever-present in the studio in his early days; a boxset of the complete RPM-Kent recordings features over 400 tracks, including alternate takes

15. Days Of Old

2000’s Riding With The King saw 75-year-old BB rolling back the years on a collaboration with Eric Clapton that had finally come to fruition after years of mutual appreciation. The record featured five vintage BB King songs, and on the uptempo Days Of Old from 1958, an elite band with Andy Fairweather-Low, Joe Sample et al offer a perfect substitute for the horn stabs of the original. Clapton pulls out all the stops throughout the record, mimics the intro line and staccato Q&A licks that leapt out of the original, and when it’s Lucille’s turn in the spotlight, King soars above the mix with a push-and-pull solo soaked in expressiveness that draws on all of his years of experience with the song – a highlight from a record brimming with mutual admiration from two guitar greats.

Did you know?

Fans of Texas blues should give Riding With The King a spin for the guest spots from Jimmie Vaughan and Doyle Bramhall II; the latter’s songs Marry You and I Wanna Be are covered

14. Guess Who

The cover image from King’s 1972 album Guess Who shows him laid out on the beach hovering in a state somewhere between relaxation and exhaustion, Lucille by his side – it was his 21st album, after all. But the title track shows there was still plenty more to come, and King transforms the smouldering sentimentality of this piano-blues into a consummate lesson in how his vocal and guitar were two sides of the same coin when it came to dynamics and phrasing. BB uses his full vocabulary of first-finger bends, string slides, passing notes, his magical vibrato and more to subtly transform the song’s basic melody into something only he could play.

Did you know?

King’s oft-imitated rapid vibrato technique relies on lateral movement of the wrist; unusually, the tip of his finger is the only part of his hand touching the fretboard, which contributes to its uniquely vocal quality

13. Don’t Answer The Door

This 1966 single, a cover of a Jimmy Johnson composition, was King’s highest-charting song for six years on release, but its success was modest compared to the smash that his signature song, Thrill Has Gone, became three years later. Undoubtedly, though, guitarists around the world were listening – just as important to the song’s success as the brooding electric organ and King’s impassioned vocal are the bursts of ghostly lead guitar, drenched in pools of sumptuous amp reverb, an effect also put to spine-chilling use by King’s favourite UK bluesman, Peter Green.

Did you know?

Listen also to the brooding live version on the outstanding half-live, half-studio Live & Well album from 1969, part of a set which King proclaimed was the best he’d ever played

12. Chains And Things

“I know the critics always name Live & Well or Live At The Regal as my best albums,” King once reflected, “but I think Indianola Mississippi Seeds was the best album I have ever made artistically.” The record came on the heels of his breakthrough hit Thrill Is Gone, from the Completely Well record, and young Bill Szymcyzk (who produced that album and would later go on to produce Hotel California) gently nudged King away from his well-trodden formula into fresh territory, with exceptional results. Chains And Things, also featuring Carole King on Fender Rhodes, is a case in point: simmering with world-weary minor-key indignation, BB delivers a haunting vocal and his guitar solo, embellished with interwoven string lines, seems to emanate from deep inside him.

Did you know?

The solo’s opening note was a mistake, according to BB: “I played the wrong note and followed it as best I could… then we got the arranger to make the strings follow it”

11. Gambler’s Blues

When you summon BB King’s playing to mind, chances are you’ll hear it floating serenely above a bed of horns of the kind that characterised Live At The Regal. But on the 1966 live album Blues Is King, BB took to the stage in Chicago with a stripped-down band featuring only organ, alto sax and a trumpet in their place, and the results were grittier and far more visceral as a result. There are many six-string highlights, including the stark, spiky lines of opener Waiting On You and the spills of feedback threatening the reverb-coated licks on Night Life (there’s also an unfortunate string break on Blind Love). But Gambler’s Blues is the guitar highpoint – a prowling beast of a performance, so real it feels as though he’s in the room with you.

Did you know?

BB King was in debt at this time due to a bus crash incident that left him personally liable and claims for back taxes from the IRS, hence the stripped-down line-up

10. How Blue Can You Get (aka Downhearted)

A crowdpleasing staple in King’s live sets on account of its clever wordplay, BB recorded the 1949 Jane and Leonard Feather composition twice; once in 1963 as Downhearted, and then in a revamped version the following year, which made the Billboard 100. This version – from a 1979 tour of Russia, filmed in what looks like an aircraft hangar, in Tblisi of all places – is a great watch, firstly for the extreme-close-up camerawork offering us an almost uncomfortably intimate view of his guitar technique, secondly for the noodling in the intro, and finally, for an appreciation of BB King as an out-and-out showman, acting out the lyrics as he goes.

Did you know?

There are many to choose from: definitive live versions are a toss-up between those on Live At The Regal, Sing Sing, Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! and Cook County Jail

9. Blues At Midnight

A towering track included on King’s ABC-Paramount debut album Mr Blues, from 1963 – a record that combines the output of three separate sessions with a variety of groups into a stylistically varied but not entirely satisfying whole – Blues At Midnight enjoys the distinction of having an uncommonly great guitar tone that’s different from much of the rest of his output. Articulate, nasal and sounding almost-out-of-phase, how exactly he came across it remains a mystery. King had a famous preference for Gibson’s Lab series L-5 amps and used Fender models, but beyond that, was seemingly far from a gearhound.

Did you know?

It’s speculated that the tone on this record may be the product of one of the settings on King’s custom-ordered stereo ES-335 with Varitone switch, pictured on the cover

8. Hummingbird

The BB King/Bill Szymcyzk partnership bore further fruit with Indianola Mississippi Seeds’ closing epic, a most uncharacteristic, shapeshifting musical exploration written by singer-pianist Leon Russell, who contributes gutsy piano to the record. Beginning with a loping Albert King-esque  strut and morphing into an ambitious rock-ballad arrangement, Hummingbird would’ve been a standout in King’s discography even without its closing section, where, over a chorus of angelic backing vocals from Sherlie Matthews, Merry Clayton, Clydie King and Venetta Fields, King offers his own unique take on the epic Layla-esque 70s rock outro, wringing almost Stones-y licks from Lucille’s neck for a satisfyingly bitter and earthy contrast to the song’s emotive crescendo.

Did you know?

The surreal cover image, featuring a watermelon guitar complete with pickups, neck and bridge, won a Grammy for photographer, Ivan Nagy and cover designer, Robert Lockart

7. Rock Me Baby

This early BB King song, recorded sometime between 1958 and 1962, was his first to hit the Top 40 in the US, and both it and Muddy Waters’ Rock Me share a common ancestor in Lil’ Son Jackson’s Rockin’ And Rollin’. King’s take is a prowling monster of a recording, bleeding into the red, that pairs a deep, barrelling piano bassline with a manky stray cat of a main lick; but what elevates it is the perfectly formed guitar solo, with its sophisticated manipulation of space, its visceral string rakes, mix of major and minor and its microtonal bends. It’s a rare glimpse of BB King in unadulterated macho-swagger mode and it’s since entered the blues canon.

Did you know?

Hendrix revamped the song somewhat for his mindblowing 1967 Monterey Pop Festival performance and BB King re-recorded the song in 2000 with Clapton for Riding With The King

6. Every Day I Have The Blues

A 1935 song by the Sparks brothers, updated by Memphis Slim, Count Basie And His Orchestra and others, King’s version of Every Day I Have The Blues recorded 20 years later became his “theme” on account of its novel DI’d guitar sound (resulting in extra cuthrough and twang) and “crisp and relaxed” horn arrangements from Maxwell Davis. It was a regular concert opener, opening both Live At The Regal and Live At Cook County Jail, and for all the charm of the original, it’s in performance that it comes to life. Here’s a great hyperactive version from circa 1969-70 where BB slickly sorts out his guitar issues before peeling out a stinging solo that dances around the horn lines and takes advantage of the sustain from his cranked amp.

Did you know?

Though King’s first version was recorded in 1955, it had to wait until 2004 for a Grammy Hall of Fame Award and until 2019 to be inducted into the Blues Hall Of Fame as a Classic Of Blues Recording

5. Why I Sing The Blues

The closing song on BB’s classic 1969 album Completely Well catalogues the historical and contemporary racial injustices of US society head on, and with simmering dignity. Though the original is a cool slab of funk, driven by a propulsive bassline from Gerald ‘Jerry’ Jemmott, it’s best heard in the sweltering heat of the Zaire 74 concert: 80,000 people watch on as his band up the tempo and the bandleader closes his eyes and coaxes Lucille to sing. When describing his guitar phrasing, BB would often explain his approach in terms of a conversation, constructing complete sentences by repeating themes while varying the dynamics, bends and sustain in his licks; and this is a prime example of how he did it, with a bonus funky outro thrown in just for the hell of it.

Did you know?

King’s right-hand technique is an essential aspect of his sound: he played with a heavy pick and used mostly downstrokes to strike the notes, sacrificing the speed of alternate picking for more control and consistency of emphasis. He also exclusively damped the strings with his right hand

4. Three O’Clock Blues

BB had his first chart appearance in 1951 with a brooding take on Lowell Fulson’s Three O’Clock Blues, restlessly alternating soulful crooning with restless, barbed guitar licks over a bed of soporific horns. The influence of T-Bone Walker on King’s early style shines through here, in the emphatic use of bends and the abrupt, unexpected pauses for thought interrupting the flow of his lead lines to convey emotion through the power of silence. King’s raw and authoritative playing when he revisited the song for 2000’s Riding With The King makes for an interesting comparison: half a century of blues playing is a lot of water under the bridge, but his expressive power is completely undiminished.

Did you know?

Beginning life as a Gibson L-30, Lucille took many forms before King settled on his iconic choice of centreblock-equipped ES-355 and its less bling sister models, the 335 and 345. At this point in his career, Lucille was an ES-125; a hollowbody model with a single P-90 pickup

3. Worry Worry Worry (Live In Cook County Jail)

Johnny Cash’s prison concerts (1968’s At Folsom Prison and 1969’s At San Quentin) set the precedent for BB King to accept an invitation to perform at Cook County Jail in Chicago in 1971, and the experience had a lasting effect on him: BB would go on to co-found the Foundation for the Advancement of Inmate Recreation and Rehabilitation (FAIRR) in 1972. The Cook County performance has many fine moments, but Worry Worry Worry, its 10-minute centrepiece, finds him using everything in his power – from spoken-word soliloquys and hummingbird falsetto to band dynamics and verse after verse of spectacularly emotive blues lead – to make a connection with the lost souls staring back at him.

Did you know?

BB King was a passionate advocate for prison reform, and played around 70 prison gigs over the course of his career, including the subject of the 1972 documentary At Sing Sing Prison

2. Sweet Little Angel

Live At The Regal is forever praised as one of the greatest live albums of all time and even though its timelessness ultimately lies in the connection with the crowd and the ensemble performance, it’s also littered with exceptional, enormously varied guitar playing. An undoubted high point for many is King’s playing on Sweet Little Angel, a reworking of Lucille Bogan’s 1930 song Black Angel Blues. While King had refined his guitar style on singles towards a more minimalist approach out of necessity, onstage, it could be a different story, and so it proves here: from its authoritative, melodic opening phrase onwards, his brief off-the-cuff solo covers so much ground, it’s virtually a song in itself.

Did you know?

At one point in his 60s career, Eric Clapton listened to this album every night before going onstage

1. The Thrill Is Gone

King’s signature song was a hit for Roy Hawkins, its co-writer, in 1951, but BB’s ground-up reworking of it reached No. 15 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1970 and took his popularity to a new audience, and a new level. Its dramatic arrangment – immersing King’s angst-ridden vocals and laconic, reverb-shrouded stabs of guitar in a sea of heartbreak made up of pensive strings and atmospheric Wurlitzer, provided the established bluesman with an entirely fresh sonic setting.

The song was masterminded by Bill Szymczyk, an up-and-coming staff producer at ABC Records who had lobbied hard to allow executives to pair him up with King in the studio. The result of their first collaboration was 1969’s Live & Well album: a half-live, half-studio test exercise. For its follow-up, Completely Well, Szymczyk recruited session players Herbie Lovell on drums, bassist Gerry Jemmott, keys player Paul Harris and guitarist Hugh McCracken and set up in New York’s Hit Factory studio in September 1969. The producer asked string arranger Bert de Coteaux to come up with the song’s distinctive arrangement.

Szymczyk told Mix Online: “The thing I remember most vividly about that session was how BB smiled during it. This had never happened to him before – strings on a blues record. I’m not sure it had ever happened to anyone before.”

The atmospheric backdrop stirred up an emotional response from King, whose terse, pent-up lines bristle with dynamic energy, swooping gracefully above and below the other elements in the mix before embarking on an outro that Szymcyk recalls went on a full eight minutes.

Did you know?

BB King recorded the song live with no guitar or vocal overdubs, using a Gibson ES-355 with Varitone through a Fender Twin Reverb

Источник: https://guitar.com/guides/essential-guide/bb-king-best-guitar-solos-songs-moments/
Privacy Policy

Tracks of the Day – B.B. KING ‘The Thrill Is Gone’, ‘Why I Sing The Blues’ & ‘Lucille Talks Back’

bb_KING

Rest in peace, B.B. King.

There are a lot of glorious tunes by B.B. King out there. I’ve picked three of my favourites for this special Tracks of the Day: ‘The Thrill Is Gone’, featuring Tracy Chapman (another one of my favourite musicians) on vocals and guitar; ‘Why I Sing The Blues’, recorded live in 1974 when B.B. King opened for Muhammed Ali (in a manner of speaking…); and ‘Lucille Talks Back’ a beautiful instrumental track from his 1975 album by the same name.

Like this:

LikeLoading...

Related

Источник: https://realrockandroll.wordpress.com/2015/05/16/tracks-of-the-day-b-b-king-the-thrill-is-gone-why-i-sing-the-blues-lucille-talks-back/

Lucille

As Burrows suggests, musicians can displace their own agency onto the instruments they play in ways that constitute those instruments as (semi-)autonomous entities to which they relate as performing partners rather than just tools. I once saw Judd Hughes, a virtuosic country guitarist who played lead in Patty Loveless’s band, hold and manipulate an acoustic guitar as if it were an unruly alter ego, like a barely trained Great Dane over which he had temporary control but that could get away from him at any moment. A more celebrated example is B.B. King, who in naming his guitar Lucille encourages his audience to perceive it as a separate being, and implies that his relationship with it is fraught with the complexities attending heterosexual relationships between men and women.[1]

King’s relationship with Lucille is indeed complex, and I cannot hope to do it justice here. The guitar is said to be named for a woman over whom two men brawled at a juke joint in Arkansas where King played in the late 1940s, early in his career; the fight led to the immolation of the place, a story that itself could have been taken from a blues ballad. King consistently treats Lucille as an entity separate from himself, both discursively and in the way he performs with her. He frequently gives Lucille instructions, saying “One more, Lucille” when he wants to play another chorus, or “Take it easy” when he plays pianissimo. He confirms his ventriloquial relationship with Lucille in the way he seeks to make her sing in his displaced voice: “The one thing that I’m concerned about today, to make Lucille sound even more like singing, more in the style of my singing.”[2] King defers to Lucille at moments when he claims to find himself unable to speak, suggesting that his voice and Lucille’s are expressively interchangeable. In his recording of the song “Lucille,” one of the places where he has recounted the story of how the guitar got its name, King says at one point: “Sometimes I get to a place where I can’t even say nothing.” This remark is followed immediately by guitar playing, to which King responds appreciatively, “Look out!” as if addressing the actions of another. At a different moment in the same song, he says, “Sorta hard to talk to you myself. I guess I’ll let Lucille say a few words, and then..” His voice trails off as the guitar takes over; when he resumes speaking at the end of the instrumental passage, he does not pick up where he left off—it is as if Lucille had completed the thought for

him.[3]

He also describes Lucille as a distinct individual, with her own sensibility, from whom he must coax musical sound:

It seems that it loves to be petted and played with. There’s also a certain way you hold it, the certain noises it makes, the way it excites me. and Lucille don’t want to play anything but the blues.. Lucille is real, when I play her it’s almost like hearing words, and of course, naturally I hear cries. I’d be playing sometimes and as I’d play, it seems like it almost has a conversation with me.[4]

King’s rhetoric here is worth attending to. There is ambivalence in the way he refers to the guitar sometimes as “it” and sometimes as “her,” alternately personifying the instrument and acknowledging its status as an object. When he discusses his actions on Lucille (petting, playing, holding), he refers to the instrument as “it.” But when he discusses Lucille’s own musical contribution, he refers to the guitar either by name or using feminine pronouns, thus clearly positioning Lucille as an active, gendered entity separate from himself.[5] This entity has human characteristics: she speaks, cries, engages in conversation. He implies that Lucille is autonomous: she is “real” and has specific ideas about what music she will perform. However, King does not characterize Lucille as “treacherous,” the word Godlovitch uses to describe the resistance the guitar offers its player. Lucille is King’s indispensable creative partner and alter ego, but it is clear that her cooperation is not guaranteed: she must be cajoled. King must do what she wants (“it loves to be petted and played with”) if she is to work willingly with him in playing the blues.

King dramatizes this aspect of his relationship with Lucille in performance. Like many other guitarists who are also vocalists, King often does not play when he is singing. When he sings, his guitar simply hangs against his torso on its strap while he uses his arms and hands to gesticulate in ways that underline the emotional states expressed in his songs’ lyrics (Fig. 1). While singing, he stands erect, his face toward his audience or directed slightly heavenward, his eyes often closed. When he plays Lucille, however, his posture changes. He hunches over the fretboard in his left hand, his head tilted downward toward the instrument. Even if his eyes are closed, his head is positioned as if he were looking at Lucille, giving her his full attention (Fig. 2). While he is playing, every movement of his body and every facial expression is a direct response to the sounds emanating from Lucille, often on a note-by-note basis. In conjunction with what he says about Lucille, this way of performing with her suggests that when King is singing, he is free to express his own feelings as conveyed through the lyrics. If he wants Lucille to participate, however, the focus must be entirely on her and what she has to say.[6] In Burrows’s description, quoted earlier, ventriloquism “involves splitting the performer’s personality and displacing part of it onto an alter ego.” In King’s case, it is arguably not just his personality that is split and displaced, but also the two musical functions he performs: he sings as himself, but his guitar playing is displaced onto Lucille as

Fig. 1 B.B. King sings on Ralph Gleason’s Jazz Casual (National Educational Television 1968)

B.B. King communes with Lucille on Ralph Gleason’s Jazz Casual (National Educational Television 1968)

Fig. 2 B.B. King communes with Lucille on Ralph Gleason’s Jazz Casual (National Educational Television 1968)

his alter ego. In this respect, King may be said to be dramatizing the relationship between singer and instrumentalist posited by Cone. Cone describes the character portrayed by the singer as the music’s “vocal persona” (or protagonist) and the accompanying music as the “instrumental (or virtual) persona.” Cone treats these two personae as distinct voices in the performed composition and considers the dialogue between them to express the composer’s intentions. He also suggests that the relationship between them can take many forms (Cone 1974, pp. 18, 29). Gelbart proposes that in the performance of rock music, vocal and instrumental personae are fused into a single entity. By contrast, King, the blues singer, performs as the vocal protagonist while King, the blues guitarist, anthropomorphizes the instrumental persona in the “person” of Lucille.

In a discussion of a series of experiments intended to show the connections between the auditory and the visual in musical perception, a group of research psychologists describes King’s typical gestures and facial expressions, noting that

King frequently adopts an introspective demeanor, with eyes closed and a pained expression, yet stubbornly shaking his head. This affective display conveys an impression of stoically reflecting upon but not surrendering to difficult emotions. Periodically he stares open-eyed at the audience with an open mouth. The expression appears to convey a sense of wonder.... Judge A [one of the experimental subjects] observed that King’s facial expressions often functioned to signal that certain passages were difficult but satisfying to play. (Thompson et al. 2005, pp. 207f, emphasis in original)

These authors also observe the direct relationship between King’s behavior and the music he plays:

It is notable that B.B. King’s facial expressions closely track his guitar sounds.. In some cases his rapid head shaking movement mirrors vibrato on individual notes. This gesture has the effect of drawing the listeners’ attention to local aspects of music, specifically to B.

B. King’s nuanced treatment of individual notes. (ibid., p. 208)

I suggest that the ventriloquial paradigm for instrumental performance points toward a different reading of King’s performance, though not one that excludes the psychologists’ analysis. Whereas the psychologists take it as given that King’s behaviors express his feelings about his own playing and the music he is producing, it seems to me that the same gestures and expressions can equally well be read as his reactions to Lucille’s behavior. Perhaps the sounds Lucille produces arouse difficult emotions within him, and perhaps it is her ability to move him that stirs his sense of wonder. Perhaps it is Lucille’s prowess at rendering difficult passages rather than his own that he signals for the audience, and perhaps he is following “her” playing with his head movements. Constituting the guitar as a separate “person” (or persona) and acting toward it as such allows King to dramatize the ventriloquial relationship between instrumentalist and instrument, a relationship that is always enacted, though not usually foregrounded, in conventional musical performance.

Источник: https://ebrary.net/
Contact us

By CNN Library

(CNN) — Here's a look at the life of blues legend B.B. King.

Personal: Birth date: September 16, 1925

Death date: May 14, 2015

Birth place: Mississippi Delta cotton plantation between Indianola and what is now Itta Bena, Mississippi

Birth name: Riley B. King

Father: Albert Lee King, a sharecropper

Mother: Nora Ella (Pully) King

Marriages: Sue Carol Hall (1958-1966, divorced), Martha Lee Denton (1942-1950, divorced)

Children: Claims to have fathered 15 children with many different women

Military: US Army, 1943

Other Facts: King sang with church choirs as a child. He learned basic guitar chords from his uncle, a preacher, and only performed religious music at home.

King sang and played the blues on the corner of Church and Second in Indianola, and said he could earn more in one night singing on the corner than he could in one week working in the cotton field.

Enlisted in the Army during World War II but was released because he drove a tractor, an essential home front occupation.

His nickname, "BB" is short for Blues Boy, part of the name he used as a Memphis disc jockey, the Beale Street Blues Boy.

The first "Lucille" got her name after a fire broke out at a dance in Arkansas and King ran out forgetting his guitar and then risked his life to go back and get it. When he later found out that two men fighting over a woman named Lucille had knocked over a kerosene heater that had started the fire, he named the guitar Lucille, "to remind myself never to do anything that foolish."

King has used various models of Gibson guitars over the years and named them each Lucille. In the early 1980s, Gibson officially dropped the model number, ES-355, on the guitar King used and it became a custom-made signature model named Lucille, manufactured exclusively for the "King of the Blues."

King's daughter, Patty, was among the inmates at his concert at a Gainesville, Florida, correctional facility.

King has 30 Grammy nominations, 15 wins and a Lifetime Achievement award.

Timeline: 1937 - Receives his first guitar.

1947-1950 - Disc jockey for WDIA/AM Memphis.

1949 - Makes first recordings, "Miss Martha King/Take a Swing with Me" and "How Do You Feel When Your Baby Packs Up and Goes/I've Got the Blues."

December 1951 - His first hit record "Three O'clock Blues" is released. It stays on the top of the charts for four months.

1965 - Releases the album, "Live at the Regal."

June 6, 1968 - Plays the Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco and receives his first standing ovation.

December 1969 - His trademark song, "The Thrill is Gone," is released as a single. The song wins his first Grammy, for Best R&B Vocal Performance Male, in March 1970.

May 2, 1970 - King debuts an all-blues show at Carnegie Hall.

October 8, 1970 - Appears on the Ed Sullivan Show.

1971 - Co-founds, with attorney F. Lee Bailey, FAIRR - Foundation for the Advancement of Inmate Rehabilitation and Recreation - dedicated to the improvement of prison conditions.

1981 - Grammy winner for Best Ethnic or Traditional Recording for "There Must be a Better World Somewhere."

1983 and 1985 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Recording.

1987 - Is inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

1988 - Receives a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

1990 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Recording for "Live at San Quentin" and receives the National Medal of Arts from the National Endowment of the Arts.

1991 and 1993 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Album.

1994 - Performs at an invitation-only concert at Beijing's Hard Rock Café.

1995 - Kennedy Center Honoree.

1996 - King wins the Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental Performance along with Art Neville, Bonnie Raitt, Buddy Guy, Dr. John, Eric Clapton, Jimmie Vaughan, and Robert Cray for "SRV Shuffle."

March 8, 1996 - "All Blues All Around Me," King's autobiography is published.

1999 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Album for "Blues on the Bayou."

2000 - Along with Eric Clapton wins the Grammy for Best Traditional Blues Album for "Riding with the King" and with Dr. John wins for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals for "Is You Is, or Is You Ain't (My Baby)."

2002 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Album for "A Christmas Celebration of Hope" and for Best Pop Instrumental Performance for "Auld Lang Syne."

2003 - Mississippi erects the First Mississippi Blues Trail historic site marker honoring its native son in Indianola.

2005 - Wins a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for "80."

December 15, 2006 - King is awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush.

September 13, 2008 - The B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center opens to the public. In its first year, the Center has more than 30,000 visitors.

February 2009 - Wins the Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for "One Kind Favor" (2008).

February 27, 2012 - In celebration of the blues, King performs in the East Room of the White House with Buddy Guy, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck and others.

December 11, 2012 - Documentary, "BB King: The Life of Riley," opens in the United Kingdom.

October 3, 2014 - King falls ill after a show at Chicago's House of Blues due to dehydration and exhaustion. The remainder of his tour is canceled.

April 2015 - Is hospitalized for dehydration.

April 7, 2015 - King posts a message on his official website saying he wants "to thank everyone for their concern and good wishes. I'm feeling much better and am leaving the hospital today."

May 14, 2015 - Dies at the age of 89.

May 25, 2015 - Two of King's adult children allege that he was poisoned to death by two individuals who worked for him.

July 14, 2015 - The Clark County Coroner tells CNN that there was no evidence of poisoning in the death of Blues legend B.B. King. Las Vegas Coroner, John Fudenberg, states that "Alzheimer's disease was the cause of death with other significant contributing factors."

SUGGEST A CORRECTION

Источник: https://www.wral.com/b-b-king-fast-facts/17344160/

B. B. King Fast Facts

Here's a look at the life of blues legend B.B. King.

Personal: Birth date: September 16, 1925

Death date: May 14, 2015

Birth place: Mississippi Delta cotton plantation between Indianola and what is now Itta Bena, Mississippi

Birth name: Riley B. King

Father: Albert Lee King, a sharecropper

Mother: Nora Ella (Pully) King

Marriages: Sue Carol Hall (1958-1966, divorced), Martha Lee Denton (1942-1950, divorced)

Children: Claims to have fathered 15 children with many different women

Military: US Army, 1943

Other Facts: King sang with church choirs as a child. He learned basic guitar chords from his uncle, a preacher, and only performed religious music at home.

King sang and played the blues on the corner of Church and Second in Indianola, and said he could earn more in one night singing on the corner than he could in one week working in the cotton field.

Enlisted in the Army during World War II but was released because he drove a tractor, an essential home front occupation.

His nickname, "BB" is short for Blues Boy, part of the name he used as a Memphis disc jockey, the Beale Street Blues Boy.

The first "Lucille" got her name after a fire broke out at a dance in Arkansas and King ran out forgetting his guitar and then risked his life to go back and get it. When he later found out that two men fighting over a woman named Lucille had knocked over a kerosene heater that had started the fire, he named the guitar Lucille, "to remind myself never to do anything that foolish."

King has used various models of Gibson guitars over the years and named them each Lucille. In the early 1980s, Gibson officially dropped the model number, ES-355, on the guitar King used and it became a custom-made signature model named Lucille, manufactured exclusively for the "King of the Blues."

King's daughter, Patty, was among the inmates at his concert at a Gainesville, Florida, correctional facility.

King has 30 Grammy nominations, 15 wins and a Lifetime Achievement award.

Timeline: 1937 - Receives his first guitar.

1947-1950 - Disc jockey for WDIA/AM Memphis.

1949 - Makes first recordings, "Miss Martha King/Take a Swing with Me" and "How Do You Feel When Your Baby Packs Up and Goes/I've Got the Blues."

December 1951 - His first hit record "Three O'clock Blues" is released. It stays on the top of the charts for four months.

1965 - Releases the album, "Live at the Regal."

June 6, 1968 - Plays the Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco and receives his first standing ovation.

December 1969 - His trademark song, "The Thrill is Gone," is released as a single. The song wins his first Grammy, for Best R&B Vocal Performance Male, in March 1970.

May 2, 1970 - King debuts an all-blues show at Carnegie Hall.

October 8, 1970 - Appears on the Ed Sullivan Show.

1971 - Co-founds, with attorney F. Lee Bailey, FAIRR - Foundation for the Advancement of Inmate Rehabilitation and Recreation - dedicated to the improvement of prison conditions.

1981 - Grammy winner for Best Ethnic or Traditional Recording for "There Must be a Better World Somewhere."

1983 and 1985 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Recording.

1987 - Is inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

1988 - Receives a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

1990 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Recording for "Live at San Quentin" and receives the National Medal of Arts from the National Endowment of the Arts.

1991 and 1993 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Album.

1994 - Performs at an invitation-only concert at Beijing's Hard Rock Caf-.

1995 - Kennedy Center Honoree.

1996 - King wins the Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental Performance along with Art Neville, Bonnie Raitt, Buddy Guy, Dr. John, Eric Clapton, Jimmie Vaughan, and Robert Cray for "SRV Shuffle."

March 8, 1996 - "All Blues All Around Me," King's autobiography is published.

1999 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Album for "Blues on the Bayou."

2000 - Along with Eric Clapton wins the Grammy for Best Traditional Blues Album for "Riding with the King" and with Dr. John wins for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals for "Is You Is, or Is You Ain't (My Baby)."

2002 - Grammy winner for Best Traditional Blues Album for "A Christmas Celebration of Hope" and for Best Pop Instrumental Performance for "Auld Lang Syne."

2003 - Mississippi erects the First Mississippi Blues Trail historic site marker honoring its native son in Indianola.

2005 - Wins a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for "80."

December 15, 2006 - King is awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush.

September 13, 2008 - The B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center opens to the public. In its first year, the Center has more than 30,000 visitors.

February 2009 - Wins the Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for "One Kind Favor" (2008).

February 27, 2012 - In celebration of the blues, King performs in the East Room of the White House with Buddy Guy, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck and others.

December 11, 2012 - Documentary, "BB King: The Life of Riley," opens in the United Kingdom.

October 3, 2014 -King falls ill after a show at Chicago's House of Blues due to dehydration and exhaustion. The remainder of his tour is canceled.

April 2015 - Is hospitalized for dehydration.

April 7, 2015 - King posts a message on his official website saying he wants "to thank everyone for their concern and good wishes. I'm feeling much better and am leaving the hospital today."

May 14, 2015 - Dies at the age of 89.

May 25, 2015 - Two of King's adult children allege that he was poisoned to death by two individuals who worked for him.

July 14, 2015 - The Clark County Coroner tells CNN that there was no evidence of poisoning in the death of Blues legend B.B. King. Las Vegas Coroner, John Fudenberg, states that "Alzheimer's disease was the cause of death with other significant contributing factors."

Источник: https://www.actionnewsnow.com/content/national/474214163.html

Notice: Undefined variable: z_bot in /sites/msofficesetup.us/business/bb-king-lucille-instrumental.php on line 146

Notice: Undefined variable: z_empty in /sites/msofficesetup.us/business/bb-king-lucille-instrumental.php on line 146

4 Replies to “Bb king lucille instrumental”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *