facebook business account disabled

If your account has been disabled, you can contact Facebook via a form on their website. This form requires the email address used to make the Facebook account. Navigate to Facebook's Ad Manager or select the Ads Manager button at the top of the Insights page. · Select the account in the left sidebar. · Click the Settings. Deactivation puts your Twitter account in a queue for permanent deletion. Twitter may retain some information on your deactivated account to ensure the.

Facebook business account disabled -

What to Do If Your Facebook Ad Account Is Disabled

Many times Facebook Ads don't get approved. Well, this is such a derailment to your Facebook marketing campaign, but then, it's not such a big deal. The real heat is felt when your Facebook Ad account is disabled. Nothing sends shivers down the spines of Facebook advertisers like the "Your Facebook Ad Account has been DISABLED" alert.

Unlike Ads being rejected, your Ads account being disabled means your entire campaign could go down the drain. Well, that's a big scare, but then, that's not the end of everything. The truth of the matter is that you can still reactivate your disabled Facebook Ads account. In this article, find out 10 reasons why Facebook disables Ad accounts, how to get the Ad account ban lifted, and importantly, how you can remain on the safe side.

Disapproved Ads vs. Disabled Ads Account

To start, it's crucial to find out the difference between disapproved ads vs. disabled ad accounts, two of the biggest scares when managing Facebook ads.Many advertisers confuse these two concepts.

As the name suggests, disapproved ads are individual ads that are flagged down immediately or after running for some time because of one reason or another. You may have one or multiple ads disapproved, but that doesn't mean your ads account has been disabled.

On the other hand, a disabled account results from repeated Facebook ad violations, or at times, highly negative feedback on your ads account.

Why Can't You Access Your Advertising Account?

Another vital thing to be aware of is the real reason why you lost access to your Facebook Ads account. For the record, advertisers might lose access to their ads account because of two reasons.

(a) Your Personal Account is Blocked

The first reason could be that your personal Facebook account is blocked. Once your personal account is blocked, you lose access to the ads account. But that doesn't mean your ads will be paused. Facebook will still run all your ads and deduct the spend. Anyone else with access to Business Manager will still be able to log in and optimize ads. But for the user whose personal account is blocked, there's no way to access the ads account.

(b) The Ads Account is Disabled

The other reason you might not be able to access your ads account is that the ads account itself is disabled. This is the most common scenario.

What Happens When Your Facebook Ads Account is Disabled?

When the ads account is banned, all the ads are frozen. That means your entire marketing campaign is put on hold until you resolve the problem. Your company or the brands you are running campaigns for will no longer be driving any leads or sales from Facebook for an indefinite period

Why is Facebook Ad Account Disabled?

Now, onto the main business, why do Facebook ads accounts get disabled?

Many advertisers claim that they got banned from Facebook for no reason, but this rarely happens. Facebook disables ads for one reason or another. In this segment, let's find out why Facebook accounts are flagged down.

Well, there are a dozen reasons plus why Facebook bans ads accounts. It could be about the Ad itself, the Ad account, or the Ad's landing page. Let's dive deeper to find out more about why Facebook bans ad accounts.

1. Ads That Go Against Facebook Terms of Service

Many marketers get their ad accounts banned because of infringing Facebook's Terms of Service. Even the slightest violation of the Terms of Service will force the company to disable your ads account.

Make sure all the ads you serve meet the company's Terms of Service. For the record, Facebook shuns all content that promotes vices such as sex, violence, and gambling. These are three areas where many bans result from. Other ads against Facebook Terms of Service that will have your account limited include dating ads from unapproved dating vendors or advertisements that promise to help people make money through dubious means.

Go through the Facebook Terms of Service if you want to have a smooth advertising experience on this platform.

2. Ads that Violate Facebook's Advertising Policies

Besides Facebook's Terms of Service, the company has ad policies that have to be adhered to strictly for all ads served on the platform.

Below is a list of the common advertising violations that result in ad account bans.

  • (i) Personal attributes - Avoid having any content that refers to personal attributes. These include terms such as 'are you,' 'do you,' and the rest. Other personal attributes that should be avoided include terms that depict race, religion, beliefs, age, sexual orientation, etc.
  • (ii) Facebook brand usage - Ads that contain the brand name of Facebook should not represent the company's brand in any way that makes Facebook the prominent feature in the creative piece. Notably, the brand name of Facebook should start with capital 'F.'
  • (iii) The 20% rule - According to Facebook's advertising policies, image-based ads should have less than 20% text. Violating this policy might have your ads account blocked, especially if the violation is repeated multiple times.
  • (iv) Restricted keywords and categories - Facebook uses AI to screen sensitive keywords that revolve around sensitive topics, for example, mortgages, fat loss, anti-aging, and so on. Make sure your ads don't have these restricted keywords. While these keywords will only have your ads disapproved, remember, too much violation of the policy might have your ads account blocked.
  • (v) Before-and-after images - Don't serve ads that have images that have unlikely results, or 'before-and-after' images.
  • (vi) Poor content quality - Facebook might ban your ads account if you serve ads that have poor quality. All the images and text should be of high quality. Besides, the text should have proper grammar and punctuation. Importantly, avoid using capital letters too frequently.

The above are some of the common Facebook ad policies that advertisers violate. While violating any of them doesn't mean that your ads account will be blocked immediately, making the same mistake severally will trigger a disablement.

3. Ads that Attract Negative User Feedback

Another reason why Facebook disables ad accounts is because of negative user feedback. There are cases where your ads may comply with the company's ad policies, but they receive a lot of negative feedback from consumers, or Facebook itself.

Recently, Facebook rolled out Relevance Scores, a feature that allows users to close ads and rate the relevance of ads. A lower score is something you should be wary of. A negative score doesn't reduce engagement only; it will have your ads account closed. Just to note, it's not all about your Relevance Score; receiving a lot of negative feedback can trigger doom.

To protect your ads account from negative feedback, make sure to avoid advertisements that lack relevance. Ads that attract negative feedback have click baits and exaggerated information. They also contain unsubstantiated claims, lack clear intentions, and have misleading or irrelevant images.

To avoid having your ads account closed because of negative feedback, make sure to check for negative feedback and pause such ads before it gets worse.

4. Large Volumes of Disapproved Ads

Ads are first checked before being approved. In many cases, the ads account ban results from having too many ads disapproved. Definitely, with many ads disapproved, the company assumes that you have not read the Terms of Use of the platform, or the ads policies, so Facebook is left with no option but to limit your ads account.

To be on the safe side, make sure to read the ads policies and Terms of Use in detail. Importantly, avoid launching large volumes of ads. Go slow on ads to ensure that no large batches of ads are disapproved. Besides having large disapproved ads, having a long history of disapproved ads raises red flags. It's advisable to delete all disapproved ads.

5. Spending Exorbitantly

Facebook, as a business, is out there to make money, but then, the company has a limit to how you can grow your ad campaign. This is to limit the chances of advertisers spamming Facebook users.

Many marketers make the mistake of spending exorbitantly. This is one of the reasons that many ad accounts are banned. While you may have the budget, it's essential to scale your spending slowly instead of splashing money at once. Experts recommend scaling up your budget daily by less than 15% until the ad account is seasoned enough not to raise the red flags that you are spamming users.

6. Logging in from Different IP Addresses

Facebook, just like other websites, tends to associate logging in from different devices with online fraud. This is something that many advertisers are not aware of. Logging in using different devices is considered unusual activity and can be the sole reason your ads account is disabled. Your account won't be disabled immediately, but you can expect Facebook to act if the trend continues.

The best way to stay safe here is by logging in from a single device. If this is not possible, especially during business trips or when you are away from your office, log in using your mobile device.

7. Not Limiting Access to your Ads Account

Facebook keeps track of all personal accounts, fan pages, and ad accounts to detect any association. If a user has been banned from Facebook and is associated with your ad account, you risk losing the fan page or ad account altogether.

That said, you should be strict with all users associated with your account. If Facebook banned them for other reasons, they could spell doom to your account.

8. Using the Same Payment Method for Multiple Ad Accounts

Another reason that could get your Facebook ad account blocked is using the same payment method for multiple accounts. When Facebook bans an ads account, they also ban the particular payment source. That means, if you are using the same payment method for an account that has been banned, you also risk having that account banned.

As a smart advertiser, create a Facebook Business Manager account that allows you to add multiple accounts with different payment methods. This way, even if one of your accounts is banned, you can still use other payment sources without any worries.

9. Landing Pages with Unclear Intentions

Facebook will also block your ad accounts if your landing pages have unclear intentions. An appropriate landing page should show users what exactly they are getting when they opt in. The offer information should be specified. The landing page should also have business information such as the business name and logo, contact details, address, resources, and a disclaimer.

10. Inconsistent Payment Issues

The last reason most ad accounts are disabled is because of inconsistent payment issues. Facebook flags down accounts that have late payments as this implies the account is unreliable. To avoid ad account closure because of inconsistent payment issues, make sure to pay all pending bills on time.

What to Do If Your Facebook Ad Account Is Disabled

Now that you know the common reasons that lead to Facebook ad account closure, the big question is, how do you get the Facebook ban lifted?

Whether it's your fault or not, getting back a disabled ads account is not a walk in the park. But that doesn't mean it is the end of you and Facebook marketing. You will, however, have to go through a rather tiresome appeal process. In this section, find out how you can restore a disabled ads account.

1. Appeal By Requesting a Review

One of the ways of having the Facebook ad account ban lifted is by requesting a review. There are chances that your account was closed by mistake, but this happens rarely. If you think this is the case, you might want to ask for the account to be reviewed. Do this only when you are sure that it was flagged down by mistake.

To request a review, navigate to the 'Request Review' tab, upload the form ID, and then send your review request. After asking for a review, keep checking your Facebook Help Center Support inbox for any feedback.

After the ad account review is complete, your account will be either reinstated or banned permanently. When appealing, make sure to be polite. First, thank the team for taking their time to review the ban. Then, write a summary of what happened without beating about the bush.

2. Use the Live Chat Support Feature

Another fix for a disabled Facebook ads account is contacting a Facebook representative via live chat support. To contact a support agent via live chat, navigate to the Facebook Business Help Page, where you will get two options; "Find answers or contact support." Click on 'Get Started' and then navigate to Ads or Policy and Security. At the bottom of the page, you will see the options of "Need more help? Contact Support." Click on "Chat with an Agent," fill out the information requested, and you will be redirected to a live chat agent.

This method is the best because you are speaking with a human specialist, not a bot. They will explain if any infringements might have led to the ban and what to do in the future. If your account was flagged down by mistake, the turnaround of lifting the ban would also be faster. When talking to the representative, be honest, descriptive, and appreciative.

3. Consult a Facebook Account Executive

If the above methods are not working, you can seek the services of a Facebook account executive. For starters, these are Facebook employees who offer free expert advice, consultations, and recommendations on anything regarding Facebook advertising and ad optimization.

A Facebook marketing expert will come in handy in troubleshooting your ad account block. But then, not all advertisers can access this service. First, check whether you are eligible for the service, then book an appointment. For the record, you can't apply to have an account representative; Facebook has its criteria of assigning account representatives.

How Long Will It Take to Recover a Disabled Ads Account?

After filing for a review or appeal, be patient. Don't try to contact the Facebook team multiple times. Some reviews and appeals might take just 24 hours, but in some cases, it can go up to five days, or even more before you get feedback - be it a complete ban or a reinstatement.

What If Facebook Rejects The Appeals and Reviews?

The above are the most potent methods of recovering a Facebook ads account. Just to clear the air, they don't guarantee that you will get back your ads account. That takes us to the next question? What do you do if your account is permanently disabled?

Well, there is nothing much you can do once Facebook declines to restore your Facebook ads account. But there are a few tips that can help you continue running your ad campaigns.

The most viable option is registering a new business account. If you aren't allowed to create a new Business Manager, you can use the account of a family, friend, or colleague. But then, this is not something you should be doing whenever an account is disabled. Make sure to follow all the Facebook guidelines related to advertising to avoid any further inconveniences.

Besides opening new accounts, consider using other channels that are less restrictive. A good option here is native advertising which has proven to be just as effective as Facebook marketing. What's more? Native advertising is intriguing, engaging, and inspiring. Besides native advertising, you can also try other channels, such as Reddit ads, Snapchat ads, Amazon ads, Twitter ads, Pinterest ads, and Quora ads.

How To Protect Your Facebook Ads Account

While it's possible to recover a disabled Facebook ads account or to get a new account once yours is permanently disabled, the most important thing is staying safe. In this segment, find out how you can stay safe to avoid losing your ads account.

1. Grasp Facebook Ads Policies

To prevent your Facebook account from being disabled, make sure to read and understand Facebook Terms of Use, and importantly, the company's ads policies. As you have seen, there are so many rules and regulations that have to be adhered to. Importantly, make sure that landing pages and the content therein meet the set standards.

2. Serve Quality Ads

Then, minimize the risk score of your account. For starters, risk score refers to the level of your account's trustworthiness to Facebook. The score is determined by the company's algorithms. Be consistent in the quality of ads you serve to prevent large volumes of disapproved ads and other related reasons that could be detrimental to your Facebook customer feedback score. To ensure that the ads you serve are up to the mark, test them first.

3. Avoid Payment Issues

The payment schedule should also be consistent. As discussed earlier, Facebook tends to flag down accounts that are characterized by late or defaulted payments. Importantly, use Business Manager to manage your payments. It allows you to use different payment methods without running any risks.

4. Be Careful with Access

It's also essential to conduct due diligence when issuing access to your ads account. Make sure that all the team members you add have no existing bans or problems with Facebook. Giving access to banned users can be contagious to the health of your ads account.

5. Launch Ads from One IP address

Last, make it a habit to log in from a single device. As mentioned earlier, logging in from different devices can raise the red flags. Launching ads from multiple IP addresses is synonymous with online fraud.

Summary

There you have it, folks, ten reasons why your Facebook Ad account is disabled, how to appeal facebook ban, and importantly, how to be on the safe side from Facebook's ads account bans. Once you adhere to all the rules and regulations of Facebook, you won't have to worry about disabled Facebook ad accounts!

We’d love to hear questions, comments and suggestions from you. Contact us support@gologin.com or leave a comment below.

Are you just starting out with GoLogin? Forget about account suspension or termination. Choose any wed platform and manage multiple accounts easily. Click here to start using all GoLogin features

Источник: https://gologin.com/what-to-do-if-your-facebook-ad-account-is-disabled

Policy details

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CHANGE LOG

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Policy rationale

Authenticity is the cornerstone of our community. We believe that authenticity helps create a community where people are accountable to each other, and to Facebook, in meaningful ways. We want to allow for the range of diverse ways that identity is expressed across our global community, while also preventing impersonation and identity misrepresentation. That's why we require people to connect on Facebook using the name that they go by in everyday life. Our Authenticity Policies are intended to create a safe environment where people can trust and hold one another accountable.

In order to maintain a safe environment and empower free expression, we also remove accounts that are harmful to the community, including those that compromise the security of other accounts and our services. We have built a combination of automated and manual systems to block and remove accounts that are used to persistently or egregiously abuse our Community Standards.

Because account-level removal is a harsh severe action, whenever possible, we aim to give our community a chance to learn our rules and follow our Community Standards. Penalties, including account disables, are designed to be proportionate to the severity of the violation and the risk of harm posed to the community. Continued violations, despite repeated warnings and restrictions, or violations that pose severe safety risks, will lead to an account being disabled.

We do not allow the use of our services and will disable accounts if you:

  • Severely violate our Community Standards.
  • Persistently violate our Community Standards.
  • Represent dangerous individuals or organisations.
  • Create or use an account that demonstrates intent to violate our Community Standards.
  • Create an account, Page, group or event to evade our enforcement actions, including creating an account to bypass a restriction or after we have disabled your previous account, Page, group or event.
  • Impersonate others by:
    • Using their photos with the explicit aim to deceive others.
    • Creating an account assuming to be or speak for another person or entity.
    • Creating a Page assuming to be or speak for another person or entity for whom the user is not authorised to do so.
  • Are under 13 years old.
  • Are a convicted sex offender.
  • Are prohibited from receiving our products, services or software under applicable laws.

In certain cases, such as those outlined below, we will seek further information about an account before taking actions ranging from temporarily restricting accounts to permanently disabling them.

  • Accounts misrepresenting their identity (Facebook and Messenger only) by:
    • Using a name that is not the authentic name you go by in everyday life
      • Using an inherently violating name containing slurs or any other violations of the Community Standards
    • Providing a false date of birth.
    • Creating a single account that represents or is used by more than one person.
    • Maintaining multiple accounts as a single user.
  • Compromised accounts.
  • Empty accounts with prolonged dormancy.

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Reporting

1

Universal entry point

We have an option to report, whether it's on a post, a comment, a story, a message or something else.

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2

Getting started

We help people report things that they don't think should be on our platform.

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3

Select a problem

We ask people to tell us more about what's wrong. This helps us send the report to the right place.

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4

Report submitted

After these steps, we submit the report. We also lay out what people should expect next.

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Post-report communication

1

Update via notifications

After we've reviewed the report, we'll send the reporting user a notification.

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2

More detail in the Support Inbox

We'll share more details about our review decision in the Support Inbox. We'll notify people that this information is there and send them a link to it.

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3

Appeal option

If people think we made the wrong decision, they can request another review.

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4

Post-appeal communication

We'll send a final response after we've re-reviewed the content, again to the Support Inbox.

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Takedown experience

1

Immediate notification

When someone posts something that violates our Community Standards, we'll tell them.

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Additional context

We'll also address common misperceptions around enforcement.

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Explain the policy

We'll give people easy-to-understand explanations about why their content was removed.

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Ask for input

After we've established the context for our decision and explained our policy, we'll ask people what they'd like to do next, including letting us know if they think we made a mistake.

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Tell us more

If people disagree with the decision, we'll ask them to tell us more.

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Set expectations

Here, we set expectations on what will happen next.

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Warning screens

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Warning screens in context

We cover certain content in News Feed and other surfaces, so people can choose whether to see it.

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More information

In this example, we give more context on why we've covered the photo with more context from independent fact-checkers

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Enforcement

We have the same policies around the world, for everyone on Facebook.

Review teams

Our global team of over 15,000 reviewers work every day to keep people on Facebook safe.

Stakeholder engagement

Outside experts, academics, NGOs and policymakers help inform the Facebook Community Standards.

Источник: https://transparency.fb.com/policies/community-standards/account-integrity-and-authentic-identity/

Why Your Facebook Ad Account is Disabled and How to Fix It

As we know, Facebook ads have completely changed the advertising game. They make it easier for small and large businesses alike to reach their targeted audiences in innovative and effective ways. The possibilities are endless. Unless, of course, your ad account gets disabled. If this has happened to you, not to worry! You’re not alone. We know firsthand how awful this experience can be. 

In this post, we will answer all of the questions you may have about Facebook ad account deactivation. If you’re in the clear, stick around to learn ways you can protect your account from being deactivated in the future. 

Why was your account deactivated?

Unfortunately, Facebook doesn’t always say exactly why your account has been disabled. If you get a message like this one, you will need to rereview their Advertising Policies. In this post, we explain the most common reasons for account disablement. 

The Most Common Reasons for Account Deactivation

Uh oh. So you’ve attempted to log in to your ad account and up pops the red box of death. It states that your account has been disabled for violating Facebook’s terms of use or advertising guidelines. You’re in complete shock and your first thought is obviously, “Why?!” 

There are many reasons an ad account can be disabled. Facebook lists these reasons on their ad policies page. The most common reasons include: 

Unsettled or Pending settlement 

You may not have violated any of Facebook’s community guidelines or terms of use. If this is the case, log in and check your account to see if all payments have been settled. Consider yourself lucky, because this is an easy fix. 

Make sure that your payment and billing information is up to date. For example, perhaps you received a new card from your bank. Make sure that the new card information has been updated on your account. Once the payment is settled, it shouldn’t take long before your ads are up and running again. 

Branded Content 

Facebook defines branded content as “any post—including text, photos, videos, Instant Articles, links, 360 videos and Live videos—from media companies, celebrities or other influencers that features a third party product, brand or sponsor.” For example, a makeup brand may collaborate with a beauty influencer to promote a new eyeshadow palette. 

Facebook updated their branded content policy in 2016. It requires influencers and publishers to tag the company they are collaborating with on paid partnership and sponsorship posts. Make sure that, both,ads and organic posts tag the business partner. 

It’s important to Facebook that users know when they are viewing an ad. Customers don’t want to feel like they are being tricked into purchasing a product or service. They will naturally be open to products introduced by their favorite influencers, as long as those individuals are trustworthy. 

Since the policy update, Facebook has created a tool for branded content. This feature allows publishers and influencers to officially tag a business partner. It also gives both parties access to insightful information, such as engagement, reach metrics, total spend, and CPM. 

“Paid sponsorship with [company name]” will now appear at the top of the post, under the influencer’s instagram account name. Benjamin Chacon’s article on branded content includes a step-by-step tutorial on how to tag and post branded content. 

Personal Attributes 

Facebook’s policy regarding personal attributes states: 

“Ads must not contain content that asserts or implies personal attributes. This includes direct or indirect assertions or implications about a person’s race, ethnic origin, religion, beliefs, age, sexual orientation or practices, gender identity, disability, medical condition (including physical or mental health), financial status, membership in a trade union, criminal record, or name.”

Whoa! We know, we know. That list is longer than an ten-foot anaconda. However, hopefully we can all agree, these terms are necessary. 

It’s so important to remain mindful of the way we word advertisements, so that they will not offend others. Focus on your unique selling proposition, and try to avoid questions that ask the viewer identifying questions. 

For example, “Gingivitis getting in the way of your relationship? Get help now,” is not permitted. It implies that you know that the viewer has gingivitis, which is too personal and invasive. Instead, try, “We have dental care plans for your every need. Click here for more info.” 

Sexually Suggestive Content

Yikes! Believe it or not, this is a topic that Facebook describes as a “common point of confusion.” Other platforms may give more leeway in this area, but Facebook has strict guidelines on what it deems acceptable in regards to explicit material or images. 

Adult content is never permitted in Facebook advertisements. This includes, “nudity, depictions of people in explicit or suggestive positions, or activities that are overly suggestive or sexually provocative.” But perhaps you are in the business of selling undergarments, body wash, or art. You must still tread lightly. 

For example, images that focus on specific body parts, even if not “explicitly sexual in nature,” are not permitted. However, images of art, such as greek statues, are generally deemed acceptable. 

Facebook Brand Usage 

Facebook states, ads that link to Facebook or Instagram content (such as pages, groups, events, or sites that use Facebook Login), “may make limited reference to ‘Facebook’ or ‘Instagram’ in ad text for the purpose of clarifying the destination of the ad.” 

However, Facebook branding cannot be the most “distinctive or prominent part of the creative.” You may be thinking, “I’ll use the Facebook logo in my ad to grab the attention of viewers.” Perhaps it would make the ad seem more “official.” Sorry to burst your bubble, but using the Facebook logo in any way, shape, or form is strictly prohibited. 

What are other reasons for account deactivation? 

Violating Restricted Content Policies

For many of the topics below, your company will need to apply for written permission from Facebook. Others depend on the laws and jurisdictions in the area you are planning to advertise. Some require certifications, age requirements, and/or additional authorizations. For details regarding these guidelines, visit Facebook’s restricted content page. 

Content that is permitted but restricted are as follows: 

  • Alcohol
  • Dating
  • Real Money Gambling
  • State Lotteries
  • Online Pharmacies
  • Promotion of Over-the-Counter Drugs
  • Financial and Insurance Products and Services
  • Branded Content 
  • Ads About Social Issues, Elections, or Politics
  • Cryptocurrency Products and Services 
  • Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treatment 
  • Weight Loss Products and Plans 

Posting Prohibited Content 

If you’ve read the violations above and are still scratching your head, review Facebook’s page on prohibited content. Posting anything on this list is a big no-no.

What can you do? 

Submit an appeal

So, you’ve reviewed all the guidelines above, and you’re screaming, “I’m innocent, I tell you. Innocent!”  Fortunately, you have the option to submit an appeal. 

First, you must log in to your Facebook account. You will be prompted to enter your advertiser account identification number. Then, you will have the opportunity to state the issues you are experiencing and describe your recent account activity. 

We know, you’re probably in the heat of the moment trying to quickly resolve this injustice, but we agree with Jerry Banfield. Take the time to write an email that is honest, descriptive, and appreciative. 

Also, don’t forget to cite the exact Facebook policy or policies you think your ad(s) may have broken. Make sure to mention that you’ll fix the errors and do better in the future. Basically, be remorseful and ask for another chance.

Fortunately, for us, our account was accidentally deactivated. We found out after filing an appeal and explaining our situation in a logical and thoughtful manner. 

If your appeal is denied, there are still some things you can do. If your offense was minor, you may be able to create a new ad account. Don’t know where to start? Banfield has created an easy to follow, step-by-step guide on how to do this. 

One of the most important things to keep in mind is to keep trying. Even if you receive a denial from Facebook, try again, and again. 

Remember that your appeal may have been read by AI (artificial intelligence)/ a robot, which often produces a canned response. Even if the response is “final,” you can still keep asking. Obviously, there’s a limit. If you’ve received 10, 20 or 50 denials, it’s safe to assume that it’s a hard no.

This is a perfect example of why it’s important not to rely on a single platform for advertising. Be sure to diversify your marketing efforts across multiple channels. Similar to the Facebook and Instagram outage earlier this year, this experience is a reminder not to put all your eggs in one basket. 

Speak with a Facebook Marketing Expert 

If filing an appeal leads to a dead end, try contacting a Facebook Marketing Expert. Facebook Marketing Experts are Facebook employees who provide free consultations and make recommendations for ad optimization. 

First, you’ll need to find out if you are eligible for a consultation. Then you can schedule an appointment. 

Since appeals are most likely processed by AI, contacting a Facebook Marketing Expert will give you the opportunity to speak with a real person. During the call, you can ask for advice on future ad campaigns. Explain that your ad account has been deactivated and you’re seeking advice to avoid policy violations in the future. 

Ask for his/her opinion on why your account was disabled. There’s a chance they will not be able to give you a definitive answer. But, there is a chance they will be able to view details on the back end, to give you an informed opinion. 

How long will it take? 

The appeal process could take anywhere between several hours to a couple weeks. To avoid this inconvenience, it’s best to prevent this predicament altogether. Read below to see how you can prevent the deactivation of your ad account.  

How can you avoid this?

If your account has not been disabled and you would like to avoid the horror stories you’ve heard from your colleagues, there are ways you can protect yourself. The last thing you want is to incur so many infractions that you are banned from Facebook advertising, forever. Gasp! 

Julie Stoian, CEO of Create Your Laptop Life, has great tips on how to protect your account from deactivation. If you sought out this article to be proactive, have a look at her suggestions below. 

  1. Review Facebook’s terms and policies thoroughly beforehand
  2. Keep a lookout for updates and amendments. We know, this list of “don’ts” seems to go on forever, but it is important to stay abreast of these guidelines. 
  3. Stoian recommends that you set up one ad and get it approved before duplicating it and running multiple at one time. This way, your ad money doesn’t go down the drain if your account is temporarily disabled for a minor infraction. 
  4. Stoian also recommends having multiple administrators for each back-up account. If one administrator is disabled, another may take his or her place. 
  5. Only set up accounts with payment information when you are ready to use them, and do not put payment information into accounts that you are not actively using. 
  6. Use Facebook Business Manager, not your personal ad account. This way, you can have separate ad accounts for each client or business. If something were to go wrong, all accounts would not be in jeopardy. 
  7. Keep a close eye on the comments. Not all negative comments come from “internet trolls.”  Negative comments can be indicators of a community guideline violation. This should be addressed promptly. What’s worse than being deactivated? Being deactivated and “cancelled.” 
  8. Do not schedule ads too frequently. We understand. You want repeat exposure to your ad. However, ads that are seen too frequently often get flagged. 
  9. Last but not least, Stoian recommends doing a final review of the ad copy, ad creative, and landing page prior to getting approved. 

Phew! 

If your ad account was deactivated, hopefully you now feel equipped with the information you need to hit the ground running again. We know, deactivation is scary and upsetting but with the tools listed above, there’s a chance this nightmare is soon to be over. 

In the spirit of spooky season, feel free to share you deactivation horror story below. We hope your story has a happy ending! 

Share this post with a friend, peer, or colleague and help them avoid this terror. 

Источник: https://www.kapokmarketing.com/why-your-facebook-ad-account-is-disabled-and-how-to-fix-it/

More than two billion people use Facebook to connect with their loved ones, friends, and colleagues, share details of their lives through photos and videos, do a livestream, find good deals, and even run businesses on it.

With all this data uploaded to the platform, Facebook has taken steps to protect it by increasing security measures and enforcing guidelines more strictly than before. Unfortunately, this has led to some users being locked out of their Facebook accounts, and they’re not sure how to unlock them to continue using or accessing the service.

However, what most people don’t know is that Facebook can disable or lock your account at any given time, restrict your activity even while logged in, or keep you from accessing your account altogether.

Why You’re Locked Out Of Your Facebook Account Is Locked

There are several reasons why you’re locked out of your Facebook account, which can be difficult and frustrating to undo.  These reasons can be categorized into user or system error, disregard for the Terms of Use and Community Standards, site maintenance, or security and include any of the following events:

  • You’re logged in on multiple devices, which signals to Facebook that your account may have been hacked.
  • Facebook may think that you’ve violated one or more of its rules.
  • You may have received a phishing message that misdirected you to a fake ‘Facebook’ website, and you logged in. When this happens, the cybercriminal may use your credentials to access your Facebook account, and Facebook detected and flagged the activity.
  • Someone reported your account as fake and requested for its removal, reported your content as abusive, or marked it as spam. Facebook automatically flags your account in such cases while investigating the reported content or account.
  • Violating the terms of use and Community Standards by using a fake name, posting content that violates these terms, impersonating someone else, or constantly violating the rules of the platform.
  • Your account appears to pose a security threat, which can range from general suspicious activity to promoting, illegal content, harassing other users, unsolicited contact, inappropriate or spam advertising and more.
  • Joining too many groups. Facebook limits users to a maximum of 200 groups, and if you go beyond that your account may be locked or disabled.
  • If you posted too many messages on someone’s wall or group, it may be considered spam, especially if posted within a very short time span.
  • If you’re under age and not part of a High School group.
  • You have sent out too many friend requests to others beyond the maximum limit of 5,000, though this is rare.
  • In some cases, malware, which prompts you to scan your computer, may signal to Facebook that your account has either been hacked or there’s some suspicious activity. Check out our guide on nine tips to use for better privacy on Facebook privacy.

How To Access a Locked Facebook Account

If you’re sure your Facebook account is clear of all the above reasons, and you think it has been locked or disabled by mistake, reach out to them directly so that your concerns are adequately addressed.

You can also complete and submit an online form and Facebook will investigate the issue. However, Facebook doesn’t guarantee that you’ll receive a quick response within a specific time, so you may have to wait for a response from them, which could take several weeks.

If you got locked out of your Facebook account because you forgot the email address or password you used when creating your account, you can recover or reset your account provided you have some information like your email or phone number.

If you prefer to reset your account, you’ll need to answer your security question that you picked when you created your account, which will prove to Facebook that you’re who you say you are.

Alternatively, you can pick a friend on Facebook that you trust and give them the nominated URL and retrieve a security code. Enter this code and once you’re done with any of these security checks, your account will still be visible but you’ll have to wait at least 24 hours before trying to access it again.

How Tto Avoid Your Facebook Account Getting Locked Again

We’ve looked at some of the major reasons why your Facebook account can be locked or disabled, but sometimes it may happen without warning so you won’t have control over it. Here are a few things you can do to avoid getting locked out from your account again:

  • Limit the number of friend requests you send out
  • Read and adhere to Facebook’s terms and conditions
  • Limit the number of posts you make within a short span
  • If you’re using Facebook for business marketing, add other social media platforms such as LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram and others to your marketing strategy, and build a fan base on them
  • Don’t click on links from emails that purport to be from Facebook as they may misdirect you to phishing sites and cybercriminals could easily hack your account with your credentials
  • Use a reputable antivirus or security software that can nuke any malware or virus

Get Your Social Life Back

Getting locked out of your Facebook account can be frustrating because you’ve probably shared a lot about your personal life, which you may not get back if you can access your account. We hope you now know how to gain back access to your account using the ways listed above, and keep yourself from getting shut out again. 

If you intend to leave Facebook altogether, we have a guide on how to download and delete your data from Facebook and permanently close your account by deleting your Facebook pages, groups, and accounts.

Источник: https://helpdeskgeek.com/help-desk/what-to-do-if-you-are-locked-out-of-your-facebook-account/

A Facebook user spent more than $400 on an Oculus VR headset and Portal tablet to get her account back after it got mistakenly deleted when she set up a QAnon support group

  • Facebook user Rachel Sines spent $400 on a headset and tablet to try and retrieve her account.
  • Facebook deleted her account after she made a group for people whose loved ones joined QAnon.
  • The company told Insider that it "incorrectly disabled" Sines' account.

Rachel Sines lost 15 years of memories when Facebook deleted her account for creating a support group with the word "QAnon" in the title.

After spending more than $400 on an Oculus VR headset and Portal tablet to speak to customer service, she was still locked out.

Sines tried to contact Facebook for seven months about her disabled account, but never got a response. She was only logged back in once Insider contacted Facebook for this article.

Sines, from Florida, told Insider she was setting up a support group in February for people like herself whose friends and family had turned to the right-wing conspiracy theory, QAnon.

When she hit "submit," she was locked out of her account. Facebook notified her that her account was disabled, she said.

"I lost 15 years of data in the blink of an eye... My dating journey, wedding, honeymoon, videos of our daughter's first steps and baptism," she said. "It was like I, and any trace of me, was eerily deleted."

Sines never heard from Facebook

Sines, 42, filed an appeal via Facebook's help center but received an automated message, seen by Insider, saying the company couldn't review its decision to disable her account as it didn't follow the site's Community Standards.

"I still submitted this form several times a day for weeks," she said.

She sent three emails to Facebook — one to appeals, one to the press department, and another to 10 Facebook email addresses — but got no response.

She forwarded Insider her emails to Facebook, Oculus, and Portal, as well as the receipts of her headset and Portal purchases.

Sines resorted to buying an Oculus VR headset for $318

Facebook users, like Sines, have bought Oculus headsets just to unlock their hacked or deleted Facebook accounts, NPR reported. Oculus, a virtual-reality company owned by Facebook, requires users to have a Facebook account to use the headset.

Sines' account started working when she received the headset, but it was disabled without warning soon afterwards, she said.

Sines contacted Oculus again about the issue, according to emails seen by Insider. An Oculus employee told her that the account was disabled due to "previous activity that violated Facebook's Community Standards."

"Unfortunately, we've already asked Facebook to review your account and they've decided that the status will remain," the Oculus employee told Sines in the email.

Sines also spent money on a Portal

The following day, she bought a $90 Portal, a video-calling tablet made by Facebook.

Insider viewed Sines' email to Portal's customer support team about help on retrieving her Facebook account to use the tablet. An employee replied, saying they were unable to assist and redirected her to Facebook's help center.

"I contacted a few attorneys but they really didn't want to touch it, well, because 'Facebook,'" she said.

In April, Sines returned the headset and Portal, she said.

Facebook restored her account seven months later

Two days after Insider contacted Facebook about Sines' situation, her account was reactivated. A Facebook spokesperson told Insider that Sines' account was "incorrectly disabled" and "the account was mistakenly caught in one of our checks" for misinformation and harmful content. 

"We do sometimes make mistakes when reviewing content," the spokesperson said.

Facebook says users should contact its help centre and fill in a form if they think their account was mistakenly deleted, the spokesperson added.

Although Sines is nervous that her account will get disabled again, she's happy to be back online.

"It was like losing a limb, I didn't realize how intertwined it had become in my life," she said.

Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-user-buys-oculus-headset-portal-deleted-account-mistake-2021-8

youtube video

Facebook Ad Account Ban (SOLUTION For Advertisers)

Why Your Facebook Ad Account is Disabled and How to Fix It

As we know, Facebook ads have completely changed the advertising game. They make it easier for small and large businesses alike to reach their targeted audiences in innovative and effective ways. The possibilities are endless. Unless, of course, your ad account gets disabled. If this has happened to you, not to worry! You’re not alone. We know firsthand how awful this experience can be. 

In this post, we will answer all of the questions you may have about Facebook ad account deactivation. If you’re in the clear, stick around to learn ways you can protect your account from being deactivated in the future. 

Why was your account deactivated?

Unfortunately, Facebook doesn’t always say exactly why your account has been disabled. If you get a message like this one, you will need to rereview their Advertising Policies. In this post, we explain the most common reasons for account disablement. 

The Most Common Reasons for Account Deactivation

Uh oh. So you’ve attempted to log in to your ad account and up pops the red box of death. It states that your account has been disabled for violating Facebook’s terms of use or advertising guidelines. You’re in complete shock and your first thought is obviously, “Why?!” 

There are many reasons an ad account can be disabled. Facebook lists these reasons on their ad policies page. The most common reasons include: 

Unsettled or Pending settlement 

You may not have violated any of Facebook’s community guidelines or terms of use. If this is the case, log in and check your account to see if all payments have been settled. Consider yourself lucky, because this is an easy fix. 

Make sure that your payment and billing information is up to date. For example, perhaps you received a new card from your bank. Make sure that the new card information has been updated on your account. Once the payment is settled, it shouldn’t take liberty bank phone number before your ads are up and running again. 

Branded Content 

Facebook defines branded content as “any post—including text, photos, videos, Instant Articles, links, 360 videos and Live videos—from media companies, celebrities or other influencers that features a third party product, brand or sponsor.” For example, a makeup brand may collaborate with a beauty influencer to promote a new eyeshadow palette. 

Facebook updated their branded content policy in 2016. It requires influencers and publishers to tag the company they are collaborating with on paid partnership and sponsorship posts. Make sure that, both,ads and organic posts tag the business partner. 

It’s important to Facebook that users know when they are viewing an ad. Customers don’t want to feel like they are being tricked into purchasing a product or guardian savings bank ft thomas. They will naturally be open to products introduced by their favorite influencers, as long as those individuals are trustworthy. 

Since the policy update, Facebook has created a tool for branded content. This feature allows publishers and influencers to officially tag a business partner. It also gives both parties access to insightful information, such as engagement, reach metrics, total spend, and CPM. 

“Paid sponsorship with [company name]” will now appear at the top of the post, under the influencer’s instagram account name. Benjamin Chacon’s article on branded content includes a step-by-step tutorial on how to tag and post branded content. 

Personal Attributes 

Facebook’s policy regarding personal attributes states: 

“Ads must not contain content that asserts or implies personal attributes. This includes direct or indirect assertions or implications about a person’s race, ethnic origin, religion, beliefs, age, sexual orientation or practices, gender identity, disability, medical condition (including physical or mental health), financial status, membership in a trade union, criminal record, or name.”

Whoa! We know, we know. That list is longer than an ten-foot anaconda. However, hopefully we can all agree, these terms are necessary. 

It’s so important jose luis baeza botello remain mindful of the way we word advertisements, so that they will not offend others. Focus on your unique selling proposition, and try to avoid questions that ask the viewer identifying questions. 

For example, “Gingivitis getting in the way of your relationship? Get help now,” is not permitted. It implies that you know that the viewer has gingivitis, which is too personal and invasive. Instead, try, “We have dental care plans for your every need. Click here for more info.” 

Sexually Suggestive Content

Yikes! Believe it or not, this is a topic that Facebook describes as a “common point of confusion.” Other platforms may give more leeway in this area, but Facebook has strict guidelines on what it deems acceptable in regards to explicit material or images. 

Adult content is facebook business account disabled permitted in Facebook advertisements. This includes, “nudity, depictions of people in explicit or suggestive positions, or activities that are overly suggestive or sexually provocative.” But perhaps you are in the business of selling undergarments, body wash, or art. You must still tread lightly. 

For example, images that focus on specific body parts, even if not “explicitly sexual in nature,” are not permitted. However, images of art, such as greek statues, are generally deemed acceptable. 

Facebook Brand Usage 

Facebook states, ads that link to Facebook or Instagram content (such as pages, groups, events, or sites that use Facebook Login), “may make limited reference to ‘Facebook’ or ‘Instagram’ in ad text for the purpose of clarifying the destination of the ad.” 

However, Facebook branding cannot be the most “distinctive or prominent part of the creative.” You may be thinking, “I’ll use the Facebook logo in my ad to grab the attention of viewers.” Perhaps it would make the ad seem more “official.” Sorry to burst your bubble, but using the Facebook logo in any way, shape, or form is strictly prohibited. 

What are other reasons for account deactivation? 

Violating Restricted Content Policies

For many of the topics below, your company will need to apply for written permission from Facebook. Others depend on the laws and jurisdictions in the area you are planning to advertise. Some require certifications, age requirements, and/or additional authorizations. For details regarding free atm near me for chime guidelines, visit Facebook’s restricted content page. 

Content that is permitted but restricted are as follows: 

  • Alcohol
  • Dating
  • Real Money Gambling
  • State Lotteries
  • Online Pharmacies
  • Promotion of Over-the-Counter Drugs
  • Financial and Insurance Products and Services
  • Branded Content 
  • Ads About Social Issues, Elections, or Politics
  • Cryptocurrency Products and Services 
  • Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treatment 
  • Weight Loss Products and Plans 

Posting Prohibited Content 

If you’ve read the violations above and are still scratching your head, review Facebook’s page on prohibited content. Posting anything on this list is a big no-no.

What can amazon seller contact number do? 

Submit an appeal

So, you’ve reviewed all the guidelines above, and you’re screaming, “I’m innocent, I tell you. Innocent!”  Fortunately, you have the option to submit an appeal. 

First, you must log in to your Facebook account. You will be prompted to enter your advertiser account identification number. Then, you will have the opportunity to state the issues you are experiencing and describe your recent account activity. 

We know, you’re probably in the heat of the moment trying to quickly resolve this injustice, but we agree with Jerry Banfield. Take the time to write an email that is honest, descriptive, and appreciative. 

Also, don’t forget to cite the exact Facebook policy or policies you think your ad(s) may have broken. Make sure to mention that you’ll fix the errors and do better in the future. Basically, be remorseful and ask for another chance.

Fortunately, for us, our account was accidentally deactivated. We found out after filing an appeal and explaining our situation in a logical and thoughtful manner. 

If your appeal is denied, there are still some things you can do. If your offense was minor, you may be able to create a new ad account. Don’t know where to start? Banfield has created an easy to follow, step-by-step guide on how to do this. 

One of the most important things to keep in mind is to keep trying. Even if you receive a denial from Facebook, try again, and again. 

Remember that your appeal may have been read by AI (artificial intelligence)/ a robot, which often produces a canned response. Even if the response is “final,” you can still keep asking. Obviously, there’s a limit. If you’ve received 10, 20 or 50 denials, it’s safe to assume that it’s a hard no.

This is a perfect example of why it’s important not to rely on a single platform for advertising. Be sure to diversify your marketing efforts across multiple channels. Similar to the Facebook and Instagram outage earlier this year, this experience is a reminder not to put all your eggs in one basket. 

Speak with a Facebook Marketing Expert 

If filing an appeal leads to a dead end, try contacting a Facebook Marketing Expert. Facebook Marketing Experts are Facebook employees who provide free consultations and make recommendations for ad optimization. 

First, you’ll need to find out if you are eligible for a consultation. Then you can schedule an appointment. 

Since appeals are most likely processed by AI, contacting a Facebook Marketing Expert will give you the opportunity to speak with a real person. During the call, you can ask for advice on future ad campaigns. Explain that your ad account has been deactivated and you’re seeking advice to avoid policy it comes at night 1080p in the future. 

Ask for his/her opinion on why your account was disabled. There’s a chance they will not be able to give you a definitive answer. But, there is a chance they will be able to view details on the back end, to give you an informed opinion. 

How long will it take? 

The appeal process could take anywhere between several hours to a couple weeks. To avoid this inconvenience, it’s best to prevent this predicament altogether. Read below to see how you can prevent the deactivation of your ad account.  

How can you avoid this?

If your account has not been disabled and you would like to avoid the horror stories you’ve heard from your colleagues, there are ways you can protect yourself. The last thing you want is to incur so many infractions that you are banned from Facebook advertising, forever. Gasp! 

Julie Stoian, CEO of Create Your Laptop Life, has great tips on how to protect your account from deactivation. If you sought out this article to be proactive, have a look at her suggestions below. 

  1. Review Facebook’s terms and policies thoroughly beforehand
  2. Keep a lookout for updates and amendments. We know, this list of “don’ts” seems to go on forever, but it is important to stay abreast of these guidelines. 
  3. Stoian recommends that you set up one ad and get it approved before duplicating it and running multiple at one time. This way, your ad money doesn’t go down the drain if your account is temporarily disabled for a minor infraction. 
  4. Stoian also recommends having multiple administrators for each back-up account. If one administrator is disabled, another may take his or her place. 
  5. Only set up accounts with payment information when you are ready to use them, and do not put payment information into accounts that you are not actively using. 
  6. Use Facebook Business Manager, not your personal ad account. This way, you can have separate ad accounts for each client or business. If something were to go wrong, all accounts would not be in jeopardy. 
  7. Keep a close eye on the comments. Not all negative comments come from “internet trolls.”  Negative comments can be indicators of a community guideline violation. This should be addressed promptly. What’s worse than being deactivated? Being deactivated and “cancelled.” 
  8. Do not schedule ads too frequently. We understand. You want repeat exposure to your ad. However, ads that are seen too frequently often get flagged. 
  9. Last but not least, Stoian recommends doing a final review of the ad copy, ad creative, and landing page prior to getting approved. 

Phew! 

If your ad account was deactivated, hopefully you now feel equipped with the information you need to hit the ground running again. We know, deactivation is scary and upsetting but with the tools listed above, there’s a chance this nightmare is soon to be over. 

In the spirit of spooky season, feel free to share you deactivation horror story below. We hope your story has a happy ending! 

Share this post with a friend, peer, or colleague and help them avoid this terror. 

Источник: https://www.kapokmarketing.com/why-your-facebook-ad-account-is-disabled-and-how-to-fix-it/

17 Types of Posts You Can No Longer Promote on Facebook

Facebook is cutting back on the types of ad formats your brand can promote. In an effort to make Facebook advertising more effective, the company announced on September 15th that it would be putting restrictions in place. These restrictions remove the ability for brands to take any post published on their Pages and pay Facebook to promote them by “boosting” them on their newsfeeds. Now, Facebook is being more specific about what those promoted posts include. In this article, we take a look at the ad formats that have been retired and what you can do moving forward.

Facebook is cutting back on the types of organic posts your brand can promote. Source: HubSpot

What is a boosted post?

A few years later “Promote Post” became “Boost Post” and was further refined. As Facebook’s organic reach has continued to decline over the past few years, many page owners are turning to “Boost Post” to get their messages in front of their audiences. There are two major options for boosting a post: driving website visits or driving engagement: reactions, comments, and shares.

Facebook Target Options:

  1. People who like your Page – Targets all of your existing fans
  2. People who like your Page and their friends – Targets all of your existing fans and their friends

Both ad groups can be optimized to target individuals by location. Or, you can choose to create a new audience based on location, age, sex, and interests.

There are two major options for boosting a post: driving website visits or driving engagement: reactions, comments, and shares.

Although you can choose specific interests to target with boosted posts, the targeting choices continue to be fairly limited. You can’t use Detailed Targeting to reach people who are interested in both Interest A and Interest B, and you can’t include or exclude your page fans or Custom Audiences from seeing your post.

What’s Going on at Facebook?

During the company’s recent earnings call, Facebook’s Chief Operating Officer, Sheryl Sandberg repeatedly emphasized these business results, and Facebook product manager Jyotika Prasad echoes this approach in an email statement to Marketing Land, stating: “We want businesses to utilize Facebook ad products that give them the best opportunity to achieve their business goals, and removing these inessential boosting options will reduce complexity and help them find the right products to get the best results.”

The September 15th deadline marks the demise of 17 types of posts, including:

  1. Boosting share of products from shops
  2. Page sharing a shop, then boosting the story
  3. Boosting a check-in on a map, at a restaurant, or in a city
  4. Boosting the share of a note
  5. Boosting the share of a poll
  6. Boosting place recommendations
  7. Boosting the share of cultural moments
  8. Boosting the share of comments
  9. Boosting change of a Profile picture
  10. Boosting a file upload or share
  11. Boosting a sports event
  12. Boosting of a video or image uploaded through the Facebook camera
  13. Boosting a post related to attending an event
  14. Boosting the share of a video playlist
  15. Boosting the status of watching a television show, movie, or other types of programming
  16. Sharing an already sponsored post that is an app posting to a Page’s timeline, then boosting that story
  17. Boosting a political endorsement

Any ads purchased before September 15ththat boost these types of posts will stop running after September 29th. A blog post announcing the change states,“Advertisers rarely promoted these post types, and when they did, results were not as strong as results with our more popular ad formats.”

What Can You Do Moving Forward?

If you’ve relied on some of these types of boosted posts in the past, it’s time to rethink your Facebook advertising strategy. And now you know what types of ads you can’t do, determine what will work for your business. You may choose to boost different types of posts, or you may decide to create optimized Facebook Ads targeted at the right audience. Optimized ads can help you spend your PPC budget wisely and earn a positive ROI. We’ll go through three examples of different types of Facebook ads that can help you be successful in promoting your brand.

Creating Successful Facebook Ads

First, let’s take a look at the four components of a successful Facebook ad.

1) It’s visually striking. Visual content is treated more favorably in the Facebook algorithm and is more likely to be shared and remembered than written content. Ensure your post (whether boosted or a unique Facebook Ad) contains images that will invite your audience to learn more.

2) It’s relevant to your audience. Relevancy is the most important element of Facebook advertising. If your ads aren’t relevant and valuable for your intended audience, you’re wasting your time, and you aren’t likely to see much success. When creating Facebook ads, you’ll receive a relevance score from Facebook. This score rates your ads in a similar way to Ad Rank in Google AdWords. The more relevant your destination page, copy and images are to your audience, the higher your score will be -- and the more favorably Facebook will treat your ads.

3) It reveals your USP. Your unique selling proposition isn’t only useful in marketing collateral. It can also be shortened and used in your advertising campaigns to quickly explain why your product is better than your competitors’. Make sure your value proposition chase bank atm locations chicago clear, compelling and comes off as believable.

4) It includes a clear CTA. A visually impressive ad is great, but without a call-to-action (CTA), your buyer won’t know what to do next. Your CTA should offer clear instructions on what you want to accomplish. For example, your CTA might be to visit your website, buy now, or download a piece of content.

3 Facebook Ad Examples by Type

You’re ready. You know what you can no longer post on Facebook and the four elements every great Facebook ad must have according to best practices. Here are three examples of the latter type of ads in action. (*Note usaa commercial insurance phone number there are several more types of Facebook ads, and this is a small sample of ads that have been proven to work.)

1) Facebook Video Ad

Video ads appear fairly large in the user’s News Feed and immediately attract the user’s attention. And with billions of videos being watched on Facebook daily, there’s reason to try this format for your brand if you haven’t already.

Here’s a great example from Kay Jewelers:

Here’s a great example from Kay Jewelers.

Why this works:

  • In 2016, 85% of videos on Facebook were viewed without sound. This ad allows the user to understand what’s going on quickly, without needing to turn up the volume.
  • This ad is set up to attract page likes. It has a clear CTA to “like” the brand’s page.
  • It connects with the user on an emotional level.

Creating Your Own Video Ad:

First, understand Facebook video ad requirements including length and video size. Create a video that displays your product or service in the shortest amount of time possible, and upload directly to the Facebook ads managerby following these instructions. If you are boosting your video post, simply publish as normal and hit “publish.”

2. The Local Ad

Local Ads work for businesses that facebook business account disabled to drive physical foot traffic to their location. Targeting local users can help you reach your goals, especially when you target within a specific mileage radius from your store. Create an event and run your ad a few days before to drive interest.

Create an event and run your ad a few days before to drive interest. Source: Facebook Business

Why This Works:

  • The CTA is clear. It gives the user an easy way to find local Ugg stores.
  • The copy is fun, “walk, skip or jump,” and includes a specific address.
  • The image is appropriate for the ad.

Creating Your Own Local Ad:

Choose your copy, images and CTA. CTA options include: “Like” page, get directions, call now, send message, learn more or save (location). Determine which type of CTA will help you best maximize your brand’s reach.

3. The Boosted Post

We’ve talked about the types of posts that can’t be boosted, but what does a great boosted post look like? The following boosted post from Bustle promotes one of its articles.

Bustle promotes one of its articles.

Why this works:

  • Most internet users are familiar with the Amazon Prime logo, but not in neon lights in a window display. By changing things up, the post catches the user’s eye for a longer period of time and makes him/her question what’s different.
  • People love Amazon (and buying on Amazon) which makes us curious to know which of its amazing products is considered “brilliant.”
  • There is a clear call-to-action to learn more by reading the article.

Social Media doesn’t have midfirst bank online sign in be difficult. Stay tuned here for more insights, and be sure to coldwell banker stonington ct our “5 Social Media Trends to Prepare You for 2018” blog to prepare yourself for next year’s biggest social media changes.

Источник: https://digitalmarketinginstitute.com/blog/17-types-of-posts-you-can-no-longer-promote-on-facebook
Shutterstock

Related: 12 Social Media Mistakes That Entrepreneurs Make

When things go wrong with your North texas orthopedics denton ads, it typically falls into two categories: disapproved ads or disabled account. If you’ve received an ad disapproval, it’s likely due to a violation, whereas a disabled account is due to repeated ad violations or highly negative feedback on your account.

Disapproved facebook business account disabled

There’s a difference between an ad that gets disapproved immediately versus one that is facebook business account disabled after running for a period of time. Common causes of ad disapproval are:

  • Use of flagged words, such as “this” because that word is often used as click bait. Excessive use of “you” or “your” may also cause disapproval.
  • Incessant amounts of markings, characters or using all capital letters.
  • An issue with your landing page. Redirects to another type of page, obtrusive pop-ups or income claims will get flagged.
  • Violating the personal attributes section of the ad policy.
  • Using Facebook’s trademark, logo, images or even just not capitalizing the word “Facebook.”

If your ads are disapproved after running for a period of time, it could be due to:

  • Frequency, or how long the ad has been running. If people see the same ad too often, they might report or hide it, which could encourage Facebook to shut it down.
  • Negative user feedback plus reporting makes Facebook look more closely at an ad, so don’t just set the ad and forget about it.
  • A Facebook ads rep is assigned to review your account and finds your ads in violation of a policy that “slipped through the cracks" when you first set it up.
  • Any changes or updates to Facebook's software can also trigger a sweep of disapproved ads, and in this case, it might be a mistake.

Related: 10 Laws of Social Media Marketing

Dig around and try a few things to remove the flag that caused the disapproval. Try the same ad from a different Facebook ad account and the same page, or a different ad with the same Facebook ad account and a different page. The reasoning behind this is to isolate the offending variable. It’s important to know if it’s the ad account, the Facebook business page hosting the ad, or the ad itself. If nothing seems to work, get in contact with a person at Facebook:

  1. At 9 a.m. EST on business days, go to Facebook Business Resources.
  2. Under the “Top Questions” heading you’ll see either the chat or email icon (available only during business hours).
  3. Chat with a support technician to see what the problem is. Be gracious to this person and show them that you’re willing (and trying) to comply with the rules.
  4. There is also an option to appeal via email, but I’ve always found the chat to be more efficient.

Be persistent. If you’ve tried to fix the ad and it is still being flagged, or if you have chatted with a support technician and didn’t like the answer, continue appealing. This facebook business account disabled could take several days or even a couple of weeks, but keep trying.

If this was your first time running a Facebook ad, once you’ve cleared the flags, I suggest running a few easy Facebook ads, such as “Like” and awareness ads, cash app debit card phone number boosting a Facebook Live video, just to get them approved and to familiarize yourself with the process. Typically, ads that don’t require the user to leave Facebook are approved more easily than those that send the user off Facebook. After the ads run for a few hours, you can turn them off. This is a way to “reset” the ad account so approvals start happening automatically.

Disabled accounts

If your personal adaccount is disabled, it can be dramatic lodging near custer state park south dakota professionally and personally. The first and best option is to use the chat appeal process I mentioned above. And don’t forget to keep trying, even if you get a no the first time. I had one student who had to try five times over the course of three weeks to get her account re-instated.

If none of that works, set up a new ad account using the following process:

  1. Finding a trusted friend, colleague or family member.
  2. Go to the person's house (so you’re on a different IP address).
  3. Have the person open up a brand new business manager account.
  4. Set up a new ad account in the business manager.
  5. Set up a new Facebook business page.
  6. Get a new type of payment, such as a new credit or debit card.
  7. Have them make you an admin on the new page and account so you have full administrative privileges.
  8. You might even need to run ads to landing pages that are on a different domain than you were previously.

Please note that you will no longer have a personal ad account, but a business manager account that’s “technically” owned by your trusted friend. There’s no way to recover a personal ad account unless you can get support to reinstate it, or set up a whole new personal Facebook profile, but this is against the terms of service agreement.

Related: 5 Social Media Rules Every Entrepreneur Should Know

If it wasn’t a personal ad account that got shut down, but a Business Manager ad account, ignore the steps above. You’ll simply need to create a new ad account in your business manager, a new Facebook page, and set up a new payment method. In some cases, you may not have to create a new Facebook page. That’s why the testing method I mentioned above is so handy.

This is a great time to note that it’s infinitely easier to get a new account set up when you start by using the business manager, rather than running ads from a personal ad account. If you’re a business owner, set up your business manager as soon as possible and stop using a personal ad account.

If you’re certain you didn’t break any rules, be kind and persistent. Very persistent, as it could take several days to get someone from the Facebook policy team to review your account. When you do get in touch with someone, if you’ve invested a good amount of money in Facebook ads, you like the platform and play by the rules, let that person you’re speaking with know that.

Finally -- and it goes without saying -- if you had your account disabled because you legitimately broke the rules, it’s time to review Facebook ad policy or find another way to advertise!

How to protect yourself

Whether you’ve had your hand slapped or not, here are some tips to keep you from having to deal with losing your account:

1. Test ads before making a million of them. Set one up and get it approved before you duplicate the ad sets and start running multiple ads at once.

2. Be very familiar with the policies:

3. Have multiple administrators on each account for back-up.

4. Don’t set up ad accounts with payment information until you’re ready to use them.

5. Only have payment information on the account you’re actively using.

6. Use the Business Manager and stop using your personal ad account.

7. Watch the comments on facebook business account disabled ads carefully and if you see negative feedback, address it promptly.

8. Don’t let the frequency get too high on the ad (meaning users are seeing the ad multiple times). This increases the risk of negative feedback.

9. Do a final sweep of the ad copy, ad creative and the landing page it goes to before you try to get it approved in the first place.

Spend time nurturing your page and your ad account. Don’t go for crazy and try to post risky ads. Ultimately, if your account is shut down, don’t dismay; it’s happened to many of us. Be persistent in finding frost bank online access solution to be back up and running as quickly as possible.

Julie Stoian

Written By

Julie Stoian

Julie Stoian is a digital marketing consultant, making her mark on the internet through her popular brand Create Your Laptop Life. Stoian has equipped thousands of up-and-coming business owners with the skills and strategies they need to create, build and grow profitable online businesses.

Источник: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/299011

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

You're reading Entrepreneur United States, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

As the owner of a small digital marketing agency and school, Facebook ads are a great fit for my business, my clients and my students. But, one of the biggest problems I see frequently is people dive into ads without understanding ad policy, and they end up with disapproved ads and disabled accounts.

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A Facebook user spent more than $400 on an Oculus VR headset and Portal tablet to get her account back after it got mistakenly deleted when she set up a QAnon support group

  • Facebook user Rachel Sines spent $400 on a headset and tablet to try and retrieve her account.
  • Facebook deleted her account after she made a group for people whose loved ones joined QAnon.
  • The company told Insider that it "incorrectly disabled" Sines' account.

Rachel Sines lost 15 years of memories when Facebook deleted her account for creating a support group with the word "QAnon" in the title.

After spending more than $400 on an Oculus VR headset and Portal tablet to speak to customer service, she was still locked out.

Sines tried to contact Facebook for seven months about her disabled account, but never got a response. She was only logged back in once Insider contacted Facebook for this article.

Sines, from Florida, told Insider she was setting up a support group in February for people like herself whose friends and family had turned to the right-wing conspiracy theory, QAnon.

When she hit "submit," she was locked out of her account. Facebook notified her that her account was disabled, she said.

"I lost 15 years of data in the blink of an eye. My dating journey, wedding, honeymoon, videos of our daughter's first steps and baptism," she said. "It was like I, and any trace of me, was eerily deleted."

Sines never heard from Facebook

Sines, 42, filed an appeal via Facebook's help center but received an automated message, seen by Insider, saying the company couldn't review its decision to disable her account as it didn't follow the site's Community Standards.

"I still submitted this form several times a day for weeks," she said.

She sent three emails to Facebook — one to appeals, one facebook business account disabled the press department, and another to 10 Facebook email addresses — but got no response.

She facebook business account disabled Insider her emails to Facebook, Oculus, and Portal, as well as the receipts of her headset and Portal purchases.

Sines resorted to buying an Oculus VR headset for $318

Facebook users, like Sines, have bought Oculus headsets just to unlock their hacked or deleted Facebook accounts, NPR reported. Oculus, a virtual-reality company owned by Facebook, requires users to have a Facebook account to use the headset.

Sines' account started working when she received the headset, but it was disabled without warning soon afterwards, she said.

Sines contacted Oculus again about the issue, according to emails seen by Insider. An Oculus employee told her that the account was disabled due to "previous activity that violated Facebook's Community Standards."

"Unfortunately, we've already asked Facebook to review your account and they've decided that the status will remain," the Oculus employee told Sines in the email.

Sines also spent money on a Portal

The following day, she bought a $90 Portal, a video-calling tablet made by Facebook.

Insider viewed Sines' email to Portal's customer support team about help on retrieving her Facebook account to use the tablet. An employee replied, saying they were unable to assist and redirected her to Facebook's help center.

"I contacted a few attorneys but they really didn't want to touch it, well, because 'Facebook,'" she said.

In April, Sines returned the headset and Portal, she said.

Facebook restored her account seven months later

Two days after Insider contacted Facebook about Sines' situation, her account was reactivated. A Facebook spokesperson told Insider that Sines' facebook business account disabled was "incorrectly disabled" and "the account was mistakenly caught in one of our checks" for misinformation and harmful content. 

"We do sometimes make mistakes when reviewing content," the spokesperson said.

Facebook facebook business account disabled users should contact its help centre and fill in a form if they think their account was mistakenly deleted, the spokesperson added.

Although Sines is nervous that her account will get disabled again, she's happy to be back online.

"It was like losing a limb, I didn't realize how intertwined it had become in my life," she said.

Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-user-buys-oculus-headset-portal-deleted-account-mistake-2021-8

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