john henry holliday

John Henry Holliday, DDS. Disgusted American. Reads. eugyppius. Paying subscriber. Glenn Greenwald. Paying subscriber. The Defeat Of COVID. Subscriber. Beautiful 'John Henry Holliday' Poster Print by Lowpolicious Art ✓ Printed on Metal ✓ Easy Magnet Mounting ✓ Worldwide Shipping. Buy online at DISPLATE. Among the twenty-six gentlemen upon whom the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred was one John Henry Holliday of Valdosta, Georgia.

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Faded-Kate-photoThe stormy relationship of Doc Holliday and Kate Elder is perhaps the most perplexing and frustrating dimension of John Henry Holliday’s tragic story. Despite popular images of a violent and abusive tryst and old-timer gossip about Kate’s proclivities for sex acts frowned upon even by her generation of Cyprian sisters, little exists to provide an “intimate” portrait of their life together.

Doc left not a word about her, and Kate’s accounts, given variously to Anton Mazzanovich, Joe Chisholm, and Dr. A.W. Bork in the 1930s, are all self-serving and defensive. Yet, understanding the Holliday-Elder relationship begins there, not because they are the best sources, but for now,  they are the only sources.

She was a widow living in the Arizona Pioneers Home in Prescott as Mary Katherine Cummings when she met Anton Mazzanovich, himself a pioneer Arizonan with experience as a writer. She introduced herself to him as “Mary Katherine Elder” from Illinois, when in fact she was Mary Katherine Harony of Davenport Iowa. Cautious and protective, she appears to have preferred to let her past go without a mention until the publication of Stuart N. Lake’s Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal in 1931. The image of “Big Nose Kate Fisher” as a troublesome and vindictive whore provided by Lake, angered her and, almost certainly, revived an ancient resentment against Wyatt Earp, whom she clearly blamed for destroying her relationship with Doc.

Just how Mazzanovich found her is not clear from the available sources—success in expunging her past from the public record was so complete—yet doubts that Mrs. Cummings was really Kate Elder appear to be misplaced. Kate’s recollections were confused by fading memory, calculated to portray her in the best possible light, and yet filled with information that only someone close to Doc Holliday could possibly have known. It is this internal webbing of intimate knowledge that provides the most convincing case that she was, in fact, Doc Holliday’s woman.

She was a woman with a story to tell and much to hide. The accounts she gave to Mazzanovich, Chisholm and Bork have to be sifted like river sand in a placer box to separate a great mass of debris from the nuggets of reality that do appear, and yet there is a sense in which the very composition of emotion, subterfuge, and even outright lies in what she said, reveal a fascinating set of insights into the nature of her relationship with Doc.

First, although she insisted that she was married to Doc, in one account in Saint Louis, Missouri in 1870 and in another in Valdosta, Georgia in 1876, her recollection is unemotional and almost detached insofar as her feelings for him are concerned. She defends him against charges that he was a killer and a drunkard, and she insists that he treated her well. She portrays herself as loyal and solicitous. But there is no romance in her story. Indeed, she reveals resentment toward Doc, accusing him of gambling away her money and implying Doc’s complicity in shady dealings with her accusations of Wyatt Earp’s involvement in stage robberies. She also finds Doc weak in not standing up to Wyatt.

This absence of any real sense of her affection for Doc is especially underscored by her fawning, romantic portrait of John Ringo. She fairly gushed over Ringo’s appearance and manly traits before concluding, “And he was noble, for he never fought anyone except face to face. Every time I think of him my eyes fill with tears.” There are no such terms of endearment over Doc anywhere in her recollections. Indeed, her description of Ringo is the only place in her writings where she evinces any emotion other than anger and resentment. It is almost as if her defense of Doc as a “good man” was essential to her own defense as a “good woman,” whereas her sentimentality toward Ringo revealed her simply as a woman without the guile so painfully apparent in her defense of Doc.

Second, Kate’s portrayal also provides some insight into the chronology of their relationship. Her knowledge of Doc and the accuracy of certain details, such as placing Doc’s practice in St. Louis on Fourth Street near the Comique Theatre and the Planters Hotel, make it almost certain that Kate and Doc first met in 1872 when she was working at the Comique as “Kate Fisher” and he was practicing temporarily at the office of his friend and classmate, A. Jameson Fuches, a few blocks away. Her knowledge of Doc’s inheritance, although confused in detail, is sufficient to demonstrate first hand information she could have acquired nowhere other than from Doc.

Despite some confusion about dates, she places them together next in Sweetwater in the Panhandle of Texas in the winter of 1875-76, at the time that Bat Masterson killed Corporal Melvin King. However, her lack of knowledge about Doc’s movements in 1876 (including her denial that he was in Denver) suggests that they were not together to stay at that point. Perhaps, she used Doc to justify her presence in Sweetwater where she may have gone as a dancehall girl after working at Tom Sherman’s place in Dodge City the previous summer.

She does appear to have linked up with Doc by 1877, probably at Fort Griffin, and to have enjoyed a reasonably constant relationship from that point through Doc’s peregrinations in Texas, his eventual move to Dodge City, Kansas, and his subsequent sojourn in New Mexico. Wyatt Earp’s arrival in Las Vegas, New Mexico, in the fall of 1879, appears to have ended the halcyon days of the relationship. In Arizona, Kate and Doc parted company in Gillette (she says over Doc’s decision to go to Tombstone) with Kate going to Globe and Doc first to Prescott, back to Las Vegas, possibly to Albuquerque, again to Prescott, and eventually to Tombstone.

The records of the time, as well as Kate’s own accounts, indicate that the two visited each other several times in 1881, with Kate going to Tombstone and Doc to Globe. She appears to have joined Doc for an attempted reunion early that year, for she is listed in the Tombstone Epitaph of March 21, 1881, as “Mrs. Kate Holliday,” indicating that they were living as husband and wife at the time. In early July, Kate, now curiously identified as “Kate Elder,” accused Doc of being a principal in the Benson stage robbery attempt which had occurred on March 15, 1881 and on July 5, Doc was indicted on the basis of her accusations. Kate later claimed it was a desperate move to break the hold of the Earps on Doc, but at the time, it appeared that it was merely the act of an “enraged and intoxicated woman.” Four days later, the charges were dropped, and Kate was hurried out of town with more reason to resent Wyatt Earp.

Doc visited her in Globe in October, returning with her to Tucson and eventually to Tombstone four days before the fateful confrontation on Fremont Street between the Earps and the Clanton-McLaury bunch. She later wrote touchingly of Doc’s determination that day and his emotional reaction to what happened, but when Doc was remanded to jail with Wyatt because of the shootings, she left Tombstone on money provided by John Ringo, according to her own account, which also rather pointedly notes that she needed help because “Doc had lost all my money, about $75.00, playing faro while we were at the Tucson Fiesta.”

No real evidence exists of contact between Doc and Kate between November, 1881, and the summer of 1887, when Doc apparently wrote her and asked her to come to Glenwood Springs, Colorado, to care for him in the last stages of his battle with tuberculosis. Kate went, whether out of love or loyalty or duty, and, to her credit, stood by him until the end.

The record does not support the characterization of Kate as “the nastiest whore in Kansas,” to borrow Dennis Quaid’s line as Doc Holliday in Kevin Costner’s Wyatt Earp. In fact, the only thing the record confirms for sure is that she was arrested in 1874 in Witchita for prostitution, and was a dancehall girl in Dodge City in 1875, which did not necessarily mean she was a whore. Other characterizations, both contemporary and modern, owe more to rumor and supposition than to hard fact. After she joined Doc in 1877, she does not appear ever to have worked as nymph du pave again, nor does the record provide any evidence of an abusive relationship.

What is suggested is an on again/off again relationship that most always ended in arguments. It is fair to conclude that the two needed one another until the Tombstone troubles divided them. They were both educated people and had a certain kinship in lives that had gone awry. Doc Holliday was no doubt spoiled and used to having his way, which was difficult for Kate, who was clearly a strong-willed and independent woman.

Kate’s bitter resentment toward Wyatt Earp in later years evinces more than anger over Stuart Lake’s portrayal of her. She saw Wyatt as the source of her estrangement from Doc, although Doc’s own loyalty to Wyatt and sense of honor were probably more to blame, with Kate’s affection for John Ringo possibly the final straw that drove them apart in Tombstone.

There is a hardness in Kate’s accounts that she cannot hide, and an element of deceitfulness, but there is not enough evidence to determine whether those were traits that were part of her makeup at the time she and Doc were together or attributes she acquired later. Perhaps even after all those years, she still harbored the anger of “a woman scorned.” Neither her contemporaries nor later writers have been kind to her. Joe Chisholm, who was rebuffed by her in his efforts to tell her story, characterized her in ugly terms in his Brewery Gulch, and that was the image that stuck.

In truth, there is too little hard evidence to know for certain what brought Doc Holliday and Kate Elder together or what drove them apart. There was an unmistakably strong attraction between them which caused them to find each other again and again. The story is all the more compelling because of the unanswered questions about them both. In the end, their relationship seems not so much a love story as a kind of mutual need that bred loyalty and respect, and gave a measure of comfort to both.

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Источник: https://truewestmagazine.com/mrs-john-holliday/
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Источник: https://bluegrasstoday.com/john-henry-holliday-from-flashback/

Doc Holliday

Doc Holliday was born John Henry Holliday in Griffin, Georgia on August 14, 1851. It's a little South of Atlanta. His ancestral roots were Scottish and English.

His mother was born Alice Jane McKey. His father was Henry Burroughs Holliday, who served in the military as a Major. First in the Mexican-American war, and then in the Confederate Army of the Civil War. They married on January 8, 1849, both natives of South Carolina.

The Mexican American War ended in 1848. When father Henry returned to Griffin after the war, he brought a war-orphan boy home with him. Named Francisco Hidalgo, he adopted as a son.

Doc Holliday, ca 1880Doc Holliday, ca 1880

This image of Doc Holliday is believed to be from around 1880.


Henry and Alice had their first-born child on December 3, 1849. A daughter named Martha Eleanora. She died when just over 6 months old.1

John Holliday's Early Years

Doc Holliday baptized at this Presbyterian ChurchWhere Doc Was Baptized

Soon after John Henry came into the family, he was baptized at the local First Presbyterian Church, on March 21, 1852.

He'd had a birth defect, a cleft palate. His parents obtained corrective surgery for him.4

John lived in Griffin with his adopted brother, Francisco. Plus three of his mother's siblings.3 When John Henry "Doc" Holliday was old enough, his father taught him to shoot and handle a gun. His mother taught him piano, and worked with him on speech and manners.4

In 1864 the family moved to Valdosta, Georgia. John spent adolescent school days there. Attending a private school, the Valdosta Institute. No longer there, a marker notes the historic interest.2 It's where he received classical education that stayed with him through life.

Yes - Doc Holliday Knew Latin

He studied French and Latin, also a bit of Greek. A course he enjoyed was Rhetoric. It involved advanced English language usage. It sure influenced the way he spoke throughout his life!

On September 16, 1866 his mother, Alice, died from tuberculosis (then known as consumption). We don't know what young John thought, when three months later his father remarried. A young woman from down the street, Rachel Martin, became his wife. She was much younger than Henry Holliday!3

Less than a year later, John was sent to North Georgia, spending a summer with relatives. Southern post-civil war reconstruction was ongoing at that time. Perhaps factoring into his visit.

Robert Kennedy Holliday was John's uncle in Jonesboro GA. His daughter, Doc's cousin Mattie, was about 1-1/2 years older than Doc. They hit it off well together. A lasting "kissing cousin" kind of friendship.3

Doc Holliday Dentist

In 1870 John "Doc" Holliday went to Philadelphia, enrolling in the Pennsylvania School of Dentistry. Entailing two years' coursework, plus dental labs and clinicals. His father paid his tuition and books. But he helped, working summer jobs in Valdosta.

He was 20 years old upon his education completion in March 1872. But he couldn't get his diploma for authorization as a dentist by his school, until age 21. So then ineligible for a Georgia dentist's license. 

His solution was collaboration with fellow graduate Auguste Jameson Fuches. They went to his hometown of St. Louis, Missouri, and practiced together there until John's birthday.3 

When he reached 21, John Henry returned to Georgia. He received his inheritance, through his mother's side. And gained a Dentist position in Atlanta, working alongside Doctor Arthur C. Ford. There, he roomed with his uncle, Doctor John Stiles Holliday.3

Doc Holliday Dental OfficeDoc Holliday Griffin Dental Office Property

His adopted brother Francisco had married, had six children. They lived East of Griffin, in Jenkinsburg. 

He'd contracted tuberculosis (TB). Francisco died January 13, 1873. Doc Holliday probably attended his funeral, as the next day he returned to Griffin completing a property sale.3

Nine months later, Doc was in Dallas Texas. Before that, many buzzes circulate of his activities:3

  1. He left the Atlanta practice, opening his own office in Griffin with inheritance funds
  2. His relationship with cousin Mattie was troublesome. She had affection for him. As a Catholic, she didn't want more involvement. They were too closely related. He tried overcoming her objections.
  3. His TB symptoms began. He'd had regular exposure to his mother and brother over time. John (Doc) Holliday contracted tuberculosis from one them. He was thinking about solutions.
  4. He had an incident requiring him to avoid the law. Local boys used a swimming hole on Holliday land along the Withlacoochee River. Doc chased some black kids from the river one day, firing a shotgun. Some say he killed two, wounded a few. Others say he shot over their heads. No charges were filed. The family asked him to leave town until the event memory faded.

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Doc Holliday Goes West

Doc Holliday & Partner DentistsAd in The Dallas Daily Herald - Satuday, October 4, 1873 - Page 4

In Dallas, John "Doc" Holliday began a dental practice. He moved here for the drier climate. His doctors advised that may ease his TB symptoms.

His father arranged a meeting with John A. Seeger, a local dentist. They partnered together, opening a practice on Elm.5 Together they won dental awards at the Dallas County Fair.6

On March 2, 1874 a Dallas newspaper reported the two dentists went their separate ways. Doc Holliday opened his own practice in an office over a bank in town. It didn't go well. His bedside manner suffered with continuous coughing spells. That lost him patients. He began losing interest in the practice which he couldn't maintain.

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Doc Holliday - Gambler & Gun-Fighter

The Old West Barrooms in Dallas attracted more and more of his attention. He enjoyed card games and was good at gambling. Alcohol eased the pain of his illness. That initiated his new lifestyle. He began relying on gambling for income.

He started promoting and embellishing tales of his own gun-play experiences. Establishing a virile reputation, needed since he appeared rather sickly.

Doc was arrested after a "minor" gunfight with a barkeep in a Dallas saloon. It wasn't long after this he left town. Some say after shooting and killing an important local. Next stop was West Texas.5

Doc Holliday arrested in DallasFrom The Dallas Weekly Herald - Saturday, January 2, 1875 Page 3

Doc's Wild West

In Fort Griffin Texas, Doc Holliday continued gambling. In June 1875 he found himself in court there. The Grand Jury indicted him for illegal gaming in a saloon. He paid a fine and moved on.7

His next destination was Denver Colorado by winter 1876. Along the way he stopped in Jacksboro TX. It's rumored his reputation here gave him the name: Deadly Dentist.5 In Denver more tall tales of his menacing ways developed. During the year, he also spent a little time in Cheyenne Wyoming, Dodge City, Deadwood and then Breckenridge Colorado.7

He returned to Fort Griffin in late 1877. It was a momentous trip.

He met two individuals who played a large part in his life. In John Shanssey’s saloon he met Mary Katherine Harony, well known as Big Nose Kate. Doc Holliday also first met Wyatt Earp there, beginning a life-long friendship. So did Wyatt Earp actually write about their friendship, publishing a book called "My Friend Doc Holliday by Wyatt Earp"?

After leaving Texas, Doc and Kate headed for Dodge City, Kansas.

Big Nose KateMary Katherine Harony at 40 Years Old

Dentistry in Dodge City

Big Nose Kate entered Dodge with Doc Holliday at the beginning of June 1878. Doc tried an honest living at his dental profession again. Renting an office at Dodge House, he'd often work an entire day. But his evenings at gambling.

Doc Holliday Dentist in Dodge CityFrom the Dodge City Times - Sat., June 8, 1878 - Page 3
Long Branch, Dodge CityFrom: Dodge City Times - Saturday, June 22, 1878 - Page 4

Wyatt Earp turned up in town. He and Doc renewed their friendship. Wyatt introduced him to brothers Morgan and Virgil. Wyatt found Doc useful in some of his activities.

In September that year, someone crept up behind Wyatt to shoot him in the back. Doc Holliday saw this, warning his friend, shooting Wyatt's assailant. He saved his life and Wyatt never forgot this!7 Wyatt would tell the story throughout his life.

Doc also met others there in Dodge City. Men who've made historical notoriety: Bat & Ed Masterson, Luke Short, Charlie Bassett, Dog Kelly (city mayor), Creek Johnson, Chalk Beeson (Long Branch Saloon co-owner) and entertainer Eddie Foy.7

IPA at Dodge City says ad in the 1800sDodge City Times - 1878 - Page 4

In November 1878, Doc Holliday left Dodge for dryer climes again. His health had taken a downturn with pneumonia. He traveled to recover in Trinidad, Colorado. Then went south, ending up in Las Vegas, New Mexico.7 


Doc Holliday Goes to Arizona

Doc began working with another dentist in Las Vegas NM. But regularly at his sideline: gaming tables. He partnered with former Dodge City deputy, John Joshua Webb, opening a saloon. That's when he heard of Tombstone Arizona's silver strike.

Stories of Doc Holliday in gunfights and killings surfaced during those years. Especially in New Mexico. Little truth of them can be confirmed.8 Probably it's bluster to maintain the Doc Holliday reputation.

But What Guns Did Doc Holliday Carry?

Because of his gambling "occupation" Doc wanted protection with him. As a child, his father trained him well in gun handling. But his disease sapped his strength. Doc chose weapons for practicality, with his health status in mind.

What he liked best were two double action Colt pistols, which worked well for him. Doc Holliday carried either the nickel-plated .41 caliber Thunderer, or else the .38 caliber Lightening.

Doc Holliday in Prescott AZ

Doc Holliday signed PortraitTaken in Prescott, AZ - 1879 - And Signed

About October 1879 Wyatt told Doc he was heading to Prescott AZ. Wyatt's brother Virgil Earp was there, but was going to Tombstone AZ for a lawman position. He and his brothers also had interest in silver mining there.

They left for Prescott in November. Doc started gambling there. He stayed, since his winnings were good and regular. He met John Behan and John Clum, while gaming. He'd meet up with them again later in Tombstone.

Kate and Doc lived in a Prescott hotel room together. Some arguments arose between them. She wasn't fond of Wyatt Earp, who was trying to convince Doc to come to Tombstone. Both Doc and Kate were intelligent, strong personalities, leading to clashes. Still their strong attraction kept them together. Doc finally decided to join Wyatt in Tombstone.

Kate refused to go with him. Instead she moved to Globe, Arizona.


Doc Holliday in Tombstone

Doc Holliday's Room in Tombstone AZRe-Creation of Doc's Room at Fly's Boarding House

Doc Holliday got to Tombstone AZ in September 1880. He took a room at Fly's Boarding House. Big Nose Kate joined him from time to time, staying awhile. Probably she was with him at Fly's three times when he lived in Tombstone. Each time they eventually got into a bad argument. He'd throw her out or she'd leave.7

While in Tombstone, Doc consistently gambled. He dealt the games and played. All along Doc was drinking (his favorite is said to be Old Overholt Whiskey). To ease TB's pain and coughing spasms. With consistent drinking, one gets tolerance for alcohol. Thus over time he could imbibe a quantity, without showing obvious effects.

Doc Holliday Faro TableSign on His Faro Table in The Bird Cage Theatre

His reputation began circulating in town. Locals frequenting saloons and gambling dens knew him. He interacted with ranch-hands and cow-boys coming into town. Local lawmen learned his name. He often gambled at the Oriental Saloon, at the Northeast corner of Allen and 5th Streets. The owner, Milton Joyce, wasn't fond of him, helping lead to an incident.

Lovin' Doc Holliday

Doc's Tombstone Troubles Begin

News reports Doc Holiday Accused of Stagecoach murderThe Weekly Arizona Miner - Fri. July 15, 1881 Page 3

On March 15, 1881, a Stagecoach robbery occurred north of Tombstone. Someone killed the shotgun rider and a passenger. The injured stage driver managed to shoot one of the culprits. Lawmen determined one of the bandits: a friend of Doc Holliday's.

Doc felt Oriental Owner, Milton Joyce was spreading rumors of his guilt around town. Holliday was drinking all day, and entered the Oriental. Arguing with Joyce, he got thrown out.

Doc got his gun, and returned. He unsteadily fired at Joyce, who pulled out his own pistol. Doc fired again, his bullet piercing Joyce's hand. The Oriental bartender tried grabbing Doc's gun, which fired into the barkeep's foot. Joyce retrieved his own gun, clunking Doc's head, knocking him out. A lawman entered ending the situation.5

Subsequently, Sheriff John Behan and Milton Joyce encountered Big Nose Kate drinking in a saloon. Grumbling about a recent argument with Doc Holliday: He'd told her to get out!

Behan and Joyce talked to her, bought her more drinks. In her drunken, angry state, she signed an affidavit stating Doc had been in on that stage robbery. A warrant for Doc's arrest was issued.

Big Nose Kate recovered from her alcohol binge. She remembered signing something bad about Doc Holliday. She heard plans to arrest Doc, and stood witness to manipulation by John Behan and Milton Joyce. With that and Doc Holliday's alibi, he was exonerated of the stage robbery. Doc was angry at Kate, what she'd done. He gave her money to take a stagecoach out of town.

Tensions Flare

Doc Holliday, a friend to Wyatt EarpControversy: Is It An Authentic Portrait?

Wyatt Earp still involved his good friend, Doc Holliday, in law enforcement and posse efforts. Whenever he needed extra men to help, he asked Doc. On August 13, 1881, Doc was probably with some Earp brothers on a Posse. It was formed by Marshal Crawley Dake to go after Cow-boy rustlers at the Mexican border. Clanton gang boss, Old Man Clanton, was killed during the posse's raid.

There's evidence that both Warren Earp and Doc were involved in that posse. Other Earp brothers conceivably were there. Doc seemed out commission awhile after that.5 Doc appeared around town again in October, using a cane.

Locals witnessed a clash between Holliday and Ike Clanton the evening of October 25th. They'd both been drinking all day. They ended up at the Alhambra Saloon, started insulting each other.7 Doc finally challenged Ike to try shooting him! Ike said he wasn't armed (as was the city law!). But Doc said Ike should go get a gun.5

Doc ended it by claiming he killed Ike's father, Old Man Clanton, blaming Ike. Threatening the same for Ike. Both left for the night. Ike to the Grand Hotel. Doc home to Fly's, to the comfort of Big Nose Kate.

The next day, October 26, 1881, Doc and Kate went out. Ike knocked at their door that morning looking for Doc. Mrs. Fly sent him off, since they weren't there. Later she informed Kate that Ike came by. When Doc found out, he stated "If God will let me live long enough, he will see me!"5

Doc heard about Ike roaming town that morning threatening the Earps. One of Ike's stops was Kelly's Wine House, boasting: "The Earps and Doc Holliday are about to be shot." Doc threatened Billy Clanton on the street: "Glad to meet you. Hope to kill you soon."7 

Doc Holliday in the OK Corral Gunfight

Doc went to Hafford's Saloon, meeting Virgil, Wyatt and Morgan Earp to discuss Ike.7 He realized there was more to it. The Clanton brothers were with the McLaury brothers. They'd been to Spangenberg's gun shop and then went to a lot off Fremont Street, next to the O.K. Corral.

Virgil said they must disarm these Cowboys. Wyatt turned to Doc, saying "Doc, this isn't your fight." Doc felt rather insulted, somewhat hurt that his good friend would say such a thing. He replied "That's a hell of a thing to say to me." Virgil Earp deputized Doc for this foray.7

Doc Holliday described at the O.K. Corral gunfight in the newsFrom the Arizona Weekly Citizen - Sunday October 30, 1881 Page 3

The four of them walked up 4th, turned the corner, walking West on Fremont Street. John Behan tried heading them off, saying he'd already disarmed those Cow-boys. Holliday and the Earps just brushed him aside.

When they got to the lot behind the O.K. Corral, they saw Ike & Billy Clanton, Frank & Tom McLaury, and Billy Claibourne. Claibourne ran off. Virgil requested their guns. His phrasing is conjectural. A few seconds later gunshots commenced. It's also unclear who shot first. 30 shots rang out in 30 seconds - that's how fast it went!

As the shooting started, Ike ran off. Both McLaury brothers were mortally wounded, dead within minutes. Billy Clanton was dead. Doc Holliday did lots of damage. He killed Tom McLaury, struck Frank McLaury with a slug, and probably hit Billy Clanton with a bullet. Doc Holliday himself was barely grazed.

For the Whole Gunfight at the O.K. Corral Story - Click Here

Tombstone Shooting's Aftermath

O.K. Corral Shootout ArrestsFrom the Tombstone Nugget - Mon., Oct. 30, 1881

Ike Clanton soon filed a complaint with the court. A warrant was issued to arrest Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday. The other Earps were seriously injured, and weren't then charged.

Witnesses presented testimony during November 1881. Judge Spicer gave his decision: "the defendants were fully justified in committing these homicides." It was needed in their job as deputies.5

Cowboys After the OK Corral GunfightArizona Weekly Citizen -Sun., Nov. 27, 1881 - Page 3, Heading: Tombstone Topics

Virgil Attacked - Arm Incapacitated

Ike and his fellow Cow-boys didn't take the judgment well. One response came the night of December 28th at Virgil Earp. Walking on Allen Street, near the Crystal Palace Saloon after leaving the Oriental. Bullets struck his left arm, side and back. He survived, but was handicapped thereafter. Frank Stilwell was named among the shooters, but got off with an alibi.

Ringo Confronts Doc

In mid January 1882, Johnny Ringo, friend of the Cow-boys, accosted Doc Holliday. Ringo was pretty drunk, and Doc wasn't that sober! Ringo challenged Doc to a shoot-out. Doc's good friend Wyatt was near-by. He interceded, along with Marshal James Flynn. The two were separated. That ended it for the time being.5

Morgan Earp Murdered

Morgan Earp Gravestone

Another retribution that shook Wyatt Earp to his soul happened March 18, 1882. Morgan Earp was killed, playing pool in Campbell & Hatch's on Allen Street. Doc found out, reacting with his heart and gut. He searched Tombstone, breaking down doors where he thought offenders may be.

A coroner's jury determined the murderers. Frank Stilwell, among those listed, even boasted of delivering the fatal shot.5 Wyatt Earp resolved to get justice for Morgan, in his own way. His friend Doc always supported him. Doc and Wyatt traveled by train escorting Virgil and Allie Earp to Tucson AZ. The couple caught the train to the Earp family home in Colton California, for Morgan's burial. 

Wyatt and Doc got off the train in Tucson, now March 20, 1882. Suddenly Frank Stilwell appeared, a chase ensued. Wyatt blasted off shots at Stillwell, killing him. Doc appeared, firing twice more at the dead Stillwell. A warrant named Doc and Wyatt in his death, plus others in their party that day.5

Wyatt Earp's Vendetta Posse

Wyatt aimed to get everyone behind the murder of his brother Morgan. His friends stood with him, including Doc Holliday. They formed a posse. Cochise County Sheriff John Behan had his warrants. So Behan tried to arrest Wyatt and Doc as they left town. But they refused to be detained.

A possee is forming it looks like here. Wyatt Earp's included Doc Holliday

On March 22, 1882 they rode into the Dragoon Mountains to locate Pete Spence. At Spence's camp was Florentino Cruz. As he ran from the posse, they shot him down.

Next they went to Iron Springs in the Whetstone Mountains. Nine Cow-boys were there waiting in ambush. Wyatt allegedly killed Curly Bill Brocius and Johnny Barnes. The others escaped. Curly Bill's body was never recovered.

Since John Behan didn't arrest Wyatt and Doc, he secured a posse to get it done. After Iron Springs, Wyatt's vendetta ride went Northwest to Henry Hooker's Sierra Bonita Ranch. That's Southwest of Safford, Arizona. Hooker gave them food and shelter. He protected them from Behan's posse when they followed.


Wyatt & Doc's Posse Leave Arizona

Silver City NM Old West era cabinSilver City NM Historic Area

About the first week of April 1882, Doc Holliday headed out of Arizona. Wyatt Earp's posse was along. They knew their best interests were to leave Arizona Territory.

They entered New Mexico Territory. Spending their first night in Silver City.

Then Deming and on to Albuquerque. Witnesses reported an argument between Wyatt and Doc Holliday at a restaurant there. Concerning Wyatt's relationship with Josephine Marcus. Doc made a racial slur about her Jewish heritage.5,7

They each went their separate ways. Wyatt went to Gunnison Colorado, while Doc Holliday went to Denver.7 In late May, Arizona put an extradition effort through to Colorado. Doc Holliday was arrested.

Doc Holliday arrested in Denver.Arizona Daily Star, Friday: May 19, 1882 - Page 4
Doc Holliday not returned to ArizonaColorado Denies Holliday Extradition Reported in Arizona Daily Star Friday: May 19, 1882 - Page 4

But Doc wasn't released back to Arizona for technical reasons. Therefore he wasn't extradited, and remained in Colorado.

Sheriff Paul and Doc Holliday in Tombstone AZHumorous News Report: Tombstone Epitaph, Sat., June 3, 1882 Pg. 2 - Commenting on Doc Holliday Not Extradited

Doc went to Gunnison the month after, meeting with Wyatt. Josie was there, too. Doc's health was now failing more. He was very thin, pretty weak, lacking energy. His cough was quite bad. Now, looking much older than his 31 years. Still he carried on, stopping in a few Southern Colorado towns. Finally ended up in Leadville at the end of 1882.


Doc Holliday in Leadville CO

Leadville Colorado 1880Leadville in 1880s

The elevation there wasn't good for his lungs. Tuberculosis had probably damaged half his lung tissue by now = useless for absorbing oxygen. Mucus from TB encouraged pneumonia. Plus clogged up decent lung area, further blocking oxygen absorption.

Plus remaining passable lung area was hampered in absorbing oxygen because of elevation. The air pressure there is lower. Good air pressure is needed to press oxygen molecules into the bloodstream for body usage.

So his brain wasn't getting needed oxygen. For all those reasons! That would affect his gambling skills. And it did.

He also self-medicated with drinking and regular laudanum doses. His thinking was fuzzy. His winnings were down. In fact, losses were so bad he started pawning jewelry he owned. And borrowing small amounts of money from various friends and enemies. And not quick to pay it back. That lead to another notorious life incident.9

Doc Holliday frequented Hyman's Saloon

His hang-out in Leadville was Hyman's Saloon.

Two old foes were in town. On edge, Doc heard they'd threatened him. Billy Allen demanding his $5 loan be repaid, or else! 

As Allen entered the saloon, Doc fired his gun. He hit him with his first shot, fired again and missed. Saloon patrons disarmed him.

Doc was arrested. A jury trial found him not guilty March 28, 1885: self defense. Part of his defense was his weak condition.5,9

Maybe You'd Like These Old West Memorabilia Collectibles... 


Doc Holliday: Dying Days & Death

Doc Holliday made his way to Glenwood Springs, Colorado in May 1887. Spring waters there were reputed to have healthful properties. Actually, with sulfurous odors, not really a good inhalant for tuberculin lungs! 

Doc took a room in Hotel Glenwood. It specialized in people visiting town for these local springs. In particular they went to the Yampah Hot Springs. A man he'd known from his past days in Tombstone, Charlie Smith, was in town at the time. It's from him we fortunately have a look at Doc's last days.

Glenwood Springs, Colorado

Origen Charles Smith's writings surfaced. They went through many narrow escapes! Descendants of a Smith associate preserved them through the years. A recent descendant, Clifton Brewer, collaborated with a descendant/relative of Doc Holliday. She's Karen Holliday Tanner. They presented a historical work of Smith's notes. She also authored an authoritative book on the life of John Henry Holliday.

Here are details of Doc's experiences, based on memorandums by Charlie Smith...10

Doc Holliday Historical Sign in Glenwood COHistorical Sign in Glenwood CO - With Info on Hotel Glenwood

Charlie had a room across the hall from Doc at the Hotel Glenwood. Mr. Smith kept journals, and wrote letters detailing the events. He said Doc took the narrow gauge railway from Leadville. It was a difficult for him. He continually coughed, constantly bringing up bloody mucus. He needed a cane to walk. His hair was silvery gray.

From the train station, he took the stagecoach, arriving at the Hotel Glenwood on May 24, 1887. At first he tried to earn cash by dealing Faro. But he couldn't do it. Big Nose Kate came to town to help take care of Doc. He contacted her in Globe, letting her know his plans as he left Leadville.

Doc Holliday's Last Words

By October Doc had another bout of pneumonia. He hadn't gotten out of bed, sat up, or spoken a word in many days. Any activity was just delirium. A doctor told Kate he'd done all he could do.

On November 8, 1887 Charlie Smith went to Doc's room. The bellhop let him know Doc had sat up that morning! The maid entered the room to find him that way. Was that an improvement?

When Charlie entered, Kate was there. So were a few friends, and his doctor. It was obvious to Charlie that the Doctor was telling Kate the end was near. Now Doc's breathing was very shallow. The Doctor gave him a shot of whiskey. Doc smiled at Kate. With his last breath Doc said "This is funny."

The Doctor recorded the time and date of Doc's death: Nine fifty-five, November 8, 1887. He was 36 years old.


In Memorium: The Doc Holliday Grave

Glenwood Springs CO gravesiteRIP Doc Holliday

Charlie Smith continued his notes. To include information on the funeral arrangements.10

They planned it quickly, 2 p.m. the same day. Held in Linwood Colorado. Reverend Rudolph performed the ceremony. Local friends donated his adorned coffin. Undertakers lifted his body and took it to the hearse. People on the streets offered condolences to Kate, as the hearse headed out.

He was buried in Linwood Cemetery. Some controversy exists about the exact grave-site. But there's evidence that it's probably right where the grave marker stands, or pretty close to it. 

Kate sent Doc's possessions to his family in Georgia. She returned to Globe Arizona the day after the funeral. Charlie Smith left Glenwood on November 10th.


Doc Holliday Legend Lives On

Doc Holliday remains a memorable name in the annals of the Old West. His name and life, short though it was, will continue to be of interest to many. How do we know?


References

1 "John Henry Holliday Family History". Kansas Heritage Group. Archived from the original on November 16, 2017. Retrieved January 4, 2018.

2 Siebert, D. (2018). Valdosta Institute. Digital Library of Georgia. Retrieved from Georgia Info, an Online Georgia Almanac on January 4, 2018.

3 Wilcox, V. (2001). Mischievous minor: From lad to Luger. True West: History of the American Frontier. Retrieved January 5, 2018 from https://truewestmagazine.com/mischievous-minor/

4 Doc Holliday Biography.com (April 27, 2017). The Biography.com website published by A&E Television Networks. Retrieved January 4, 2018 from https://www.biography.com/people/doc-holliday

5 Traywick, B. (October 1997). Doc Holliday. Wild West Magazine. Archived from the original on May 11, 2016. Retrieved January 4, 2018.

6 Ballard, S. (n.d.). Facts any good Doc Holliday aficionado should know (and probably doesn't). Tombstone Times. Retrieved January 4, 2018 from http://www.tombstonetimes.com/stories/facts.html

7 Gillen, P. (2017). I am John H. Holliday DDS: You may call me Doc. Bloomington IN: Authorhouse.

8 Traywick, B. (n.d.). The infamous Doc Holliday. The Tombstone News. Retrieved January 5, 2018 from http://thetombstonenews.com/the-infamous-doc-holliday-p1201-84.htm

9 Jay, R. (August 14, 2006). Spitting lead in Leadville: Doc Holliday's last stand. HistoryNet. Wild West Magazine. Retrieved January 6, 2018 from http://www.historynet.com/spitting-lead-in-leadville-doc-hollidays-last-stand.htm

10 Holliday Tanner, K. & Brewer, C. (November 1, 2001). Doc Holliday’s last days: The Origen Charles Smith memoir. True West Magazine. Retrieved January 6, 2018 from https://truewestmagazine.com/doc-hollidays-last-days/



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The Real Life of Doc Holliday – Wild West Legend that Continues to Fascinate

The names of the most famous legends of the Old West are known to most people. Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, Jesse James, and Doc Holliday have been written about numerous times, and, just as the story of George Washington’s run-in with a cherry tree, facts are sometimes clouded by legend.

Three very well researched books about Holliday, The Illustrated Life and Times of Doc Holliday, by Bob Boze Bell, Doc Holliday, A Family Portrait, by Karen Holliday Tanner (a cousin), and John Henry (The “Doc” Holliday Story), by Tombstone historian Ben T. Traywick, aim to correct the legends with actual documentation such as letters, census and church records, newspapers and court documents, and often the tools of genealogy.

Doc Holliday

Doc Holliday

On August 14, 1851, John Henry Holliday came into the world in Griffin, Georgia to Henry Burroughs Holliday and Alice McKey Holliday. The Hollidays were prominent in the town and very well liked.

His sister, Martha, passed away at six months of age in 1850. Holliday was born with a cleft palate which made nursing nearly impossible, and his mother fed him with an eyedropper and a spoon. He was operated on by his uncle, Doctor John Stiles Holliday. Alice spent years training him to speak properly with the help of her friends at the First Presbyterian Church in Griffin.

Griffin, Spalding County, Georgia. Photo by Michael Rivera CC BY SA 4.0

Griffin, Spalding County, Georgia. Photo by Michael Rivera CC BY SA 4.0

When the Civil War erupted, Doc’s father and uncles, while not supporting the split of the nation, supported their state’s vote to secede. Henry was appointed to serve as assistant quartermaster in the 27th Regiment of the Georgia Volunteer Infantry. Uncle John served as a surgeon in the Fayette Dragoons of the State Guards.

The homes of the Holliday’s served as storage for provisions and a makeshift hospital. At the end of the war, all of the hard work the men had put into securing financial stability for the families was for nothing.

Doc Holliday in Prescott, AZ

Doc Holliday in Prescott, AZ

Southern money was worthless, and property in the area had been destroyed or stolen. Father Henry and Uncle John were able to steadily recoup their losses, but another uncle, Robert Holliday, lost his home and his business and was never able to recover. The tough period took a toll on young Doc’s life. Alice passed away of consumption (tuberculosis) in 1866 when Doc was 15, and it is believed that he might have contracted it by his mother. His father remarried about three months later to a woman half his age and Doc never forgave him.

Doc Holliday

Doc Holliday

He went to live with Uncle John and began learning dentistry soon after. He graduated from the Pennsylvania College for Dentistry in March of 1872.

By 1873 Doc’ s health had begun to fail so he set out for a drier climate in Texas. He partnered with Dr. John Seegar, but, after a while, the coughs that wracked his body made him unable to work on patients. Instead, Doc sought the life of a gambling man. He had learned card games from his nanny and was proficient enough to earn a living.

This is the current headstone for Doc Holliday. As the records of exactly where his body is located within the cemetery were lost, the City of Glenwood erected a headstone that turned out to have the wrong date on it. It was replaced with this more accurate monument.

This is the current headstone for Doc Holliday. As the records of exactly where his body is located within the cemetery were lost, the City of Glenwood erected a headstone that turned out to have the wrong date on it. It was replaced with this more accurate monument.

The first erroneous facts about Doc are many of the pictures that have been made public. The majority of pictures show a dark-haired man with a bushy dark mustache. In fact, Doc was a blue-eyed blonde.

Virgil Earp’s wife and Wyatt Earp both described him as fair-haired with Wyatt commenting on him as “long, lean, and ash blonde” according to the Tombstone Times. Why he is often represented with dark hair is unknown.

Wyatt Earp 1870s

Wyatt Earp 1870s

The life of a gambler was somewhat nomadic. Doc moved around quite a bit and made some enemies because of his no-nonsense personality. At times he was in and out of jail and a famous female companion of his, known as Big Nose Kate, was involved with busting him out on one occasion.

Although legend says he left a trail of bodies behind him, there are no records of anyone done away with by Doc other than Tom McLaury during the infamous O.K. Corral fight and possibly Newman Clanton when riding with Wyatt Earp’s Federal Marshals to apprehend cattle rustlers. Wyatt and Doc had become famous pals with each of them getting involved in the struggles of the other.

Related Video: Great Cowboy Slang we should all be using

https://youtu.be/mB0rYuoVZ_c

He was also involved in several scuffles in Dodge City, but no records, including local newspapers, speak of anyone losing their life at his hand. Each time he was brought up on charges, he was acquitted for self-defense.

Third St. in Tombstone, Arizona in 1909 from the roof of the Cochise County Courthouse. The O.K. Corral was located on Allen St., the first right turn off Third St. The white building at the center right is Schiefflin Hall on Fremont St.

Third St. in Tombstone, Arizona in 1909 from the roof of the Cochise County Courthouse. The O.K. Corral was located on Allen St., the first right turn off Third St. The white building at the center right is Schiefflin Hall on Fremont St.

Doc traveled to areas in Colorado with hot springs and sulfur vapors in hopes of finding a cure for consumption, but he passed away in his hotel room at the Hotel Glenwood in Glenwood Springs, Colorado on November 8, 1887.

Read another story from us: Where cowboys went to party – 25 Photos of Old West saloons

Whether or not they thought they were helping Doc is unknown, but his close friends, Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson, both repeated exaggerated tales to reporters and potential authors who had no trouble adding to the stories to make their writing more sensational. Because of his unearned bad reputation, the family in Georgia disowned Doc. Only this generation has had the desire to look past the wild tales and exaggerations to discover the real truth about John Henry Holliday, D.D.S.

Источник: https://www.thevintagenews.com/2019/02/28/doc-holliday-old-west/

Details about  They Call Me Doc: The Story Behind the Legend of John Henry Holliday (Paperback

Product InformationJohn Henry 'Doc' Holliday was a man of education and refinement who went west after contracting tuberculosis both hoping to find a cure in the prairie air and perhaps escaping his stolid homelife for the more adventurous frontier.
Product IdentifiersPublisher Globe Pequot Press, T.H.E.ISBN-10 076276046xISBN-13 9780762760466eBay Product ID (ePID) 23038832413
Product Key FeaturesBook Title They Call ME Doc : the Story Behind the Legend of John Henry HollidayAuthor D. J. HerdaFormat Trade PaperbackLanguage EnglishTopic Folklore & Mythology, General, Criminals & Outlaws, HistoricalPublication Year 2010Genre Biography & Autobiography, Social ScienceNumber of Pages 214 Pages
DimensionsItem Length 9in.Item Width 6in.Item Weight 0.7 Oz
Additional Product FeaturesLc Classification Number F594Copyright Date 2010Target Audience TradeDewey Decimal 978.02092Dewey Edition 22Illustrated Yes
Источник: https://www.ebay.com/itm/They-Call-Me-Doc-The-Story-Behind-the-Legend-of-John-Henry-Holliday-Paperback-/362619004518

An Old West mystery still piques curiosity. The story behind the firearm given to Doc Holliday by his girlfriend as a love token continues to drive visitors see it for themselves and ponder what happened on the day the famed gunslinger died in Glenwood Springs.

Glenwood Springs, Colo. (Sept. 20, 2018)

— On Nov. 8, 1887, John Henry “Doc” Holliday died of tuberculosis in a rented room at the Hotel Glenwood in Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The fact is, despite his fame and notoriety, the gambler, gunfighter, dentist and friend of Wyatt Earp left this earth destitute. However, legend tells us that Doc did have one possession dear to him at the time of his passing that turned out to be quite valuable: an 1866 Remington derringer pistol with an inscription reading To Doc from Kate.

It’s this artifact from the past that keeps visitors coming to the Doc Holliday Museum—a stand-alone museum dedicated to Doc’s life and the times in which he lived. The museum, run by the Glenwood Springs Historical Society, is located on the lower level of the Bullocks Western Store at Eighth St. and Grand Ave. Coincidentally, it also happens to be the location of the Hotel Glenwood—where Doc died. In 1945, the Hotel Glenwood burned to the ground.

Doc’s derringer is the centerpiece exhibit of the museum. Even though the weapon is enshrined in a well-lit plexiglass case, museum-goers can still get an up-close look at the ornate inscription. It’s well known that Holliday had a relationship with Mary Katherine Horony-Cummings, better known as “Big Nose Kate,” a prostitute of Hungarian decent. According to the lore, Kate gave the gun to Holliday as a gift, probably around 1881 in 162 m limitation and stock options, Arizona.

“People are fascinated by Doc Holliday largely because of his association with Wyatt Earp and his role in the shoot-out at the OK Corral,” Executive Director of the Glenwood Springs Historical Society and the Frontier Museum Bill Kight said. “But he also had a life beyond that infamous event that defined him. It seems he had a girlfriend for whom he cared. This gun which she purportedly gave him is a token of that affection, or at least we like to think it is.”

Kight hedges a bit because shortly after the museum purchased the gun for $84,000, its provenance came under scrutiny. Some stories indicate that after Doc’s death, the derringer was taken by William G. Wells, the bartender at the Hotel Glenwood, as partial payment to cover the gambler’s funeral expenses. It remained in the Wells family until 1968 when Utah gun dealer E. Dixon Larson purchased it. It wasn’t until after the museum sealed the deal on the purchase that it learned Larson was of questionable character—a man known for his passionate pursuit for acquiring celebrity Wild West firearms. Some speculate that “Dix,” now deceased, was not above forging documents and embellishing historical john henry holliday. After Larson, the gun was bought in the 1980s by a Tennessee lawyer, then by Jason Brierly of Vancouver, Canada, who sold it to the Glenwood Springs Historical Society.

Whatever the truth may be, it’s a mystery that only adds to the mystique of Doc Holliday—and drives visitors to schedule a stop at the eponymous museum. In addition to seeing the small, pearl-handled pistol up close, Doc Holliday groupies can also make a pilgrimage to his memorial marker in Linwood Cemetery which overlooks Glenwood Springs. Near the end of his life, in ill health and unable to earn a living dealing faro at the local gambling halls, Holliday was bed-ridden. As he lay dying he is reported to have asked for a shot of whiskey. The story is that Doc fully expected to die in gunfight, but upon finding himself at death’s door in a bed instead, he appreciated the irony of his situation and uttered his last words: “This is funny.”

Though Doc’s memorial marker is a place for visitors to pay their respects, Holliday was actually buried in the cemetery’s Potter’s Field and no one knows the exact whereabouts of his final resting place. It is yet another unsolved mystery Doc Holliday left behind and one that, like the derringer, keeps Glenwood Springs visitors enthralled with this bit of Old West history in Glenwood Springs, Colorado.

Find out more about Doc Holliday, the Glenwood Springs Historical Museum and more at visitglenwood.com.


About Glenwood Springs

For more information and to plan a visit please see visitglenwood.com. Glenwood Springs is located between Aspen and Vail, Colorado, 160 miles (257 kilometers) west of Denver or 90 miles (145 kilometers) east of Grand Junction on Interstate 70 off Exit 116. An online Media Room is available at visitglenwood.com/media. B-roll video footage is available upon request.

Media Contacts:

Lisa Langer, Director of Tourism Promotion

Glenwood Springs Chamber Resort Association

970-230-9035

Lisa’s email

or

Patsy Popejoy, Communications Director

Resort Trends, Inc. – tourism communications

317-509-7384

Patsy’s email

Источник: https://visitglenwood.com/blog/2018/09/a-glenwood-springs-unsolved-mystery-derringer-continues-to-attract-doc-holliday-history-buffs/

Facts any good Doc Holliday aficionado should know

Doc Holliday

"A shiftless, bagged-legged character - a killer and professional cut-throat and not a wit too refined to rob stages or even steal sheep." The Las Vegas Optic.

"Without question a stone killer, an alcoholic and a whoremonger. He was known to cheat at cards." Doc O'Meara, Guns of the Gunfighters, Krause Publications, 2003.

"Few men of his character had more friends or stronger champions." Denver Republican, November 10th, 1887.

"He was a dentist whom necessity had made a gambler; a gentleman whom disease had made a vagabond; a philosopher whom life had made a caustic wit." Wyatt Earp as told to Stuart N. Lake, Wyatt Earp, Frontier Marshal, copyright 1931.

"Doc had but three redeeming traits. One was his courage; he was afraid of nothing on Earth. The second was the one commendable principal in his code of life, sterling loyalty to friends. The third was his affection for Wyatt Earp." Bat Masterson, Wyatt Earp, Frontier Marshal, copyright 1931, Stuart N. Lake.

What hasn't been said about John Henry "Doc" Holliday? Depending on your point of view, whether you see the man as unjustly maligned or just getting his comeuppance, either too much or not enough. Was he good, bad or perhaps something in between, something more human? Let's take a look and hopefully along the way set the record just a bit straighter.

John Henry Holliday was born in Griffin, Georgia to Henry Burroughs Holliday and Alice McKey Holliday. Even Doc's best friend, Wyatt Earp, got Holliday's state of birth wrong. In a eulogy written in 1896 Wyatt states, "He was a Virginian, but preferred to be a frontiersman and a vagabond."

Holliday was born August 14th, 1851, not 1852 as was credited on an erroneous tombstone which rested in the Linwood Cemetery, Glenwood Springs, Colorado for many years. That stone was replaced on October 17th, 2004 by a monument more suited to the era in which Doc lived and died and which, thankfully, corrects the error of his birth date.

John Henry was born with a serious birth defect, a cleft palate. His mother, Alice, using a spoon, an eye-dropper and a small cup fed farmers state bank west bend iowa newly born child who could not nurse due to the nature of his defect.

Doc's uncle, Doctor John Stiles Holliday, operated on the infant and repaired the cleft palate. In his honor the baby was named John with his father's name, Henry, secondary.

In all probability, John Henry retained a slight speech impediment due to the cleft palate.

Doc was the second child born to Henry Burroughs Holliday and Alice McKey Holliday. His only sibling, a sister named Martha Eleanora Holliday, was born December 3rd, 1849 and died a scant six months later.

As mentioned, Doc's sister died as an infant. Therefore any mention of Holliday leaving his pistols to a nephew upon his death, a story repeated many times in print, is totally erroneous.

Doc's mother, Alice McKey Holliday, died of consumption when John Henry was 15 years old. Sadly, in all likelihood he contracted the fatal disease from her.

Doc's father, Henry Burroughs Holliday, served in the George Volunteer Infantry as assistant quartermaster of the Twenty-seventh Regiment during the War Between the States, attaining the rank of major.

Reports that a youthful John Henry killed anywhere from one to six black children he caught frolicking in the family swimming hole in Georgia is without merit. He did, however, shoot over john henry holliday boys' heads. Through the years this relatively minor incident has been blown way out of proportion.

Sophie Walton, a young mulatto woman, a retainer in the household of John Stiles Holliday, taught Doc how to play cards. Among the games Sophie taught to John Henry and his cousins was "Skinning," the original rules of which were adapted from faro! It seems young John Henry was quite adept at this - a portent of things to come?

Doc was a dentist, not a physician as portrayed in more than one Hollywood film. Even John Ford, whose advisor on the director's celluloid version of the Tombstone gunfight, "My Darling Clementine" was none other than Stuart N. Lake, Wyatt Earp's biographer, chose to ignore the facts. Ford's Doc Holliday is a surgeon, from Boston no less, who dies at the end of the gunfight.

Doc graduated from the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery on March 1st, 1872, not the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, an error mistakenly repeated by many authors. John H. Holliday's thesis was titled "Diseases of the Teeth."

Doc's cousin, Martha Anne "Mattie" Holliday, who in later life joined the Order of the Sisters of Mercy to become Sister Mary Melanie, was said to be the model for the saintly Miss Melanie in "Gone With the Wind." This is certainly not as far-fetched as it sounds. Philip Fitzgerald, the uncle-in-law of Robert Kennedy Holliday (one of Doc's uncles) was the great-grandfather of "Gone With the Wind" author Margaret Mitchell, but wait - it gets better. Of the eight children born to Robert Kennedy Holliday and his wife was one Martha Anne "Mattie" Holliday, Sister Mary Melanie.

Doc, like most of his male Holliday cousins, stood nearly 6 feet tall.

Doc was fair-haired, a platinum blond so said Virgil's wife, Allie, upon meeting him for the first time, not dark-haired as most surviving and probably doctored photos show. Wyatt described him as "long, lean and ash blond."

Doc's weapon of choice early in his western career was an 1851 Colt Navy revolver given him by his uncle, one of four. The remaining three pistols were given by Uncle John to his own sons. Later Doc carried a nickel-plated .41 caliber Colt Thunderer or the .38 caliber Colt Lightening, both double action pistols. Never was Holliday's weapon of choice a shotgun, let alone the .10 gauge Meteor "whipit" (a double-barreled shotgun cut down to a mere 20") with which he was often credited. He used a shotgun at the Tombstone gunfight because Virgil handed it to him. Being slightly built and not in robust health, the idea of Holliday's weapon of choice being a shotgun with its wicked kick is ludicrous. In Stuart Lake's Wyatt Earp, Frontier Marshal, Wyatt states, "Doc Holliday never carried a sawed-off shotgun into a fight but once in his life and upon this one occasion (the Tombstone gunfight) he threw the gun down in disgust after firing one shot and jerked the nickel-plated Colt's which was for years his favorite weapon."

Doc was an award-winning dentist. Exhibits John Henry prepared for dental school were entered at the Annual Fair of the North Texas Agricultural, Mechanical, and Blood Stock Association at the Dallas County Fair by Holliday and his dental partner Doctor John A. Seegar. Holliday took all three awards - "best set of teeth in gold," "the best in Vulcanized rubber" and "the best set of artificial teeth and dental ware." The prizes, a plate and five dollars for each display, were quite a tidy stipend for 1873.

While on the trail of outlaw Dave Rudabaugh, Wyatt Earp crossed Doc's path for the first time in Fort Griffin, Texas in 1877. Upon visiting an old acquaintance of his, saloon owner John Shanssey, Wyatt is introduced to Doc Holliday. The rest, as they say, is history.

It is also in Fort Griffin that Doc meets the only woman who will feature prominently in his life from imperfect foods point on, Mary Katherine Harony (or Haroney), aka Big Nose Kate, aka Kate Fisher, aka Kate Elder, aka Kate Holliday. The couple remains together, off and on, until Doc's death ten year later.

Doc did not engage in violent behavior against his live-in love, Kate. This supposed truth was promulgated by an author, he who shall not be named, whose works were published under the guise of being non-fiction; it turns out this was a hoax. However, much of this fiction lives on, unfortunately for Doc's reputation.

Big Nose Kate was well-educated and came from a fine Hungarian family; her father was a physician. Doc must have found her to be as pleasant a surprise in the often john henry holliday surroundings he was forced to endure as she did him.

Although Kate stated on more than one occasion that she and Doc were legally married, no license exists.

A photograph showing a heavy set, coarse-featured woman with wavy hair is often ascribed to as being the likeness of Big Nose Kate. It is not Kate Elder, but a prostitute known as Nosey Kate.

Doc actively practiced dentistry in Dodge City taking out this ad in the local newspaper. "J.H. Holliday, Dentist, very respectfully offers his professional services to the citizens of Dodge City and surrounding country during the summer. Office at room No. 24, Dodge House. Where satisfaction is not given money will be refunded."

Doc was not the prolific killer myth has alleged. Proof points to the fact he killed only one man for sure, Tom McLaury at the Tombstone gunfight near the O.K. Corral. However, by his own admission to Ike Clanton, whether the truth or just a ploy to goad Ike to action, Doc also killed Newman Haynes "Old Man" Clanton while a member of Wyatt Earp's federal posse in Guadalupe Canyon in August of 1881 while in pursuit of cattle rustlers.

When confronted by Frank McLaury at the gunfight Doc's reply to McLaury's challenge, "I've got you now," really was "Blaze away! You're a daisy if you have!"

Doc was wounded by Frank McLaury. Years later Wyatt gave this account of the matter. "Morgan wheeled around and in doing so fell on his side. While in that position he caught sight of Doc Holliday and Frank McLaury aiming at each other. With a quick drop he shot McLaury in the head. At the same instant McLaury's gun flashed and Doc Holliday was shot in the hip." Fortunately for Doc, the wound is a superficial graze.

Doc spent two plus weeks in a Tombstone jail in the company of Wyatt while both awaited a hearing pertaining to the October 26th, 1881 gunfight. They, as well as Virgil and Morgan Earp, were acquitted. According to the statement of presiding Justice of the Peace, Wells Spicer," I cannot resist the conclusion that the defendants were fully justified in committing these homicides, that it is a necessary act done in the discharge of official duty."

Doc Holliday's last shootout occurred in Leadville, Colorado on August 19th, 1884 when Doc shoots Billy Allen in Manny Hyman's saloon, wounding Allen. Doc, having fallen on hard times, had borrowed five dollars from Allen. Allen then threatened the physically frail Holliday with a severe beating, at john henry holliday very least, if the fiver wasn't paid back by the 19th. Due to corroborating witnesses and Doc's own impassioned plea, "I knew that I would be as a child in his hands if he got hold of me; I weight 122 pounds; I think Allen weights 170. I have had pneumonia three or four times; I don't think I was able to protect myself against him," the final verdict was "not guilty."

Doc arrived in Glenwood Springs, Colorado via stagecoach in May of 1887, not by train as is often alleged. The Denver and Rio Grande pulled into Glenwood Springs for the first time on October 5th, 1887.

On November 8th, 1887, John Henry "Doc" Holliday, D.D.S. died in The Hotel Glenwood, in Glenwood Springs, Colorado. He did not die in a sanitarium. Doc was just barely into his 36th year, but lived an amazing 14 years after being diagnosed with consumption. For a man who many claimed had a "death wish," Doc's ability to cling to life with a tenacity second to none puts those claimants to shame.

Among the many books available to those interested in reading more about John Henry "Doc" Holliday, these are three of the best.

The Illustrated Life and Times of Doc Holliday by Bob Boze Bell is a witty, slightly irreverent chronology of John Henry Holliday's life from birth to death and beyond. Illustrated beautifully throughout with BBB's original artwork, this book also boasts excellent photographs, maps and sketches. Sprinkled among the pages are a host of highly entertaining topics such as "There's Nothing New Under the Sun," "How to Play Doc's Favorite Game" and "Was Doc Holliday a Lousy Shot?" Although, at first glance, The Illustrated Life and Times of Doc Holliday might appear as eye candy, (which it most assuredly is with its wonderfully colorful Bell illustrations) it also contains a wealth of well-researched, accurate information in an easy to follow format. For the Doc Holliday buff or just the casual reader of history, this book is definitely a "daisy!" Pick one up today!

Doc Holliday, A Family Portrait by Karen Holliday Tanner is an in depth look at John Henry Holliday as seen through the eyes of his family, past and present. Packed with information and rare photographs, A Family Portrait manages to entertain as well as inform. Especially interesting is the section on Holliday genealogy. A Family Portrait is a must have addition to any "Doc" library.

John Henry (The "Doc" Holliday Story) by Tombstone historian, Ben T. Traywick is chockfull of facts all backed up by extensive research and illustrated with copies of rare original letters, documents and photographs. Traywick smashes through the lies and misconceptions to present an honest straightforward look into John Henry Holliday, the man behind the legend. Do yourself a favor - make John Henry (The "Doc" Holliday Story) the cornerstone of your history collection.

Источник: https://tombstonetimes.com/doc-facts/

Dr. John Henry "Doc" Holliday

1851 - 1887

"He was the most skillful gambler, and the nerviest, fastest, deadliest man with a six-gun I ever saw."
This was the tribute paid to Doc Holliday by Wyatt Earp, who was something of a tough character himself.

On August 14, 1851 in Griffin, Georgia, John Henry Holliday was born to Henry Burroughs and Alice Jane Holliday. Their first child, Martha Eleanora, had died on June 12, 1850 at six months of age. When he married Alice Jane McKay on January 8, 1849, Henry Burroughs was a pharmacist by trade and, later, became a wealthy planter, lawyer, and during the War between the States, a Confederate Major. Church records state: "John Henry, infant son of Henry B. and Alice J. Holliday, received the ordinance of baptism on Sunday, March 21, 1852, at the First Presbyterian Church in Griffin."

Alice Jane died on September 16, 1866. This was a terrible blow to young John Henry for he and his mother were very close. To compound this loss, his father married Rachel Martin only three months later on December 18, 1866. Shortly after this marriage, the Holliday family moved to Valdosta, Georgia. Major Holliday quickly became one of the town's leading citizens, becoming Mayor, the Secretary of the County Agricultural Society, a Member of the Masonic Lodge, the Secretary of the Confederate Veterans Camp, and the Superintendent of local elections.

Because of his family status, John Henry had to choose some sort of profession and he chose dentistry. He enrolled in dental school in 1870 and attended his first lecture session in 1870-1872. Each lecture session lasted a little over three months. John wrote his required thesis on "Disease of the Teeth". He served his required two years apprenticeship under Dr. L.F. Frank. On March 1, 1872, the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery in Philadelphia, conferred the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery upon twenty-six men, one of whom was John Henry Holliday. Upon completion of his training and graduation, Dr. Holliday opened an office with a Dr. Arthur C. Ford in Atlanta home remedies for cold sores in toddlers 1872. The Atlanta Constitution on July 26, 1872, ran the following item:

"I hereby inform my patients that I have to attend the session of the Southern Dental Association in Richmond, Virginia, and will be absent until about the middle of August, during which time Dr. John H. Holliday will fill my place in my office. Office: 26 Whitehall Street - Arthur C. Ford, D.D.A."

Heading West

John was a good dentist, but shortly after starting his practice, he discovered that he had contracted tuberculosis. Although he consulted a number of doctors, the consensus of all was that he had only months to live. However, they all concurred that he might add a few months to his life if he moved to a dry climate. Following this advice, Doc packed up and headed West. His first stop was in Dallas, Texas, the end of the railroad at the time. The date was October 1873, and Doc soon found a suitable position as an associate of Dr. John A. Seegar. He hung out his shingle and prepared for business, but his terrible illness was not through with him. Coughing spells wracked his thin frame and often occurred at the most embarrassing times, such as in the midst of filling a tooth or making an extraction. As a result, his dental business gradually declined. John soon had to find other means of earning a livelihood.

It became apparent that he possessed a natural ability for gambling and this quickly became his sole means of support. In those days, a gambler in the west had to be able to protect john henry holliday, for he stood alone. Doc was well aware of this and faithfully practiced with six-gun and knife. On January 2, 1875, Doc and a local saloon keeper, named Austin, had a disagreement that flared into violence. Each man went for his pistol. Several shots were fired, but not one struck its intended target. According to the Dallas Weekly Herald, both shooters were arrested. Most of the local citizens thought such a gunfight highly amusing, but changed their views a few days later when Doc put two large holes through a prominent citizen, leaving him very dead. Feelings ran high over this killing and Doc was forced to flee Dallas a short distance in front of a posse. His next stop was Jacksboro over in Jack's County, where he found a job dealing Faro. Jackson was a tough cow-town situated near an armypost.

Not to be outdone, Doc now carried a gun in a shoulder holster, one on his hip, and a long, wicked knife as well. Reports confirm the fact that he was becoming an expert with these weapons as he john henry holliday involved in three gunfights in a very short span of time. One of these left another dead man lot model modular homes for sale Doc's credit. Since this was a pretty wild section of the West at that time, no law action was taken against him. During the summer of 1876, Holliday again became a participant in a gunfight. On this occasion, he was careless enough to kill a soldier from Fort Richardson. The killing brought the United States Government into the investigation.

Doc hit the trail again, but this time his back trail was cluttered with the Army, U.S. Marshals, Texas Rangers, and local lawmen and citizens, who were anxious to collect the reward offered for him. Holliday knew that if he was captured, his neck would be stretched with very few preliminaries, so he headed straight into Apache country for Colorado, eight hundred miles away. Stopping for short periods at Pueblo, Leadville, Georgetown and Central City, three more men went down before his guns before he reached Denver. There he went by the name of Tom Mackey and was practically unknown until he was involved in an argument with Bud Ryan, while dealing Faro at Babbitt's House.

In the ensuing fight, Doc came very near to cutting Ryan's head off. Ryan, who was a well-known gambling tough, survived the vicious slashing, but his face and neck were horribly mutilated. Although his victim did not die, public resentment forced Doc to flee again. He drifted on to Wyoming, then to New Mexico, and from there to Fort Griffin, Texas. It was there that Doc met the only woman who was ever to come into his life. She was known as "Big Nose" Kate, a frontier dance hall woman and prostitute. It was quite true that Kate's nose was prominent, but her other features were quite attractive. Her ample curves were generous and all in the right places. Tough, stubborn, fearless, and high tempered, she worked at the business of being a Madam and a prostitute because she liked it! She belonged to no man or no Madam's House, but plied her trade as an individual in the manner she chose.

Doc met her while he was dealing cards in John Shanssey's saloon. It was also at Shanssey's that he met Wyatt Earp, another person who was to have a great deal of influence on his life. Earp rode in from Dodge City on the trail of Dave Rudabaugh, who was wanted for train robbery. While Doc was helping Wyatt gain the information he needed, they became fast friends. Holliday had already gained the reputation of being a cold-blooded killer. Many believed that he liked to kill, but that was not true. He was simply a hot-tempered Southerner who stood aside for no man. Bat Masterson said of him: "Doc Holliday was afraid of nothing on earth". Doc could be described as a fatalist. He knew that he was already condemned to a slow, painful death. If his death was quick and painless, who was he to object! Actually, he expected a quick demise because of the violent life he lived.

A bully boy of Fort Griffin sat down in a poker game with Holliday. His name was Ed Bailey and he had grown accustomed to having his way with no one questioning his actions. Doc's reputation seemed to make no impression on him whatever. In an obvious attempt to irritate Doc, Bailey kept picking up the discards and looking through them. This was strictly against the rules of Western poker, and anyone who broke this rule forfeited the pot. Holliday warned Bailey twice, but the erstwhile bad man ignored his protests. The very next hand Bailey picked up the discards again. Without saying a word Doc reached out and raked in the pot without showing his hand, Bailey brought a six-shooter from under the table, while a large knife materialized in Doc's hand. Before the local bully could pull the trigger, Doc, with one slash, completely disemboweled him. Spilling blood everywhere, Bailey sprawled across the table.

As he felt that he was obviously only protecting himself and in the right, Doc stuck around town and allowed the Marshal to arrest him. That was certainly a mistake, for once he had been disarmed and locked up, Bailey's friends and the town vigilantes began a clamor for his blood. "Big Nose" Kate knew that Doc was finished unless someone did something and quick. Likely as not, the local lawmen would turn the slim gunman over to the mob. Kate went into action by setting fire to an old shed. It burned so rapidly that the flames threatened to engulf the town. Everyone went to fight the fire with the exception of three people: Kate, Doc, and the Officer who guarded him. As soon as the lawman and his prisoner were left alone, she stepped in and confronted them. A pistol in each hand, she disarmed the startled guard, then passed a pistol to Doc and the two of them vanished into the night.

All that night they hid in the brush, carefully avoiding parties of searchers. The next morning they headed for Dodge City, four hundred miles away, on "borrowed" horses. The couple registered at Deacon Cox's Boarding House in Dodge City as Dr. and Mrs. J. H. Holliday. Doc felt he owed Kate a great deal for rescuing him from a hang tree in Fort Griffin and was determined to do anything in his power to make her happy. Kate gave up being a prostitute and inhabiting the saloons. Doc gave up gambling and hung out his shingle again. All of Doc's good intentions were totally unappreciated and did not endure for long. Kate stood the quiet and boredom of respectable living as long as she could. Then she told Doc that she was going back to the bright lights and excitement of the dance halls and gambling dens. Consequently, the two split up, as they were destined to do many times during the remainder of Doc's life.

September found Doc back dealing Faro in the Long Branch Saloon. A number of Texas cowboys had just arrived in Dodge City with a herd of cattle. After many weeks on the trail, they were a wild, salty bunch, ready to "tree" Dodge. Word was brought into the Long Branch that several of the trail drivers had Wyatt Earp cornered and were boasting that they intended to shoot him down. Doc leaped through the door, gun in hand. When he arrived, two cowboys, Morrison and Driscoll, were holding cocked revolvers on Wyatt, goading him to draw before they shot him down. About twenty of their friends also stood nearby, taunting and insulting the enraged, but helpless, Wyatt. Holliday loosed a volume of profanity and, as the self-styled bad men turned to face Doc, Wyatt rapped Morrison over the head with his long barrel Colt. Then he set about relieving the other cowboys of their guns. Wyatt never forgot the fact that Doc Holliday saved his life that night in Dodge City.

Kate and Doc soon had another of their frequent, violent quarrels and Doc, in a furious mood, saddled his horse and rode out to Trinidad, Colorado. Shortly after he arrived in town, a young gambler, known as "Kid Colton", wishing to make himself a reputation, badgered Doc into a fight. Doc's gun roared twice and Colton collapsed john henry holliday the dust of the street. Under such circumstances, Doc did not wish to linger around, and rode on into New Mexico. In the summer of 1879, Doc tried birdee stephens hand as a dentist for the last time in Las Vegas, New Mexico. It was a very weak attempt and ended in a short time when he bought a saloon on Center Street. A few weeks later, he got into an argument with a local gunman, named Mike Gordon, who, by all evidence, was rather popular with the locals. Not one to mince words, Doc politely invited him to start shooting whenever he felt like it and then shot him three times in the stomach. A mob quickly gathered and began plans for decorating a hang tree, using Doc as an ornament. Wisely, Doc disappeared like smoke. Since he had to move on again, Doc knew the one place he would be safe in was Dodge City. After all, Wyatt Earp was his friend. But when he rode back into town, he discovered that Wyatt had gone to a new silver strike, in a place called Tombstone, Arizona.

Bound for Tombstone

There was nothing to hold him in Dodge City with Wyatt gone, so Doc headed West, bound for Tombstone. Without Doc knowing it, he would soon get to know more of the Earp family, for all of the Earp brothers were bound for Tombstone. Morgan was coming in from Montana, Wyatt and James from Dodge City and Virgil from Prescott, where Marshal Crawley Dake had just made him a Deputy U.S. Marshal. Virgil left Prescott for Tombstone without Hollidaywho was having a fantastic run of luck at the poker tables.

"Big Nose" Kate, also enroute to the new boom town of Tombstone, caught up with Doc in Prescott while he was still winning at poker. The two of them reached Tombstone in the early summer of 1880 and Doc, with $40,000 of the Prescott gamblers' money in his pockets, found Kate very happy to be in his company.

In Tombstone, Doc found Kate's living quarters sandwiched between a funeral parlor and the Soma Winery on the North side of Allen Street, at Sixth Street. Kate was quick to realize opportunity and, soon after her arrival in Tombstone, went into business and was soon making a sizable income. She purchased a large tent, rounded up several girls, a few barrels of bad, cheap whiskey and operated Tombstone's first "sporting house".

The outlaw gang in Tombstone had things their way for quite some time and they resented the arrival of the Earp brothers and Doc Holliday. "Old man" Clanton, his sons, Ike, Phin, and Billy, the McLaury brothers, Frank and Tom, Curly Bill Brocius, John Ringo and their followers lost no time in expressing their displeasure. Doc had become quite famous as a gunman by the time he had reached Tombstone. Several men had died in encounters with him. At any rate, Holliday was a welcome addition to the Earp's fight with the "Cowboy" faction.

Johnny Tyler and Doc had a dispute in the Oriental Saloon, early in October, 1880. Tyler left as quickly as possible but Doc and Milt Joyce, the saloon owner, continue to argue. The argument turned into gunplay and Doc drunkenly fired several shots. Finally, Milt struck Doc on the head with a pistol. When the affair ended Joyce had been shot through the hand, Parker, his bartender, was shot through the toe on the left foot and Holliday had a lump on his head from the pistol-whipping by Joyce. Doc was arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon. He was found guilty by Justice Reilly and fined $20 for assault and battery and $11.25 costs.

Once they were settled in town, Holliday and "Big Nose" Kate took up where they had left off. Although they lived togetherDoc went back to drinking and gambling and Kate to her operation as a prostitute. Their arguments were frequent, but not really serious until Kate got drunk and abusive. Doc, at this point, decided that enough was enough and threw her out. As fate would have it, four masked men attempted a hold up on a stagecoach near Contention on March 15, 1881. In the attempt, they killed two men: Bud Philpot, the stage driver, and Peter Roerig, a passenger. The Cowboy faction immediately seized upon the opportunity and accused Doc Holliday of being one of the holdup men. Sheriff Behan and Deputy Stilwell found Kate on one of her drunken binges, still berating Doc for throwing her out. They sympathized with her and fed her more whiskey, then persuaded her to sign an affidavit that Doc had been one of the masked highwaymen and had actually pulled the trigger on the shot that killed Bud Philpot.

While Kate was sobering up, the Earps began to round up witnesses who could verify Doc's whereabouts on the night in question. When Kate realized what she had done, she regretted her actions and repudiated her statement. Since witnesses and Kate's new stand exposed the Cowboy frame-up, Doc was released. The District Attorney labeled the charges as ridiculous and threw them out. Doc gave Kate some money and put her on a stage leaving town. As far as he was concerned, his debt to her was paid in full. "Big Nose" Kate how to load your cash app card with cash a far different woman than most of the people in Tombstone realized. She had been born Mary Katherine Horony, in Budapest, Hungary on November 7, 1850. During her long life she was to use many last names: Elder, Melvin, Fisher, Holliday, Cummings and Howard. She did not travel far on the stage, only to Globe. Evidently, she made two or three trips back to Tombstone to visit Doc as she claimed to be a witness to the gunfight. She may have been, as she and Doc were staying in a room at Mrs. Fly's.

Most likely that is why the Cowboys were in a vacant lot next door near the O.K. Corral. They may have been waiting for Doc to come back to the room they shared where they would have an opportunity to kill him.

Kate was apparently in Colorado from 1882 to the early part of 1888, although there is no information that she was living with Doc any of those years. She married a blacksmith, named George M. Cummings in 1888 and with her new husband moved to Bisbee, Arizona, only a few miles from Tombstone. They also lived for a time in Pearce, Arizona. In 1889, Kate left her husband and moved to the tiny railroad town of Cochise. (Cummings committed suicide in Courtland, Arizona on July 7, 1915. The coroner's jury report said that he killed himself because he had an incurable cancer of the head.) Cochise had been born in 1886 as a railroad station and post office at the junction of the Arizona Eastern and Southern Pacific railroads. John J. Rath hired Kate to work in his Cochise Hotel in 1899, although the customers never knew her true identity. She left the Cochise Hotel in the summer of 1900, and moved in with a man named Howard, from the mining town of Dos Cabezas.

She lived with him until 1930, and when he died she inherited some property. In 1931, she wrote to the Governor of Arizona, George W.P. Hunt, requesting admission to the "Arizona Pioneers Home". Being foreign born, she was not eligible but she claimed that she had been born in Davenport, Iowa. So Hunt gave her permission for admission to the home and she stayed there until her death on November 2, 1940.

The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral

Other gunfights and the aftermath of O.K. Corral

On January 17, 1882, came the famous confrontation between Wyatt, Doc and Ringo. Many writers would say that Ringo challenged all the Earps and Holliday. Not true. Virgil and Morgan were incapacitated with painful wounds. Ringo wasn't running much risk as there was little chance that they would accept his challenge. They knew that Ringo had been drinking heavily and that the Whiskey was talking. In addition, they had troubles enough from the aftermath of the gunfight at O.K. Corral. Ringo was well aware of all this.

On March 18,1882, the assassins struck again. Morgan was playing pool with Bob Hatch at Campbell and Hatch's Saloon and Billiard Parlor, on Allen Street between Fourth and John henry holliday Street. A shot was fired from the darkness of the alley. That shot struck him in the back and snuffed out his life. Morgan's body was dressed in one of Doc Holliday's suits and shipped to the parents in Colton, California for burial.

The Earp party encountered Frank Stilwell and Ike John henry holliday at the Tucson Station. Wyatt chased Stilwell down the track and filled him full peoples state bank rhinelander wisconsin holes. The date was March 20, 1882. A Tucson Coroner's Jury named Wyatt and Warren Earp, Doc Holliday, "Texas Jack", and McMasters as the men who had killed Stillwell. A Tucson judge issued warrants for their arrests. As far as Wyatt Earp was concerned, the man who shot Virgil and killed Morgan were dead men, only living until he found them. The killing of Stilwell was just the beginning of his bloody trail of vengeance, and Doc Holliday rode beside him all the way. Wyatt received word that Pete Spencer was at his wood camp in the Dragoons. The "federal posse" rode there and found: not Pete Spencer, but Florentino Cruz. Frightened, he named the men who had murdered Morgan, himself included. The Earp posse shot him to pieces. The date was March 22, 1882. The Earp posse was riding along a deep wash near Iron Springs when they encountered Curly Bill Brocius and eight of his men. In the fight that followed, Curly Bill was killed and Johnny Barnes received a wound that eventually killed him. The date was March 24, 1882.

In a little more than a year, the list of Cowboy outlaws that had been eliminated was astonishing: "Old Man" Clanton, Billy Clanton, Frank McLaury, Tom McLaury, Frank Stilwell, Indian Charlie, Dixie 1st round leader golf bet, Florentino Cruz, Curly Bill, Johnny Barnes, Jim Crane, Harry Head, Bill Leonard, Joe Hill, Luther King, Charley Snow, Billy Lang, Zwing Hunt, Billy Grounds and 2016 lexus rc 350 f sport Swilling. Pete Spencer, volunteered for the penitentiary for his own safety. Doc Holliday accounted for more than his share of the Cowboys, and when he and Wyatt Earp left Tombstone for good, they rode american fidelity mortgage corp horses to Silver City, New Mexico, sold them, rode a stage to Deming, and boarded a train for Colorado.

Doc was arrested in Denver shortly after his arrival. The arresting officer was a man named Perry Mallan. (Some believe that he was actually a brother to Johnny Tyler, a foe of Holliday and would-be gunman, that Doc ran out of Tombstone). While Doc was in jail the Denver Republican of May 22, 1882, ran the following: "Holliday has a big reputation as a fighter, and has probably put more rustlers and cowboys under the sod than any other one man in the west. He had been the terror of the lawless element in Arizona, and with the Earps was the only man brave enough to face the bloodthirsty crowd which has made the name of Arizona a stench in the nostrils of decent men."

Mallan remarked in the paper that he was standing along side when Curly Bill Brocius was killed. Doc related his thoughts as to that: ".eight rustlers rose up from behind the bank and poured from thirty-five to forty shots at us. Our escape was miraculous. The shots cut our clothes and saddles and killed one horse, but did not hit us. I think we would have been killed if God Almighty wasn't on john henry holliday side. Wyatt Earp turned loose with a shotgun and killed Curly Bill. The eight men in the gang which attacked us were all outlaws, for each of whom a big reward has been offered.If Mallan was along side Curly Bill when he was killed, he was with one of the worst gangs of murderers and robbers in the country."

Doc's troubles, concerning extradition to Arizona, ended and the following article was in the Rocky Mountain News, May 30, 1882: "Doc Holliday's case was finally disposed of by Governor Pitkin yesterday, his Excellency deciding that he could not honor the requisition from Arizona. The District Attorney's Office was represented by Honorable I.E. Barnum, Assistant District Attorney, who was accompanied in his visit to the Governor by Deputy Sheriff Linton and Sheriff Paul of Arizona. Among others present were Deputy Sheriff Masterson (Bat) of Trinidad and several friends of Holliday."

Doc left Denver and went to Pueblo and from there to Leadville. It was there that he ran into two old enemies from Tombstone, Billy Allen and Johnny Tyler. Friends advised Doc that Allen had threatened him and was looking for him with a pistol. Around 5 PM on August 19, 1884, Doc strolled into Hyman's Saloon, and placed himself at the end of the bar near the cigar lighter. As Billy Allen crossed the threshold, Doc leveled his pistol and fired creasing Allen's head. Reaching over the tobacco counter, Doc shot him again through the left arm below the shoulder. Holliday would have shot him again, but bystanders disarmed him. Allen was much larger than Doc and had obviously threatened him publicly so Doc was acquitted of f 14 super tomcat 21 shooting charges.

Doc Holliday claimed he almost lost his life a total of nine times. Four attempts were made to hang him and he was shot at in a gunfight or from ambush five times. In May, 1887, Doc went to Glenwood Springs to try the sulfur vapors, as his health was steadily growing worse, but he was too far gone. He spent his last fifty-seven days in bed and was delirious fourteen of them. On November 8, 1887, he awoke clear-eyed and asked for a glass of whiskey. It was given to him and he drank it down with enjoyment. Then he said, "This is funny", and died.

Doc Holliday had come West years before, knowing his days were numbered. Long before his death he had maintained that he would not die in bed coughing his guts out. He always believed that he would be killed by a quicker, easier death than that planned for him by destiny. He often said that his end would come from lead poisoning, at the end of a rope, a knife in his ribs, or that he might drink himself to death. That's why he considered it funny when he died peacefully in bed. Doc was the best of the Western gamblers and he lost his biggest bet when he died of tuberculosis. The greater part of his target redcard pay bill had been lived on borrowed time. His remains were buried in their final resting place in the Glenwood Cemetery (Old Hill Cemetery), Colorado.

So passed Tombstone's most deadly gun.
Источник: http://www.knowsouthernhistory.net/Biographies/Doc_Holliday/

Faded-Kate-photoThe stormy relationship of Doc Holliday and Kate Elder is perhaps the most perplexing and frustrating dimension of John Henry Holliday’s tragic story. Despite popular images of a violent and abusive tryst and old-timer gossip about Kate’s proclivities for sex acts frowned upon even by her generation of Cyprian sisters, little exists to provide an “intimate” portrait of their life together.

Doc left not a word about her, and Kate’s accounts, given variously to Anton Mazzanovich, Joe Chisholm, and Dr. A.W. Bork in the 1930s, are all self-serving and defensive. Yet, understanding the Holliday-Elder relationship begins there, not because they are the best sources, but for now,  they are the only sources.

She was a widow living in the Arizona Pioneers Home in Prescott as Mary Katherine Cummings when she met Anton Mazzanovich, himself a pioneer Arizonan with experience as a writer. She bank of hawaii kapolei hours of operation herself to him as “Mary Katherine Elder” from Illinois, when in fact she was Mary Katherine Harony of Davenport Iowa. Cautious and protective, she appears to have preferred to let her past go without a mention until the publication of Stuart N. Lake’s Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal in 1931. The image of “Big Nose Kate Fisher” as a troublesome and vindictive whore provided by Lake, angered how to access chase account number online and, almost certainly, revived an ancient hsa card restrictions against Wyatt Earp, whom she clearly blamed for destroying her relationship with Doc.

Just how Mazzanovich found her is not clear from the available sources—success in expunging her past from the public record was so complete—yet doubts that Mrs. Cummings was really Kate Elder appear to be misplaced. Kate’s recollections were confused by fading memory, calculated to portray her in the best possible light, and yet filled with information that only someone close to Doc Holliday could possibly have known. It is this internal webbing of intimate knowledge that provides the most convincing case that she was, in fact, Doc Holliday’s woman.

She was a woman with a story to tell and much to hide. The accounts she gave to Mazzanovich, Chisholm and Bork have to be sifted like river sand in a placer box to separate a great mass of debris from the nuggets of reality that do appear, and yet there is a sense in which the very composition of emotion, subterfuge, and even outright lies in what she said, reveal a fascinating set of insights into the nature of her relationship with Doc.

First, although she insisted that she was married to Doc, in one account in Saint Louis, Missouri in 1870 and in another in Valdosta, Georgia in 1876, her recollection is unemotional and almost detached insofar as her feelings for him are concerned. She defends him against charges that he was a killer and a drunkard, santanderbank com refer a friend she insists that he treated her well. She portrays herself as loyal and solicitous. But there is no romance in her story. Indeed, she reveals resentment toward Doc, accusing him of gambling away her money and implying Doc’s complicity in shady dealings with her accusations of Wyatt Earp’s involvement in stage robberies. She also finds Doc weak in not standing up to Wyatt.

This absence of any real sense of her affection for Doc john henry holliday hoa support union bank underscored by her fawning, romantic solana town center meridian of John Ringo. She fairly gushed over Ringo’s appearance and manly traits before concluding, “And he was noble, for he never fought anyone except face to face. Every time I think of him my eyes fill with tears.” There are no such terms of endearment over Doc anywhere in her recollections. Indeed, her description of Ringo is the only place in her writings where she evinces any emotion other than anger and resentment. It is almost as if her defense of Doc as a “good man” was essential to her own defense as a “good woman,” whereas her sentimentality toward Ringo revealed her simply as a woman without the guile so painfully apparent in her defense of Doc.

Second, Kate’s portrayal also provides some insight into the chronology of their relationship. Her knowledge of Doc and the accuracy of certain details, such as placing Doc’s practice in St. Louis on Fourth Street near the Comique Theatre and the Planters Hotel, make it almost certain that Kate and Doc first met in 1872 when she was working at the Comique as “Kate Fisher” and he was practicing temporarily at the office of his friend and classmate, A. Jameson Fuches, a few blocks away. Her knowledge of Doc’s inheritance, although confused in detail, is sufficient to demonstrate first hand information she could have acquired nowhere other than from Doc.

Despite some confusion about dates, she places them together next in Sweetwater in the Panhandle of Texas in the winter of 1875-76, at the time that Bat Masterson killed Corporal Melvin King. However, her lack of knowledge about Doc’s movements in 1876 (including her denial that he was in Denver) suggests that they were not together to stay at that point. Perhaps, she used Doc to justify her presence in Sweetwater where she may have gone as a dancehall girl after working at Tom Sherman’s place in Dodge City the previous summer.

She does appear to have linked up with Doc by 1877, probably at Fort Griffin, and to have enjoyed a reasonably constant relationship from that point through Doc’s peregrinations in Texas, his eventual move to Dodge City, Kansas, and his subsequent sojourn in New Mexico. Wyatt Earp’s arrival in Las Vegas, New Mexico, in the fall of 1879, appears to have ended the halcyon days of the relationship. In Arizona, Kate and Doc parted company in Gillette (she says over Doc’s decision to go to Tombstone) with Kate going to Globe and Doc first to Prescott, back to Las Vegas, possibly to Albuquerque, again to Prescott, and eventually to Tombstone.

The records of the time, as well as Kate’s own accounts, indicate that the two visited each other several times in 1881, with Kate going to Tombstone and Doc to Globe. She appears to have joined Doc for an attempted reunion early that year, for she is listed in the Tombstone Epitaph of March 21, 1881, as “Mrs. Kate Holliday,” indicating that they were living as husband and wife at the time. In early July, Kate, now curiously identified as “Kate Elder,” accused Doc of being a principal in the Benson stage robbery attempt which had occurred on March 15, 1881 and on July 5, Doc was indicted on the basis of her accusations. Kate later claimed it was a desperate move to break the hold of the Earps on Doc, but at the time, it appeared that it was merely the act of an “enraged and intoxicated woman.” Four days later, the charges were dropped, and Kate was hurried out of town with more reason to resent Wyatt Earp.

Doc visited her in Globe in October, returning with her to Tucson and eventually to Tombstone four days before the fateful confrontation on Fremont Street between the Earps and the Clanton-McLaury bunch. She later wrote touchingly of Doc’s determination that day and his emotional reaction to what happened, but when Doc was remanded to jail with Wyatt because of the shootings, she left Tombstone on money provided by John Ringo, according to her own account, which also rather pointedly notes that she needed help because “Doc had lost all my money, about $75.00, playing faro while we were at the Tucson Fiesta.”

No real evidence exists of contact between Doc and Kate chime mobile app login November, 1881, and the summer of 1887, when Doc apparently wrote her and asked her to come to Glenwood Springs, Colorado, to care for him in the last stages of his battle with tuberculosis. Kate went, whether out of love or loyalty or duty, and, to her credit, stood by him until the end.

The record does not support the characterization of Kate as “the nastiest whore in Kansas,” to borrow Dennis Quaid’s line as Doc Holliday in Kevin Costner’s Wyatt Earp. In fact, the only thing the record confirms for sure is that she was arrested in 1874 in Witchita for prostitution, and was a dancehall girl in Dodge City in 1875, which did not necessarily mean she was a whore. Other characterizations, both contemporary and modern, owe more to rumor and supposition than to hard fact. After she joined Doc in 1877, she does not appear ever to have worked as nymph du pave again, nor does the record provide any evidence of an abusive relationship.

What is suggested is an on again/off again relationship that most always ended in arguments. It is fair to conclude that the two needed one another until the Tombstone troubles divided them. They were both educated people and had a certain kinship in lives that had gone awry. Doc Holliday was no doubt spoiled and used to having his way, which was difficult for Kate, who was clearly a strong-willed and independent woman.

Kate’s bitter resentment toward Wyatt Earp in later years evinces more than anger over Stuart Lake’s portrayal of her. She saw Wyatt as the source of her estrangement from Doc, although Doc’s own loyalty to Wyatt and sense of honor were probably more to blame, with Kate’s affection for John Ringo possibly the final straw that drove them apart in Tombstone.

There is a hardness in Kate’s accounts that she cannot hide, and an element of deceitfulness, but there is not enough evidence to determine whether those were traits that were part of her makeup at the time she and Doc were together or attributes she acquired later. Perhaps even after all those years, she still harbored the anger of “a woman scorned.” Neither her contemporaries nor later writers have been kind to her. Joe Chisholm, who was rebuffed by her in his efforts to tell her story, characterized her in ugly terms in his Brewery Gulch, and that was the image that stuck.

In truth, there is too little hard evidence to know for certain what brought Doc Holliday and Kate Elder together or what drove them apart. There was an unmistakably strong attraction between them which caused them to find each other again and again. The story is all the more compelling because of the unanswered questions about them both. In the end, their relationship seems not so much a love story as a kind of mutual need that bred loyalty and respect, and gave a measure of comfort to both.

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Источник: https://truewestmagazine.com/mrs-john-holliday/

Holliday

In the 1993 movie Tombstone, Doc Holliday (portrayed by actor Val Kilmer) is depicted as a good guy at heart, helping Wyatt Earp to keep order and law in the dangerous old west town of Tombstone, Arizona. As is the case with Earp, there is a mound of evidence that the real Doc Holliday wasn’t nearly so squeaky clean.  Here is the truth behind the legend of the “slickest gunslinger in the west,” Doc Holliday.

Born John Henry Holliday on August 4, 1851 in Griffin, Georgia (today, a suburb of Atlanta), “Doc” was the second child born to his parents, Henry (“Major”) and Alice Jane Holliday, but his older sister passed away during childbirth. He would remain an only child. His father was a veteran of several wars, including the Cherokee Indian War and the Mexican-American war. When he returned in 1848 from the Mexican-American war, he brought with him an orphaned Mexican boy named Francisco Hidalgo. It is said when John Henry was a young child, Francisco taught him how to become “the quickest draw in the west.”

Growing up on a “Southern frontier” farm was tough living, with humid air and erratic weather. John’s family was Scottish-Irish, like many in the region, and he was raised Protestant. His mother taught him manners and etiquette, while his father regaled him with war stories and survival skills. John was but nine years old when the Civil War broke out and his father once again left for war, but not before moving his family even further south, to the Georgia-Florida border. John attended school and was a good student, though he was noted as being somewhat rebellious.

Quickly after his mother’s death in May of 1866 from consumption (a.k.a. tuberculosis, see: Why Tuberculosis was Called “Consumption”), Major remarried to a neighbor’s daughter (who was 23, eight years older than John). John’s relationship with his father became strained and he left home to attend the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery in 1869, one of the best dental northwest community in the country. Seemingly, he did quite well at school and graduated with a license in 1872. He moved to St. Louis for a period of time, to join a friend’s dental practice, before moving back to Georgia.

Now, here begins the more interesting part of Holliday’s life. In 1872, in a story recounted in a Doc Holliday biography written by Gary Roberts, Doc Holliday: The Life and Legend, (but first conveyed in 1907 by noted writer Bat Masterson) Holliday first killed a man in Georgia during a racial dispute. Holliday and a few friends were at a watering hole when a group of African-American men joined them as well. Holliday did not approve and told them to leave. They didn’t. He produced a gun and shot one to three men (reports vary) to death. Now, a few historians think this story may not be entirely accurate commonwealth financial systems complaints to discrepancies in the 1907 version, but it wouldn’t have been too out of character for Holliday given his preponderance towards violence.

Also around this time, he was diagnosed with tuberculosis just like his mother, who he watched die from the disease. With no effective cure, it was thought that a dry climate could at least alleviate the symptoms. Either because he was run out of town or due to his sickness, or maybe both, he moved to the his only weakness maya banks read online air of Dallas, shortly thereafter in 1872.

He opened a dental practice in Dallas, but it wasn’t for long. According to True West Magazine, Doc’s constant coughing and illness kept patients away, so he had to learn how to make money another way – card games and gambling.

Refined, intelligent, and good at keeping a poker face, Doc excelled at Faro, where he became a dealer (or “banker”) at several saloons across Dallas. Faro was a game which pitted the banker against the other players. It was also a game that could be easily rigged. Doc was extremely good at Faro, or at least extremely good at cheating, earning himself a lot of money – and a lot of enemies.

Throughout the next few years, Doc was regularly arrested and fined for his gaming in Dallas. To avoid charges, he went on the run throughout the Southwest, dealing Faro at saloons all along the way. He got into more than one disagreement that required the use, or at least the threatening of, the skills he learned from Fransisco so many years back.  He seems to have gotten into gunfights throughout Texas, Kansas, Wyoming, and New Mexico. He also is known to have sliced open a man’s stomach when the man refused to follow the Faro rules that Doc had “implemented.” At one point, it is thought that US Marshals and Texas Rangers were even after him.

In 1879, he had made enough money to open his own saloon in New Mexico. He spent his time dealing Faro and drinking heavily, until one night a former army scout put up a fuss when one of Holliday’s saloon girls (possibly a prostitute) told him that she wasn’t in love with him. The army scout went outside and began to fire shots into Holliday’s establishment. So, Doc went outside and killed the man. The following year, he found himself in Tombstone, Arizona where history was waiting for him.

Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday first became familiar, where else, but at a Faro gaming table. As the deputy of Dodge City, Earp was on the trail of well-known train robber Dave Rudabaugh and was venturing way out of his jurisdiction in pursuit, nearly 400 miles and into Fort Griffin, Texas.  Historians believe Earp wasn’t doing this out of any sense of justice, but rather for the considerable reward money. Either way, he was directed to the Faro table of Doc Holliday, who had dealt with Rudabaugh. Victoria secret pink rain jacket, Holliday would never talk to a lawman, but upon hearing about the reward over a game of Faro, he spilled the beans that he had heard that Rudabaugh was hightailing it back to Kansas. Earp wired the information to a friend there and Rudabaugh was soon captured. It is not known if Earp shared the reward money with Holliday, nor who won that game of Faro.

Also, according to a story supposedly told by Earp (possibly just a legend, given Earp’s and his many biographers’ known propensity to make up such stories), Holliday once saved Earp’s life. In 1879, with Holiday paying a visit to Dodge City with his girlfriend “Big Nose Kate,” the noted cowboy Tabo Driskell pulled a gun on Earp and was about to shoot him when Holliday came up behind him and placed a gun at his temple. Driskell dropped his gun and from then on, Earp credited Holliday with saving his life.

Whether true or not, in 1881, Earp wrote a letter to Holliday asking him to join him in Tombstone, saying they could use a dentist in those parts. More likely, Earp probably just wanted his favorite Faro dealer by his side to help fleece the denizens of the then santander bank usa car loan silver mining town. So, Doc Holliday moved to Tombstone and that was where his legend was made and why anybody still remembers who he was.

It seems Holliday’s participation in the showdown at the OK Corral (or rather in a vacant lot next to the OK Corral) against Ike Clanton and his men had more to do with his loyalty to Earp, and the fact that he rarely said no to a gunfight, than upholding the law. There is also some evidence that Clanton may have been spreading rumors about Holliday robbing a stagecoach and that his girlfriend, “Big Nose Kate,” was a prostitute. There is also a story that Clanton called Holliday and the Earps out for the fight over they having cheated Clanton in a Faro game. On the other hand, this all may have been said after the fact to give Holliday reason to be in the gunfight.

The violence only took thirty seconds, left three men dead, and several men injured. While no one knows for sure who fired first, it was Doc’s bullet that first rendered a fatal shot. It is even written in some accounts that Clanton was not armed. But finding the truth about what happened in that gunfight is about as difficult as finding Bigfoot.

In the end, Holliday, along with Earp, was put on trial for murder. He was exonerated, but several attempts were made on his life over the next few years. He eventually made his way to Colorado where he increasingly became dependent on alcohol and opium as his health deteriorated.

He died in 1887 at the young age of 37 in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, from the same illness that claimed his mother – tuberculosis.

Wyatt Earp lived on and moved to Los Angeles in the early 20th century where his story got the Hollywood treatment, most prominently in the largely fictitious, but ever popular, “biography” Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshall. Always loyal tri city national bank holiday hours his friend, Earp perpetuated the myth that his card shark, gun fighter pal, Doc Holliday, was an old west hero. It seems, if we are taking real historical accounts and evidence into consideration, this is actually quite false. But, as with Earp’s Hollywoodized tale, it sure makes a great story.

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