weekend at bernies dance

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Weekend at bernies dance -

A film is a petrified fountain of thought. – Jean Cocteau

Nobody is going to confuse “Weekend at Bernie’s” for a comedic masterpiece. Even though it was popular enough to spawn a sequel, it is mostly thought of with the kind of nostalgia you are vaguely embarrassed about. Like, “I can’t believe we liked that movie.” I look back on it fondly because it was a movie I loved as a kid. Still, its legend has endured in an odd way, and clearly, I’m not the only one who feels this way. Twenty-three years after its release, the film continues to echo through our culture.

It’s obvious that “Weekend at Bernie’s” is not a political film. It’s a pretty straightforward albeit ridiculous story. But when we look closely at any movie that outperforms its box office expectations, we usually find that it has hit some kind of social or cultural nerve that was previously hidden. “Weekend at Bernie’s” is no exception. It seems in fact as if the movie was, at some point in its production, meant to be a sharp satire of ‘80s culture and economic policy, but it was watered down to be a cheap farce. Still, there remains a nugget of sharp satire that is worthy of being explored.

Bernie Lomax, the president of a successful insurance company, represents the new American Dream. In the ‘50s and ‘60s, young Americans dreamed of a family, a house in the suburbs, and a white picket fence. But when Larry (Andrew McCarthy) and Richard (Jonathan Silverman), two entry-level analysts, look at their boss, they see a man who has it all: a “beautiful apartment, house at the beach, babes, boats, cars.” The “go-go ‘80s” created an entire generation that sought not just to be financially independent but also to become masters of the universe and to attain all of the fleeting pleasures that came with it. Bernie is a manifestation of those goals, but while Larry and Richard may idolize him, the film is more interested in satirizing his lifestyle.

The movie’s centerpiece is a party scene in which half of the Hamptons show up at Bernie’s house shortly after he has died. Larry and Richard, still deciding whether to call the police, have him propped up on the couch and don’t have time to move him before the party quite suddenly arrives. It’s a surreal and funny scene that illuminates how shallow and self-involved the guests are. As they drift in and out of conversation with the corpse, a light is cast on the ‘80s upper-class mentality.

What we see is an entire class of people who are totally disconnected from reality. They are so focused on immediate fulfillment of their material desires that they do not even notice whether the person they are speaking to is alive. All they see is what he can do for them, and their goals do not even require a living being. This scene shows how materialism dehumanizes us, forcing us to de-emphasize human connection in favor of the acquisition of things.

It immediately brings to the mind director Hal Ashby’s “Being There,” the brilliant 1974 satire of Washington, DC and the culture of television. The dynamic is similar, but instead of a corpse, Ashby used an idiot. In that film, Chauncey Gardner, a middle-aged house servant, is thrust out into the streets of Washington for the first time after his employer dies, his only knowledge of the world what he learned from watching television. When his naivete is mistaken for sage wisdom, he becomes a hit among the D.C. power players, even garnering a meeting with the president. As Chauncey hits the cocktail scene and some of the most powerful people in the world become increasingly enchanted with him, the film shows the self-involvement and short-sightedness of our policymakers. This idea culminates in an absurd sex scene in which an unhappy Washington wife lures Chauncey to bed and gets herself off on his presence alone, while he sits idly by, watching television. “Bernie” contains a similar – if less satirically sharp – scene in which Bernie’s mistress has sex with his corpse, of course without noticing he is dead.

Given the current state of the economy and Hollywood’s eagerness to remake just about every movie released in ‘80s, I am surprised no one has gotten around to “Weekend at Bernie’s” yet. It seems a good fit for these times. Public antipathy towards corrupt CEOs is far higher now than it was in 1989, and resentment between generations – a theme present but largely unexplored in the original – is a theme that has found its way into several successful films this year already. How about this? Instead of an insurance magnate, make Bernie a financial advisor or hedge fund manager who is secretly bilking his clients out of millions in an elaborate Ponzi scheme. Hey, you wouldn’t even have to change the title. 

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June 13, 2012 in Analysis. Tags: Andrew McCarthy, Being There, Hal Ashby, Peter Sellers, Weekend at Bernie'sИсточник: https://reelchange.net/2012/06/13/ripe-for-a-remake-weekend-at-bernies-and-the-culture-of-the-1980s/

My Eulogy for Weekend at Bernie’s: Summer’s #1 Dark Comedy of the ’80s

Weekend at Bernie's movie poster

Weekend at Bernie’s movie poster

Weekend at Bernie’s was released in the U.S. on July 5th, 1989. Fast forward 30 years later and I’m writing a blog post about it. Totally not a waste of time at all.

At the time Weekend at Bernie’s released, I was 8 years old. It was the summer before 4th grade. I might’ve had a sick flat-top haircut and I was obsessed with Bo Jackson and Neon Deion Sanders. Taylor Swift didn’t exist.

My family was living in Westwood, Massachusetts, a Boston suburb that’s home to former NFL QB Matt Hasselbeck. I’d be lying if I said I saw WaB in the theater but you best believe I saw this almost every single time it aired on HBO.

If you haven’t seen the movie, I don’t know that you can fully appreciate it today. Try to place yourself in the mind of an adolescent boy in the late ’80s. Should be simple enough.

Bernie’s follows two guys who work at an insurance corporation and discover insurance fraud. After reporting this to their boss, he invites them to his beach house for the weekend. Turns out, the boss is the fraudster and he’s hired a hitman to murder his employees. The mafia decides the boss is a major liability, so they off him instead. Two employees show up, discover boss is dead, and have to pretend he’s alive until they figure shit out.

Evan Smith of Script Magazine wrote a helpful article about comedy writing. In it, he states that the best comedy movies and tv shows feature protagonists making bad decisions. Weekend at Bernie’s is a masterclass in bad decisions.

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Taglines

  • Bernie Lomax would be the perfect host, except for one small thing. He’s dead.
  • Bernie would be the perfect host, except for one small thing . . . he’s dead. Now, he’s the life of the party.
  • A lively comedy about a guy who isn’t.
  • Bernie may be dead, but he’s still the life of the party!
  • Bernie Lomax would be the perfect host, except for one small problem: He’s dead.
  • The drop dead comedy of the year!
  • Two morons. One corpse. And the plot thickens…

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Cast

Andrew McCarthy (St. Elmo’s Fire, Pretty in Pink, Mannequin) as Larry Wilson

In a 2017 interview with AV Club, McCarthy said this about the film:

“I mean, that movie was completely stupid and fantastic. It’s the stupidest movie. I love it. I love Bernie’s. My son—he’s 15—he saw Weekend. He’s never seen anything I’ve been in, my kids, but he saw Weekend At Bernie’s, and he said, “Dad, that movie is really stupid.” But I love Bernie. I think Bernie is great. I mean, it was ridiculous. We knew at the time it was ridiculous, and there was no top to go over. You can just do anything… that movie has its own logic.”

Jonathan Silverman (Girls Just Want To Have Fun, Caddyshack II, The Single Guy) as Richard Parker

Catherine Mary Stewart (The Last Starfighter) as Gwen Saunders

Terry Kiser as Bernie Lomax — I wonder if it chaps his ass that he’s got 152 acting credits and his most memorable is playing a corpse

Don Calfa (Return of the Living Dead) as Paulie, Vito’s Hit Man

Catherine Parks (Friday the 13th Part III) as Tina, Vito’s Girl – She held the titles of Miss Tampa, Miss Hillsborough County and Miss Florida, and was 4th runner up at the 1978 Miss America Pageant

Eloise DeJoria (Don’t Mess with the Zohan, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps) as Tawny — Playboy Playmate of the Month April 1988.
Was a child bride, married at age 15, but divorced soon after.

BREAKING DOWN THE TRAILER & CLIPS

“For Larry and Richard, this is a place to die for. But what they don’t realize, is while they’re checking in, Bernie Lomax will be checking out.”

Mmmm mmm, the cheese on those lines. Enough to clog a couple arteries. Feel like my dad jokes would’ve crushed in the ’80s.

Never has a corpse been as desecrated as this. Never has a death been more ridiculed, mocked, and minimized. And I still can’t help but laugh. Bernie was more beloved in death than he was in life. Could this movie be released today? Probably not. Imagine sitting in a theater and that preview runs. If any of this takes place in the winter, it’s a no-go but the summer beach house vibes seal the deal.

CLIP 1: Richard wants Gwen…

…so he makes up a story about his parents perished in train accident that involved a plane falling on it. Gwen is eating it up, which is standard for most female love interests of the ’80s. Like, do you have a brain? The most revealing line in this whole clip is Gwen asking “You let your butler talk to you like that?” It’s funny but also implies Gwen does not fuck around with the help. Ay-chihuahua. So, yeah, it sets the tone because we see Gwen’s about that life and Richard will have to really be about that life to “get” Gwen.

FUN FACT: Richard’s dad (in the undies) is the director. It should be a law that directors have to appear in their own films. Always a good Easter egg.

CLIP 2: Richard finds the heroin needle in Bernie’s pocket…

…and discovers his boss is dead. While Richard tries to process it all, we get to see Larry’s self-centered behavior on full display. As silly as the movie is, this scene really illustrates the differences between Richard (more thoughtful) and Larry (egotistic).

Of course, one could argue that Richard’s idea of personal success or aspirations has been rocked to its very core by Bernie’s demise and that feeling supersedes anything he actually felt for Bernie. So, in a way, he’s looking out for his own interests as well but it’s more veiled than Larry’s. What a challenge for the writer to get viewers on board with these two.

CLIP 3 – The ‘floating party’ wanders in and lets the good times roll.

No one realizes Bernie’s dead. Even after Richard tells a partygoer the bad news, the guest responds with “That’s the idea, isn’t it?” What a line. So deep, so profound, so on the nose. We’re all just dying and Bernie’s crossed the finish line. Partying is a celebration of life but, for some, it’s also an escape from life (i.e. death). The beach house during the summer is the perfect location for all this shit to go down. Everyone’s carefree, living it up, pushing rumors and gossip, trying to get laid and impressing other people in the most casual way possible.

But, I should leave the dissection and analysis to the pros. Like Mikel Koven, the University of Worcester lecturer who wrote “Traditional Narrative, Popular Aesthetics, Weekend at Bernie’s, and Vernacular Cinema,” published in Of Corpse: Death and Humor in Folklore and Popular Culture. In that selection, he suggested that the movie is a satire of the upper class of the late ’80s, “whose self-indulgences and self-obsessions make them oblivious to Bernie’s dilemma.”

Kinda weird to say that Bernie has a dilemma. There’s no choice to be made. It was made for him. Unless the director’s cut has some scenes in purgatory? But, the themes of self-indulgences and self-obsessions is spot on.

CLIP 4 – Larry and Richard carry Bernie out of the party…

…while Gwen gets hit on by the drunk buddy of our deeply profound Martini swigger with swagger. I mean, “Polyester doesn’t crumple”? Our guy did it again. Quite possibly the best back-to-back lines in movie history.

The guy trying to sell Bernie his Porsche gets his way. Who wears a sweatband and sweater over their shoulders to a beach party in the summer? A Porsche owner. Duh. You have to know that there are probably dozens of verbal deals going down at this party that won’t actually get executed anytime soon.

Larry spots Gwen on the beach and Richard decides to make his move. Larry continues to roll with the punches with aplomb. Vocab teacher would be proud. Why didn’t you report this dead body to the police? Sorry, officer, but I would like to report a hot body to my bedroom. Yowza! 

This also positions Gwen as someone who doesn’t want to be a part of that floating party. Maybe she’s not as conformist or elitist as we thought? She’s not trying to work her way up the social ladder through vapid exchanges. Still can’t get over the butler comment.

TL;DR – Gwen’s seeking something different.

CLIP 5 – Richard makes out with Gwen on the beach.

Bernie washes up on shore. The party’s died down. Just about everyone’s left. Richard finds our Quote Machine seemingly dead on the couch, but turns out he passed out.

Meanwhile, Larry’s getting down to business. The business of knocking them boots. It’s coitus interruptus all around. All hands on deck to fish Bernie out of the water.

CLIP 6 – A woman in lingerie has sex with Bernie…

…while one of the mobsters watches through binocs. If you thought I had questions about sex as an 8-year-old before this scene, you best believe the inquiries went way up watching a hot woman sit on a stiff with stiffie. Dad, do all dogs go to heaven? Yeah, cool. Do we all die with a boner?

Pro tip for all you eligible bachelors — you find a girl who smokes and downs scotch neat, you’ve found yourself one helluva morning-after story.

Here’s Jonathan Silverman’s take on the necrophilia, from “Weekend at Bernie’s and the Art of the Crazy ’80s Comedy“:

“…a better theory for why fans embraced its particular brand of insanity comes from Silverman, who admitted in 2005 that Bernie’s aforementioned off-screen necrophilia bit did give him pause: “This is me reading the script: ‘Who the f— is going to find this funny?’ But people did. And they found it endearing… Terry Kiser did something so clever: He died with a smirk on his face, which let the audience love him.”

CLIP 7 – A little kid buries Bernie under the sand.

Kinda ironic the guys get pissed at the kid for doing what they should be doing. It’s also fitting that Larry doesn’t remember the Hail Mary. These guys have been obliterating every religious mandate known to man, they’re not men of faith.

CLIP 8 – I gotta admit. Andrew McCarthy can MOVE.

The guy’s quick, swift, slick. Kudos to the costume designer for outfitting him in a flowing, unbuttoned button-down shirt. When he’s flying around, the shirt catches air. It’s like watching the caped crusader swoop.

Say what you will about the stupidity of the film and its main characters, but it’s the little things that make this movie so beloved. There are 2 examples in this scene alone:

  1. The synchronized backflips from the couple that got knocked off their boat.
  2. The hoity-toity dude in the captain’s hat, blazer, and ascot who points and kind of matter-of-factly shout-talks “That’s illegal! What you’re doing is illegal!”

I was wrong about not being able to appreciate this on a second viewing as a “mature” adult. Those flew right under the radar as a kid.

CLIP 9 – Larry and Richard get distracted by BIKINI BAAAAAAABES…

…and almost crash twice before getting launched by a wave that causes Bernie to fall off the back. This movie is one long chain reaction of dominoes falling.

Onlookers think Bernie’s “showing off again”… in khakis, a windbreaker, and boatshoes without skis. Like McCarthy said in his interview, it’s a world with its own logic and that logic is “Why let death ruin your life?” and “Live your best death”. Some would say it’s that never-say-die attitude that is so very American. Makes sense this was released Fourth of July week.

Also, an insurance guy (Bernie) naming his boat “Premiums” is such a beautifully understated joke. Cue Blink 182’s “All the Small Things”.

CLIP 10 – Gwen confronts Richard about Bernie…

…claiming he lied about Lomax croaking. Larry provides the receipt. Gwen freaks out. One of the all-time reactions. Have to think she got the part on that reaction alone.

Also, “Do we look like killers?” followed by cracking skulls with bottles is a ballet of buffoonery that’s bellisimo.

***

Of course, critics hated it. That’s what they do. They heart comedies like “Get Out”. Except for The Hollywood Reporter, which called WaB a “good old, knock-down slapstick”.

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Did you know…

…the working title was “Hot and Cold”

Oof. Talk about dodging a bullet. Where are we as a world if “Hot and Cold” is the title? Would we be in The Upside Down? The Darkest Timeline? We definitely don’t get the Bernie dance. No Bernie Sanders memes. There’s no sequel. It’s possible Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman quit acting altogether. Do we even get Swiss Army Man?

SIDE NOTE: Isn’t it bonkers that I can’t bring myself to watch Swiss Army Man as a grown-ass man but I watched 2 dudes toss around a lifeless Bernie before I hit double digits?

…this was considered as a possible vehicle for Corey Haim and Corey Feldman?

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The film was a commercial success with Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman. It was in the top 40 grossers of ’89, out-earning Road House, Say Anything, Do The Right Thing, and the Hulk Hogan classic No Holds Barred. But, with the Two Coreys coming off 1987’s The Lost Boys and 1988’s License to Drive, I could see Bernie’s busting into the top 20. I mean, Harlem Nights was at 21 and Sea of Love was 22 that year and I can’t tell you a single thing about either one.

A stuntman broke a rib while filming the scene where Bernie is dragged behind a boat. (Via People)

“Actor Terry Kiser played Bernie in both his pre- and post-death forms, but he left the truly dangerous work to the professionals, one of whom suffered multiple injuries during this boating scene. They couldn’t have used a mannequin?”

The shady accounting practices used in the film were also used on the film. (via People)

“At least, that’s what director Ted Kotcheff and writer Robert Klane allege in a lawsuit against 20th Century Fox and MGM. Both men say their contracts for the film included a percentage of its profits, millions of dollars of which they have not seen a penny. The lawsuit has not yet been settled, but if we were the two of them, we’d refrain from going to the Hamptons alone for a little while.”

Yes, the dark slapstick comedy was directed by Ted Kotcheff (North Dallas Forty, Rambo First Blood, Red Shoe Diaries). What an eclectic array of credits. Sports comedy, blockbuster action flick with a high body-count, and softcore erotica. Might seem like chaos, but Ted was the perfect choice. Action, sex, machismo. The perfect blend for peak ’80s-ness.

Robert Klane wrote the script. His credits include National Lampoon’s European Vacation, The Man with One Red Shoe, and M*A*S*H*. Again, you can’t do any better. Fish out of water + average Joe in over his head + experience with dead bodies.

Weekend at Bernie’s was the crown jewel of production company Gladden Entertainment but they also gave us Mannequin, Gleaming the Cube, and The Fabulous Baker Boys. There might not be a more ’80s string of movies out there on the ‘net. Gladden was founded by David Begelman who was involved in an embezzlement scandal in the ’70s. Talk about life imitating art. They say write (or produce) what you know.

REBOOT or REMAKE?

My initial thought was no way. But then I read this Reddit comment…

 

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Filed Under: Entertainment, MoviesTagged With: andrew mccarthy, catherine mary stewart, catherine parks, jonathan silverman, movie, movies, terry kiser, weekend at bernie's, weekend at bernies cast
Источник: https://neallynch.com/2019/07/17/weekend-at-bernies-summer-dark-comedy-80s/

The first "Weekend at Bernie's," released in 1989, stretched its one-joke premise to wire-thin extremes:

Two insurance employees (Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman) discover that their their boss, a thug named Bernie (Terry Kiser), has embezzled $2 million. They go to his lavish digs, where they witness his murder, and then spend the rest of the film trying to make it appear that he's not really dead.

As a result, the film overdoses on dead-guy-bonking-into-things gags but somehow does manage to get some laughs.

The sequel, imaginatively titled "Weekend at Bernie's II," never actually goes to Bernie's at all. But at least it's a two-joke movie.

In addition to the dead-guy-bonking-into-things gags, there is also a voodoo spell cast over Bernie, which causes him to get up and dance every time he hears music. This joke is also beaten into the ground . . . so to speak.

The biggest difference here, however, is that the sequel gets no laughs whatsoever.

Silverman and especially McCarthy seem even more stupid, sexist and obnoxious this time out, as they take Bernie's body to the Virgin Islands to look for the missing $2 million.

In pursuit is bungling insurance investigator Barry Bostwick, looking like a low-rent Frank Langella. But then, no one looks good in this picture.

At one point Bernie is shown dancing under the sea, an accurate metaphor for the film itself — which is also dead in the water.

"Weekend at Bernie's II" is rated PG for comic violence, profanity, vulgarity and plenty of female near-nudity on the beach.

Источник: https://www.deseret.com/1993/7/14/20088960/film-review-weekend-at-bernie-s-ii

Warner Theater To Present Screening of WEEKEND AT BERNIE'S

Warner Theater To Present Screening of WEEKEND AT BERNIE'S

It's Not Just a Movie...It's a Movie at the Warner! Get dressed in your summer best and head to the Warner Theater on Friday, March 1 at 8 pm when WEEKEND AT BERNIE'S will be shown on the big screen, sponsored by Elevator Service Company. Doors open at 7 pm and tickets are just $5!

It sounded like a great weekend away at their boss Bernie's beachside pleasure palace. But when working stiffs Richard and Larry (Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman) arrive to find a real stiff - their murdered boss - they're forced to concoct a crazy scheme to avoid being implicated and/or dead themselves! With Bernie propped up and his death effectively covered up, Richard and Larry's weekend escape becomes exactly that, as they dodge curious babes, a curtain of bullets and one confused hit man!

Hilarious performances by McCarthy and Silverman make this fatally funny comedy a "good old, knockdown slapstick with just the right dose of cruelty thrown in" (The Hollywood Reporter)!

Rated PG-13. To purchase tickets, call the Warner Box Office at 860-489-7180 or visit warnertheatre.org.

Built by Warner Brothers Studios and opened in 1931 as a movie palace (1,772 seats), the Warner Theatre was described then as "Connecticut's Most Beautiful Theatre." Damaged extensively in a flood, the Warner was slated for demolition in the early 1980s until the non-profit Northwest Connecticut Association for the Arts (NCAA) was founded and purchased the theatre. The Warner reopened as a performing arts center in 1983, and restoration of the main lobbies and auditorium was completed in November 2002. In 2008, the new 50,000 square foot Carole and Ray Neag Performing Arts Center, which houses a 300 seat Studio Theatre, 200 seat restaurant and expansive school for the arts, was completed. Today, the Warner is in operation year-round with more than 160 performances and 100,000 patrons passing through its doors each season. Over 10,000 students, pre K-adult, participate in arts education programs and classes. Together, with the support of the community, the Warner has raised close to $17 million to revitalize its facilities. NCAA's mission is to preserve the Warner Theatre as an historic landmark, enhance its reputation as a center of artistic excellence and a focal point of community involvement, and satisfy the diverse cultural needs of the region. To learn more about the Warner Theatre, visit our website: www.warnertheatre.org

Источник: https://www.broadwayworld.com/connecticut/article/Warner-Theater-To-Present-Screening-of-WEEKEND-AT-BERNIES-20190109

German Women Try To Pull Off Real Life Weekend At Bernies

You’ve seen Weekend at Bernies (but hopefully not Weekend at Bernie’s II). And as ridiculous as the premise is, you know you always wanted to try it. You’d love to get some string, a funky little hat, a pair of sunglasses and see if you could pass off a dead person as alive. You just never had a readily available corpse to work with. Well, a couple of German ladies, Gilla Jarant and Anka Anusic, gave it the old Studienplatz try. According to Blackbook, they tried to pass off their husband/step-father as “sleeping” while getting on a plane to Berlin.

Authorities noticed something amiss when the “disabled” guy, Curt Willi Jurant, was, oh what’s the word, oh yeah: dead. The two women tried to get Curt on the plane, claiming he needed assistance. They loaded him on an airport taxi in the attempt to get him seated on the plane. The airport worker immediately noticed something was wrong when the guy wasn’t breathing, couldn’t lift his head up, and acted a little too much like Gary Busey. Hadn’t these ladies seen the movie? What they should have done was tied their hands and legs to Curt and done a little funky dance down the tarmac while making him wave to passersby.

Not to make light of the dead (probably too late), but what is going through your head when you load a dead person on board a plane? Luckily no reggae music started playing; the old guy would have started dancing in the aisles.

Doug began writing for CinemaBlend back when Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles actually existed. Since then he's been writing This Rotten Week, predicting RottenTomatoes scores for movies you don't even remember for the better part of a decade. He can be found re-watching The Office for the infinity time.

Источник: https://www.cinemablend.com/new/German-Women-Try-Pull-Off-Real-Life-Weekend-Bernies-17979.html

'Weekend at Bernie's' is 25. Here is How it Would Really Happen

Bernie Lomax just won’t die. His grinning corpse made its debut in “Weekend at Bernie’s,” the unlikely buddy comedy released 25 years ago on Saturday.

Like its titular character, “Weekend at Bernie’s” somehow managed to keep moving long after it should have been proclaimed deceased. In 2010, the song/dance craze “Move it Like Bernie” became a YouTube hit, garnering more than 12.2 million views. Two years later, a pair of dudes drove around Denver with their friend’s corpse in the car and used his debit card to fund a night at a strip club. Good luck finding a headline in America that failed to reference “Weekend at Bernie’s.”

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In the movie, two wild-eyed New Yorkers escort the dead body of their boss, Bernie, around Hampton Island during a wild Labor Day weekend. Just how absurd is this scenario? We asked Daniel Wescott, a forensic anthropologist at Texas State University, to explain the science (or lack thereof) behind “Weekend at Bernie’s.”

The first problem with the movie: Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman have a pretty easy time moving Bernie’s body around. Sure, they look kind of strained while hoisting him up, but according to Wescott, without the dead person’s assistance, it would feel like “trying to carry a 150-pound bag of loose potatoes.”

Not to mention that Bernie would be stiff as a board for most of the movie. At a raucous party in his mansion, thanks to a few head nods and loose limbs, everyone keeps right on sipping champagne with no idea that their host has entered the great beyond.

But only two to four hours after his death — pretty much when the party breaks out — rigor mortis (muscle stiffness) would become a factor.

“Once rigor set in it would be very difficult for them to move Bernie’s joints,” Wescott said. “It will usually start to dissipate by 24 hours. So, for much of the movie he would have been in rigor.”

The next day after his death, Bernie is propped up in a golf cart, his arms waved at the locals. He even spends some time sunbathing by the pool. The whole time he looks good — healthy even!

In real life, this is what would happen: Soon after death, autolysis would begin. That is the process in which cells break down, and bacteria, fungi and protozoa start the putrefaction process, which produces several gases. Side effects include bloating, discoloration of the skin and a bad smell.

“By the end of the weekend, he would probably be turning green or black in the face and abdomen and his face and belly would be starting to show signs of bloat,” Wescott said.

Oh, and the proteins in his eyes would start to denature, not to mention Bernie would become a fly magnet.

“Once flies locate the body they tend to lay eggs during daylight in natural orifices of the body and open wounds,” Wescott said. “Flies are attracted to dead bodies almost immediately. Therefore, Bernie would have had flies buzzing around during most of the movie.”

Not exactly a guy you would want to party with. At one point in the movie, Bernie is dragged out to sea, washing back ashore just as Jonathan Silverman’s character is kissing Catherine Mary Stewart (of “The Last Starfighter” fame!) on the beach. Even more awkward than seeing a corpse float by during a make-out session: smelling one that probably would have been feasted on by “crabs and other small animals.”

Oddly enough, one of the more realistic scenarios involves the two main characters using Bernie’s body as a flotation device.

“The body would float if it was in bloat stage,” Wescott said. “However, by this point the body would be starting to marble and change color and smell really bad.”

When the movie ends, Bernie is in good enough shape to dance in a conga line in the inevitable sequel, “Weekend at Bernie’s II.” He would not fare so well in the real world.

To answer Andrew McCarthy’s question, “What kind of host invites you over for the weekend and dies on you?” A stiff, bloated, insect-covered, smelly one.

Источник: https://www.nbcnews.com/science/weird-science/weekend-bernies-25-here-how-it-would-really-happen-n146551

In a decision that was absolutely fitting for what has been a wild, bizarre and awesome two months of Oakland A's baseball, the team invited Terry Kiser to throw out the first pitch on Saturday. Kiser is most well known for his role as Bernie Lomax in Weekend At Bernie's and Weekend At Bernie's 2.

Why was the man known as Bernie on hand? Well, as the Oakland Athletics have rolled through a dominating July and August, they have become big proponents of a dance called the "Bernie Lean". The dance comes from a song by ATM & IMD and has become a favorite weekend at bernies dance the A's clubhouse, most notably Brandon Inge, Josh Reddick and Coco Crisp.

The A's decided to turn this weekend into a "Weekend At Bernie's" tribute weekend, with the man who played Bernie in attendance. Terry Kiser attended Friday night's 20-2 stomping of the Red Sox and was back Saturday evening to throw out the first pitch. During his first pitch, Kiser was all about Bernie:

Here is a picture (courtesy of Brodie Brazil) of Kiser being helped off after the first pitch in his "Bernie" state:

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Источник: https://bayarea.sbnation.com/2012/9/1/3286284/terry-kiser-bernie-lomax-first-pitch-video-the-bernie-dance-oakland-athletics

Weekend At Bernies 2 Dance

Tenor
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Источник: https://tenor.com/search/weekend-at-bernies-2-dance-gifs

A film is a petrified fountain of thought. – Jean Cocteau

Nobody is going to confuse “Weekend at Bernie’s” for a comedic masterpiece. Even though it was popular enough to spawn a sequel, it is mostly thought of with the kind of nostalgia you are vaguely embarrassed about. Like, “I can’t believe we liked that movie.” I look back on it fondly because it was a movie I loved as a kid. Still, its legend has endured in an odd way, and clearly, I’m not the only one who feels this way. Twenty-three years after its release, the film continues to echo through our culture.

It’s obvious that “Weekend at Bernie’s” is not a political film. It’s a pretty straightforward albeit ridiculous story. But when we look closely at any movie that outperforms its box office expectations, we usually find that it has hit some kind of social or cultural nerve that was previously hidden. “Weekend at Bernie’s” is no exception. It seems in fact as if the movie was, at some point in its production, meant to be a sharp satire of ‘80s culture and economic policy, but it was watered down to be a cheap farce. Still, there remains a nugget of sharp satire that is worthy of being explored.

Bernie Lomax, the president of a successful insurance company, represents the new American Dream. In the ‘50s and ‘60s, young Americans dreamed of a family, a house in the suburbs, and a white picket fence. But when Larry (Andrew McCarthy) and Richard (Jonathan Silverman), two entry-level analysts, look at their boss, they see a man who has it all: a “beautiful apartment, house at the beach, babes, boats, cars.” The “go-go ‘80s” created an entire generation that sought not just to be financially independent but also to become masters of the universe and to attain all of the fleeting pleasures that came with it. Bernie is a manifestation of those goals, but while Larry and Richard may idolize him, the film is more interested in satirizing his lifestyle.

The movie’s centerpiece is a party scene in which half of the Hamptons show up at Bernie’s house shortly after he has died. Larry and Richard, still deciding whether to call the police, have him propped up on the couch and don’t have time to move him before the party quite suddenly arrives. It’s a surreal and funny scene that illuminates how shallow and self-involved the guests are. As they drift in and out of conversation with the corpse, a light is cast on the ‘80s upper-class mentality.

What we see is an entire class of people who are totally disconnected from reality. They are so focused on immediate fulfillment of their material desires that they do not even notice whether the person they are speaking to is alive. All they see is what he can do for them, and their goals do not even require a living being. This scene shows how materialism dehumanizes us, forcing us to de-emphasize human connection in favor of the acquisition of lowest interest rate for mortgage refinance immediately bank of america card fraud department to the mind director Hal Ashby’s “Being There,” the brilliant 1974 satire of Washington, DC and the culture of television. The dynamic is similar, but instead of a corpse, Ashby used an idiot. In that film, Chauncey Gardner, a middle-aged house servant, is thrust out into the streets of Washington for the first time after his employer dies, his only knowledge of the world what he learned from watching television. When his naivete is mistaken for sage wisdom, he becomes a hit among the D.C. power players, even garnering a meeting with the president. As Chauncey hits the cocktail scene and some of the most powerful people in the world become increasingly enchanted with him, the film shows the self-involvement and short-sightedness of our policymakers. This idea culminates in an absurd sex scene in which an unhappy Washington wife lures Chauncey to bed and gets herself off on his presence alone, while he sits idly by, watching television. “Bernie” contains a similar – if less satirically sharp – scene in which Bernie’s mistress has sex with his corpse, of course without noticing he is dead.

Given the current state of the economy and Hollywood’s eagerness to remake just about every movie released in ‘80s, I am surprised no one has gotten around to “Weekend at Bernie’s” yet. It seems a good fit for these times. Public antipathy towards corrupt CEOs is far higher now than it was in 1989, and resentment between generations – a theme present but largely unexplored in the original – is a theme american express high yield savings referral has found its way into several successful films this year already. How about this? Instead of an insurance magnate, make Bernie a financial advisor or hedge fund manager who is secretly bilking his clients out of millions in an elaborate Ponzi scheme. Hey, you wouldn’t even have to change the title. 

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June 13, 2012 in Analysis. Tags: Andrew McCarthy, Being There, Hal Ashby, Peter Sellers, Weekend at Bernie'sИсточник: https://reelchange.net/2012/06/13/ripe-for-a-remake-weekend-at-bernies-and-the-culture-of-the-1980s/

My Eulogy for Weekend at Bernie’s: Summer’s #1 Dark Comedy of the ’80s

Weekend at Bernie's movie poster

Weekend at Bernie’s movie poster

Weekend at Bernie’s was released in the U.S. on July 5th, 1989. Fast forward 30 years later and I’m writing a blog post about it. Totally not a waste of time at all.

At the time Weekend at Bernie’s released, I was 8 years old. It was the summer before 4th grade. I might’ve had a sick flat-top haircut and I was obsessed with Bo Jackson and Neon Deion Sanders. Taylor Swift didn’t weekend at bernies dance family was living in Westwood, Massachusetts, a Boston suburb that’s home to former NFL QB Matt Hasselbeck. I’d be lying if I said I saw WaB in the theater but you best believe I saw this almost every single time it aired on HBO.

If you haven’t seen the movie, I don’t know that you can fully appreciate it today. Try to place yourself in the mind of an adolescent boy in the late ’80s. Should be simple enough.

Bernie’s follows two guys who work at an insurance corporation and discover insurance fraud. After reporting this to their boss, he invites them to his beach house for the weekend. Turns out, the boss is the fraudster and he’s hired a hitman to murder his employees. The mafia decides the boss is a major liability, so they off him instead. Two employees show up, discover boss is dead, and have to pretend he’s alive until they figure shit out.

Evan Smith of Script Magazine wrote a helpful article about comedy writing. In it, he states that the best comedy movies and tv shows feature protagonists making bad decisions. Weekend at Bernie’s is a masterclass in bad decisions.

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Taglines

  • Bernie Lomax would be the perfect host, except for one small thing. He’s dead.
  • Bernie would be the perfect host, except for one small thing. . he’s dead. Now, he’s the life of the party.
  • A lively comedy about a guy who isn’t.
  • Bernie may be dead, but he’s still the life of the party!
  • Bernie Lomax would be the perfect host, except for one small problem: He’s dead.
  • The drop dead comedy of the year!
  • Two morons. One corpse. And the plot thickens…

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Cast

Andrew McCarthy (St. Elmo’s Fire, Pretty in Pink, Mannequin) as Larry Wilson

In a 2017 interview with AV Club, McCarthy said this about the film:

“I mean, that movie was completely stupid and fantastic. It’s the stupidest movie. I love it. I love Bernie’s. My son—he’s 15—he saw Weekend. He’s never seen anything I’ve been in, my kids, but he saw Weekend At Bernie’s, and he said, “Dad, that movie is really stupid.” But I love Bernie. I think Bernie is great. I mean, it was ridiculous. We knew at the time it was ridiculous, and there was no top to go over. You can just do anything… that movie has its own logic.”

Jonathan Silverman (Girls Just Want To Have Fun, Caddyshack II, The Single Guy) as Richard Parker

Catherine Mary Stewart (The Last Starfighter) as Gwen Saunders

Terry Kiser as Bernie Lomax — I wonder if it chaps his ass that he’s got 152 acting credits and his most memorable is playing a corpse

Don Calfa (Return of the Living Dead) as Paulie, Vito’s Hit Man

Catherine Parks (Friday the 13th Part III) as Tina, Vito’s Girl – She held the titles of Miss Tampa, Miss Hillsborough County and Miss Florida, and was 4th runner up at the 1978 Miss America Pageant

Eloise DeJoria (Don’t Mess with the Zohan, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps) as Tawny — Playboy Playmate of the Month April 1988.
Was a child bride, married at age 15, but divorced soon after.

BREAKING DOWN THE TRAILER & CLIPS

“For Larry and Richard, this is a place to die for. But what they don’t realize, is while they’re checking in, Bernie Lomax will be checking out.”

Mmmm mmm, the cheese on those lines. Enough to clog a couple arteries. Feel like my dad jokes would’ve crushed in the ’80s.

Never has a corpse been as desecrated as this. Never has a death been more ridiculed, bank owned homes in houston tx, and minimized. And I still can’t help but laugh. Bernie was more beloved in death than he was in life. Could this movie be released today? Probably not. Imagine sitting in a theater and that preview runs. If any of this takes place in the winter, it’s a no-go but the summer beach house vibes seal the deal.

CLIP 1: Richard wants Gwen…

…so he makes up a story about his parents perished in train accident that involved a plane falling on it. Gwen is eating it up, which is standard for most female love interests of the ’80s. Like, do you have a brain? The most revealing line in this whole clip is Gwen asking “You let your butler talk to you like that?” It’s funny but also implies Gwen does not fuck around with the help. Ay-chihuahua. So, yeah, it sets the tone because we see Gwen’s about that life and Richard will have to really be about that life to “get” Gwen.

FUN FACT: Richard’s dad (in the undies) is the director. It should be a law that directors have to appear in their are banks in georgia open today films. Always a good Easter egg.

CLIP 2: Richard finds the heroin needle in Bernie’s pocket…

…and discovers his boss is dead. While Richard tries to process it all, we get to see Larry’s self-centered behavior on full display. As silly as the movie is, this scene really illustrates the differences between Richard (more thoughtful) and Larry (egotistic).

Of course, one could argue that Richard’s idea of personal success or aspirations has been rocked to its very core by Bernie’s demise and that feeling supersedes anything he actually felt for Bernie. So, in a way, he’s looking out for his own interests as well but it’s more veiled than Larry’s. What a challenge for the writer to get viewers on board with these two.

CLIP 3 – The ‘floating party’ wanders in and lets the good times roll.

No one realizes Bernie’s dead. Even after Richard tells a partygoer the bad news, the guest responds with “That’s the idea, isn’t it?” What a line. So deep, so profound, so on the nose. We’re all just dying and Bernie’s crossed the finish line. Partying is a celebration of life but, for some, it’s also an escape from life (i.e. death). The beach house during the summer is the perfect location for all this shit to go down. Everyone’s carefree, living it up, pushing rumors and gossip, trying to get laid and impressing other people in the most casual way possible.

But, I should leave the dissection and analysis to the pros. Like Mikel Koven, the University of Worcester lecturer who wrote “Traditional Narrative, Popular Aesthetics, Weekend at Bernie’s, and Vernacular Cinema,” published in Of Corpse: Death and Humor in Folklore and Popular Culture. In that selection, he suggested that the movie is a satire of the upper class of the late ’80s, “whose self-indulgences and self-obsessions make them oblivious to Bernie’s dilemma.”

Kinda weird to say that Bernie has a dilemma. There’s no choice to be made. It was made for him. Unless the director’s cut has some scenes in purgatory? But, the themes of self-indulgences and self-obsessions is spot on.

CLIP 4 – Larry and Richard carry Bernie out of the party…

…while Gwen gets hit on by the drunk buddy of our deeply profound Martini swigger with swagger. I mean, “Polyester doesn’t crumple”? Our guy did it again. Quite possibly the best back-to-back lines in movie history.

The guy trying to sell Bernie his Porsche gets his way. Who wears a sweatband and sweater over their shoulders to a beach party in the summer? A Porsche owner. Duh. You have to know that there are probably dozens of verbal deals going down at this party that won’t actually get executed anytime soon.

Larry spots Gwen on the beach and Richard decides to make his move. Larry continues to roll with the punches with aplomb. Vocab teacher would be proud. Why didn’t you report this dead body to the police? Sorry, officer, but I would like to report a hot body to my bedroom. Yowza! 

This also positions Gwen as someone who doesn’t want to be a part of that floating party. Maybe she’s not as conformist or elitist as we thought? She’s not trying to work her way up the social ladder through vapid exchanges. Still can’t get over the butler weekend at bernies dance – Gwen’s seeking something different.

CLIP 5 – Richard makes out with Gwen on the beach.

Bernie washes up on shore. The party’s died down. Just about everyone’s left. Richard finds our Quote Machine seemingly dead on the couch, but turns out he passed out.

Meanwhile, Larry’s getting down to business. The business of knocking them boots. It’s coitus interruptus all around. All hands on deck to fish Bernie out of the water.

CLIP 6 – A woman in lingerie has sex with Bernie…

…while one of the mobsters watches through binocs. If you thought I had questions about sex as an 8-year-old before this scene, you best believe the inquiries went way up watching a hot woman sit on a stiff with stiffie. Dad, do all dogs go to heaven? Yeah, cool. Do we all die with a boner?

Pro tip for all you eligible bachelors — you find a girl who smokes and downs scotch neat, you’ve found yourself one helluva morning-after story.

Here’s Jonathan Silverman’s take on the necrophilia, from “Weekend at Bernie’s and the Art of the Crazy ’80s Comedy“:

“…a better theory for why fans embraced its particular brand of insanity comes from Silverman, who admitted in 2005 that Bernie’s aforementioned off-screen necrophilia bit did give him pause: “This is me reading the script: ‘Who the f— is going to find this funny?’ But people did. And they found it endearing… Terry Kiser did something so clever: He died with a smirk on his face, which let the audience love him.”

CLIP 7 – A little kid buries Bernie under the sand.

Kinda ironic the guys get pissed at the kid for doing what they should be doing. It’s also fitting that Larry doesn’t remember the Hail Mary. These guys have been obliterating every religious mandate known to man, they’re not men of faith.

CLIP 8 – I gotta admit. Andrew McCarthy can MOVE.

The guy’s quick, swift, slick. Kudos to the costume designer for outfitting him in a flowing, unbuttoned button-down shirt. When he’s flying around, the shirt catches air. It’s like watching americas next top model season 10 caped crusader swoop.

Say what you will about the stupidity of the film and its main characters, but it’s the little things that make this movie so beloved. There are 2 examples in this scene alone:

  1. The synchronized backflips from the couple that got knocked off their boat.
  2. The hoity-toity dude in the captain’s hat, blazer, and ascot who points and kind of matter-of-factly shout-talks “That’s illegal! What you’re doing is illegal!”

I was wrong about not being able to appreciate this on a second viewing as a “mature” adult. Those flew right under the radar as a kid.

CLIP 9 – Larry and Richard get distracted by BIKINI BAAAAAAABES…

…and almost crash twice before getting launched by a wave that causes Bernie to fall off the back. This movie is one long chain reaction of dominoes falling.

Onlookers think Bernie’s “showing off again”… in khakis, a windbreaker, and boatshoes without skis. Like McCarthy said in his interview, it’s a world with its own logic and that logic is “Why let death ruin your life?” and “Live your best death”. Some would say it’s that never-say-die attitude that is so very American. Makes sense this was released Fourth of July week.

Also, an insurance guy (Bernie) naming his boat “Premiums” is such a beautifully understated joke. Cue Blink 182’s “All the Small Things”.

CLIP 10 – Gwen confronts Richard about Bernie…

…claiming he lied about Lomax croaking. Larry provides the receipt. Gwen freaks out. One of the all-time reactions. Have to think she got the part on that reaction alone.

Also, “Do we look like killers?” followed by cracking skulls with bottles is a ballet of buffoonery that’s bellisimo.

***

Of course, critics hated it. That’s what they do. They heart comedies like “Get Out”. Except for The Hollywood Reporter, which called WaB a “good old, knock-down slapstick”.

Weekend At Bernies GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

Did you know…

…the working title was “Hot and Cold”

Oof. Talk about dodging a bullet. Where are we as a world if “Hot and Cold” is the title? Would we be in The Upside Down? The Darkest Timeline? We definitely don’t get the Bernie dance. No Bernie Sanders memes. There’s no sequel. It’s possible Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman quit acting altogether. Do we even get Swiss Army Man?

SIDE NOTE: Isn’t it bonkers that I can’t bring myself to watch Swiss Army Man as a grown-ass man but I watched 2 dudes toss around a lifeless Bernie before I hit double digits?

…this was considered as a possible vehicle for Corey Haim and Corey Feldman?

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The film was a commercial success with Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman. It was in the top 40 grossers of ’89, out-earning Road House, Say Anything, Do The Right Thing, and the Hulk Hogan classic No Holds Barred. But, with the Two Coreys coming off 1987’s The Lost Boys and 1988’s License to Drive, I could see Bernie’s busting into the top 20. I mean, Harlem Nights was at 21 and Sea of Love was 22 that year and I can’t tell you a single thing about either one.

A stuntman broke a rib while filming the scene where Bernie is dragged behind a boat. (Via People)

“Actor Terry Kiser played Bernie in both his pre- and post-death forms, but he left the truly dangerous work to the professionals, one of whom suffered multiple injuries during this boating scene. They couldn’t have used a mannequin?”

The shady accounting practices used in the film were also used on the film. (via People)

“At least, that’s what director Ted Kotcheff and writer Robert Klane allege in a lawsuit against 20th Century Fox and MGM. Both men say their contracts for the film included a percentage of its profits, millions of dollars of which they have not seen a penny. The lawsuit has not yet been settled, but if we were the two of them, we’d refrain from going to the Hamptons alone for a little while.”

Yes, the dark slapstick comedy was directed by Ted Kotcheff (North Dallas Forty, Rambo First Blood, Red Shoe Diaries). What an eclectic array of credits. Sports comedy, blockbuster action flick with a high body-count, and softcore erotica. Might seem like chaos, but Ted was the perfect choice. Action, sex, machismo. The perfect blend for peak ’80s-ness.

Robert Klane wrote the script. His credits include weekend at bernies dance Lampoon’s European Vacation, The Man with One Red Shoe, and M*A*S*H*. Again, you can’t do any better. Fish out of water + average Joe in over his head + experience with dead bodies.

Weekend at Bernie’s was the crown jewel of production company Gladden Entertainment but they also gave us Mannequin, Gleaming the Cube, and The Fabulous Baker Boys. There might not be a more ’80s string of movies out there on the ‘net. Gladden was founded by David Begelman who was involved in an embezzlement scandal in the ’70s. Talk about life imitating art. They say write (or produce) what you know.

REBOOT or REMAKE?

My initial thought was no way. But then I read this Reddit comment…

 

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Filed Under: Entertainment, MoviesTagged With: andrew mccarthy, catherine mary stewart, catherine weekend at bernies dance, jonathan silverman, movie, movies, terry kiser, weekend at bernie's, weekend at weekend at bernies dance cast
Источник: https://neallynch.com/2019/07/17/weekend-at-bernies-summer-dark-comedy-80s/

Bernie Dance Meme

mammal room standing

About

Bernie Dance (also known as "Moving Like Bernie") is a dance style performed by leaning one's head back and wobbling with loosely held arms. The movements resemble the character Bernie Lomax's walk from the 1993 comedy film Weekend at Bernies II.

Origin

On March 4th, 2009, the bernietv1 YouTube channel uploaded a music video for the song "Weekend At Bernie's Dance" by the rap artist Tre-Doh. In the video, Tre-Doh falls asleep while watching the 1993 comedy film Weekend at Bernie's II and dreams about performing the Bernie dance.


Weekend at Bernie's II

On July 9th, 1993, the comedy film Weekend at Bernie's II was released, which starred Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman. In the film, a deceased man is animated with voodoo magic to walk toward hidden treasure when music is played. The movie was the sequel to the 1989 comedy Weekend at Bernie's, in which two insurance corporation employees attempt to convince people that their deceased boss Bernie Lomax is still alive.


Spread

On July 14th, 2009, YouTuber LHOTDOGSPT uploaded a music video titled “Moving like Berney [sic]," (shown below) featuring a montage of people performing the dance to the song with the same name by the rap artist ISA.


On October 27th, 2010, a reupload of the video was posted on the /r/WTF subreddit in a post titled "I'm convinced black people make shit like this up to troll white people", which accumulated 762 up votes prior to being archived. The following day, the video was posted on the viral content site BuzzFeed, the Internet humor blog Blame it on the Voices and the entertainment blog Best Week Ever. Within three years, the original upload received over 2,200,000 views and the reupload accumulated over 9,700,000 views. On November 10th, an Urban Dictionary definition for "Move it Like Bernie" was submitted by user Sleepy Dumb, who described it as a "hyphy-esque dance craze."

Move it Like Bernie A hyphy-esque dance craze in which you "hold yo head back like a nosebleed comin through" while letting the body get loose and like Bernie Weekend At Bernies 1 & 2. 209 up, 49 down Move t. The reference comes from the popular 1980's movies, Tonite I'm gon thizz, get dumb!!!! and Move it like Bernie!l Get dead and hyphy text font line product

On November 22nd, the song "Moving Like Bernie" was released for sale on the Apple iTunes music store. On November 27th, YouTuber Sparklesl2008 uploaded a video titled "4 yr old super star moving like berney [sic]" (shown below, left), which featured a young boy performing the Bernie Dance. Within two years the video received over 3,400,000 views. On July 9th, 2011, thomaston savings bank careers Bernie Dance flash mob took place at Bardstown Road in Louisville, KY, where participants danced by the side of a road for three minutes (shown below, right).


Notable Examples

Several YouTubers uploaded videos of people performing the dance, most of which used the track "Moving Like Bernie" by ISA as background music.


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Источник: https://knowyourmeme.com/memes/bernie-dance

The first "Weekend at Bernie's," released in 1989, stretched its one-joke premise to wire-thin extremes:

Two insurance employees (Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman) discover that their their boss, a thug named Bernie (Terry Kiser), has embezzled $2 million. They go to his lavish digs, where they witness his murder, and then spend the rest of the film trying to make it appear that he's not really dead.

As a result, the film overdoses on dead-guy-bonking-into-things gags but somehow does manage to get some laughs.

The sequel, imaginatively titled "Weekend at Bernie's II," never actually goes to Bernie's at all. But at least it's a two-joke movie.

In addition to the dead-guy-bonking-into-things gags, there is also a voodoo spell cast over Bernie, which causes him to get up and dance every time he hears music. This joke is also beaten into the ground. . so to speak.

The biggest difference here, however, is that the sequel gets no laughs whatsoever.

Silverman and especially McCarthy seem even more stupid, sexist and obnoxious this time out, as they take Bernie's body to the Virgin Islands to look for the missing $2 million.

In pursuit is bungling insurance investigator Barry Bostwick, looking like a low-rent Frank Langella. But then, no one looks good in this picture.

At one point Bernie is shown dancing under the sea, an accurate metaphor for the film itself — which is also dead in the water.

"Weekend at Bernie's II" is rated PG for comic violence, profanity, vulgarity and plenty of female near-nudity on the beach.

Источник: https://www.deseret.com/1993/7/14/20088960/film-review-weekend-at-bernie-s-ii

'Weekend at Bernie's' is 25. Here is How it Would Really Happen

Bernie Lomax just won’t die. His grinning corpse made its debut in “Weekend at Bernie’s,” the unlikely buddy comedy released 25 years ago on Saturday.

Like its titular character, “Weekend at Bernie’s” somehow managed to keep moving long after it should have been proclaimed deceased. In 2010, the song/dance craze “Move it Like Bernie” became a YouTube hit, garnering more than 12.2 million views. Two years later, a pair of dudes drove around Denver with their friend’s corpse in the car and used his debit card to fund a night at a strip club. Good luck finding a headline in America that failed to reference “Weekend at Bernie’s.”

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In the movie, two wild-eyed New Yorkers escort the dead body of their boss, Bernie, around Hampton Island during a wild Labor Day weekend. Just how absurd etrade log on capital one this scenario? We asked Daniel Wescott, a forensic anthropologist at Texas State University, to explain the science (or lack thereof) behind “Weekend at Bernie’s.”

The first problem with the movie: Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman have a pretty easy time moving Bernie’s body around. Sure, they look kind of strained while hoisting him up, but according to Wescott, without the dead person’s assistance, it would feel like “trying to carry a 150-pound bag of loose potatoes.”

Not to mention that Bernie would be stiff as a board for most of the movie. At a raucous party in his mansion, thanks to a few head nods and loose limbs, everyone keeps right on sipping champagne with no idea that their host has entered the great beyond.

But only two to four hours after his death — pretty much when the party breaks out — rigor mortis (muscle stiffness) would become a factor.

“Once rigor set in it would be very difficult for them to move Bernie’s joints,” Wescott said. “It will usually start to dissipate by 24 hours. So, for much of the movie he would have been in rigor.”

The next day after his death, Bernie is propped up in a golf cart, his arms waved at the locals. He even spends some time sunbathing by the pool. The whole time he looks good — healthy even!

In real life, this is what would happen: Soon after death, autolysis would begin. That is the process in which cells break down, and bacteria, fungi and protozoa start the putrefaction process, which produces several gases. Side effects include bloating, discoloration of the skin and a bad smell.

“By the end of the weekend, he would probably be turning green or black in the face and abdomen and his face and belly would be starting to show signs of bloat,” Wescott said.

Oh, and the proteins in his eyes would start to denature, not to mention Bernie would become a fly magnet.

“Once flies locate the body they tend to lay eggs during daylight in natural orifices of the body and open wounds,” Wescott said. “Flies are attracted to dead bodies almost immediately. Therefore, Bernie would have had flies buzzing around during most of the movie.”

Not exactly a guy you would want to party with. At one point in the movie, Bernie is dragged out to sea, washing back ashore just as Jonathan Silverman’s character is kissing Catherine Mary Stewart (of “The Last Starfighter” fame!) on the beach. Even more awkward than seeing a corpse float by during a make-out session: smelling one that probably would have been feasted on by “crabs and other small animals.”

Oddly enough, one of the more realistic scenarios involves the two main characters using Bernie’s body as a flotation device.

“The body would float if it was in bloat stage,” Wescott said. “However, by this point the body would be starting to marble and change color and smell really bad.”

When the movie ends, Bernie is in good enough shape to dance in a conga line in the inevitable sequel, “Weekend at Bernie’s II.” He would not fare so well in the real world.

To answer Andrew McCarthy’s question, “What kind of host invites you over for the weekend and dies on you?” A stiff, bloated, insect-covered, smelly one.

Источник: https://www.nbcnews.com/science/weird-science/weekend-bernies-25-here-how-it-would-really-happen-n146551

Thematic video

Weekend at Bernie's 2 (1993) The Conga Line

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