when was i ll be home for christmas written

That year, his first song was published, entitled “For Tonight.” A few years later, he was writing for films as well, starting with the title song for “Always. The song "I'll Be Home for Christmas" almost never got recorded, he said. Written in 1943 by Kimball Gannon about a soldier writing to his. 6. "I'll Be Home for Christmas" by Johnny Mathis (1958) Johnny Mathis' version is slow and dreamlike, as if the narrator is lost in thought. when was i ll be home for christmas written

When was i ll be home for christmas written -

One of Canadian-born country artist Meghan Patrick's favorite Christmas songs is particularly apt this year. The singer is releasing her version of the classic "I'll Be Home for Christmas" -- premiering exclusively on The Boot -- ahead of a holiday season she likely won't be spending her family.

Bing Crosby made "I'll Be Home for Christmas" famous in 1943 -- the height of World War II -- when he recorded the Kim Gannon and Walter Kent-written song, sung from a soldier's point of view. Patrick heard the song often during her childhood, and as she's grown up, lived away from home and become a touring artist, she's more deeply connected to its emotions.

"Growing up, my mom always went all out with decorations, food, music and traditions at Christmastime ... As someone who moved out of my parents' house pretty young, and has spent a lot of time on the road and touring since, going home for Christmas was always something I really looked forward to," Patrick tells The Boot. "In light of this year’s challenges with COVID, and knowing that some people (myself included) may not be able to go home to be with their family because of it, “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” seemed like the perfect choice, to give everyone a bit of nostalgic hope leading up the holidays."

10 Must-Own Country Christmas Albums:

A Bowmansville, Ontario, native, Patrick grew up hunting, fishing and mountain biking, and with dreams of becoming a professional snowboarder. However, after she broke her back and collarbone and suffered a concussion in a fall on the slopes, she started songwriting while recovering and decided to go to school to pursue music.

An opera program wasn't a good fit, so she switched to a jazz program -- still not quite right, so she dropped out and started touring with a bluegrass group. “Right before that band ended, we got invited to play this huge country music festival in Ontario. That was my first exposure to country fans in a large setting like that, and I fell in love with the atmosphere immediately. I felt so seen and understood by that audience, like I naturally related to them and they related to me," Patrick recalls.

Now signed to Warner Music Canada, Patrick has released two albums and an EP, and has scored several Top 10 singles in her native Canada, including the No. 1 single "Walls Come Down." She's a back-to-back CCMA Female Artist of the Year winner and a Juno Award winner, and is now signed to Riser House Records in the United States.

"My First Car" is Patrick's debut single in the States. She now lives full-time in Nashville.

Listen to Meghan Patrick's Version of "I'll Be Home for Christmas":

Who Is Meghan Patrick? 5 Things You Need to Know:

Источник: https://theboot.com/meghan-patrick-ill-be-home-for-christmas-cover/

“I’ll Be Home for Christmas” is one of America’s most popular holiday songs

Originally recorded by Bing Crosby in 1943, “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” has become one of America’s most popular holiday songs and it’s still a big hit. The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) named it the #10 most-performed holiday song of the last century.

I’ll be home for Christmas
You can count on me
Please have snow and mistletoe
And presents on the tree
Christmas Eve will find me
Where the lovelight gleams
I’ll be home for Christmas
If only in my dreams

Bing Crosby publicity photo, c. 1930s

Bing Crosby publicity photo, c. 1930s

The song has been written from the perspective of a soldier serving overseas during World War II. The soldier is telling his family that he will be coming home for the holiday and requests snow, mistletoe, and presents on the tree. The 39 words long song “I’ll be Home for Christmas” ends on a melancholy note with the soldier saying, “I’ll be home for Christmas, if only in my dreams”.

“I’ll be Home for Christmas” was written by Walter Kent and Kim Gannon in 1943.

Later Sam “Buck” Ram was also credited as a co-writer of the song following a lawsuit brought by Ram’s publisher, Mills Music. Sam “Buck” Ram copyrighted a song titled “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” on December 21st, 1942. Besides the fact that the lyrics and the tune were different he sued successfully for shared credit and was credited as a co-writer of the song.

Gannon and Kent couldn’t get any takers for the tune because people in the music business felt that the final line was too sad for all those separated from their loved ones in the military. Crosby agreed to record it after Gannon sang the song for him while the two were playing golf.

1945 V-Disc release by the U.S. Army of "White Christmas" and "I'll Be Home for Christmas" by Bing Crosby

1945 V-Disc release by the U.S. Army of “White Christmas” and “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” by Bing Crosby

It was October 4th, 1943, when Crosby recorded the song under the title “I’ll Be Home For Christmas (If Only In My Dreams)” with the John Scott Trotter Orchestra for Decca Records. The song hit the music charts in a short period and it became one of the most requested songs at Crosby’s many USO shows throughout World War II.

In 1943 the world was at war and many Americans were out on the battlefields during Christmas. “I’ll Be Home For Christmas” was the best gift for many soldiers who were spending Christmas far from home and their families. It was a wartime favorite for many Americans says the Library of Congress:

A 1907 Christmas card with Santa and some of his reindeer

A 1907 Christmas card with Santa and some of his reindeer

“It touched a tender place in the hearts of Americans, both soldiers and civilians, who were then in the depths of World War II, and it earned Crosby his fifth gold record”.

However, not everyone loved “I’ll Be Home For Christmas” and BBC banned the song because they thought that the lyrics might lower morale among British troops.

Here is another fun read from us:The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is an iconic symbol of the holiday season

“I’ll Be Home For Christmas” has been covered by almost every artist who’s ever released a Christmas album, for example, Perry Como (1946), Frank Sinatra (1957) and countless other artists.

Источник: https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/12/09/ill-be-home-for-christmas-is-one-of-americas-most-popular-holiday-songs/

"I'll Be Home for Christmas" Song Lyrics (The Story of A WWII Soldier Longing For His Family)

By Karen Harris

The holiday greeting is spelled out by U.S. aviation Cadets in the Southeast Air Corps Training Center. (Getty Images)

"I'll Be Home For Christmas" was written by Kim Gannon and Walter Kent, but it's most closely associated with American singer Bing Crosby, who also struck holiday gold with his recording of another holiday favorite, "White Christmas." Gannon and Kent had approached several other singers to record "I'll Be Home For Christmas," but they all rejected the song because it was so crushingly sad. When Gannon sang it to Bing Crosby during a golf outing, however, Crosby agreed to record it on October 1, 1943, and the rest is history.

A U.S.O. Favorite

During World War II, Bing Crosby was one of the most popular entertainers in the United States and an especially popular U.S.O. performer. The soldiers in the audience begged him to sing "I'll Be Home For Christmas" regardless of the season, and according to Yank, the magazine of the American G.I. serving overseas, Crosby "accomplished more for military morale than anyone else of that era." A recording of Crosby's performance of the song on the December 7, 1944 broadcast of Kraft Music Hall Radio Show was even released by the United States War Department specifically for distribution to the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy.

(Mark Thomas/Pixabay)

What Is "I'll Be Home For Christmas" About?

"I'll Be Home For Christmas" was written well into World War II, when an estimated 16 million Americans (or 11% of the population) were serving in the armed forces. There was hardly a home in the country that didn't have a conspicuously empty place at the dinner table during the holiday season, and the loneliness of being separated during Christmas was universally felt. The melodic longing of a man stuck far away from home and hoping (though not optimistically) to return for Christmas spoke not only to the soldiers serving on the front lines but their loved ones on the home front as well.

The final line of "I'll Be Home For Christmas"—"If only in my dreams"— has been the subject of some debate. Some believe the line simply means the narrator suspects he'll dream of being home for the holidays while circumstances inevitably keep him away, but others interpret the line to mean he believes he'll never make it home at all and the only place he'll be there for Christmas ever again is in his mind. As much of a bummer as this interpretation adds to an already downer song, it was a bleak reality for the 416,800 soldiers who celebrated their last Christmas before the war was over.

(Decca Records/Wikimedia Commons)

Christmas Controversy

After "I'll Be Home For Christmas" became a hit, Sam "Buck" Ram, a songwriter who later became producer and manager for the Platters, claimed that he wrote a song by the same title which he copyrighted on December 21, 1942, well before Gannon and Kent wrote theirs in 1943. Ram's lyrics and tune were very different, but he sued the songwriting pair anyway, the courts ruled in his favor, and his name was added to the credits of "I'll Be Home For Christmas."

Although the song was beloved by soldiers and their families alike, the B.B.C. banned "I'll Be Home For Christmas" from its playlist for the duration of the war at the urging of U.K. military officials. They feared it would make their soldiers sad, especially as the holiday season approached, and sad people don't fight so well. 

(NASA/Wikimedia Commons)

I'll Be In Space For Christmas

On December 4, 1965, American astronauts Jim Lovell and Frank Borman blasted off in the Gemini 7 for a 14-day spaceflight, but first, the two-man crew requested that N.A.S.A. ground control play "I'll Be Home For Christmas" for them upon their return to Earth. Lovell and Borman touched down safely on December 18, just in time to celebrate.

I'm dreaming tonight of a place I love
Even more than I usually do
And although I know it's a long road back
I promise you
I'll be home for Christmas
You can count on me
Please have snow and mistletoe
And presents on the tree
Christmas Eve will find me
Where the love light gleams
I'll be home for Christmas
If only in my dreams
Please have snow and mistletoe
And presents on the tree
Christmas Eve will find me
Where the love light gleams
I'll be home for Christmas
If only in my dreams
If only in my dreams

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Karen Harris

Writer

Karen left the world of academic, quitting her job as a college professor to write full-time. She spends her days with her firefighter husband and four daughters on a hobby farm with an assortment of animals, including a goat named Atticus, a turkey named Gravy, and a chicken named Chickaletta.


Источник: https://historydaily.org

Here's The Real Significance Of 'I'll Be Home For Christmas'

In 1943 at the peak of World War II, Bing Crosby released the ever-popular “I’ll Be Home for Christmas,” and stirred the hearts of war-time Americans on the Homefront and overseas. Over time, other vocalists recorded their version of this timeless classic, but no one quite measures up to Crosby’s beautiful rendition.

The lyrics of this Christmas classic come from the perspective of a World War II soldier with the longing to be home on Christmas day, and many credit Crosby for boosting the morale of the military because of the resonance they found within this evocative song. In the timeless classic originally penned by James 'Kim' Gannon, the universal longing for home is displayed.

Home. Few words parallel the pleasure and joy associated with this word of comfort. Our hearts long for home and family more during the Christmas season than anytime else in the year. Our hearts desire the familiar feeling of enjoying time in the presence of those we love. O

ur hearts ache for the keeping of age-old traditions as we sit under the glow of a Christmas tree, but coming home for Christmas is not a reality for many.

“I’ll Be Home for Christmas” reflects the sometimes unattainable desire to come home as the song ends with a mournful phrase: “I’ll be home for Christmas / if only in my dreams…”

The next time I hear this Christmas song, I will think of those spending Christmas in camouflage and combat boots. Remember our soldiers (and their families) this Christmas who celebrate their Christmases overseas so we can celebrate ours in safety. Remember those who celebrate Christmas an ocean away from their loved ones because there really is no place like home for the holidays.

This Christmas, I am especially thankful for the men and women who spend their Christmas in war so we may spend ours in peace.

To support our troops and help them feel a little closer to home this Christmas season, consider sending a care package or letter to a soldier overseas: https://supportourtroops.org/care-packages

Join forces with our soldiers this holiday season.

Sources:

https://www.coldwellbanker.com/blog/the-story-of-i...

http://www.christmascarnivals.com/christmas-histor...

Источник: https://www.theodysseyonline.com/ill-be-home-for-christmas-significance

If there is one thing that is constant in this world, it is that the day after Halloween marks a multi-month-long non-negotiable stream of holiday music in just about every public place that has speakers. From coffee shops to convenience stores, your car radio to your dentist’s waiting room, there’s no escaping the unsolicited visions of silver bells ringing and sugar plums dancing in your ear drums. We're just days away, folks.

But not all holiday music is bad. Actually, some of the new albums are actually, well, good. But if you're not looking for entire collections, but rather a smattering of songs to throw on a playlist—songs just with a bit more refined taste—we’ve got you covered. Go mull some wine, start up the fire, and crank your home speakers high enough to drown out your neighborhood carolers’ off-key rendition of “Christmas Shoes.” These are the best Christmas songs of all time.

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"God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" by Hozier

All there is to say about this is that it's Hozier. If the man read me my credit card bill every month, I'd pay it with chill vibes and good spirits.

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"Christmas Don't Be Late" by Norah Jones

Norah Jones and The Chipmunks feels like an uncomfortable pairing, but Jones's jazzy, slowed down take on the (whiney) classic is refreshingly nostalgic and modern at the same time.

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"If We Make It Through December" by Pistol Annies

No one is ever going to match the brilliance of the original, but the Pistol Annie's do a stripped back version of the track that's breathtaking in its own way.

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"Christmas Isn't Canceled (Just You)" by Kelly Clarkson

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That title may make your eye twitch a bit (I think we're all done with the word), but the cut from Clarkson's new holiday album is a brilliantly upbeat take on the holiday break up song. Once you've had enough listens to Dolly's "Hard Candy Christmas," pivot to this bad boy.

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"Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" by Manchester Orchestra

Lean into the sad boy vibes this holiday season with a toned down version of "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" from Manchester Orchestra. The track dials back the nostalgia and focuses solely on the wistful emotions behind the lyrics to the point that it nearly becomes a melancholic lullaby.

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"The Christmas Song” by Nat King Cole

    Is it bold for a track title to self-proclaim as the Christmas song? Yes. Is roasting chestnuts a fairly outdated tradition that doesn’t actually taste very good in practice? Also yes. But, this iconic tune deserves all of the liberties it takes and more. Nat King Cole’s warm vocals paired with the romantic string accompaniment make for as sweet a combo as Santa’s cookies and milk.

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    “Feliz Navidad” by José Feliciano

      A great unifier not only for its bilingual lyrics but also for its universal charm, José Feliciano’s “Feliz Navidad” has become a staple in the library of holiday pop songs that don’t suck.

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      “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” by Frank Sinatra

        Originally written for soldiers overseas during World War II, this classic croon has become an anthem for all the lonely hearts who can’t be home for the holidays.

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        “River” by Joni Mitchell

          While it’s more of a breakup ballad than it is a Christmas song, anyone who has to endure the acute ache of going through a split during the holiday season deserves a song of their own.

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          “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch” by Thurl Ravenscroft

            This is the original (and perhaps the only) holiday diss track. Essentially one long series of back-handed compliments sung in a hilarious baritone, this song is sure to make even Mr. Grinch himself crack a smile.

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            David Bowie and Bing Crosby — “Little Drummer Boy/“Peace on Earth)”

            In 1977, the modern art-rock star and the old-school silky-voiced crooner joined forces in one of the most unexpectedly successful duets of all time. This famed medley of "Little Drummer Boy" and "Peace on Earth" is not only one of Bowie's most commercially successful songs in his storied career, but it marked one of the last vocal recordings Crosby ever made—having been recorded a month before his death.

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            Lizzo — “Never Felt Like Christmas”

            When the old Christmas love songs won’t cut it, there’s always this one from Lizzo. And in true Lizzo form, she doesn’t mince words when it comes to capturing those who feel bitter about Christmas feels.

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            The Carpenters — “Sleigh Ride”

            Ah yes, classic cheesy Christmas schmaltz from The Carpenters. It must be December.

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            Fitz & the Tantrums — “Santa Stole My Lady”

            Christmas sucks for the brokenhearted. We've all been there. Might as well make the best of it with this Fitz & the Tantrums soul ballad.

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            The Killers — “Don’t Shoot Me, Santa"

            This Killers song is for the true lovers of alternative Christmas tracks. Also, the thought Santa as a low-key criminal is pretty funny (and the plot of Bad Santa).

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            Ariana Grande — “Wit It This Christmas”

            This 2015 song features the lyrics “Are you down for some of these milk and cookies?,” which is really the only way anyone should ever address Santa Claus.

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            Julie Andrews — “My Favorite Things”

            Though it wasn't specifically intended to be one, "My Favorite Things," has become a Christmas song. Yes, over the years there have been many covers—like one from Kelly Clarkson—but Julie Andrews will always be the OG.

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            Barbra Streisand — "Jingle Bells?"

            In 1967, Barbra Streisand recorded “A Christmas Album,” which included “Jingle Bells?,” sung at such a fast pace it’ll get your heart rate going as effectively as a quick jaunt around the block.

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            John Lennon and Yoko Ono — “Happy Xmas (War Is Over)”

            This is about as political as a Christmas song gets. This 1971 song was inspired by John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s protest against America’s involvement in the Vietnam War.

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            Celine Dion — “Happy Xmas (War Is Over)”

            And if you want an updated—though pointedly less political version—there's Celine Dion's cover. What it lacks in politics it makes up with 100 percent more Celine.

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            Dolly Parton – "Hard Candy Christmas"

            Dolly’s entry into the great holiday songbook wasn’t even initially intended for Christmas. As a bit of a showender for The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, the soundtrack version is a solo performance from Parton. Her version was co-opted into the melancholy Christmas single-anthem that is pro-getting drunk on apple wine.

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            Judy Garland – "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas"

            If this isn’t on your Christmas playlist, it’s a tragedy. While “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” has been recorded more times than probably any of us can count, it’s the emotional Judy Garland version from Meet Me in St. Louis that stands above the rest.

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            Barenaked Ladies & Sarah McLachlan – "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen/We Three Kings"

            Fun fact: Barenaked Ladies came out with a Christmas album. More fun fact: the best song on it is the irresistible harmony between the band and McLachlan, whose angelic voice lends itself perfectly to anything to do with Christmas.

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            Kelly Clarkson – "Underneath the Tree"

            Kelly loves a bop, and “Underneath the Tree” is just happy, Christmas noise. While her album Wrapped in Red is a testament that Clarkson should throw her hat in the ring for all Christmas music, this one is just especially fun.

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            Sia – "Puppies Are Forever"

            Sia’s foray into the holiday album space is as off the wall as you might imagine it might be, but at the top of that heap of silly is “Puppies Are Forever.” Outside of being saccharine to the point of giving you a cavity, it’s an earworm that you’ll undoubtedly be humming an hour after listening.

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            Sufjan Stevens – "Auld Lang Syne"

            Sufjan Stevens’s take on what most people know as the song that plays at New Years is a folksy banjo-laden track that feels simplified and stripped down in the same way you’d imagine a big group of friends would perform it at their own New Years party.

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            The Pogues feat. Kirsty MacColl – "Fairytale of New York"

            If you could imagine a British Celtic punk band coming out with a Christmas song, it’s probably going to be “Fairytale of New York.” What starts out as a slow jam moves into full Irish vibes about a minute in. With the exception of one ~problematic~ line, “Fairytale of New York” is a drunken beautiful mess of an ode to Christmas.

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            Kacey Musgraves – "Christmas Makes Me Cry"

            Musgraves’s 2016 holiday album, A Very Kacey Christmas, is a late entry into the canon, but it’s entirely deserving. Especially this cut, which hones in on the nuanced pain that the annual event can cause.

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            The Crystals – "Santa Claus is Coming to Town"

            Off the best Christmas album of all time, A Christmas Gift For You From Phil Spector, the New York girl group logs this ebullient holiday party jam that will get even Grinch to twist it out on the dance floor.

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            Elvis Presley – "Blue Christmas"

            Elvis’ Christmas Album is, arguably, the best testament to the King’s artistic interests of all his albums as it masterfully tackles rockabilly, gospel, country, pop, and gospel across its 12 tracks. The most enduring cut, though, is the equal parts woeful and hopeful “Blue Christmas.” Give it a listen and you’ll see why.

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            Smokey Robinson and The Miracles – "Jingle Bells"

            “Jingle Bells” is hardly the grooviest of all holiday songs, but the soul legend’s trusty backing outfit revamped the familiar tune in new, delicate, Motown-inspired ways.

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            The Beach Boys – "Santa's Beard"

            One of six original cuts on the group’s 1964 holiday LP—the aptly-titled Beach Boys’ Christmas Album—”Santa’s Beard” is the darkly funny tale of Mike Love taking his younger brother to the mall to meet Santa. When the kid tugs that fake facial hair right off, his life is changed forever.

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            Bing Crosby – "White Christmas"

            The ultimate Christmas song and a masterclass in stately, elegant singing. They don’t make them like this anymore—Crosby released the dreamy ballad in 1941—which makes enjoying this each year even more necessary.

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            Ella Fitzgerald – "Winter Wonderland"

            Few do it as well as the First Lady of Jazz. Case in point: Her delightful, swinging take on the holiday classic “Winter Wonderland.” A necessary addition for every holiday dinner’s playlist.

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            Willie Nelson – "Pretty Paper"

            Penned by Nelson but originally released by Roy Orbison in 1963, “Pretty Paper” is one of the finest songs ever crafted. (Nelson recorded his own version for his 1979 holiday LP.) A spacious ballad, it tells the story of a street vendor hustling to sell pencils and, yes, pretty paper during the holiday season. It’ll warm your heart and bring a tear to your eye, all at once.

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            Louis Armstrong – "Cool Yule"

            This Steve Allen-penned Christmas track has gotten a lot of play over the years, bur Satchmo's inaugural version still stands above the rest.

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            Donny Hathaway – "This Christmas"

            The R&B legend's 1970 Yuletide tune is a lightly funky bounce that revels in the holiday season's possibility.

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            The Kinks – "Father Christmas"

            The cheeky Britpoppers' class-conscious Christmas rave-up cloaks its serious message about the haves and the have-nots in a letter to Santa. .

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            Slade – "Merry Christmas Everybody"

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            Billy Squier – "Christmas Is The Time To Say I Love You"

            The arena rocker's sweet ode to the Yuletide spirit imprinted itself on a generation when it doubled as the de facto Christmas card from the then-fledgeling MTV to its viewers.

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            Wham! – "Last Christmas"

            The greatest pop singer of the '80s turns his holiday heartache into snowy synthpop.

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            Darlene Love – "Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)"

            Yuletide longing spins into pop gold for a 1960s pop doyenne.

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            Mariah Carey – "All I Want for Christmas Is You"

            Mimi's entry into the Christmas canon is filled with flirtatious coos, beltable verses, and girl-group harmonies.

            This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

            The Ronettes – "Frosty the Snowman"

            Pop's preeminent bad girl Ronnie Spector shows off her winter-wonderland spirit.

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            Bruce Springsteen – "Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town"

            One of the most buoyant takes on this ode to Father Christmas features Bruce Springsteen playfully needling his bandmates about their behavior over the past year and a joyous sax solo by Clarence Clemons.

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            Ramones – "Merry Christmas (I Don't Wanna Fight Tonight)"

            Queens' punk-rock royalty offers up a speedy plea for Christmas peace on the domestic front.

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            Alvin & The Chipmunks – "The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don't Be Late)"

            A divisive track, to be sure, but you're probably bluffing if you don't crack a smile when singing along with Alvin's wishes for a "hooooo-laaaaa-hoooooop."

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            Daryl Hall & John Oates – "Jingle Bell Rock"

            Bobby Helms's 1957 celebration of Christmas rock is well-trod territory, but Hall & Oates' blue-eyed soul version is a cut above its peers.

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            Madonna – "Santa Baby"

            Madonna was in full-on ˆ mode for this cover of Eartha Kitt's fireside seduction, all hiccuping flirtation and winking vamps.

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            The Darkness – "Christmas Time (Don't Let the Bells End)"

            British glam bands from Wizzard to Slade have caught the Christmas spirit, but the outré absurdity of this retro-minded outfit provides a particularly sweet Yuletide thrill.

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            Run-DMC – "Christmas in Hollis"

            Flipping "Jingle Bells" into a story of the holiday season in Queens, this track isn't just one of the greatest Christmas raps—it's one of the best 20th-century holiday songs.

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            Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings – "Please Come Home for Christmas"

            A fiery take on Charles Brown's brokenhearted love song from the much-missed soul revivalist.

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            The Jackson 5 – "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus"

            Young Michael Jackson turns in one of his most joyous early performances, which is saying a lot given the ebullience quotient of his other Jackson 5 offerings.

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            The Temptations – "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer"

            Picking one track off these soul titans' 1970 Christmas album is harder than choosing between rum and bourbon for your eggnog, so let's just go with its opener.

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            John Denver & The Muppets – "Christmas Is Coming"

            The delightful collaboration between the "Rocky Mountain High" singer and Jim Henson's band of misfit puppets is full of highlights, but the album's calypso-flavored version of this Yuletide nursery rhyme features a particularly giggle-worthy star turn from Miss Piggy.

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            Paul McCartney – "Wonderful Christmastime"

            An upbeat trifle about having fun around the holidays that showcases the former Beatle's silly side.

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            Al Green and Annie Lennox – "Put a Little Love in Your Heart"

            The grain of the Reverend Al's voice and the slickness of the Eurythmics singer's belt on this Jackie DeShannon cover make for a glorious combination.

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            The Waitresses – "Christmas Wrapping"

            Chance meetings with cute guys in the supermarket are the stuff Yuletide fairytales are made of—especially when they're set to bubbly, sax-powered New Wave.

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            Sesame Street Cast – "Keep Christmas With You All Through the Year"

            The 1978 special Christmas Eve on Sesame Street represents the educational show at its finest, and this original track about holding on to the Christmas spirit year-round still tugs at the heartstrings.

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            Otis Redding – "Merry Christmas Baby"

            Otis's blazing version of this R&B Yuletide classic is spine-tingling nearly 50 years after its recording.

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            Elton John – "Step Into Christmas"

            Elton's outsized personality and his signature holiday track's rollicking feel make for a joyous occasion.

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            Stevie Wonder – "Someday at Christmas"

            Stevie Wonder's plea for Yuletide peace (which he recently covered with Andra Day) has extra relevance in troubled times.

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            Lloyd – "She's All I Want for Christmas"

            A new entry in the Christmas canon, this R&B rave-up showcases a Michael Jackson-channeling performance from one of Atlanta's best new soul singers.

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            Bob Rivers – "The Twelve Pains of Christmas"

            Goofy Christmas tracks are in no short supply, but this perky rundown of the holiday's more hellish aspects has a relatable moment for everyone, from crying kids to hangover shakes.

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            Vince Guaraldi Trio – "Christmas Time Is Here"

            Seasonally appropriate melancholia from A Charlie Brown Christmas, which is still the greatest animated salute to the spirit of the season.

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            Источник: https://www.esquire.com/entertainment/music/a50968/best-christmas-songs/

            “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” is one of America’s most popular holiday songs

            Originally recorded by Bing Crosby in 1943, “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” has become one of America’s most popular holiday songs and it’s still a big hit. The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) named it the #10 most-performed holiday song of the last century.

            I’ll be home for Christmas
            You can count on me
            Please have snow and mistletoe
            And presents on the tree
            Christmas Eve will find me
            Where the lovelight gleams
            I’ll be home for Christmas
            If only in my dreams

            Bing Crosby publicity photo, c. 1930s

            Bing Crosby publicity photo, c. 1930s

            The song has been written from the perspective of a soldier serving overseas during World War II. The soldier is telling his family that he will be coming home for the holiday and requests snow, mistletoe, and presents on the tree. The 39 words long song “I’ll be Home for Christmas” ends on a melancholy note with the soldier saying, “I’ll be home for Christmas, if only in my dreams”.

            “I’ll be Home for Christmas” was written by Walter Kent and Kim Gannon in 1943.

            Later Sam “Buck” Ram was also credited as a co-writer of the song following a lawsuit brought by Ram’s publisher, Mills Music. Sam “Buck” Ram copyrighted a song titled “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” on December 21st, 1942. Besides the fact that the lyrics and the tune were different he sued successfully for shared credit and was credited as a co-writer of the song.

            Gannon and Kent couldn’t get any takers for the tune because people in the music business felt that the final line was too sad for all those separated from their loved ones in the military. Crosby agreed to record it after Gannon sang the song for him while the two were playing golf.

            1945 V-Disc release by the U.S. Army of "White Christmas" and "I'll Be Home for Christmas" by Bing Crosby

            1945 V-Disc release by the U.S. Army of “White Christmas” and “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” by Bing Crosby

            It was October 4th, 1943, when Crosby recorded the song under the title “I’ll Be Home For Christmas (If Only In My Dreams)” with the John Scott Trotter Orchestra for Decca Records. The song hit the music charts in a short period and it became one of the most requested songs at Crosby’s many USO shows throughout World War II.

            In 1943 the world was at war and many Americans were out on the battlefields during Christmas. “I’ll Be Home For Christmas” was the best gift for many soldiers who were spending Christmas far from home and their families. It was a wartime favorite for many Americans says the Library of Congress:

            A 1907 Christmas card with Santa and some of his reindeer

            A 1907 Christmas card with Santa and some of his reindeer

            “It touched a tender place in the hearts of Americans, both soldiers and civilians, who were then in the depths of World War II, and it earned Crosby his fifth gold record”.

            However, not everyone loved “I’ll Be Home For Christmas” and BBC banned the song because they thought that the lyrics might lower morale among British troops.

            Here is another fun read from us:The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is an iconic symbol of the holiday season

            “I’ll Be Home For Christmas” has been covered by almost every artist who’s ever released a Christmas album, for example, Perry Como (1946), Frank Sinatra (1957) and countless other artists.

            Источник: https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/12/09/ill-be-home-for-christmas-is-one-of-americas-most-popular-holiday-songs/

            "I'll Be Home for Christmas" Song Lyrics (The Story of A WWII Soldier Longing For His Family)

            By Karen Harris

            The holiday greeting is spelled out by U.S. aviation Cadets in the Southeast Air Corps Training Center. (Getty Images)

            "I'll Be Home For Christmas" was written by Kim Gannon and Walter Kent, but it's most closely associated with American singer Bing Crosby, who also struck ally savings interest gold with his recording of another holiday favorite, "White Christmas." Gannon and Kent had approached several other singers to record "I'll Be Home For Christmas," but they all rejected the song because it was so crushingly sad. When Gannon sang it to Bing Crosby during a local foods downtown houston parking outing, however, Crosby agreed to record it on October 1, 1943, and the rest is history.

            A U.S.O. Favorite

            During World War II, Bing Crosby was one of the most popular entertainers in the United States and an especially popular U.S.O. performer. The soldiers in the audience begged him to sing "I'll Be Home For Christmas" regardless of the season, and according to Yank, the magazine of the American G.I. serving overseas, Crosby "accomplished more for military morale than anyone else of that era." A recording of Crosby's performance of the song on the December 7, 1944 broadcast of Kraft Music Hall Radio Show was even released by the United States War Department specifically for distribution to the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy.

            (Mark Thomas/Pixabay)

            What Is "I'll Be Home For Christmas" About?

            "I'll Be Home For Christmas" was written well into World War II, when an estimated 16 million Americans (or 11% of the population) were serving in the armed forces. There was hardly a home in the country that didn't have a conspicuously empty place at the dinner table during the holiday season, and the loneliness of being separated during Christmas was universally felt. The melodic longing of a man stuck far away from home and hoping (though not optimistically) to return for Christmas spoke not only to the soldiers serving on the front lines but their loved ones on the home front as well.

            The final line of "I'll Be Home For Christmas"—"If only in my dreams"— has been the subject of some debate. Some believe the line simply means the narrator suspects he'll dream of being home for the holidays while circumstances inevitably keep him away, but others interpret the line to mean he believes he'll never make it home at all and the only place he'll be there for Christmas ever again is in his mind. As much of a bummer as this interpretation adds to an already downer song, it was a bleak reality for the 416,800 soldiers who celebrated their last Christmas before the war was over.

            (Decca Records/Wikimedia Commons)

            Christmas Controversy

            After "I'll Be Home For Christmas" became a hit, Sam "Buck" Ram, a songwriter who later became producer and manager for the Platters, claimed that he wrote a song by the same title which he copyrighted on December 21, 1942, well before Gannon and Kent wrote theirs in 1943. Ram's lyrics and tune were very different, but he sued the songwriting pair anyway, the courts ruled in his favor, and his name was added to the credits of "I'll Be Home For Christmas."

            Although the song was beloved by soldiers and their families alike, the B.B.C. banned "I'll Be Home For Christmas" from its playlist for the duration of the war at the urging of U.K. military officials. They feared it would make their soldiers sad, especially as the holiday season approached, and sad people don't fight so well. 

            (NASA/Wikimedia Commons)

            I'll Be In Space For Christmas

            On December 4, 1965, American astronauts Jim Lovell and Frank Borman blasted off in the Gemini 7 for a 14-day spaceflight, but first, the two-man crew requested that N.A.S.A. ground control play "I'll Be Home For Christmas" for them upon their return to Earth. Lovell and Borman touched down safely on December 18, just in time to celebrate.

            I'm dreaming tonight of a place I love
            Even more than I usually do
            And although I know it's a long road back
            I promise you
            I'll be home for Christmas
            You can count on me
            Please have snow and mistletoe
            And presents on the tree
            Christmas Eve will find me
            Where the love light gleams
            I'll be home for Christmas
            If only in my dreams
            Please have snow and mistletoe
            And presents on the tree
            Christmas Eve will find me
            Where the love light gleams
            I'll be home for Christmas
            If only in my dreams
            If only in my dreams

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            Karen Harris

            Writer

            Karen left the world of academic, quitting her job as a college professor to write full-time. She spends her days with her firefighter husband and four daughters on a hobby farm with an assortment of animals, including a goat named Atticus, a turkey named Gravy, and a chicken named Chickaletta.


            Источник: https://historydaily.org

            Ever wonder what it means when a song is in �public domain�? It means the song is old enough to have had its copyrights expired, so it can be performed live or on a broadcast without permission or royalties paid to the songwriters, or was never copyrighted in the first place. Many of the popular Christmas songs we know and love are in the public domain, such as �Silent Night� or �Jingle People of walmart women wearing pants as shirt. On the other hand, there are a number of Christmas songs that, while written a long time ago and popularly thought of as being in public domain, are in fact still copyrighted. Here is a list of ten popular Christmas songs you may have thought were public domain, but actually are not.

            Winter Wonderland

            �Winter Wonderland� is a winter song that has been appropriated as a Christmas song when was i ll be home for christmas written its lack of a reference to the holiday. The song was co-written by Felix Bernard, Lon Smith, and Richard Smith in 1934 and was inspired by Richard Smith�s view of a snow-covered park in his hometown of. �Winter Wonderland� is published by Warner Chappell Music Co and according to the ASCAP website is the most-played ASCAP-member-written holiday song of the previous five years.

            Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas

            �Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas� was written by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane in 1944 and first appeared in the musical �Meet Me in � starring Judy Garland. The song originally had a somber tone, as it appeared in a scene in which a family is distraught over being forced from their home in. After resisting pressure from and her co-stars, Martin and Blane agreed to alter the lyrics to make the song more upbeat. The lyrics were altered in several other versions but the Judy Garland version is by far the most commonly recorded version. �Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas� is published by EMI Music Publishing.

            White Christmas

            Though it is known that Irving Berlin wrote the original version of �White Christmas�, the exact year that he wrote it is unclear. It is most commonly believed that he wrote it sitting poolside at the Biltmore hotel in in 1942, which is fitting given the lyrics of the song. The version sung by Bing Crosby is the best-selling single of all time with over fifty million copies sold worldwide. �White Christmas� is published by Imagem Music.

            I�ll Be Home For Christmas

            Written in 1943, one year after �White Christmas�, �I�ll Be Home for Christmas� sailed to the top of the charts due in large part to the original version sung once again by Bing Crosby. The song was written by Buck Ram, Kim Gannon, and Walter Kent, who got the idea from soldiers in World War I and II. The soldiers originally thought that the wars would be over quickly and that they would be home for Christmastime. �I�ll Be Home for Christmas� is controlled by Gannon & Kent Music Company and the Piedmont Music Company.

            The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire)

            �The Christmas Song�, more commonly known as �Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire�, was written in 1944 by vocalist Mel Torm� and Robert Wells. The song is said to have inspired by Torm�s desire to keep cool during an unusually hot summer and was first recorded in 1946 by The Nat King Cole Trio. �The Christmas Song� is published by Sony/ATV Music Publishing.

            Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!

            In the same vein as �The Christmas Song�, �Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow!� was written in 1945 by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne during one of the hottest days on record in in hopes of creating a �cooler� mindset. Vaughn Monroe recorded the first version, which reached number one on the Billboard charts the following year. �Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow!� is published by Warner-Chappell.

            Jingle Rock

            �Jingle Bell Rock� was written by by two men who were not known primarily as musicians. Joseph Beal, a public relations executive, and James Boothe, when was i ll be home for christmas written Texan in the advertising business, wrote the song in 1957 and it appeared for the first time that year in a release by Bobby Helms. The song is a mixture of the classic �Jingle Bells� and one of the most popular songs of the 1950�s, �Rock Around the Clock�. �Jingle Bell Rock� is published by Warner-Chappell as well.

            Frosty The Snowman

            Another one of the most popular Christmas songs incorrectly classified as public domain is �Frosty the Snowman�. Written in 1950 by Walter �Jack� Rollins and Steve Nelson, the song was first recorded by Gene Autry and the Cass County Boys. Autry was chosen to be the first to record the song following the success of recording of �Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer�. �Frosty the Snowman� is published by Warner-Chappell as well.

            Santa Claus Is Coming To Town

            �Santa Claus is Coming to Town� was written by Fred Coots and Haven Gillespie in 1934 and was first sung on Eddie Cantor�s Radio Show in November of the same year. By Christmastime of that year over 100,000 copies of sheet music and 400,000 copies of the single had been sold in the. �Santa Clause is Coming to Town is published by EMI Music Publishing.

            The Little Drummer Boy

            �The Little Drummer Boy� endured many lyrical changes before it became the most commonly used version that we hear today. Originally written by Katherine Davis in 1941, the song was entitled �Carol of the Drum� and was based on a Czech carol. In 1957 the song was re-arranged by Henry Onorati and once again in 1958 by Harry Pinnacle federal credit union reviews. The culmination of these arrangements birthed the current version of �Little Drummer Boy�, an arrangement which is also published by EMI.

            (Reprinted courtesy The Rights Workshop. Originally published October 2010. For more information, go to www.therightsworkshop.com)

            Источник: https://northfloridanow.com/so-you-think-your-christmas-favorites-are-in-public-domain-p9823-92.htm
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            about

            "I'll Be Home for Christmas" was written by Walter Kent (music) and James "Kim" Gannon (words) and made famous by Bing Crosby crooning the holiday classic. First released around Christmas in 1943, the song is written from the perspective of a soldier serving over seas during World War 2.

            This dream-pop interpretation by Sentinel pays homage to Ice House, The Jesus and Mary Jane, the Cocteau Twins, and The Carpenters, along with all the many artists who have covered it.

            lyrics

            I'm dreamin' tonight of a place I love
            Even more than I usually do
            And although I know it's a long road back home
            I promise you.

            I'll be home for Christmas
            You can plan on me
            Please have snow and mistletoe
            And presents on the tree

            Christmas Eve will find me
            Where the lovelight gleams
            I'll be home for Christmas
            If only in my dreams

            I'll be home for Christmas
            You can plan on me
            Please have snow and mistletoe
            And presents on the tree

            Christmas Eve will find me
            Where the lovelight gleams
            I'll be home for Christmas
            If when was i ll be home for christmas written in my dreams

            credits

            released December 15, 2018
            Original by Walter Kent (music) and James "Kim" Gannon (words).
            This version, sung by Tarabud, instrumental composition by Dennis Bestafka.

            license

            some rights reserved

            Источник: https://sentineldream.bandcamp.com/track/ill-be-home-for-christmas

            If there is one thing that is constant in this world, it is that the day after Halloween marks a multi-month-long non-negotiable stream of holiday music in just about every public place that has speakers. From coffee shops to convenience stores, your car radio to your dentist’s waiting room, there’s no escaping the unsolicited visions of silver bells ringing and sugar plums dancing in your ear drums. We're just days away, folks.

            But not all holiday music is bad. Actually, some of the new albums are actually, well, good. But if you're not looking for entire collections, but rather a smattering of songs to throw on a playlist—songs just with a bit more refined taste—we’ve got you covered. Go mull some wine, start up the fire, and crank your home speakers high enough to drown out your neighborhood carolers’ off-key rendition of “Christmas Shoes.” These are the best Christmas songs of all time.

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            "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" by Hozier

            All there is to say about this is that it's Hozier. If the man read me my credit card bill every month, I'd pay it with chill vibes and good spirits.

            This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

            "Christmas Don't Be Late" by Norah Jones

            Norah Jones and The Chipmunks feels like an uncomfortable pairing, but Jones's jazzy, slowed down take on the (whiney) classic is refreshingly nostalgic and modern at the same time.

            This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

            "If We Make It Through December" by Pistol Annies

            No one is ever going to match the brilliance of the original, but the Pistol Annie's do a stripped back version of the track that's breathtaking in its own way.

            This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

            "Christmas Isn't Canceled (Just You)" by Kelly Clarkson

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            That title may make your eye twitch a bit (I think we're all done with the word), but the cut from Clarkson's new holiday album is a brilliantly upbeat take on the holiday break up song. Once you've had enough listens to Dolly's "Hard Candy Christmas," pivot to this bad boy.

            This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

            "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" by Manchester Orchestra

            Lean into the sad boy vibes this holiday season with a toned down version of "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" from Manchester Orchestra. The track dials back the nostalgia and focuses solely on the wistful emotions behind the lyrics to the point that it nearly becomes a melancholic lullaby.

            This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

            "The Christmas Song” by Nat King Cole

              Is it bold for a track title to self-proclaim as the Christmas song? Yes. Is roasting chestnuts a fairly outdated tradition that doesn’t actually taste very good in practice? Also yes. But, this iconic tune deserves all of the liberties it takes and more. Nat King Cole’s warm vocals paired with the romantic string accompaniment make for as sweet a combo as Santa’s cookies and milk.

              This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

              “Feliz Navidad” by José Feliciano

                A great unifier not only for its bilingual lyrics but also for its universal charm, José Feliciano’s “Feliz Navidad” has become a staple in the library of holiday pop songs that don’t suck.

                This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

                “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” by Frank Sinatra

                  Originally written for soldiers overseas during World War II, this classic croon has become an anthem for all the lonely hearts who can’t be home for the holidays.

                  This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

                  “River” by Joni Mitchell

                    While it’s more of a breakup ballad than it is a Christmas song, anyone who has to endure the acute ache of going through a split during the holiday season deserves a song of their own.

                    This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

                    “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch” by Thurl Ravenscroft

                      This is the original (and perhaps the only) holiday diss track. Essentially one long series of back-handed compliments sung in a hilarious baritone, this song is sure to make even Mr. Grinch himself crack a smile.

                      This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

                      David Bowie and Bing Crosby — “Little Drummer Boy/“Peace on Earth)”

                      In 1977, the modern art-rock star and the old-school silky-voiced crooner joined forces in one of the most unexpectedly successful duets of all time. This famed medley of "Little Drummer Boy" and "Peace on Earth" is not only one of Bowie's most commercially successful songs in his storied career, but it marked one of the last vocal recordings Crosby ever made—having been recorded a month before his death.

                      This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

                      Lizzo — “Never Felt Like Christmas”

                      When the old Christmas love songs won’t cut it, there’s always this one from Lizzo. And in true Lizzo form, she doesn’t mince words when it comes to capturing those who feel bitter about Christmas feels.

                      This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

                      The Carpenters — “Sleigh Ride”

                      Ah yes, classic cheesy Christmas schmaltz from The Carpenters. It must be December.

                      This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

                      Fitz & the Tantrums — “Santa Stole My Lady”

                      Christmas sucks for the brokenhearted. We've all been there. Might as well make the best of it with this Fitz & the Tantrums soul ballad.

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                      The Killers — “Don’t Shoot Me, Santa"

                      This Killers song is for the true lovers of alternative Christmas tracks. Also, the thought Santa as a low-key criminal is pretty funny (and the plot of Bad Santa).

                      This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

                      Ariana Grande — “Wit It This Christmas”

                      This 2015 song features the lyrics “Are you down for some of these milk and cookies?,” which is really the only way anyone should ever address Santa Claus.

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                      Julie Andrews — “My Favorite Things”

                      Though it wasn't specifically intended to be one, "My Favorite Things," has become a Christmas song. Yes, over the years there have been many covers—like one from Kelly Clarkson—but Julie Andrews will always be the OG.

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                      Barbra Streisand — "Jingle Bells?"

                      In 1967, Barbra Streisand recorded “A Christmas Album,” which included “Jingle Bells?,” sung at such a fast pace it’ll get your heart rate going as effectively as a quick jaunt around the block.

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                      John Lennon and Yoko Ono — “Happy Xmas (War Is Over)”

                      This is about as political as a Christmas song gets. This 1971 song was inspired by John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s protest against America’s involvement in the Vietnam War.

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                      Celine Dion — “Happy Xmas (War Is Over)”

                      And if you want an updated—though pointedly less political version—there's Celine Dion's cover. What it lacks in politics it makes up with 100 percent more Celine.

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                      Dolly Parton – "Hard Candy Christmas"

                      Dolly’s entry into the great holiday songbook wasn’t even initially intended for Christmas. As a bit of a showender for The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, the soundtrack version is a solo performance from Parton. Her version was co-opted into the melancholy Christmas single-anthem that is pro-getting drunk on apple wine.

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                      Judy Garland – "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas"

                      If this isn’t on your Christmas playlist, it’s a tragedy. While “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” has been recorded more times than probably any of us can count, it’s the emotional Judy Garland version from Meet Me in St. Louis that stands above the rest.

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                      Barenaked Ladies & Sarah McLachlan – "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen/We Three Kings"

                      Fun fact: Barenaked Ladies came out with a Christmas album. More fun fact: the best song on it is the irresistible harmony between the band and McLachlan, whose angelic voice lends itself perfectly to anything to do with Christmas.

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                      Kelly Clarkson – "Underneath the Tree"

                      Kelly loves a bop, and “Underneath the Tree” is just happy, Christmas noise. While her album Wrapped in Red is a testament that Clarkson should throw her hat in the ring for all Christmas music, this one is just especially fun.

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                      Sia – "Puppies Are Forever"

                      Sia’s foray into the holiday album space is as off the wall as you might imagine it might be, but at the top of that heap of silly is “Puppies Are Forever.” Outside of being saccharine to the point of giving you a cavity, it’s an earworm that you’ll undoubtedly be humming an hour after listening.

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                      Sufjan Stevens – "Auld Lang Syne"

                      Sufjan Stevens’s take on what most people know as the song that plays at New Years is a folksy banjo-laden track that feels simplified and stripped down in the same way you’d imagine a big group of friends would perform it at their own New Years party.

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                      The Pogues feat. Kirsty MacColl – "Fairytale of New York"

                      If you could imagine a British Celtic punk band coming out with a Christmas song, it’s probably going to be “Fairytale of New York.” What starts out as a slow jam moves into full Irish vibes about a minute in. With the exception of one ~problematic~ line, “Fairytale of New York” is a drunken beautiful mess of an ode to Christmas.

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                      Kacey Musgraves – "Christmas Makes Me Cry"

                      Musgraves’s 2016 holiday album, A Very Kacey Christmas, is a late entry into the canon, but it’s entirely deserving. Especially this cut, which hones in on the nuanced pain that the annual event can cause.

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                      The Crystals – "Santa Claus is Coming to Town"

                      Off the best Christmas album of all time, A Christmas Gift For You From Phil Spector, the New York girl group logs this ebullient holiday party jam that will get even Grinch to twist it out on the dance floor.

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                      Elvis Presley – "Blue Christmas"

                      Elvis’ Christmas Album is, arguably, the best testament to the King’s artistic interests of all his albums as it masterfully tackles rockabilly, gospel, country, pop, and gospel across its 12 tracks. The when was i ll be home for christmas written enduring cut, though, is the equal parts woeful and hopeful “Blue Christmas.” Give it a listen and you’ll see why.

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                      Smokey Robinson and The Miracles – "Jingle Bells"

                      “Jingle Bells” is hardly the grooviest of all holiday songs, but the soul legend’s trusty backing outfit revamped the familiar tune in new, delicate, Motown-inspired ways.

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                      The Beach Boys – "Santa's Beard"

                      One of six original cuts on the group’s 1964 holiday LP—the aptly-titled Beach Boys’ Christmas Album—”Santa’s Beard” is the darkly funny tale of Mike Love taking his younger brother to the mall to meet Santa. When the kid tugs that fake facial hair right off, his life is changed forever.

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                      Bing Crosby – "White Christmas"

                      The ultimate Christmas song and a masterclass in stately, elegant singing. They don’t make them like this anymore—Crosby released the dreamy ballad in 1941—which makes enjoying this each year even more necessary.

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                      Ella Fitzgerald – "Winter Wonderland"

                      Few do it as well as the First Lady of Jazz. Case in point: Her delightful, swinging take on the holiday classic “Winter Wonderland.” A necessary addition for every holiday dinner’s playlist.

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                      Willie Nelson – "Pretty Paper"

                      Penned by Nelson but originally released by Roy Orbison in 1963, “Pretty Paper” is one of the finest songs ever crafted. (Nelson recorded his own version for his 1979 holiday LP.) A spacious ballad, it tells the story of a street vendor hustling to sell pencils and, yes, pretty paper during the holiday season. It’ll warm your heart and bring a tear to your eye, all at once.

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                      Louis Armstrong – "Cool Yule"

                      This Steve Allen-penned Christmas track has gotten a lot of play over the years, bur Satchmo's inaugural version still stands above the rest.

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                      Donny Hathaway – "This Christmas"

                      The R&B legend's 1970 Yuletide tune is a lightly funky bounce that revels in the holiday season's possibility.

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                      The Kinks – "Father Christmas"

                      The cheeky Britpoppers' class-conscious Christmas rave-up cloaks its serious message about the haves and the have-nots in a letter to Santa. .

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                      Slade – "Merry Christmas Everybody"

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                      Billy Squier – "Christmas Is The Time To Say I Love You"

                      The arena rocker's sweet ode to the Yuletide spirit imprinted itself on a when was i ll be home for christmas written when it doubled as the de facto Christmas card from the then-fledgeling MTV to its viewers.

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                      Wham! – "Last Christmas"

                      The when was i ll be home for christmas written pop singer of the '80s turns his holiday heartache into snowy synthpop.

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                      Darlene Love – "Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)"

                      Yuletide longing spins into pop gold for a 1960s pop doyenne.

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                      Mariah Carey – "All I Want for Christmas Is You"

                      Mimi's entry into the Christmas canon is filled with flirtatious coos, beltable verses, and girl-group harmonies.

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                      The Ronettes – "Frosty the Snowman"

                      Pop's preeminent bad girl Ronnie Spector shows off her winter-wonderland spirit.

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                      Bruce Springsteen – "Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town"

                      One of the most buoyant takes on this ode to Father Christmas features Bruce Springsteen playfully needling his bandmates about their behavior over the past year and a joyous sax solo by Clarence Clemons.

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                      Ramones – "Merry Christmas (I Don't Wanna Fight Tonight)"

                      Queens' punk-rock royalty offers up a speedy plea for Christmas peace on the domestic front.

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                      Alvin & The Chipmunks – "The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don't Be Late)"

                      A divisive track, to be sure, but you're probably bluffing if you don't crack a smile when singing along with Alvin's wishes for a "hooooo-laaaaa-hoooooop."

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                      Daryl Hall & John Oates – "Jingle Bell Rock"

                      Bobby Helms's 1957 celebration of Christmas rock is well-trod territory, but Hall & Oates' blue-eyed soul version is a cut above its peers.

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                      Madonna – "Santa Baby"

                      Madonna was in full-on ˆ mode for this cover of Eartha Kitt's fireside seduction, all hiccuping flirtation and winking vamps.

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                      The Darkness – "Christmas Time (Don't Let the Bells End)"

                      British glam bands from Wizzard to Slade have caught the Christmas spirit, but the outré absurdity of this retro-minded outfit provides a particularly sweet Yuletide thrill.

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                      Run-DMC – "Christmas in Hollis"

                      Flipping "Jingle Bells" into a story of the holiday season in Queens, this track isn't just one of the greatest Christmas raps—it's one of the best 20th-century holiday songs.

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                      Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings – "Please Come Home for Christmas"

                      A fiery take on Charles Brown's brokenhearted love song from the much-missed soul revivalist.

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                      The Jackson 5 – "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus"

                      Young Michael Jackson turns in one of his most joyous early performances, which is saying a lot given the ebullience quotient of his other Jackson 5 offerings.

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                      The Temptations – "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer"

                      Picking one track off these soul titans' 1970 Christmas album is harder than choosing between rum and bourbon for your eggnog, so let's just go with its opener.

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                      John Denver & The Muppets – "Christmas Is Coming"

                      The delightful collaboration between the "Rocky Mountain High" singer and Jim Henson's band of misfit puppets is full of highlights, but the album's calypso-flavored version of this Yuletide nursery rhyme features a particularly giggle-worthy star turn from Miss Piggy.

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                      Paul McCartney – "Wonderful Christmastime"

                      An upbeat trifle about having fun around the holidays that showcases the former Beatle's silly side.

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                      Al Green and Annie Lennox – "Put a Little Love in Your Heart"

                      The grain of the Reverend Al's voice and the slickness of the Eurythmics singer's belt on this Jackie DeShannon cover make for a glorious combination.

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                      The Waitresses – "Christmas Wrapping"

                      Chance meetings with cute guys in the supermarket are the stuff Yuletide fairytales are made of—especially when they're set to bubbly, sax-powered New Wave.

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                      Sesame Street Cast – "Keep Christmas With You All Through the Year"

                      The 1978 special Christmas Eve on Sesame Street represents the educational show at its finest, and this original track about holding on to the Christmas spirit year-round still tugs at the heartstrings.

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                      Otis Redding – "Merry Christmas Baby"

                      Otis's blazing version of this R&B Yuletide classic is spine-tingling nearly 50 years after its recording.

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                      Elton John – "Step Into Christmas"

                      Elton's outsized personality and his signature holiday track's rollicking feel make for a joyous occasion.

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                      Stevie Wonder – "Someday at Christmas"

                      Stevie Wonder's plea for Yuletide peace (which he recently covered with Andra Day) has extra relevance in troubled times.

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                      Lloyd – "She's All I Want for Christmas"

                      A new entry in the Christmas canon, this R&B rave-up showcases a Michael Jackson-channeling performance from one of Atlanta's best new soul singers.

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                      Bob Rivers – "The Twelve Pains of Christmas"

                      Goofy Christmas tracks are in no short supply, but this perky rundown of the holiday's more hellish aspects has a relatable moment for everyone, from crying kids to hangover shakes.

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                      Vince Guaraldi Trio – "Christmas Time Is Here"

                      Seasonally appropriate melancholia from A Charlie Brown Christmas, which is still the greatest animated salute to the spirit of the season.

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                      Источник: https://www.esquire.com/entertainment/music/a50968/best-christmas-songs/

                      We at Casemate wish everyone the nicest holiday season. People are reconnecting with family now, taking long-overdue days off, and in general seeking to regenerate in pleasant circumstances for the next year to come.

                      While we all take a brief respite, nevertheless, a particular song has been going on in our heads that still resonates through the decades, and as a military history publisher it may be appropriate for us here to describe its context.

                      “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” was written by the songwriting team of Gannon and Kent, with credit to Buck Ram for its original lyrics. The song was recorded by Bing Crosby in 1943, right in the middle of World War II, just as America had flung literally millions of its men across its oceans—to Europe and the Pacific—to try to retrieve Western values against aggressive dictators who sought power through force rather than the universal principles to which Americans preferred to adhere.

                      At the time of the song’s release it was still unclear whether America and its allies—primarily the British Empire–could prevail. The climactic battles had then yet to be fought, and the German and Japanese empires, along with their subsumed nations, might have still been unassailable in 1943. Yet the Yultetide song beckoned for a positive resolution as early as possible, when U.S. forces could finish their job and return home.

                      By 1944 the song had become a favorite among Allied troops, and by then they had gained an upper hand. As the Christmas of 1944 approached Anglo-American forces had already caved in the Nazis’ Normandy front and had ridden across France. In the Pacific we had nearly gained the Philippines. In Europe we were at the very border of the Third Reich—while the Soviets were hammering them in from the other side.

                      “I’ll be home for Christmas” now seemed less a song than a logistical goal as our commanders began to think the war was nearly finished.

                      But then in December 1944—precisely 70 years ago–the Germans launched a gigantic counteroffensive when was i ll be home for christmas written the Ardennes Forest that took the Americans by surprise. Two panzer armies, supported by infantry, crashed through U.S. First Army in the center, and then a titanic month-long battle ensued as the Allies’ “broad front” strategy came to a halt. Every single resource was needed as our forces from the south and north needed to converge on the enemy’s 60-mile breakthrough, known to history as “The Battle of the Bulge.”

                      For evenhanded details of the battle, readers need only see our recently released “The Ardennes: Hitler’s Winter Offensive, 1944–45,” by the Swedish historian Christer Bergstrom. With hundreds of photos, diagrams and maps, alongside its deeply researched narrative, we have a more
                      comprehensive view of this battle than seen before.

                      Another thing that the battle entailed was nearly half a million American troops desperately fighting across a snowy landscape 2,000 miles from home. Gallantly they did so, in their freezing foxholes or small bridgeheads or winter entrenchments as the cream of the Wehrmacht sought to destroy them.

                      Back to the song: by December 1944, “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” was more popular with the troops then ever. But now it was seen that at Christmas 1944, it was not yet. Instead 19,000 U.S. soldiers died in that horrific winter battle, over 60,000 more wounded, and some 26,000 captured. Our troops eventually did prevail and push the Wehrmacht back, whereupon Germany’s days were drastically numbered.

                      But in those bleak, fire-filled days amidst the snow of the Ardennes in December 1944 it was obvious that our troops would not be home by that Christmas. Instead on that very Christmas day they had to wage the greatest fight in our history as the Germans made one more lunge.

                      It’s a curiosity that “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” was initially rejected by its NY publisher since the lyrics were considered too depressing. The BBC banned it throughout the war. But then it became a wartime hit, and for many U.S. soldiers in the Ardennes that Christmastime—survivors or not–it is when was i ll be home for christmas written that the lyrics expressed their thoughts exactly:

                      Christmas Eve will find me
                      Where the lovelight gleams.
                      I’ll be home for Christmas
                      If only in my dreams.

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                      Источник: https://thecasemateblog.wordpress.com/2014/12/24/ill-be-home-for-christmas/

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