how bad is mozzarella cheese for you

But what exactly is vegan cheese and what do you need to know Vegan Mozzarella Cheese: "Miyoko's Kitchen Fresh Italian-Style Vegan Mozz. You can safely enjoy some types of mozzarella cheese during pregnancy, while others cheese is its potential to harbor harmful bacteria such as listeria. Adding this healthy cheese to your weight loss diet ensures that you get to enjoy the health benefits of cheese without compromising on your.

How bad is mozzarella cheese for you -

Q: What’s the best way to store mozzarella, and how long will it last before it goes bad?

A: Fresh mozzarella comes in a variety of ball- and loaf-shape sizes and is typically packaged in brine, whey or water/liquid packing solution, which helps retain its shape, moisture and soft, creamy, slightly elastic texture. Expert opinions vary about the use, storage and shelf life of fresh mozzarella. Some connoisseurs—those who like to eat it as a standalone item—say it should be entirely eaten on the day it was made. They warn against refrigerating it, which will cause the texture to become more chewy and rubberlike. Others say it’s OK to refrigerate fresh mozzarella but that it should be removed from the fridge between one and two hours before eating it—allowing it to warm to room temperature yields the best mouth-feel, texture and flavor. Finally, others say you can leave it refrigerated in its solution until you are ready to eat it.

Generally, vacuum-sealed containers of unopened, refrigerated fresh mozzarella will last up to four to six weeks from the date of manufacture, assuming that it’s salted. You should also check the use-by date on the package. Once opened, it should be refrigerated and used within four to seven days. It won’t go bad after this period of time, but it won’t taste the same as it begins to sour with age (fortunately, it won’t make you sick). If you can’t serve it all within the four-to-seven-day period, use the remainder in a pasta dish or as a pizza topping.

Related: Recipe for fresh mozzarella

Packaged in block, stick, sliced and shredded formats, traditional aged mozzarella has a much longer shelf life due to its lower water content and the processing it undergoes during manufacturing. Recommendations for its shelf life include:

Unopened and refrigerated: Up to three weeks beyond the use-by date, depending on refrigeration temperature, or, according to some experts, up to 70 days after the production date.

Unopened and frozen: Between four and six months after the use-by date. Thaw in refrigerator and use within seven to 28 days after opening.

Opened and refrigerated: Between seven and 28 days

Opened and frozen: Up to three months. Freeze within seven to 14 days after opening the package. Thaw in the refrigerator and use within seven to 14 days.

Jeff Zeak was the pilot plant manager for the American Institute of Baking (AIB) and is currently listed as the Corporate Bakery Sales Support Specialist for Reiser in Canton, Massachusetts. He was a frequent contributor to PMQ Pizza Magazine before leaving his position at the AIB. This article was originally published in the September 2013 issue of PMQ Pizza Magazine.

Источник: https://www.pmq.com/making-the-most-of-mozzarella/

There’s some leftover mozzarella in the fridge from that salad or homemade pizza you made. How long does mozzarella cheese last?

Or you’ve bought a mozzarella loaf (or stick), and you’re wondering how its storage time compares to hard cheeses.

Either way, you could benefit from knowing a thing or two more about mozzarella. And that’s what this article is all about.

Couple of mozzarella balls

How Long Does Fresh Mozzarella Last and How to Store It

Fresh mozzarella lasts for up to a week past the date on the label. Once you open the bag, the cheese keeps between 3 and 7 days, depending on the storage method.

Fresh mozzarella doesn’t last that long. Its date is usually about three to four weeks from the manufacture date, so the storage time is shorter than one of blue cheese or Brie.

As you probably know, you always keep mozzarella in the fridge. For leftover fresh mozzarella, there are two storage options:

  • Wrapped in plastic. Such mozzarella keeps nice and moist for about 3 to 4 days.
  • Submerged in water or brine. This option allows you to keep it in good quality for up to a week.

It’s best to store fresh mozzarella in the liquid that’s in the package.

If you discarded it, use water or water with salt (half a teaspoon salt per one cup of water). Go with the latter if your mozzarella is salted. Change the liquid every two days.

If you go with wrapping the mozzarella ball in plastic, make sure it’s tight. Otherwise, the cheese will start drying out and harden.

Mozzarella balls in a container

How To Tell If Fresh Mozzarella Is Bad?

Discard your fresh mozzarella if:

  • It’s moldy, or there are some discolorations on the surface. It grows mold much faster when it’s not covered in liquid. Cutting out the spoiled area and eating the rest isn’t safe – get rid of the whole thing immediately.
  • It smells or tastes sour. Sour mozzarella equals old mozzarella. If it’s a bit sour it won’t give you a stomach ache or anything, but you certainly won’t like the experience.
  • It’s all dried out or hardened. If you wrapped mozzarella in plastic wrap and the cheese has dried out, you probably didn’t do a very good job of it. Hardened mozzarella is no good quality-wise, and getting rid of it is perhaps the best choice.
Mozzarella starting to spoil

Is a bit sour or partly dry mozzarella actually spoiled?

Not really. Unless there’s mold or any other obvious sign that the cheese is done for, the rest is a matter of personal preference.

As I mentioned, eating sour mozzarella shouldn’t make you sick, and the same goes for hardened mozzarella balls. At this point, it’s all about the quality.

Bag of mozzarella balls

I, for one, am not bothered much if the food quality isn’t optimal anymore.

When I see mozzarella getting old and start to turn sour-ish, I have no problem consuming it. But I would never serve it to my wife (who cares about food quality a bit more than I do) or any guests we’re having.

If that leftover mozzarella doesn’t taste as good as you’d like, get rid of it.

Breakfast with scrambled eggs and mozzarella

How Long Does Mozzarella Loaf Last and How to Store It

Unopened mozzarella blocks last for about two to three weeks past the date on the label. Once you open the package, the stick keeps quality for up to two, maybe three weeks.

Mozzarella sticks (or loaves) last a bit longer than fresh mozzarella, but still nowhere near hard cheeses like Parmesan.

The date on the label is usually about two to three months of the packaging date. And because it lasts longer, it also keeps quality longer past its date.

Mozzarella block on a cutting board

Once you open the package, you need to keep the cheese wrapped so that it doesn’t dry out.

If you can use the original plastic wrap to do that, great. Otherwise, use plastic wrap or cheese wrap, and make sure the dairy product is wrapped well. A plastic bag can work too; just remember to remove all the air before sealing it.

If those two to three weeks of storage time aren’t enough for you, consider grating the leftovers and freezing them.

Melted mozzarella

How To Tell If Mozzarella Loaf Is Bad?

When checking if your mozzarella block is still okay to eat, do the following:

  • Look for mold or other discolorations on the surface. If there’s only a small spot on the surface, you can cut it out (and then some), and eat the rest. If it’s quite large, getting rid of the block is the better choice.
  • Check the smell. If it smells sour or off in any other way, it’s time for it to go.
  • Consider storage time. If the loaf sits in the refrigerator open for like six weeks, it’s better to assume it’s expired and get rid of it. Yes, even if it seems alright.
Prepping panini with mozzarella

Besides that, the leftover stick can dry out and harden over time, as Gouda or Edam cheeses do.

Hardened mozzarella is fine for melting, but not that great otherwise. If the latter is the case, cut away the dry area and enjoy the rest.

An old mozzarella block works well in recipes where you melt it, like, e.g., mozzarella sticks, paninis, and various toppings.

Mozzarella block and slices

Summary

  • Always keep mozzarella refrigerated.
  • You can store fresh mozzarella in the liquid it comes in, make brine yourself, of wrap it in plastic wrap.
  • Fresh mozzarella lasts for up to a week past its date, and for three days to a week after opening.
  • Store mozzarella loaf wrapped properly, so it doesn’t dry out too quickly.
  • Mozzarella block lasts for a couple of weeks after opening.
Panini with mozzarella
Источник: https://www.canitgobad.net/how-long-does-mozzarella-cheese-last/

So long as you still like the taste, the cheese is fine. Just be aware that the flavor will intensify on most cheeses over time. If the small bite of cheese makes your tongue, lips or cheek tingle or burn, the cheese is bad (even if it passed the look and smell tests).

Unopened and refrigerated: Up to three weeks beyond the use-by date, depending on refrigeration temperature, or, according to some experts, up to 70 days after the production date. Unopened and frozen: Between four and six months after the use-by date. Thaw in refrigerator and use within seven to 28 days after opening.

Voir la réponse complète

D’autre part, Can you get sick from eating old cheese?

Dangers of eating moldy cheese Molds can carry harmful bacteria, including E. coli, Listeria, Salmonella, and Brucella, all of which can cause food poisoning ( 5 , 6 ). The symptoms of food poisoning include vomiting, stomach pain, and diarrhea. In severe cases, it may lead to death.

De plus, Does fresh mozzarella go bad?

Properly stored, fresh mozzarella cheese will maintain best quality for about 6 months, but will remain safe beyond that time. … Fresh mozzarella cheese that is going bad typically will develop an off smell; if mold appears on the fresh mozzarella cheese, discard it entirely.

Ensuite, What happens if you eat expired cheese?

Consuming spoiled foods will typically only cause an upset stomach, although improperly stored canned goods can cause botulism. “Is someone likely to contract botulism by eating cheese that’s had mold adjacent to it? It’s unlikely,” Tosh says.

Can you eat expired shredded cheese?

Properly stored, shredded cheddar cheese will maintain best quality for about 8 months, but will remain safe beyond that time. … The best way is to smell and look at the cheese: if cheese develops an off odor, flavor or appearance, it should be discarded; if mold appears, discard all of the shredded cheddar cheese.


25 Questions en relation trouvés

 

How long is unopened cheese good for after expiration date?

between two and four months

How do you know if mozzarella is bad?

– The bag is bloated. If your unopened bag of mozzarella is bloated, it’s fairly sure the cheese is done for. …
– Visible mold. That’s pretty self-explanatory – if you see mold, you throw out the mozzarella. …
– Sour smell. …
– Sour or bitter taste.

Can you eat unopened cheese past expiration?

Even if there is a little mold growing, consuming “expired” cheese can be safe — as long as you cut off the mold and it still smells alright. For example, New York cheesemonger Rachel Freier told Thrillist that semi-hard and semi-soft cheeses can stay good two to four weeks past the expiration date.

Is it safe to eat mozzarella cheese after the expiration date?

Tightly packaged, properly refrigerated, mozzarella cheese lasts as long as six months, but once opened, storage time drops to about one month. … Even if there is a little mold growing, consuming “expired” cheese can be safe — as long as you cut off the mold and it still smells alright.

Can you get sick from cheese?

You can get very sick from raw (unpasteurized) milk and products made with it, including soft cheeses (such as queso fresco, blue-veined, feta, brie and camembert), ice cream, and yogurt. That’s because raw milk can carry harmful germs, including Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella.

How can you tell if cheese is spoiled?

Cheese: It smells like sour milk. If you spot mold on a hard cheese, it’s generally safe to cut off the moldy part and eat the rest, since the spores likely will not have spread throughout the cheese. Another sign that a cheese has gone bad is a smell or taste of spoiled, sour milk.

How long does it take to get sick after eating bad cheese?

Found in many foods, including unpasteurized milk or juice, cheese, eggs, poultry, contaminated raw produce, and peanut butter. Symptoms include fever and abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. Symptoms begin about 6 – 48 hours after eating contaminated food and last for about 4 -7 days.

How can you tell if fresh mozzarella is bad?

– The bag is bloated. If your unopened bag of mozzarella is bloated, it’s fairly sure the cheese is done for. …
– Visible mold. That’s pretty self-explanatory – if you see mold, you throw out the mozzarella. …
– Sour smell. …
– Sour or bitter taste.

Can you eat fresh mozzarella after expiration date?

Tightly packaged, properly refrigerated, mozzarella cheese lasts as long as six months, but once opened, storage time drops to about one month. … Even if there is a little mold growing, consuming “expired” cheese can be safe — as long as you cut off the mold and it still smells alright.

How long does unopened cheese last after expiration date?

between two and four months

Is it okay to eat spoiled cheese?

Mold generally can’t penetrate far into hard and semisoft cheeses, such as cheddar, colby, Parmesan and Swiss. So you can cut away the moldy part and eat the rest of the cheese. Cut off at least 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) around and below the moldy spot. … These molds are safe for healthy adults to eat.

How long does mozzarella last after expiration date?

Unopened and refrigerated: Up to three weeks beyond the use-by date, depending on refrigeration temperature, or, according to some experts, up to 70 days after the production date. Unopened and frozen: Between four and six months after the use-by date. Thaw in refrigerator and use within seven to 28 days after opening.

How long does shredded mozzarella last after expiration date?

about 1 week


Dernière mise à jour : Il y a 14 jours – Co-auteurs : 14 – Utilisateurs : 5

Camie Phillis

Источник: https://popularask.net/what-happens-if-you-eat-expired-mozzarella-cheese/

Cheese Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Cheese is a food that many of us crave. Some people add cheese to salads, others layer it on sandwiches and some just enjoy cheese on its own. Either way, cheese provides a creamy flavor that most of us find satisfying. But cheese calories and fat can add up quickly and some cheese choices are healthier than others.

Nutrition Facts

If you're a cheese lover, then there's good news for you. Not all cheese is unhealthy for your diet. In fact, there are plenty of ways to include cheese in a weight loss or weight maintenance plan, you'll just need to be careful about what you buy and how much you eat.

The following nutrition information is provided by the USDA for one slice (22g) of Swiss cheese.

  • Calories: 86
  • Fat: 6.8g
  • Sodium: 40.5mg
  • Carbohydrates: 0.3g
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Sugars: 0g
  • Protein: 5.9g

One of the lowest calorie cheeses is skim mozzarella. One stick of part skim mozzarella cheese (28g) provides around 84 calories, 7 grams of protein and 6 grams of fat. This lower fat, lower calorie cheese is easy to shred or slice, easy to use in recipes and melts well. Many people also keep skim mozzarella sticks in the refrigerator so that they have a quick protein snack ready to go.

Parmesan is another popular cheese among healthy eaters. One tablespoon of shredded Parmesan cheese (from a hard block) provides just 21 calories and 1.4 grams of protein. And because Parmesan has an intense flavor, it's easy to use less of it on your favorite dish.

A single one-ounce serving of Swiss cheese provides just over 100 calories and just under 8 grams of fat. Other popular cheese varieties have calorie counts in the same range, according to USDA data.

  • A single serving of cheddar cheese provides 114 calories, 7 grams of protein and 9 grams of fat.
  • A single serving of blue cheese provides 100 calories, 6 grams of protein and 8 grams of fat
  • A single serving of American cheese (pasteurized and processed) provides 94 calories, 5 grams of protein and 7 grams of fat. But American cheese calories can be tricky to calculate. Many cheese "singles" are less than one ounce and are likely to provide closer to 71 calories.

Less Healthy Cheese Options

Cheese calories and nutrition are less healthy in products that are heavily processed. Why? Because they often contain less healthy ingredients like oil and other fillers to boost texture and flavor. 

  • Cheese singles. Many individually-wrapped, processed American singles are not actually cheese, but a cheese-like product that contains oil and other ingredients.
  • Cheese spray. Cheese that comes in a can is only part cheese. If you check the ingredients label on your favorite canned cheese, you'll probably see that it contains oils and other additives.
  • Cheese dips. Many jarred cheese products are made by combining cheese and other ingredients like oil and artificial flavors to make them creamy and spicy.

Health Benefits and Drawbacks 

Even though cheese provides saturated fat, when you consume dairy products, like cheese, you gain certain health benefits. Cheese provides both protein and fat to improve satiety or the feeling of fullness and satisfaction you get after eating.

In addition, like many dairy products, real cheese is a good source of calcium. Your bones need calcium to stay healthy. Calcium can also contribute to a healthy heart and strong muscles.

Some studies have shown that eating cheese may be helpful to maintain healthy cholesterol levels. However, most health experts still recommend that you limit your saturated fat intake. Cheese is a source of saturated fat.

Lastly, if you are watching your sodium intake, be sure to check the nutrition facts label for cheese before you buy. Some varieties of cheese, like cottage cheese or feta, have higher levels of sodium than others.

Cheese Calories and Weight Loss

When considering how much cheese to eat, it's helpful to know that a single serving of cheese is one ounce. That's about one thin slice or two small cubes, roughly the size of a pair of dice. It's easy to serve yourself more than an ounce of cheese, so if you are counting calories or fat be aware of the amount you want to consume.

When using low-calorie or low-fat cheese, keep in mind that while some may enjoy the taste and texture of these products, they don't always melt well or provide the same creamy texture as full-fat cheese. Also, be aware that if you eat more low-calorie cheese in an effort to satisfy your cheese ravings you may end up consuming more fat and calories as a result.

And lastly, consider the way you eat cheese. Sometimes, it's not the cheese calories that do harm to your diet, but rather the wine, crackers or bread that you consume with the cheese. If you love cheese but are watching your calories, consider pairing it with a slice of fresh fruit.

Cheese Recipes

If you're a cheese lover, try a mac and cheese recipe to keep cheese in your healthy diet. Enjoy your cheesy meal with vegetables and fresh fruit to make it more nutritious.

A Word From Verywell

Because it is a source of saturated fat, the American Heart Association's Presidential Advisory has evaluated the role of cheese in a heart-healthy diet. They recommend that Americans reduce their intake of all saturated fats, including cheese. So, if you choose to add cheese to your meal, just aim to eat it in moderation.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Cheese, swiss. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  2. Cheese, part skim mozzarella. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  3. Cheese, parmesan, grated. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  4. Cheese. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  5. Nilsen R, Høstmark AT, Haug A, Skeie S. Effect of a high intake of cheese on cholesterol and metabolic syndrome: results of a randomized trial. Food Nutr Res. 2015;59:27651. doi:10.3402/fnr.v59.27651

  6. Rozenberg S, Body JJ, Bruyère O, et al. Effects of dairy products consumption on health: Benefits and beliefs--a commentary from the Belgian Bone Club and the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases. Calcif Tissue Int. 2016;98(1):1–17. doi:10.1007/s00223-015-0062-x

  7. de Goede J, Geleijnse JM, Ding EL, Soedamah-Muthu SS. Effect of cheese consumption on blood lipids: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutr Rev. 2015;73(5):259-75. doi:10.1093/nutrit/nuu060

  8. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Food exchange lists. 

  9. Dairy Products - Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese. American Heart Association. Reviewed April 16, 2018.

Источник: https://www.verywellfit.com/cheese-nutrition-facts-calories-and-health-benefits-4117668

What are the healthiest types of cheese? 9 nutritionist-approved cheeses that are packed with nutrients

  • Some of the healthiest cheeses are feta and goat cheese, which are better for lactose intolerance.
  • Cottage cheese and ricotta have more than 11 grams of muscle-building protein in a single serving.  
  • Swiss cheese is naturally lower in sodium, so it is a good option for people with hypertension.
  • Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice.

Eating cheese can be part of a healthy diet. But some cheeses, like jarred queso, are high in sodium and preservatives— plus, they contain very few beneficial nutrients like protein.

There are plenty of healthier cheeses out there that can provide you with essential vitamins and minerals for a balanced, equally delicious, diet.

Note: "Given that most cheeses are high in saturated fat and this can raise the bad cholesterol in our bodies, we generally recommend limiting cheese to around an ounce a day," says Liz Weinandy, MPH, RDN at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. 

Here are 10 kinds of cheese that are on the healthier side. 

1. Part-skim mozzarella cheese

mozzerella
Brett Taylor/Getty Images

Weinandy says part-skim mozzarella cheese has a lower amount of saturated fat and sodium compared to many other kinds of cheese, with about 2.9 grams of saturated fat and 175 milligrams of sodium in a one-ounce serving. By comparison brie, another soft cheese has 4.9 grams of saturated fat — almost double.  

Additionally, mozzarella is soft, mild in flavor and versatile, says Kathy Siegel, MS, RDN, a nutrition consultant and author of Eating Clean Vegetarian Cookbook.

A one-ounce serving of part-skim mozzarella cheese contains:

  • Calories: 72
  • Protein: 6.9 grams
  • Sodium: 175 milligrams
  • Carbs: 0.8 grams
  • Saturated fat: 2.9 grams 
  • Calcium: ​​222 milligrams

Tip: Melt some part-skim mozzarella on sliced tomatoes and basil to boost your calcium intake for the day.

2. Feta cheese

6 — Feta
Robyn Mackenzie/ Shutterstock

Feta cheese is traditionally made from goat or sheep milk, says Weinandy. This is beneficial for people who are lactose intolerant because feta lacks casein — the major protein in cow's milk that lactose intolerants can't easily digest. 

Additionally, Siegel says feta is rich in the mineral phosphorus which is great for healthy, strong bones and teeth. A one-ounce serving of feta contains 95.5 mg of phosphorous, which is about 15% of your daily dietary value.

A one-ounce serving of feta cheese contains:

  • Calories: 75.1
  • Protein: 4.0 grams
  • Sodium: 323 milligrams
  • Carbs: 1.1 grams
  • Saturated fat: 3.77 grams
  • Calcium: 140 milligrams

Tip: Instead of drowning your salad in a cream-based dressing that's loaded with saturated fat, throw some crumbled feta cheese on for that creamy kick, and then use a vinaigrette for extra flavor without the unhealthy fat.

3. Low fat cottage cheese

cottage cheese with fruit
Arx0nt/ Getty Images

Although cottage cheese isn't as high in calcium as some other cheeses, it's a great source of protein, says Weinandy. This can be beneficial for vegetarians who aren't getting protein from other sources, such as meat. 

Opting for a low-fat version is preferable if you're watching your weight and following a heart-healthy diet, says Weinandy.

Also, you can easily blend up cottage cheese and add it to other foods for a protein boost. Weinandy says cottage cheese can be blended into smoothies, pancakes, or muffins. 

A 100 gram serving (about ½ cup) of low fat cottage cheese contains:

  • Calories: 80
  • Protein: 11.5 grams
  • Sodium: 407 milligrams
  • Carbs: 5.3 grams
  • Saturated fat: 0.44 grams
  • Calcium: 80 milligrams

Tip: Add some fresh berries to a bowl of cottage cheese for a low-cal, low-carb breakfast that's packed with antioxidants.

4. Goat cheese

goat cheese
bitt24/Shutterstock

Goat cheese is a soft cheese with a mild and neutral flavor that can pair well with either sweet or savory foods, says Siegel. Additionally, she says goat milk has less lactose than cow's milk, so it's better tolerated by people with lactose intolerance.

A one-ounce serving of goat cheese contains

  • Calories: 80.1
  • Protein: 4 grams
  • Sodium: 75 milligrams
  • Carbs: 4 grams
  • Saturated fat: 3.5 grams
  • Calcium: 19.9 milligrams

Tip: Instead of cream cheese on your bagel, use goat cheese, which contains 30% less saturated fat in a one-ounce serving. (A one-ounce serving of cream cheese has 5 grams of saturated fat.)

5. Ricotta cheese

tomato and ricotta toast
Anshu Ajitsaria/Getty Images

Ricotta cheese is made from whey protein, which contains amino acids that are beneficial for muscle health and growth. 

"Ricotta is produced by heating milk until the curds and whey separate, and then reheating the whey again to create a creamy, grainy cheese," says Siegel.

A 100 gram serving of ricotta cheese contains:

  • Calories: 97
  • Protein: 11.29 grams
  • Sodium: 242 milligrams
  • Carbs: 4.84 grams
  • Saturated fat: 3.23 grams
  • Calcium: 161 milligrams

Tip: Top a slice of whole-grain toast with ricotta cheese, a drizzle of honey, and sliced figs for a snack or quick breakfast.

6. Swiss cheese

swiss cheese
Copyright Eric Reichbaum/Getty Images

Compared to other cheeses, Swiss is naturally lower in sodium, Siegel says, which makes it a good choice for people with hypertension or at risk of heart disease who are watching their sodium intake. According to the FDA, adults should limit their sodium intake to less than 2,300 mg per day.

A one-ounce serving of Swiss cheese contains:

  • Calories: 110
  • Protein: 9 grams
  • Sodium: 45.1 milligrams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Saturated fat: 5 grams
  • Calcium: 300 milligrams

Tip: Try a healthier version of grilled cheese by topping whole-grain toast with a slice of tomato, some avocado, and melted swiss cheese. 

7. Cheddar cheese

A pile of shredded cheddar cheese on a cutting board
bhofack2/Getty Images

Cheddar is usually naturally aged, says Siegel. This is beneficial for those sensitive to lactose since the longer a cheese is aged, the more the remaining lactose breaks down. 

Plus, cheddar is high in calcium, with about 15% of your daily value in a one-ounce serving. Calcium is crucial for healthy bones.  

A one-ounce serving of cheddar cheese contains:

  • Calories: 120
  • Protein: 7 grams
  • Sodium: 190 milligrams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Saturated fat: 6 grams
  • Calcium: 200 milligrams

Tip: Sprinkle some cheddar on cauliflower and bake for a low-carb option.

8. Gouda cheese

zucchini boat
bonchan/Getty Images

Gouda is semi-hard and aged, with a sweet and nutty taste. It is typically made from unpasteurized milk, which means it is packed with probiotics, Siegel says. 

Tip: For a unique and healthy dish, make roasted zucchini boats stuffed with gouda cheese, whole grain bread crumbs, sliced cherry tomatoes, and basil.

Probiotics are a type of "good" bacteria that can promote a healthy gut by balancing the good and bad bacteria in the gut, which can.

Note: Cheese made from unpasteurized milk should not be consumed by people with compromised immune systems or pregnant people, says Siegel. 

A one-ounce serving of gouda cheese contains: 

  • Calories: 101
  • Protein: 7.06 grams
  • Sodium: 232 milligrams
  • Carbs: .63 grams
  • Saturated fat: 5 grams
  • Calcium: 198 milligrams

9. Parmesan Cheese

Parmesan
iStock

Parmesan is a hard cheese that is typically served grated over dishes such as pasta. It's usually consumed in very small portions, as a topping on foods. 

Siegel says the main benefits of parmesan are that it's packed with calcium and protein. Plus, a small amount of parmesan cheese packs a lot of flavor, so you'll end up eating few calories for all the flavor that you get, says Siegal.

A one-tablespoon serving of parmesan cheese contains: 

  • Calories: 20
  • Protein: 2 grams
  • Sodium: 55 milligrams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Saturated fat: 0.5 grams
  • Calcium: 60 milligrams

Tip: Sprinkle some parmesan cheese on top of whole wheat pasta and tomato sauce for a filling, flavor-packed meal. 


10. Cashew cheese

cashew cheese
Westend61/Getty Images

Cashew cheese is dairy-free and safe to consume for people who are lactose intolerant or choose to avoid animal products. Siegel says cashew cheese is one of the more popular nut cheeses due to the creamy consistency it produces. 

The "cheese" is made from processed cashew nuts, creating an end product that's high in iron, potassium, and fiber, comparable to dairy cheese, Siegel says. 

Tip: When you're shopping for cashew cheese, Siegel recommends looking for ingredient lists that include whole food ingredients like nuts and live cultures and avoiding additives, and food coloring.   

A one-ounce serving of cashew cheese contains:

  • Calories: 90
  • Protein: 3 grams
  • Sodium: 130 milligrams
  • Carbs: 5 grams
  • Saturated fat: 1.5 grams
  • Calcium: 20 milligrams

Insider's takeaway

When it comes to nutrition, the key is having everything in moderation, and cheese is no exception. Limit your portions of cheese to roughly an ounce a day and you'll be on track to maintaining a balanced (and delicious) diet.

If you need help with planning out your meals and snacks, don't hesitate to reach out to a dietitian for advice. 

Источник: https://www.insider.com/healthiest-cheese

So long as you still like the taste, the cheese is fine. Just be aware that the flavor will intensify on most cheeses over time. If the small bite of cheese makes your tongue, lips or cheek tingle or burn, the cheese is bad (even if it passed the look and smell tests).

Unopened and refrigerated: Up to three weeks beyond the use-by date, depending on refrigeration temperature, or, according to some experts, up to 70 days after the production date. Unopened and frozen: Between four and six months after the use-by date. Thaw in refrigerator and use within seven to 28 days after opening.

Voir la réponse complète

D’autre part, Can you get sick from eating old cheese?

Dangers of eating moldy cheese Molds can carry harmful bacteria, including E. coli, Listeria, Salmonella, and Brucella, all of which can cause food poisoning ( 56 ). The symptoms of food poisoning include vomiting, stomach pain, and diarrhea. In severe cases, it may lead to death.

De plus, Does fresh mozzarella go bad?

Properly stored, fresh mozzarella cheese will maintain best quality for about 6 months, but will remain safe beyond that time. … Fresh mozzarella cheese that is going bad typically will develop an off smell; if mold appears on the fresh mozzarella cheese, hsa card restrictions it entirely.

Ensuite, What happens if you eat expired cheese?

Consuming spoiled foods will typically only cause an upset stomach, although improperly stored canned goods can cause botulism. “Is someone likely to contract botulism by eating cheese that’s had mold adjacent to it? It’s unlikely,” Tosh says.

Can you eat expired shredded cheese?

Properly stored, shredded cheddar cheese will maintain best quality for about 8 months, but will remain safe beyond that time. … The best way is to smell and look at the cheese: if cheese develops an off odor, flavor or appearance, it should be discarded; if mold appears, discard all of the shredded cheddar cheese.


25 Questions en relation trouvés

 

How long is unopened cheese good for after expiration date?

between two and four months

How do you know if mozzarella is bad?

– The bag is bloated. If your unopened bag of mozzarella is bloated, it’s fairly sure the cheese is done for. …
– Visible mold. That’s pretty self-explanatory – if you see mold, you throw out the mozzarella. …
– Sour smell. …
– Sour or bitter taste.

Can you eat unopened cheese past expiration?

Even if there is a little mold growing, consuming “expired” cheese can be safe — as long as you cut off the mold and it still smells alright. For example, New York cheesemonger Rachel Freier told Thrillist that semi-hard and semi-soft cheeses can stay good two to four weeks past the how bad is mozzarella cheese for you date.

Is it safe to eat mozzarella cheese after the expiration date?

Tightly packaged, properly refrigerated, mozzarella cheese lasts as long as six months, but once opened, storage time drops to about one month. … Even if there is a little mold growing, consuming “expired” cheese can be safe — as long as you cut off the mold and it still smells alright.

Can you get sick from cheese?

You can get very sick from raw (unpasteurized) milk and products made with it, including soft cheeses (such as queso fresco, blue-veined, feta, brie and camembert), ice cream, and yogurt. That’s because raw milk can carry harmful germs, including Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella.

How can you tell if cheese is spoiled?

Cheese: It smells like sour milk. If you spot mold on a hard cheese, it’s generally safe to cut off the moldy part and eat the rest, since the spores likely will not have spread throughout the cheese. Another sign that a cheese has gone bad is a smell or taste of spoiled, sour milk.

How long does it take to get sick after eating bad cheese?

Found in many foods, including unpasteurized milk or juice, cheese, eggs, poultry, contaminated raw produce, and peanut butter. Symptoms include fever and abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. Symptoms begin about 6 – 48 hours after eating contaminated food and last for about 4 -7 days.

How can you tell if fresh mozzarella is bad?

– The bag is bloated. If your unopened bag of mozzarella is bloated, it’s fairly sure the cheese is done for. …
– Visible mold. That’s pretty self-explanatory – if you see what is a routing transit number, you throw out the mozzarella. …
– Sour smell. …
– Sour or bitter taste.

Can you eat fresh mozzarella after expiration date?

Tightly packaged, properly refrigerated, mozzarella cheese lasts as long as six months, but once opened, storage time drops to about one month. … Even if there is a little mold growing, consuming “expired” cheese can be safe — as long as you cut off the mold and it still smells alright.

How long does unopened cheese last after expiration date?

between two and four months

Is it okay to eat spoiled cheese?

Mold generally can’t penetrate far into hard and semisoft cheeses, such as cheddar, colby, Parmesan and Swiss. So you can cut away the moldy part and eat the rest of the cheese. Cut off at least 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) around and below the moldy spot. … These molds are safe for healthy adults to eat.

How long does mozzarella last after expiration date?

Unopened and refrigerated: Up to three weeks beyond the use-by date, depending on refrigeration temperature, or, according to some experts, up to 70 days after the production date. Unopened and frozen: Between four and six months after the use-by date. Thaw in refrigerator and use within seven to 28 days after opening.

How long does shredded mozzarella last after expiration date?

about 1 week


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Источник: https://popularask.net/what-happens-if-you-eat-expired-mozzarella-cheese/

There’s some leftover mozzarella in the fridge from that salad or homemade pizza you made. How long does mozzarella cheese last?

Or you’ve bought a mozzarella loaf (or stick), and you’re wondering how its storage time compares to hard cheeses.

Either way, you could benefit from knowing a thing or two more about mozzarella. And that’s what this article is all about.

Couple of mozzarella balls

How Long Does Fresh Mozzarella Last and How to Store It

Fresh mozzarella how bad is mozzarella cheese for you for up to a week past the date on the label. Once you open the bag, the cheese keeps between 3 and 7 days, depending on the storage method.

Fresh mozzarella doesn’t last that long. Its date is usually about three to four weeks from the manufacture date, so the storage time is shorter than one of blue cheese or Brie.

As you probably know, you always keep mozzarella in the fridge. For leftover fresh mozzarella, there are two storage options:

  • Wrapped in plastic. Such mozzarella keeps nice and moist for about 3 to 4 days.
  • Submerged in water or brine. This option allows you to keep it in good quality for up to a week.

It’s best to store fresh mozzarella in the liquid that’s in the package.

If you discarded it, use water or water with salt (half a teaspoon salt per one cup of water). Go with the latter if your mozzarella is salted. Change the liquid every two days.

If you go with wrapping the mozzarella ball in plastic, make sure it’s tight. Otherwise, the cheese will start drying out and harden.

Mozzarella balls in a container

How To Tell If Fresh Mozzarella Is Bad?

Discard your fresh mozzarella if:

  • It’s moldy, or there are some discolorations on the surface. It grows mold much faster when it’s not covered in liquid. Cutting out the spoiled area and eating the rest isn’t safe – get rid of the whole thing immediately.
  • It smells or tastes sour. Sour mozzarella equals old mozzarella. If it’s a bit sour it won’t give you a stomach ache or anything, but you certainly won’t like the experience.
  • It’s all dried out or hardened. If you wrapped mozzarella in plastic wrap and the cheese has dried out, you probably didn’t do a very good job of it. Hardened mozzarella is no good quality-wise, and getting rid of it is perhaps the best choice.
Mozzarella starting to spoil

Is a bit sour or partly dry mozzarella actually spoiled?

Not really. Unless there’s mold or any other obvious sign that the cheese is done for, the rest is a matter of personal preference.

As I mentioned, eating sour mozzarella shouldn’t make you sick, and the same goes for hardened mozzarella balls. At this point, it’s all about the quality.

Bag of mozzarella balls

I, for one, am not bothered much if the food quality isn’t optimal anymore.

When I see mozzarella getting old and start to turn sour-ish, I have no problem consuming it. But I would never serve it to my wife (who cares about food quality a bit more than I do) or any guests we’re having.

If that leftover mozzarella doesn’t taste as good as you’d like, get rid of it.

Breakfast with scrambled eggs and mozzarella

How Long Does Mozzarella Loaf Last and How to Store It

Unopened mozzarella blocks last for about two to three weeks past how bad is mozzarella cheese for you date on the label. Once you open the package, the stick keeps quality for up to two, maybe three weeks.

Mozzarella sticks (or loaves) last a bit longer than fresh mozzarella, but still nowhere near hard cheeses like Parmesan.

The date on the label is usually about two to three months of the packaging date. And because it lasts longer, it also keeps quality longer past its date.

Mozzarella block on a cutting board

Once you open the package, you need to keep the cheese wrapped so that it doesn’t dry out.

If you can use the original plastic wrap to do that, great. Otherwise, use plastic wrap or cheese wrap, and make sure the dairy product is wrapped well. A plastic bag can work too; just remember to remove all the air before sealing it.

If those two to three weeks of storage time aren’t enough for you, consider grating the leftovers and freezing them.

Melted mozzarella

How To Tell If Mozzarella Loaf Is Bad?

When checking if your mozzarella block is still okay to eat, do the following:

  • Look for mold or other discolorations on the surface. If there’s only a small spot on the surface, you can cut it out (and then some), and eat the rest. If it’s quite large, getting rid of the block is the better choice.
  • Check the smell. If it smells sour or off in any other way, it’s time for it how bad is mozzarella cheese for you go.
  • Consider storage time. If the loaf sits in the refrigerator open for like six weeks, it’s better to assume it’s expired and get rid of it. Yes, even if it seems alright.
Prepping panini with mozzarella

Besides that, the leftover stick can dry out and harden over time, as Gouda or Edam cheeses do.

Hardened mozzarella is fine for melting, but not that great otherwise. If the latter is the case, cut away the dry area and enjoy the rest.

An old mozzarella block works well in recipes where you melt it, like, e.g., mozzarella sticks, paninis, and various toppings.

Mozzarella block and slices

Summary

  • Always keep mozzarella refrigerated.
  • You can store fresh mozzarella in the liquid it comes in, make brine yourself, of wrap it in plastic wrap.
  • Fresh mozzarella lasts for up to a week past its date, and for three days to a week after opening.
  • Store mozzarella loaf wrapped properly, so it doesn’t dry out too quickly.
  • Mozzarella block lasts for a couple of weeks after opening.
Panini with mozzarella
Источник: https://www.canitgobad.net/how-long-does-mozzarella-cheese-last/

The 4 Lowest-Calorie How to close us bank checking account Images

Many of us love cheese. And although it's often a main ingredient in unhealthy dishes (i.e. fast food pizza, cheeseburgers, nachos), when eaten in moderation and paired with healthy foods, cheese can play a beneficial role in your diet.

Despite being high in saturated fat, calories and sodium, cheese is a great source of nutrients, including calcium, phosphorous and B vitamins. Eating dairy products can also contribute to fighting certain chronic diseases such as osteoporosis. Food manufacturers offer many cheeses in low-fat varieties that are made with low fat milk and some also come in a fat-free form as well.

However, in many cases, the fat that is taken out is replaced with fillers and other preservatives, many times sacrificing texture and taste. Your best bet, from a flavor and health perspective, is to enjoy small amounts of full-fat cheese. Just keep in mind that one serving size of cheese is generally one ounce, or the equivalent size of two dice.

Below are some cheeses that are good options and should be considered as staples on your grocery list:

Swiss. If you are watching your salt intake, Swiss cheese is a good option. With only 55 mg of sodium per ounce, Swiss cheese has far less salt than many other cheeses. It is high in protein and calcium and is a great way to add sars bank account status flavor how bad is mozzarella cheese for you an otherwise boring sandwich. One slice has approximately 100 calories and 8 grams of fat.

Read more at Fox News Magazine:

Feta. Often associated with Greek food, traditional Greek feta is made from sheep or goat's milk. Domestic feta is made from cow’s milk. Although both kinds are high in sodium (one ounce has 325 mg), at approximately 80 calories per ounce, feta is lower in calories than many other cheeses. Feta also provides 4 grams of protein per serving.

Mozzarella. Mozzarella cheese can be made from either cow’s milk or from water buffalo milk (this would be labeled buffalo mozzarella). Remember finding mozzarella sticks in your lunch as a child? No reason to give those up just because you are an adult now. Mozzarella sticks are an easy snack that will help to increase your daily calcium intake and satisfy your hunger between meals. This is one cheese where choosing the low-fat version is a good option. One low-fat mozzarella stick has only 80 calories and provides 7 grams of protein and 222 mg of calcium.

Parmesan. One security federal savings bank logansport of Parmesan cheese has about 340 mg of calcium which is about 33 percent new mexico bank and trust tierra amarilla than Swiss or mozzarella. However, Parmesan cheese is extremely high in sodium so it is not a good choice if you are on a low sodium diet. If you are not on a restricted diet, keep Parmesan cheese as a staple in your refrigerator and sprinkle small amounts on salads or veggies to amplify the taste and nutritional value of the dish.

Samantha Linden is a registered dietitian and mother of two. Like many parents, she understands the positive impact a nutritious diet can have on a family’s overall wellness. Linden believes good eating habits begin with educating parents. She also realizes that life is very busy and sometimes the ideal isn’t always possible.

This article originally appeared on magazine.foxnews.com

Источник: https://www.health.com/food/lowest-calorie-cheeses

Q: What’s the best way to store mozzarella, and how long will it last before it goes bad?

A: Fresh mozzarella comes in a variety of ball- and loaf-shape sizes and is typically packaged in brine, whey or water/liquid packing solution, which helps retain its shape, moisture and soft, creamy, slightly elastic texture. Expert opinions vary about the use, storage and shelf life of fresh mozzarella. Some connoisseurs—those who like to eat it as a standalone item—say it should be entirely eaten on the day it was made. They warn against refrigerating it, which will cause the texture to become more chewy and rubberlike. Others say it’s OK to refrigerate fresh mozzarella but that it should be removed from the fridge between one and two hours before eating it—allowing it to warm to room temperature yields the best mouth-feel, texture and flavor. Finally, others say you can leave it refrigerated in its solution until you are ready to eat it.

Generally, vacuum-sealed containers of unopened, refrigerated fresh mozzarella will last up to four to six weeks from the date of manufacture, assuming that it’s salted. You should also check the use-by date on the package. Once opened, it should be refrigerated and used within four to seven days. It won’t go bad after this period of time, but it won’t taste the same as it begins to sour with age (fortunately, it won’t make you sick). If you can’t serve it all within the four-to-seven-day period, use the remainder in a pasta dish or as a pizza topping.

Related: Recipe for fresh mozzarella

Packaged in block, stick, sliced and shredded formats, traditional aged mozzarella has a much longer shelf life due to its lower water content and the processing it undergoes during manufacturing. Recommendations for its shelf life include:

Unopened and refrigerated: Up to three weeks beyond the use-by date, depending on refrigeration temperature, or, according to some experts, up to 70 days after the production date.

Unopened and frozen: Between four and six months after the use-by date. Thaw in refrigerator and use within seven to 28 days after opening.

Opened and refrigerated: Between seven and 28 days

Opened and frozen: Up to three months. Freeze within seven to 14 days after opening the package. Thaw in the refrigerator and use within seven to 14 days.

Jeff Zeak was the pilot plant manager for the American Institute of Baking (AIB) and is currently listed as the Corporate Bakery Sales Support Specialist for Reiser in Canton, Massachusetts. He was a frequent contributor to PMQ Pizza Magazine before leaving his position at the AIB. This article was originally published in the September 2013 issue of PMQ Pizza Magazine.

Источник: https://www.pmq.com/making-the-most-of-mozzarella/

Cheese Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Cheese is a food that many of us crave. Some people add cheese to salads, others layer it on sandwiches and some just enjoy cheese on its own. Either way, cheese provides a creamy flavor that most of us find satisfying. But cheese calories and fat can add up quickly and some cheese choices are healthier than others.

Nutrition Facts

If you're a cheese lover, then there's good news for you. Not all cheese is unhealthy for your diet. In fact, there are plenty of ways to include cheese in a weight loss or weight maintenance plan, you'll just need to be careful about what you buy and how much you eat.

The following nutrition information is provided by the USDA for one slice (22g) of Swiss cheese.

  • Calories: 86
  • Fat: 6.8g
  • Sodium: 40.5mg
  • Carbohydrates: 0.3g
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Sugars: 0g
  • Protein: 5.9g

One of the lowest calorie cheeses is skim mozzarella. One stick of part skim mozzarella cheese (28g) provides around closest fifth third atm calories, how bad is mozzarella cheese for you grams of protein and 6 grams of fat. This lower fat, lower calorie cheese is easy to shred or slice, easy to use in recipes and melts well. Many people how bad is mozzarella cheese for you keep skim mozzarella sticks in the refrigerator so that they have a quick protein snack ready to how to check your edd card balance.

Parmesan is another popular cheese among healthy eaters. One tablespoon of shredded Parmesan cheese (from a hard block) provides just 21 calories and 1.4 grams of protein. And because Parmesan has an intense flavor, it's easy to use less of it on your favorite dish.

A single one-ounce serving of Swiss cheese provides just over 100 calories and just under 8 grams of fat. Other popular cheese varieties have calorie counts in the same range, according to USDA data.

  • A single serving of cheddar cheese provides 114 calories, 7 grams of protein and 9 grams of fat.
  • A single serving of blue cheese provides 100 calories, 6 grams of protein and 8 grams of fat
  • A single serving of American cheese (pasteurized and processed) provides 94 calories, 5 grams of protein and 7 grams of fat. But American cheese calories can be tricky to calculate. Many cheese "singles" are less than one ounce and are likely to provide closer to 71 calories.

Less Healthy Cheese Options

Cheese calories and nutrition are less healthy in products that are heavily processed. Why? Because they often contain less healthy ingredients like oil and other fillers to boost texture and flavor. 

  • Cheese singles. Many individually-wrapped, processed American singles are not actually cheese, but financial federal health credit union cheese-like product that contains oil and other ingredients.
  • Cheese spray. Cheese that comes in a can is only part cheese. If you check the ingredients label on your favorite canned cheese, you'll probably see that it contains oils and other additives.
  • Cheese dips. Many jarred cheese products are made by combining cheese and other ingredients like oil and artificial flavors to make them creamy and spicy.

Health Benefits and Drawbacks 

Even though cheese provides saturated fat, when you consume dairy products, like cheese, you gain certain health benefits. Cheese provides both protein and fat to improve satiety or the feeling of fullness and satisfaction you get after eating.

In addition, like many dairy products, real cheese is a good source of calcium. Your bones need calcium to stay healthy. Calcium can also contribute to a healthy heart and strong muscles.

Some studies have shown that eating cheese may be helpful to maintain healthy cholesterol levels. However, most health experts still recommend that you limit your saturated fat intake. Cheese is a source of saturated fat.

Lastly, if you are watching your sodium intake, be sure to check the nutrition facts label for cheese before you buy. Some varieties of cheese, like cottage cheese or feta, have higher levels of sodium than others.

Cheese Calories and Weight Loss

When considering how much cheese to eat, it's helpful to know that a single serving of cheese is one ounce. That's about one thin slice or two small cubes, roughly the size of a pair of dice. It's easy to serve yourself more than an ounce of cheese, so if you are counting calories or fat be aware of the amount you want to consume.

When using low-calorie or low-fat cheese, keep in mind that while some may enjoy the taste and texture of these products, they don't always melt well or provide the same creamy texture as full-fat cheese. Also, be aware that if you eat more low-calorie cheese in an effort to satisfy your cheese ravings you may end up consuming more fat and calories as a result.

And lastly, consider the way you eat cheese. Sometimes, it's not the cheese calories that do harm to your diet, but rather the wine, crackers or bread that you consume with the cheese. If you love cheese but are watching your calories, consider pairing it with a slice of fresh fruit.

Cheese Recipes

If you're a cheese lover, try a mac and cheese recipe to keep cheese in your healthy diet. Enjoy your cheesy meal with vegetables and fresh fruit to make it more nutritious.

A Word From Verywell

Because it is a source of saturated fat, the American Heart Association's Presidential Advisory has evaluated the role of cheese in a heart-healthy diet. They recommend that Americans reduce their intake of all saturated fats, including cheese. So, if you choose to add cheese to your meal, just aim to eat it in moderation.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Cheese, swiss. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  2. Cheese, part skim mozzarella. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  3. Cheese, parmesan, grated. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  4. Cheese. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  5. Nilsen R, Høstmark AT, Haug A, Skeie S. Effect of a high intake of cheese on cholesterol and metabolic syndrome: results of a randomized trial. Food Nutr Res. 2015;59:27651. doi:10.3402/fnr.v59.27651

  6. Rozenberg S, Body JJ, Bruyère O, et al. Effects of dairy products consumption on health: Benefits and beliefs--a commentary from the Belgian Bone Club and the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases. Calcif Tissue Int. 2016;98(1):1–17. doi:10.1007/s00223-015-0062-x

  7. de Goede J, Geleijnse JM, Ding EL, Soedamah-Muthu SS. Effect of cheese consumption on blood lipids: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutr Rev. 2015;73(5):259-75. doi:10.1093/nutrit/nuu060

  8. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Food exchange lists. 

  9. Dairy Products - Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese. American Heart Association. Reviewed April 16, 2018.

Источник: https://www.verywellfit.com/cheese-nutrition-facts-calories-and-health-benefits-4117668

Healthiest cheese: Best and worst cheeses for your diet

  • We earn a commission for products purchased through some links in this article.

  • We’re a nation of cheese lovers, but do you know which is the healthiest cheese? We’ve ranked 17 cheeses from best to worst, so you know which ones to top your crackers with. 

    Whether it’s on toast, in a sawnie or taking pride of place on a cheeseboard – it’s official: us Brits can’t get enough of cheese.

    Each year we produce 700 different named British varieties. And our love for this dairy delight really comes into it’s own during the festive period, when we fork out £2 billion on cheese for our Christmas day spreads.

    Whilst this favourite fridge staple is incredibly delicious, we’re not oblivious to the fact that most cheeses aren’t a healthy snack, and indeed how bad is mozzarella cheese for you with a heavy fat and calorie content. And though there is some evidence that a little bit of cheese is good for you, experts still encourage us to enjoy it in moderation.

    As dietitian Jasmine Carbon of Carbon Nutrition explains: “Adding cheese to a meal is a great way to incorporate depth of flavour, saltiness, and increases the nutritional value by adding calories, protein, iodine, phosphorus, and vitamin C. In moderate amounts (about 30g), cheese can and should be enjoyed as part of a balanced diet. Yet regularly having more than that can take you over your daily salt, saturated fat and calories allowance.”

    Wanting to be wise in our future cheese choices, we studied the fat, salt and calorie content of some of our best loved cheeses to determine the healthiest cheese options overall. From Stilton to Cheddar and Parmesan to Philadelphia, we ranked our favourites and found some surprising results…

    Which cheese is healthiest?

    The healthiest cheese overall was Fat Free Cottage Cheese which as you’d expect ranks the best for fat content and is also the lowest calorie cheese on the market. In a 100g serving, Cottage Cheese boasts only 0.4g of salt, making it the best cheese for salt content too.

    • Healthiest cheese overall: Fat Free Cottage Cheese
    • Lowest calorie cheese: Fat Free Cottage Cheese
    • Lowest fat cheese: Fat Free Cottage Cheese
    A close-up of a woman inspecting the healthiest cheese in the cheese aisle of a supermarket

    Credit: Getty

    The least healthiest cheese overall is Double Gloucester, which contains the highest amount of calories (415 per 100 grams) and a whopping 21.9g of saturated fat – which is more than the NHS’s recommended daily saturated fat limit for women.

    • Worst cheese overall: Double Gloucester (contains the most calories and fat)
    • Worst cheese for salt content: Roquefort
    • Worst cheese for saturated fat content: Stilton

    Healthiest cheeses ranked from best to worst

    1. Lowest calorie cheese and lowest fat cheese: Fat Free Cottage Cheese

    The healthiest cheese is low fat cottage cheese

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 62 – lowest calorie cheese
    Fat: 0.3g – lowest fat content
    Saturated fat: 0.3g
    Sugar: 4.7g
    Salt: 0.4g – lowest salt content
    Price: £1.20 at Tesco

    Verdict: Behold the humble cottage cheese, which takes the crown for the lowest calorie cheese and lowest fat cheese on the market. Though it’s a bit of a love it or hate it food, cottage cheese truly is the best cheese out there if you’re watching your weight. Try topping the original on a rice cracker with some cherry tomatoes for a more savoury taste. Or if you’re not keen on the plain version you could try one of the other varieties that are flavoured with fruits like pineapple or mango. Just bear in mind fruit versions like pineapple ones will be higher in sugar.

    View at Tesco

    2. Philadelphia light

    One of the healthiest cheese options is a tub of Philadelphia light

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 87
    Fat: 2.5g
    Saturated fat: 1.7g
    Sugar: 4.9g
    Salt: 0.85g
    Price: £1.95 at Tesco

    Verdict: Soft cheeses like good old Philadelphia light are generally lower in fat than a typical sandwich filler like Cheddar, but they are much lower in calcium. This is a cheese we tend to use as a spreadable snack, meaning that we don’t tend to eat too much in one portion. However if you’re thinking of filling a chicken breast with some then make sure you pick up the lighter tub, it’s got less than half the fat of regular Philly. Oh, and don’t be taken in by all the fancy flavours and variations, just stick to the original lighter offerings.

    View at Tesco

    3. Mini Babybel light

    Mini babybels are one of the healthiest cheese options

    Credit: Ocado

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 208 (just 42 cals per Babybel)
    Fat: 12g
    Saturated fat: 8g
    Sugar: Trace
    Salt: 1.8g
    Price: £1.95 for 6 or £3.50 for 12 at Ocado

    Verdict: If you’re really trying to be good and looking to quash your cheese craving with a quick snack, these little Babybels are perfect. The lighter versions contain just 42 calories and 2.4 grams of fat per cheese. We’ve ranked these highly in our healthiest cheese list as limiting yourself to just one is admirable and shouldn’t jeopardise a balanced diet.

    View at Ocado

    4. Reduced Fat Mozzarella

    A packet of Tesco reduced fat mozzarella

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 164
    Fat: 9g
    Saturated fat: 6.6g
    Sugar: 0.7g
    Salt: 0.4g
    Price: 70p at Tesco

    Verdict: Mozzarella is a fresh cheese traditionally made with Italian buffalo milk but quite often made with cows’ milk. You may associate mozzarella with your favourite pizza, a caprese salad, or the topping for a hearty lasagne. But how does it fair in the health stakes? It’s worth choosing lighter how bad is mozzarella cheese for you options over Buffalo mozzarella or the full fat variety here, which carries double the amount of fat (18g per 100g serving).  Lots of supermarkets sell their own range of reduced fat mozzarella which cuts the fat and calorie content by half, making it a great option for salads.

    View at Tesco

    5. Reduced Fat Feta

    Reduced Fat Feta is one of the healthiest cheese options you could make

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 163
    Fat: 9.3g
    Saturated fat: 5.9g
    Sugar: 1g
    Salt: 1.8g
    Price: £1.00 at Tesco

    Verdict: Feta is a crumbly, aged Greek cheese made with sheep’s milk, so can be a saviour to anyone with an allergy to cow’s milk. It’s a delicious summer cheese, great with olives, and is everyone’s favourite part of a classic Greek salad. Overall, Feta is one of the healthiest cheeses you can buy, especially the lighter versions which carry less saturated fat than the full fat kind. Plus, the bonus about feta is that applying for 2 chase credit cards it’s relatively low in calories it’s strong in taste – a combination that is hard to come by. It’ll satisfy your cheese craving without sitting heavily on your waistline.

    View at Tesco

    6. Light Cypriot Halloumi (30% less fat)

    A packet of light halloumi cheese from Tesco

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 253
    Fat: 17g
    Saturated fat: 11.7g
    Sugar: 0.7g
    Salt: 3.1g
    Price: £2.00 at Tesco

    Verdict: Cypriot cheese Halloumi has gained a following in recent years, fast becoming one of the nation’s best loved cheeses. It’s really high melting point makes it’s great for frying or grilling and having in a wrap or pitta bread. Regular halloumi how bad is mozzarella cheese for you quite fatty, around 25g of fat in every 100 grams, but we’ve discovered that supermarkets sell lighter options that carry 30% less fat. Naturally salty in nature, halloumi therefore has one of the highest salt contents for cheese. So just watch your portion size when tossing into a salad or making Joe Wicks’ halloumi fries.

    View at Tesco

    7. Cornish Brie

    Tesco's cornish brie is oen of the healthiest cream cheese options

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 276
    Fat: 20.5g
    Saturated fat: 13.1g
    Sugar: 0.1g
    Salt:1.3g
    Price: £1.60 at Tesco

    Verdict: Brie, we had you all wrong. We thought this creamy soft cow’s milk cheese would be filled with fat. And whilst it’s not the healthiest cheese we’ve seen, it’s considerably less fatty than both full fat and light Cheddar and creamy blue cheeses like Stilton. It’s incredibly hard to find a light fat brie option though, so we’ve compared both Cornish and classic French brie options and found that the English variety is considerably better calorie and fat content wise.

    View at Tesco

    8. Le Rustique camembert

    Camembert is a middle of the range healthy cheese

    Credit: Ocado

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 268
    Fat: 20g
    Saturated Fat: 14g
    Sugar: <0.5g
    Salt: 1.6g
    Price: £2.05 at Ocado

    Verdict: Camembert has a similar nutritional make-up as brie, but we’ve ranked it a little lower for it’s increased saturated fat columbia savings bank marlboro nj. We could forgive you for thinking that a baked camembert is one of the worst cheese offerings, yet it’s fat and calorie numbers actually rivals most hard cheeses like Cheddar, Cheshire and Wensleydale cheese.  Sharing one of these beauties between two is under 300 calories – provided you skip the bread (which may cause bloating!)

    View at Ocado

    9. Pilgrims Choice Lighter Mature Cheddar

    A lighter cheddar cheese is the best cheddar option for your diet

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 314
    Fat: 22.1g
    Saturated fat: 13.8g
    Sugar: 0.1g
    Salt: 1.8g
    Price: £2.59 at Tesco

    Verdict: A true British favourite, this cheese gets its name from the English village of Cheddar in Somerset. Who can resist a tasty slab of Cheddar on a ham sandwich, or melted over a slice of toast? Unfortunately for us Cheddar lovers, it’s one of the fattiest cheeses around. If you can’t bear to part with your Cheddar for a lower-fat cheese, then make sure you’re richard madden and holliday grainger a smart Cheddar choice by buying the lighter version, like this Pilgrim’s Choice one.

    View at Tesco

    10. Goats’ cheese

    Goats' cheese isn't the healthiest cheese option

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 279
    Fat: 23g
    Saturated fat: 16g
    Sugar: <0.1g
    Salt: 1.7g
    Price: £2.00 at Tesco

    Verdict: Goats’ cheese isn’t too bad, it still beats full fat Cheddar and super fatty Stilton. Unfortunately we’ve not been able to track down a lighter version, but it is rich in vitamin D, and compared to lots of lighter versions, it doesn’t fare too badly. Despite it not being the healthiest cheese, we reckon it’s okay to enjoy from time to time.

    View at Tesco

    11. President Emmental cheese

    President Emmental is one of the worst cheeses for your diet

    Credit: Ocado

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 368
    Fat: 28g
    Saturated fat: 19g
    Sugar: 0g – sugar free
    Salt: 1.5g
    Price: £2.20 at Ocado

    Verdict: Holey moly – who knew that Emmental cheese was so high in fat? If, like us, you thought the holes made it a healthier cheese, think again. Whilst this soft, savoury cheese is good on a piece of crusty bread it’s not so good for our waistlines. Per 100 grams this regular Swiss cheese sets you back 368 calories, which means it’s not a viable low calorie snack option. Sadly, President seemed to have discontinued their lighter option, what is capital one interest rates for saving if you are eating the original be sure to keep an eye on your serving.

    View at Ocado

    12. Worst cheese for salt content: Roquefort

    Roquefort is one of the least healthiest cheese options as it's high in salt

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 372
    Fat: 32g
    Saturated fat: 20g
    Sugar: 0g – sugar free
    Salt: 3.6g – highest salt content
    Price: £2.00 at Tesco

    Verdict: We were quite surprised at how much salt is in blue cheese Roquefort. The 3.6g of salt in every 100g serving makes up over half of the NHS’s daily salt allowance. However, it’s still lower in fat and calories than Stilton. Plus it’s made from sheep’s milk – making it a great choice if you’re allergic to cow’s milk.

    View at Tesco

    13. Worst cheese for sugar content: Wensleydale with cranberries

    A packet of Tesco Finest Wensleydale cheese with <a href=kemba financial credit union atm width="300" height="169">

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 365
    Fat: 25.6g
    Saturated fat: 15.9g
    Sugar: 15.7g – highest sugar count
    Salt: 1.3g
    Price: £2.50 at Tesco

    Verdict:‘What’s wrong with Wensleydale, Gromit?’ We love a bit of Wensleydale cheese as it’s light and slightly sweeter than other cheeses – especially when it’s mixed with fruits and other flavours like chilli. However be mindful federal pension benefit guaranty corporation these different flavour combinations hike up the sugar content; this Tesco Finest Wensleydale with cranberries is officially the worst cheese for sugar content (a staggering 15.7g per 100 grams).

    View at Tesco

    14. Cheshire cheese

    Cheshire cheese is one of the least healthiest cheese options

    Credit: Ocado

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 381
    Fat: 31.8g
    Saturated fat: 21.1g
    Sugar: 0.1g
    Salt: 1.58g
    Price: £2.10 at Ocado

    Verdict: Did you know that Cheshire cheese is the oldest known cheese in the UK? Perhaps not, but what you do need to know is that it contains almost 32 grams of fat per 100g – which is almost the same as full fat Cheddar. Unfortunately all our dairy drawer favourites seem to be very high in both fat and saturated fat. And while lots of lighter versions have appeared on the shelves in the last few years, our beloved Cheshire is one we’re yet to see have a reduced fat version. Best saved for a treat, we say.

    View at Ocado

    15. Parmesan

    A packet of grated parmesan

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 402
    Fat: 29.7g
    Saturated fat: 19.6g
    Sugar: 0g – sugar free
    Salt: 1.6g
    Price: £2.20 at Tesco

    Verdict: This cheese is an Italian hard cheese made from raw cow’s milk. Thankfully when we use Parmesan we tend to be quite sparing with it, grating a little bit here and there over a pizza or pasta, and it’s just as well, because it’s almost as calorific as Stilton. Just under 20g of saturated fat and over 400 calories north texas tollway authority 100g, Parmesan is not one of the healthiest cheese options. However, whilst Parmesan does tend to be a pretty fatty and salty cheese, one of its benefits is that it is high in calcium. In fact, just an ounce of Parmesan contains a third of your recommended daily allowance.

    View at Tesco

    16. Worst cheese for saturated fat: Stilton

    Stilton is one of the wrost cheeses for your diet

    Credit: Ocado

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 410
    Fat: 35g – joint highest in fat
    Saturated fat: 23g – highest in sat fat
    Sugar: 0.1g
    Salt: 1.98g
    Price: £1.70 at Ocado

    Verdict: It’s sad news for Stilton fans. This rather fragrant blue number is officially the worst cheese for fat and saturated fat.  And what’s more, these figures are especially alarming when you realise that an 100g serving of this will take women over their daily saturated fat limit. For those that really can’t resist a slice, consider a half portion treat every now and again.

    View at Ocado

    17. Highest calorie cheese: Double Gloucester

    Double Gloucester is the least healthiest cheese overall

    Credit: Tesco

    Per 100g serving:
    Cals: 415 – highest calorie count
    Fat: 35g – joint highest in fat
    Saturated fat: 21.9g
    Sugar: 0.1g
    Salt: 1.7g
    Price: £1.55 at Tesco

    Verdict: A strong, savoury flavour, this is the sort of cheese we end up eating chunks of in between putting some in a sandwich. But these nutritional figures should hopefully make us lay off the mindless snacking. Double Gloucester is again quite similar to Cheddar in the sense that it’s a hard cheese with a high amount of fat. Every 100 grams has over 30 grams of fat and 415 calories – making it officially the highest calorie cheese. So, although it’s tasty, it’s actually the least healthiest cheese on the market.

    View at Tesco

    What is the healthiest vegan cheese?

    Generally vegan cheeses are typically lower in fat, protein and calcium compared to regular cheese choices. However, as vegan cheese is a processed food, it often carries a higher sodium and saturated fat content than regular cheese. So it’s wise to consult the label before purchasing.

    The healthiest vegan cheese is Violife Original Soft Cheese Dairy Alternative

    Credit: Tesco

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    We’ve researched the vegan cheese market and found that the healthiest vegan cheese overall is Violife’s dairy free soft cheese. This spreadable vegan cheese actually contains just over 1g of salt and is 239 calories per 100g serving.

    For those after a harder vegan cheese – the healthiest option is Violife’s original flavour block. Compared to other leading vegan cheese brands (think Follow Your How bad is mozzarella cheese for you, Koko and Tesco’s dairy free range) this cheese has fewer calories (270 per 100g) and a commendable 19g saturated fat (most contain 23g and over).

    Источник: https://www.goodto.com/wellbeing/best-and-worst-cheeses-for-your-diet-the-healthiest-cheese-on-the-shelves-35147

    How bad is mozzarella cheese for you -

    So long as you still like the taste, the cheese is fine. Just be aware that the flavor will intensify on most cheeses over time. If the small bite of cheese makes your tongue, lips or cheek tingle or burn, the cheese is bad (even if it passed the look and smell tests).

    Unopened and refrigerated: Up to three weeks beyond the use-by date, depending on refrigeration temperature, or, according to some experts, up to 70 days after the production date. Unopened and frozen: Between four and six months after the use-by date. Thaw in refrigerator and use within seven to 28 days after opening.

    Voir la réponse complète

    D’autre part, Can you get sick from eating old cheese?

    Dangers of eating moldy cheese Molds can carry harmful bacteria, including E. coli, Listeria, Salmonella, and Brucella, all of which can cause food poisoning ( 5 , 6 ). The symptoms of food poisoning include vomiting, stomach pain, and diarrhea. In severe cases, it may lead to death.

    De plus, Does fresh mozzarella go bad?

    Properly stored, fresh mozzarella cheese will maintain best quality for about 6 months, but will remain safe beyond that time. … Fresh mozzarella cheese that is going bad typically will develop an off smell; if mold appears on the fresh mozzarella cheese, discard it entirely.

    Ensuite, What happens if you eat expired cheese?

    Consuming spoiled foods will typically only cause an upset stomach, although improperly stored canned goods can cause botulism. “Is someone likely to contract botulism by eating cheese that’s had mold adjacent to it? It’s unlikely,” Tosh says.

    Can you eat expired shredded cheese?

    Properly stored, shredded cheddar cheese will maintain best quality for about 8 months, but will remain safe beyond that time. … The best way is to smell and look at the cheese: if cheese develops an off odor, flavor or appearance, it should be discarded; if mold appears, discard all of the shredded cheddar cheese.


    25 Questions en relation trouvés

     

    How long is unopened cheese good for after expiration date?

    between two and four months

    How do you know if mozzarella is bad?

    – The bag is bloated. If your unopened bag of mozzarella is bloated, it’s fairly sure the cheese is done for. …
    – Visible mold. That’s pretty self-explanatory – if you see mold, you throw out the mozzarella. …
    – Sour smell. …
    – Sour or bitter taste.

    Can you eat unopened cheese past expiration?

    Even if there is a little mold growing, consuming “expired” cheese can be safe — as long as you cut off the mold and it still smells alright. For example, New York cheesemonger Rachel Freier told Thrillist that semi-hard and semi-soft cheeses can stay good two to four weeks past the expiration date.

    Is it safe to eat mozzarella cheese after the expiration date?

    Tightly packaged, properly refrigerated, mozzarella cheese lasts as long as six months, but once opened, storage time drops to about one month. … Even if there is a little mold growing, consuming “expired” cheese can be safe — as long as you cut off the mold and it still smells alright.

    Can you get sick from cheese?

    You can get very sick from raw (unpasteurized) milk and products made with it, including soft cheeses (such as queso fresco, blue-veined, feta, brie and camembert), ice cream, and yogurt. That’s because raw milk can carry harmful germs, including Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella.

    How can you tell if cheese is spoiled?

    Cheese: It smells like sour milk. If you spot mold on a hard cheese, it’s generally safe to cut off the moldy part and eat the rest, since the spores likely will not have spread throughout the cheese. Another sign that a cheese has gone bad is a smell or taste of spoiled, sour milk.

    How long does it take to get sick after eating bad cheese?

    Found in many foods, including unpasteurized milk or juice, cheese, eggs, poultry, contaminated raw produce, and peanut butter. Symptoms include fever and abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. Symptoms begin about 6 – 48 hours after eating contaminated food and last for about 4 -7 days.

    How can you tell if fresh mozzarella is bad?

    – The bag is bloated. If your unopened bag of mozzarella is bloated, it’s fairly sure the cheese is done for. …
    – Visible mold. That’s pretty self-explanatory – if you see mold, you throw out the mozzarella. …
    – Sour smell. …
    – Sour or bitter taste.

    Can you eat fresh mozzarella after expiration date?

    Tightly packaged, properly refrigerated, mozzarella cheese lasts as long as six months, but once opened, storage time drops to about one month. … Even if there is a little mold growing, consuming “expired” cheese can be safe — as long as you cut off the mold and it still smells alright.

    How long does unopened cheese last after expiration date?

    between two and four months

    Is it okay to eat spoiled cheese?

    Mold generally can’t penetrate far into hard and semisoft cheeses, such as cheddar, colby, Parmesan and Swiss. So you can cut away the moldy part and eat the rest of the cheese. Cut off at least 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) around and below the moldy spot. … These molds are safe for healthy adults to eat.

    How long does mozzarella last after expiration date?

    Unopened and refrigerated: Up to three weeks beyond the use-by date, depending on refrigeration temperature, or, according to some experts, up to 70 days after the production date. Unopened and frozen: Between four and six months after the use-by date. Thaw in refrigerator and use within seven to 28 days after opening.

    How long does shredded mozzarella last after expiration date?

    about 1 week


    Dernière mise à jour : Il y a 14 jours – Co-auteurs : 14 – Utilisateurs : 5

    Camie Phillis

    Источник: https://popularask.net/what-happens-if-you-eat-expired-mozzarella-cheese/

    Is cheese better than butter for heart health?

    By Andrew M. Seaman, Reuters Health

    4 Min Read

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Doctors and nutritionists have long recommended avoiding all animal fats to trim cholesterol, but Danish researchers report that cheese may not be so bad, and probably shouldn’t be lumped in the same category with butter.

    Their study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that people who ate daily servings of cheese for six-week intervals had lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, than when they ate a comparable amount of butter. The cheese-eaters also did not have higher LDL during the experiment than when the same subjects ate a normal diet.

    Dr. Elizabeth Jackson, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan Health Systems, told Reuters Health that the study was well done, but does not really change what cardiologists currently recommend.

    “We want people to have a diet focused on whole grains and vegetables and moderate fats,” said Jackson, who was not involved in the work.

    The researchers, from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, set out to learn what effects cheese and butter had on heart disease risk factors, such as HDL, or “good” cholesterol, LDL and total cholesterol levels.

    The researchers followed about 50 people who answered ads in local newspapers. Each person was put on a controlled diet and added a measured amount of cheese or butter daily.

    Throughout, each participant was compared against his or herself, to follow the changes in the body caused by the foods.

    Researchers gave each person cheese or butter, both made from cows milk, equal to 13 percent of their daily energy consumption from fat.

    During six-week intervals, each person ate the set amount of cheese or butter, separated by a 14-day cleansing period in which they returned to their normal diet. Then they switched, and for six weeks those who had eaten the cheese before, ate butter, while the butter eaters in the first phase changed over to cheese.

    Despite eating more fat than had been in their normal diet, the cheese eaters showed no increase in LDL or total cholesterol. While eating butter, however, the same subjects had LDL levels about seven percent higher on average.

    While eating cheese, subjects’ HDL cholesterol dropped slightly compared to when they ate butter, but not compared to their normal eating period.

    The authors speculate there could be several reasons why cheese behaved differently than butter, but nothing conclusive.

    For one, cheese has a lot of calcium, which has been shown to increase the amount of fat excreted by the digestive tract. (See Reuters Health story of October 21, 2011).

    The researchers did detect a little more fecal fat during the time the group ate cheese, but the amounts were not statistically significant.

    Other possible explanations involve the large amount of protein in cheeses and its fermentation process, both of which could affect the way it’s digested compared with butter.

    The study was supported by the Danish Dairy Board and the National Dairy Research Institute.

    Jackson cautioned this one study does not mean people should start eating endless amounts of cheese. “In terms of cheese, anything in moderation,” she said.

    SOURCE: bit.ly/vDIMx7 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, online October 26, 2011.

    Источник: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-cheese-butter-idUSTRE7AD2AV20111114

    The 4 Lowest-Calorie Cheeses


    Getty Images

    Many of us love cheese. And although it's often a main ingredient in unhealthy dishes (i.e. fast food pizza, cheeseburgers, nachos), when eaten in moderation and paired with healthy foods, cheese can play a beneficial role in your diet.

    Despite being high in saturated fat, calories and sodium, cheese is a great source of nutrients, including calcium, phosphorous and B vitamins. Eating dairy products can also contribute to fighting certain chronic diseases such as osteoporosis. Food manufacturers offer many cheeses in low-fat varieties that are made with low fat milk and some also come in a fat-free form as well.

    However, in many cases, the fat that is taken out is replaced with fillers and other preservatives, many times sacrificing texture and taste. Your best bet, from a flavor and health perspective, is to enjoy small amounts of full-fat cheese. Just keep in mind that one serving size of cheese is generally one ounce, or the equivalent size of two dice.

    Below are some cheeses that are good options and should be considered as staples on your grocery list:

    Swiss. If you are watching your salt intake, Swiss cheese is a good option. With only 55 mg of sodium per ounce, Swiss cheese has far less salt than many other cheeses. It is high in protein and calcium and is a great way to add nutritious flavor to an otherwise boring sandwich. One slice has approximately 100 calories and 8 grams of fat.

    Read more at Fox News Magazine:

    Feta. Often associated with Greek food, traditional Greek feta is made from sheep or goat's milk. Domestic feta is made from cow’s milk. Although both kinds are high in sodium (one ounce has 325 mg), at approximately 80 calories per ounce, feta is lower in calories than many other cheeses. Feta also provides 4 grams of protein per serving.

    Mozzarella. Mozzarella cheese can be made from either cow’s milk or from water buffalo milk (this would be labeled buffalo mozzarella). Remember finding mozzarella sticks in your lunch as a child? No reason to give those up just because you are an adult now. Mozzarella sticks are an easy snack that will help to increase your daily calcium intake and satisfy your hunger between meals. This is one cheese where choosing the low-fat version is a good option. One low-fat mozzarella stick has only 80 calories and provides 7 grams of protein and 222 mg of calcium.

    Parmesan. One ounce of Parmesan cheese has about 340 mg of calcium which is about 33 percent more than Swiss or mozzarella. However, Parmesan cheese is extremely high in sodium so it is not a good choice if you are on a low sodium diet. If you are not on a restricted diet, keep Parmesan cheese as a staple in your refrigerator and sprinkle small amounts on salads or veggies to amplify the taste and nutritional value of the dish.

    Samantha Linden is a registered dietitian and mother of two. Like many parents, she understands the positive impact a nutritious diet can have on a family’s overall wellness. Linden believes good eating habits begin with educating parents. She also realizes that life is very busy and sometimes the ideal isn’t always possible.

    This article originally appeared on magazine.foxnews.com

    Источник: https://www.health.com/food/lowest-calorie-cheeses

    You don't have to cut cheese out of your diet, but if you have high cholesterol or blood pressure, use high-fat cheeses sparingly. Using lower-fat cheeses – such as mozzarella, feta, cottage cheese or reduced-fat cheeses – will provide less saturated fat.


    Click to see full answer

    People also ask, which cheese has the lowest cholesterol?

    Low-cholesterol cheeses include:

    • Part-skim mozzarella cheese (18 mg cholesterol per ounce)
    • Low-fat (1 percent) cottage cheese (1 mg cholesterol per ounce or 8 mg per cup)
    • Low-fat cheddar or Colby cheese (6 mg cholesterol per ounce)
    • Fat-free cream cheese (1 mg cholesterol per tablespoon)

    Furthermore, how much cheese can you eat if you have high cholesterol? 2. Cheese. A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of cheese provides 27 mg of cholesterol, or about 9% of the RDI (16). Although cheese is often associated with increased cholesterol, several studies have shown that full-fat cheese does not negatively impact cholesterol levels.

    Also, can you eat cheese if you have high cholesterol?

    You can eat cheese and still maintain healthy cholesterol levels. One study reported that cheese intake, compared with the same amount of fat from butter, didn't increase LDL. While you may not want to eat tons of cheese, there's no reason you need to totally cut it out of your diet.

    Is mozzarella cheese unhealthy?

    For example, mozzarella contains 85 calories and 6.3 grams of fat per ounce. Compare that to Brie, which has 95 calories and 7.9 grams of fat per ounce, and cheddar, which has 113 calories and 9 grams of fat. If you want to stick with lower-calorie cheeses, try part-skim mozzarella, Swiss cheese, and feta cheese.

    Источник: https://findanyanswer.com/is-mozzarella-cheese-bad-for-high-cholesterol

    There’s some leftover mozzarella in the fridge from that salad or homemade pizza you made. How long does mozzarella cheese last?

    Or you’ve bought a mozzarella loaf (or stick), and you’re wondering how its storage time compares to hard cheeses.

    Either way, you could benefit from knowing a thing or two more about mozzarella. And that’s what this article is all about.

    Couple of mozzarella balls

    How Long Does Fresh Mozzarella Last and How to Store It

    Fresh mozzarella lasts for up to a week past the date on the label. Once you open the bag, the cheese keeps between 3 and 7 days, depending on the storage method.

    Fresh mozzarella doesn’t last that long. Its date is usually about three to four weeks from the manufacture date, so the storage time is shorter than one of blue cheese or Brie.

    As you probably know, you always keep mozzarella in the fridge. For leftover fresh mozzarella, there are two storage options:

    • Wrapped in plastic. Such mozzarella keeps nice and moist for about 3 to 4 days.
    • Submerged in water or brine. This option allows you to keep it in good quality for up to a week.

    It’s best to store fresh mozzarella in the liquid that’s in the package.

    If you discarded it, use water or water with salt (half a teaspoon salt per one cup of water). Go with the latter if your mozzarella is salted. Change the liquid every two days.

    If you go with wrapping the mozzarella ball in plastic, make sure it’s tight. Otherwise, the cheese will start drying out and harden.

    Mozzarella balls in a container

    How To Tell If Fresh Mozzarella Is Bad?

    Discard your fresh mozzarella if:

    • It’s moldy, or there are some discolorations on the surface. It grows mold much faster when it’s not covered in liquid. Cutting out the spoiled area and eating the rest isn’t safe – get rid of the whole thing immediately.
    • It smells or tastes sour. Sour mozzarella equals old mozzarella. If it’s a bit sour it won’t give you a stomach ache or anything, but you certainly won’t like the experience.
    • It’s all dried out or hardened. If you wrapped mozzarella in plastic wrap and the cheese has dried out, you probably didn’t do a very good job of it. Hardened mozzarella is no good quality-wise, and getting rid of it is perhaps the best choice.
    Mozzarella starting to spoil

    Is a bit sour or partly dry mozzarella actually spoiled?

    Not really. Unless there’s mold or any other obvious sign that the cheese is done for, the rest is a matter of personal preference.

    As I mentioned, eating sour mozzarella shouldn’t make you sick, and the same goes for hardened mozzarella balls. At this point, it’s all about the quality.

    Bag of mozzarella balls

    I, for one, am not bothered much if the food quality isn’t optimal anymore.

    When I see mozzarella getting old and start to turn sour-ish, I have no problem consuming it. But I would never serve it to my wife (who cares about food quality a bit more than I do) or any guests we’re having.

    If that leftover mozzarella doesn’t taste as good as you’d like, get rid of it.

    Breakfast with scrambled eggs and mozzarella

    How Long Does Mozzarella Loaf Last and How to Store It

    Unopened mozzarella blocks last for about two to three weeks past the date on the label. Once you open the package, the stick keeps quality for up to two, maybe three weeks.

    Mozzarella sticks (or loaves) last a bit longer than fresh mozzarella, but still nowhere near hard cheeses like Parmesan.

    The date on the label is usually about two to three months of the packaging date. And because it lasts longer, it also keeps quality longer past its date.

    Mozzarella block on a cutting board

    Once you open the package, you need to keep the cheese wrapped so that it doesn’t dry out.

    If you can use the original plastic wrap to do that, great. Otherwise, use plastic wrap or cheese wrap, and make sure the dairy product is wrapped well. A plastic bag can work too; just remember to remove all the air before sealing it.

    If those two to three weeks of storage time aren’t enough for you, consider grating the leftovers and freezing them.

    Melted mozzarella

    How To Tell If Mozzarella Loaf Is Bad?

    When checking if your mozzarella block is still okay to eat, do the following:

    • Look for mold or other discolorations on the surface. If there’s only a small spot on the surface, you can cut it out (and then some), and eat the rest. If it’s quite large, getting rid of the block is the better choice.
    • Check the smell. If it smells sour or off in any other way, it’s time for it to go.
    • Consider storage time. If the loaf sits in the refrigerator open for like six weeks, it’s better to assume it’s expired and get rid of it. Yes, even if it seems alright.
    Prepping panini with mozzarella

    Besides that, the leftover stick can dry out and harden over time, as Gouda or Edam cheeses do.

    Hardened mozzarella is fine for melting, but not that great otherwise. If the latter is the case, cut away the dry area and enjoy the rest.

    An old mozzarella block works well in recipes where you melt it, like, e.g., mozzarella sticks, paninis, and various toppings.

    Mozzarella block and slices

    Summary

    • Always keep mozzarella refrigerated.
    • You can store fresh mozzarella in the liquid it comes in, make brine yourself, of wrap it in plastic wrap.
    • Fresh mozzarella lasts for up to a week past its date, and for three days to a week after opening.
    • Store mozzarella loaf wrapped properly, so it doesn’t dry out too quickly.
    • Mozzarella block lasts for a couple of weeks after opening.
    Panini with mozzarella
    Источник: https://www.canitgobad.net/how-long-does-mozzarella-cheese-last/

    It’s easy for things to get lost in your fridge. So, when you come across cheese that’s been hanging out for a while, there’s a solid chance it could have grown mold.

    That’s where the mental dilemma comes in: Do you really have to chuck the whole thing? Can you cut off the moldy part and eat the rest? And how bad is it to eat cheese with mold on it, anyway? Before you try to eat around the problem, there are a few things you should know about moldy cheese first.

    What is mold, exactly?

    Mold is a type of microscopic fungus that thrives in moist areas, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). It’s unclear exactly how many different types of mold there are, but there may be 300,000 or more.

    Most molds are threadlike, multi-celled organisms that are transported by water, air, or insects, the USDA says. Many have a body that consist of root threads that invade the food it lives on, a stalk that rises above the food, and spores that form at the ends of the stalks.

    Foods that are moldy can also have invisible, harmful bacteria like Listeria, Salmonella, and E. coli growing along with them, says Darin Detwiler, Ph.D., director of the Regulatory Affairs of Food and Food Industries program at Northeastern University and author of Food Safety: Past, Present, and Predictions.

    Keep in mind that you can’t necessarily see all of the mold that’s infected your cheese (or any other food). “Think of mold as a weed,” says Susan Whittier, Ph.D., director of the clinical microbiology service at New York Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. “Even though you pull it out, it still has roots and it’s just going to grow back.”

    The type of food matters here, she says. Mold may be more likely to spread widely in soft foods, ruining even the parts that look OK, while it may be more localized in dense, hard foods, like a Parmesan cheese.

    Why can mold be harmful?

    Again, there is a wide range of molds out there. Some will do nothing, while others can make you really sick. Certain molds can cause allergic reactions and respiratory problems, the USDA says. And some molds, with the right conditions, can produce something called “mycotoxins,” that is, poisonous substances that can make you sick and even kill you.

    How does cheese get moldy?

    Some cheeses are meant to be moldy, and it’s OK to eat those molds, says Jane Ziegler, D.C.N., R.D., L.D.N., associate professor and director of the Department of Clinical and Preventive Nutrition Sciences at Rutgers University. “Blue veined cheese—Roquefort, blue, Gorgonzola, and Stilton—are formed by the introduction of Penicillium roqueforti spores,” she explains. “Brie and Camembert have white surface molds. Other cheeses may have an internal and a surface mold. These cheeses are safe to eat.”

    But mold spores can also latch onto your cheese through the air or water, where they can grow. “When moisture exists on any food, ventilation allows for exposure to spores, which can collect and grow on the food’s surface,” Detwiler says. “Mostly these are invisible to the naked eye, but when one can see mold, strong roots have already grown.

    What can happen if you eat moldy cheese?

    There’s a wide range here and a lot depends on the type of mold and whether it’s harboring bacteria—things you really can’t tell simply by eyeballing it. Detwiler breaks down possible outcomes this way:

    • Best-case scenario: Nothing. It could taste bad or you might get an upset stomach.
    • In-between scenario: You could have a moderate allergic reaction, contract a foodborne illness, or have respiratory issues.
    • Worst-case scenario: You could be hospitalized, put on dialysis, or even die. This is more of a risk in people who are immunocompromised, Detwiler says.

    “To be safe, it is better to toss the cheese, especially when there are children and individuals at high-risk in the household,” Ziegler says.

    That’s especially true when you’re dealing with a soft cheese, shredded cheese, or sliced cheese. “Because soft cheeses have a high moisture content, they can be contaminated well beyond the surface of the moldy area,” Ziegler says.

    If your cheese is hard or semi-soft, like cheddar, Parmesan, or Swiss, Detwiler says you might be OK to cut off the moldy part and eat the rest of the cheese. “Cut off at least one inch around and below the moldy spot,” he says. “Be sure to keep the knife out of the mold, so it doesn’t contaminate other parts of the cheese.”

    The best way to store your cheese safely

    The USDA specifically recommends cleaning the inside of your fridge every few months with either baking soda dissolved in water or a bleach solution to try to get rid of mold spores that could be lurking in there.

    You’ll also want to keep your cheese covered in plastic wrap, and make sure you don’t leave it out of the fridge for more than two hours at a time, the USDA says. If you want to be really next-level about your cheese storage, you can try this tip from Detwiler: Wrap a hard or soft cheese in a new piece of parchment or waxed paper after each use to keep it fresh. “These breathable materials prevent mold-causing moisture from collecting on the surface without drying it out,” he says.

    Bottom line: If you have moldy cheese and you’re not sure what kind it is or what to do, it’s really best to pitch it. If in doubt, throw it out.


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    Korin MillerKorin Miller is a freelance writer specializing in general wellness, sexual health and relationships, and lifestyle trends, with work appearing in Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Self, Glamour, and more.

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    Источник: https://www.prevention.com/food-nutrition/healthy-eating/a20457021/how-bad-is-it-to-eat-cheese-with-mold-on-it/

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