how is honey good for you

Honey, popularly known as the elixir of good health is packed with nutrients. Did you know a single tablespoon of honey contains 64 calories. Not only will drinking warm water and honey increase your hydration (plus everything else I've listed), it also helps to increase the levels of “good”. Honey is a natural antibacterial and antimicrobial agentTrusted Source. It contains hydrogen peroxide and glucose oxidase and has. how is honey good for you

How is honey good for you -

How is Honey Good For You?

Honey is one of those special, wonderful fruits of the earth. Food that’s delicious and good for you. Created by hard working honey bees collecting the nectar from flowers, this sweet liquid is often touted as nature’s perfect food.

Pooh Bear isn’t the only one who loves this sticky sweet substance. The bounty of honey has been celebrated for centuries all around the world. We know it’s been used for food, medicine and skin care for at least 5,000 years.

A few fun facts about honey:

  • A single hive produces an average of 65 pounds of surplus honey per year.
  • Honey’s flavor and color depends on the type of flower used to make it.
  • Do not give honey to children under 12 months old.

Health Benefits of Honey

Honey is actually sweeter than sugar and has more calories per serving – that’s why we use just a touch for our nut and seed butters. Plus, there are lots of other ways honey is good for you.

For one, those calories are not just empty carbs – honey is a great source of natural energy and full of powerful antioxidants like flavonoids and phenolic acids. Plus trace amounts of important minerals like potassium, calcium, and iron. Honey also has antiseptic and antibacterial properties, and has been linked to better heart health, lower triglycerides, lower blood pressure, cough suppression and more.

Why We use Organic Non-GMO Honey

We care about using high quality ingredients because they are better for you. But also because they benefit the earth. We’re all abuzz about the benefits of organic honey – for both bees and humans! Here are a few of the ways organic honey is better for you, and better for bees:

Organic honey is chemical-free

Organic honey makers provide only organic wildflowers for their bees to feed on. Chemical fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides are a no-no, so the bees aren’t exposed to these harmful chemicals, and neither is your honey. Nothing but the good stuff!

Organic honey retains natural pollens

Bee pollen is loaded with over 250 biologically active substances including carbs, proteins, amino acids, lipids, fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, enzymes and antioxidants. With organic honey, you can be sure you’re getting the most of those beneficial pollens.

No added ingredients

Organic honey contains no added sugars or fillers. The only ingredient is fresh, natural, golden honey.

Organic honey is safer for bees

You may have heard, bees are in danger! Colony Collapse Disorder is possibly the greatest threat to North American bees today. It’s believed that pesticides are a major stressor for CCD. So while non-organic bee hives may be treated with pesticides or antibiotics, this is never the case for organic beehives.

And better for the environment

Bees have a huge impact on our food supply, pollinating everything from almonds to broccoli to zucchini. When bees to live a healthy life, it’s good for all of us. Organic bee hives and the surrounding areas are certified organic and non-GMO agriculture zones. This means beekeepers work to protect the native plants and encourage biodiversity in the area.

We use a touch of organic honey in all of our craveable gourmet nut and seed butters , except our Toasted Coconut Cashew Butter (honey-free). While we use organic honey, our nut butters are low in sugar (2-4g per serving). Our organic honey is also Non-GMO Project Verified, so you can munch on the best almond, cashew, or peanut butter guilt-free.

 

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Источник: https://betsysbest.com/ingredients/how-is-honey-good-for-you/

The Health Benefits of Dark Honey

Look closely inside any bee hive, and you will find an army of bees working in unison to create a sweet, sweet thing: honey. Not only is honey a wonderful natural sweetener, there are also some amazing health benefits that can be gained from incorporating raw honey into your diet. While all honeys contain healthy minerals and antioxidants, these health benefits can be found in higher concentrations in certain dark honeys. Similarly to other goods, such as maple syrup, honey is classified by the USDA into different categories depending on color. These categories are: water white, extra white, white, extra light amber, light amber, amber and dark amber. The classification of honey color is measured using a tool called the Pfund Grader. A variety of factors contribute to the vast color variety of honeys available throughout the world. 

Photos by Kurt Wiegand

In order to produce a certain type of honey, beekeepers position their beehives in areas that contain a high concentration of plants the bees are intended to pollinate. While there is no saying exactly where a bee goes, and exactly what it chooses to gather nectar and pollen from, they generally remain within about a four mile radius when pollinating. This is how we get monofloral honey, or honey that contains over a certain percent sample of represented pollen. Certain plants that the bees pollinate have darker pollen and nectar, and contain different minerals in higher amounts that contribute to the darker color of the honey. Beekeepers will find the honey they harvest will be different colors in different seasons, based on what plants are in bloom and when. Honey that also remains inside of honeycomb for longer periods of time than other honeys can become darker in color, due to some oxidation. These combinations of factors contribute to the wide spectrum of honey color gradient that can be found in the world.

Is Dark Honey Healthier?

Raw honey in general has lots of health benefits. Raw honey is naturally antimicrobial, and contains minerals, enzymes, and antioxidants. Studies have also shown that some raw honey contains Lactobacillus probiotics (Shin H.S, 2005). However, darker honeys have been shown to contain higher amounts of these antioxidants, minerals, and enzymes. Lighter honeys have been recorded to contain about a 0.04% mineral content, when some darker honeys have been recorded to contain closer to 0.20% (Solayman, Md, 2015). Research seems to conclude that the minerals and antioxidants found in honey have a positive correlation, meaning darker honey has higher amounts of both. Minerals found in honey come from the environment and soil, and then into the plants that bees pollinate. Trace minerals are important to human health, and are needed for body function. Antioxidants are important to our health because they help our bodies fight free radicals, which can cause harm if they become too prevalent in our bodies. Antioxidants prevalent in higher concentrations in darker honeys include flavonoids, phenolic acids, and enzymes. Antioxidant and mineral content found in honey can be tested by measuring the electrical conductivity of a honey sample. Pretty neat!

 Sourwood

Sourwood honey is on the lighter side of our darker honeys, falling in the light amber category. This domestic honey comes from sourwood trees, growing in the Southern Appalachian Mountains and into Georgia. These trees bloom only for about three weeks, and produce high amounts of nectar, making them a highly desirable stop to honeybees! The pollen from the sourwood trees can also be an allergen to some, and it is said that regular consumption of raw sourwood honey can help folks ease these allergy symptoms. This honey has tasting notes of caramel, butter, and a touch of a spice or star anise in the aftertaste. A popular drink among farmers in the Appalachian region is the “switchel”, also known as the haymaker’s punch. This usually consists of a mix of ginger, apple cider vinegar, seltzer water, and sourwood honey. It can help ease stomach pain and be a natural refreshing source of electrolytes on a hot day, offering just some of benefits of honey and apple cider vinegar when working together. You can also use sourwood honey in gingerbread recipes, biscuits, as a pork glaze, or in black tea. 


Palmetto

The next darkest honey in our collection is Palmetto, falling into the amber category. This honey comes from saw palmetto trees. These slow-growing trees grow in the south, including Florida, where our Palmetto honey originates. Bees do not pollinate them until they are mature enough to produce enough nectar, or closer to 100 years old! This honey is harder to find and a beautiful result of nature working together over time. It has been said to rival the health benefits of manuka honey, since it is rich in similar enzymes, antioxidants, and antimicrobial compounds. Palmetto honey has a rich, sweet, and smoky flavor with light citrus and wood notes. We think it tastes almost like a toasted marshmallow, and recommend trying it with a smokier tea, like Lapsang Souchong or Russian Caravan.


Black Forest

Getting into the darker honey category of dark amber, we have our Spanish Black Forest honey. This unique honey does not come from the usual blossom nectar and pollen of a plant alone, but also from the help of some of our little friends, the aphids! Aphids and other plant sucking insects feed on trees, leaves, and sap to get their required nutrients. They need to work their way through lots of plant matter, which contains water, sugar, and amino acids, in order to get the right amount to keep them energized. The waste product that they don’t need is what we know as honeydew. They expel this sweet substance onto nearby leaves and branches in large quantities, where it is then utilized by other insects, like honey bees and ants. Because the honeydew is plant matter processed through the digestive system of the aphid, combined with some other pollen and nectar sources, and then processed by honeybees, it contains extra minerals, enzymes, and antioxidants than many other honeys. Honeydew honey is also said to be higher in certain oligosaccharides, or prebiotics that can have a beneficial effect on gut bacteria and digestion. We recommend trying honeydew honeys like our Spanish Black Forest over toast with eggs sprinkled with pepper and turmeric, or in rich earthy aged teas. 


Buckwheat

Buckwheat is our darkest honey, falling into the dark amber category. Buckwheat flowers grow in a variety of climates and can be found in different parts of the world, and ours comes from Washington state. A University of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign study showed that honey made from the pollen and nectar of buckwheat flowers can have 20 times the antioxidant value of lighter honeys, such as sage honey. It is also said to be a natural intestinal health aid, as studies have shown it supports the growth of the good Bifidobacteria and restricts the growth of bad gut bacteria (Jiang et al, 2020). This honey is earthy, rich, and comparable to molasses. It pairs wonderfully with sharp cheeses, as a syrup substitute over breakfast, or as a marinade for barbecue. It also pairs nicely with rooibos based teas, like Saratoga Red Chai.

Overall, raw honey is an excellent and proven healthful alternative to other sweeteners. Buzz on over to our monofloral page to explore these dark honeys for yourself, and try them in your everyday routine, or in exciting new recipes. 


Resources and further reading:

Carbohydrate composition of honey from different floral sources and their influence on growth of selected intestinal bacteria: An in vitro comparison. Shin H.S; Ustunol Z. Food Res Int 38:721-728, 2005.

Honey  with High Levels of Antioxidants Can Provide Protection to Healthy Human Subjects. Derek D. Schramm; Malina Karim; Heather R. Schrader; Roberta R. Holt; Marcia Cardetti; and Carl L. Keen Departments of Nutrition and Internal Medicine at the University of California. J. Agric. Food Chem., 2003, 51 (6), pp 1732–1735

Jiang L;Xie M;Chen G;Qiao J;Zhang H;Zeng X; “Phenolics and Carbohydrates in Buckwheat Honey Regulate the Human Intestinal Microbiota.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 

Solayman, Md., et al. “Physicochemical Properties, Minerals, Trace Elements, and Heavy Metals in Honey of Different Origins: A Comprehensive Review.” Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, vol. 15, no. 1, 2015, pp. 219–233., 

Terrab, Anass, et al. “Mineral Content and Electrical Conductivity of the Honeys Produced in Northwest Morocco and Their Contribution to the Characterisation of Unifloral Honeys.” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, vol. 83, no. 7, 2003, pp. 637–643., 

University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign. (1998, July 8). Dark Honey Has More Illness-Fighting Agents Than Light Honey. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 21, 2021

Источник: https://www.saratogateaandhoney.com/blogs/honey-education/the-benefits-of-dark-honey

The Amazing Benefits of Local Honey

Why use local honey, you wonder? Shopping local has tremendous environmental benefits, no matter what you’re looking to buy. When it comes to honey, not only are you helping the planet (and community businesses), you’re helping yourself too. I recently took my kids to visit a local honey farm to learn about the benefits of local honey and why this sweet stuff is so amazing.

Buying local honey has many benefits.

The Health Benefits

Local bees make local honey, which means the pollen they collect and bring back to the hive is all sourced from local plants. Since many seasonal allergies are caused by these same plants, eating honey that contains that pollen can possibly combat those allergies. While no formal studies have been conducted on the effects of local honey on allergies, the idea behind trace-exposure to allergens in order to desensitize patients to food allergies is one that’s gaining steam.

In addition to potentially fighting allergies, one of the great benefits of local honey is that it’s unprocessed and pure. The stuff you find in the grocery stores is often filtered, a process that removes the trace amounts of pollen it might contain. The purer the honey, the stronger its medicinal benefits, like potential anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties.

You can reap the benefits with an all-natural sweet treat.

The Environmental Benefits

One of the more interesting things I learned on my visit to the local honey farm was how the local plant life factors into the honey-making process. The honey produced at the farm comes in different flavors, including the traditional wildflower, orange, and avocado. These flavors don’t come from additives, however. Instead, they are created based on the plants from which the bees draw pollen. Releasing the farm-raised bees into select local plant life not only creates some incredible honey flavors, but it also helps pollinate the plants, which is beneficial to all local wildlife.

Besides benefiting the plant life, supporting local honey helps the bee population as well. Since bees are now endangered, it’s more vital than ever to support local bee farmers who are helping raise and maintain healthy bees.

Drizzle local honey on plain yogurt for a healthy dessert.

How To Reap the Rewards

Like many other things in life, honey is best in moderation—you don’t have to consume an entire jar in one sitting to enjoy the benefits. For allergies, just a spoonful of honey a day during allergy season can potentially make a difference. Despite how delicious it is all on its own, there are plenty of creative ways to incorporate a spoonful of honey into your regular diet, too. You can add honey to sauces and as a sugar substitute in baked goods, but if you really want to enjoy the health benefits of local honey, it’s best to keep it raw and unheated.

Some of my absolute favorite ways to use it include adding a tablespoon to fruit smoothies, which my kids adore, drizzling some on top of a sharp, dry cheese for a special snack or hors d’oeuvre, and as a topping for plain Greek yogurt to turn it into a healthy dessert. It also makes a great natural sweetener for lemonades or iced tea.

One of the best things about local honey is the natural variety. The avocado honey, for example, was much less sweet than the wildflower one, with an almost molasses-like flavor. It’s fun to experiment with the different types in recipes.

No matter how you choose to enjoy it, the benefits are clearly worth going local. Keep in mind that honey never goes bad, so even if you pay extra, it’s a worthwhile investment. Share your own uses for local honey with us on Twitter.

Image source: Sher Warkentin

The views and opinions expressed in any guest post featured on our site are those of the guest author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions and views of Tom’s of Maine.

Источник: https://www.tomsofmaine.com/good-matters/natural-products/the-amazing-benefits-of-local-honey

September is almost over, but guess what? It's National Honey Month! Which means you still have a day and a half to indulge in the sweet stuff without the guilt. Better yet, take the time to appreciate the health benefits of honey.

Not only does honey make your tea taste better, it's also a natural way to sweeten and enhance the flavor of foods (Michelle Obama keeps a honey beehive in the White House garden!). It also helps take the edge off a Sunday morning hangover, or so we hear, and may even combat cancer.

To comb even more super-sweet facts about honey, we spoke to Willow Jarosh and Stephanie Clarke, contributing editors at SELF and co-founders of C&J Nutrition. They told us all about the other awesome health benefits of honey—that is benefits beyond being sweet and delicious. Here are seven things you probably didn't know about honey that will have you singing its sticky praises.

1. It may help beat hangovers

Fructose speeds up the oxidation of alcohol in the liver. Honey is roughly equal parts glucose and fructose, so it has the potential to cause this reaction. However, studies that looked at honey's ability to increase alcohol metabolism are using about 2 ounces of honey (8 tablespoons) per 25 grams of alcohol, which would be about 480 calories worth of honey. We wouldn't recommend consuming that many calories worth of honey in one day.

2. It contains antioxidants

Some types of honey have been found to contain antioxidants (the darker the honey the more antioxidants it typically contains), which can help fight cell damage that may increase the risk for diseases like cancer, heart disease, etc. However, in order to really pack an antioxidant punch, you'd have to consume more than a teaspoon or two of honey; the American Heart Association recommends that most women consume no more than 25 grams or (6 teaspoons) of total added sugar per day (that's about 100 calories worth). While a teaspoon used here and there can provide a small antioxidant bonus, we'd recommend getting antioxidants from more nutritious sources, like fruits and veggies.

3. It may help fight cancer

Preliminary studies on mice show that some types of honey may inhibit cancer cell growth. So far, studies have only been done in mice, so that can't be translated with certainty to humans.

4. It may help heal your cuts and burns

Some research shows that the topical application of honey on minor to moderate wounds may speed up healing.

5. It may ease coughs

Small studies found that children's coughs decreased with given honey. (And it certainly feels soothing going down when your throat is raw from hacking.)

6. It's sweeter than sugar

Per teaspoon, honey contains 20 calories, 5 grams of sugar and no fat. Granulated sugar has 15 calories, 4 grams of sugar and no fat per teaspoon. Honey is slightly sweeter, so you can use a bit less -- so the calories probably are about equivalent to granulated sugar when you account for using less honey.

7. It may help with weight control

We almost always recommend that people buy the plain version of foods and sweeten them themselves using a natural sweetener, so they're able to control the amount of added sugar. But be sure to consume no more than 6 teaspoons (2 tablespoons) of honey per day, and that's if it's the ONLY added sugar you're eating. If you're getting sugar from other sources, make sure your total sugar intake does not top 6 teaspoons.

Related

Источник: https://www.self.com/story/7-surprising-things-you-didnt

Is Manuka honey worth the money?

Manuka honey has become increasingly popular in recent years, and can be very expensive. It tends to be sold as having health benefits - but what is the evidence for these?

Manuka honey originated in New Zealand, and it is made from nectar collected by bees that forage on the wild manuka tree, which give it a distinctive flavour. But what about its supposed health benefits?

Most honey is believed to have some bacteria killing properties because it contains chemicals that produce hydrogen peroxide. However, in 1991 a study from the Honey Research Unit in New Zealand showed that when you remove the hydrogen peroxide from a range of honeys, manuka was the only type that kept its ability to kill bacteria. This is due to the presence of a unique ingredient, now identified as methylglyoxal, which has specific antimicrobial properties.

In response to this discovery, jars of manuka honey began to be marketed bearing a UMF number – "Unique Manuka Factor" – relating to how many bacteria the honey could kill once the hydrogen peroxide had been removed.

The labelling on jars has, however, caused some confusion. As well as the UMF rating, some jars display MGO, (methylglyoxal) which equates to the same sort of measurement, while others show NPA or TA. The NPA (non-peroxide activity) rating is similarly founded on the level of methyglyoxal the honey contains once the hydrogen peroxide has been removed. TA is instead the total activity, so this includes the hydrogen peroxide, which is present in normal honey. At the same time, some jars can be found with ‘Activity’ or ‘Active’ next to numbers, while some just have numbers alone with no explanation as to their justification.

The Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) in New Zealand has released its own voluntary labelling guidelines.

Источник: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/21sD2l323f9hzdfM7Smw9B4/is-manuka-honey-worth-the-money

The proven health benefits of honey

Story highlights

  • Honey has proven antibacterial properties
  • For children over the age of one, honey is an alternative to cough and cold medications
  • The jury is still out on cancer, heart and diabetes benefits
Rock art pictures of honey harvesting, which at first glance look like drawings from A.A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh, date to about 8000 B.C.
Beeswax has been found on pottery dating as far back as 7000 B.C., most likely used for waterproofing. The ancient Egyptians offered honey to the gods and then joined the Greeks, Romans and Chinese in using it as a salve for wounds and a treatment for fevers and stomach ailments.
Today, proponents of honey tout its miraculous healing properties, claiming that it can prevent cancer and heart disease, reduce ulcers, ease digestive problems, regulate blood sugar, soothe coughs and sore throats, and increase athletic performance.
But just how many of these uses, ancient or modern, have been proved by science?

Thumbs up: Antibacterial properties

There's no doubt honey has the power to kill bacteria. Studies have shown that it is effective against dozens of strains, including E. coli and salmonella. A specific type of honey from New Zealand, called manuka honey, along with Malaysian Tualang honey, has been shown to fight staph and the digestive bacteria responsible for peptic ulcers, H. pylori.
What makes honey antimicrobic? Most bees deposit hydrogen peroxide into the honey as they synthesize flower pollen. Add that honey is naturally acidic, and you have a recipe for antibacterial properties.
That would explain honey's centuries-old role in speeding wound healing and treating gastric complaints. Sure enough, modern science has shown honey's effectiveness in treatment of ulcers, bed sores, burns, skin sores and inflammation. Honey has even been known to heal wounds that don't respond to antibiotics, although care must be taken to be sure the honey itself is free of contaminants.
Science has also found that darker, more concentrated honey may be more potent and that the type of plants harvested by the busy bee affects the antibacterial qualities. Although manuka and Tualang honeys have been thoroughly researched, scientists are busy looking at the properties of locally grown honey to understand its potential benefits.

Thumbs up: Soothing throats

A study of 139 children found that honey did a better job of easing nighttime coughs and improving sleep than both the popular cough suppressant dextromethorphan and the antihistamine diphenhydramine (Benadryl).
Another study of 105 children showed that buckwheat honey also outperformed dextromethorphan in suppressing coughs at night. Studies in Italy, using wildflower honey, and Israel, using eucalyptus, citrus and labiatae honeys, found that the gooey stuff outperformed placebos in reducing both nighttime coughs and sleeping troubles in children with respiratory infections.
But be very careful. Honey should never be given to children under the age of 1, because the digestive systems of infants can't handle any contaminates in honey, such as spores that cause botulism. Infant botulism is the most frequent form of human botulism in the US.

Thumbs up? Athletic performance

Three studies done at the sport nutrition lab at the University of Memphis found that honey was just as good or better than glucose, or sugar, water in boosting the staying power of endurance athletes. However, the studies were funded by the National Honey Board, an "industry-funded agriculture promotion group," so more research by impartial scientists is needed.

Jury's out: Cancer, heart disease, diabetes

Studies of diabetic rats have found Tualang honey to play a role in regulating blood glucose. But rats aren't people, and experts warn against using too much of the sweet stuff. Honey is still metabolized as a sugar, just like table sugar, molasses, and maple syrup.
In the lab, Tualang honey has been shown to disrupt breast, cervical and skin cancer cells, but a Petri dish is a long way from a human trial. Still, honey holds promise as an anti-cancer agent and a preventative for heart disease because it contains high levels of antioxidants that fight oxidative stress and inflammation, which underlie many cancers and cardiovascular disease.
So, think of honey as you would blueberries, broccoli and other cruciferous veggies, nuts, grapes, dark green veggies, tea and whole grains: Eating a mix of healthy powerhouse foods can only help your body fight disease.
Источник: https://www.cnn.com/2018/01/15/health/honey-health-benefits/index.html

How is Honey Good For You?

Honey is one of those special, wonderful fruits of the earth. Food that’s delicious and good for you. Created by hard working honey bees collecting the nectar from flowers, this sweet liquid is often touted as nature’s perfect food.

Pooh Bear isn’t the only one who loves this sticky sweet substance. The bounty of honey has been celebrated for centuries all around the world. We know it’s been used for food, medicine and skin care for at least 5,000 years.

A few fun facts about honey:

  • A single hive produces an average of 65 pounds of surplus honey per year.
  • Honey’s flavor and color depends on the type of flower used to make it.
  • Do not give honey to children under 12 months old.

Health Benefits of Honey

Honey is actually sweeter than sugar and has more calories per serving – that’s why we use just a touch for our nut and seed butters. Plus, there are lots of other ways honey is good for you.

For one, those calories are not just empty carbs – honey is a great source of natural energy and full of powerful antioxidants like flavonoids and phenolic acids. Plus trace amounts of important minerals like potassium, calcium, and iron. Honey also has antiseptic and antibacterial properties, and has been linked to better heart health, lower triglycerides, lower blood pressure, cough suppression and more.

Why We use Organic Non-GMO Honey

We care about using high quality ingredients because they are better for you. But also because they benefit the earth. We’re all abuzz about the benefits of organic honey – for both bees and humans! Here are a few of the ways organic honey is better for you, and better for bees:

Organic honey is chemical-free

Organic honey makers provide only organic wildflowers for their bees to feed on. Chemical fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides are a no-no, so the bees aren’t exposed to these harmful chemicals, and neither is your honey. Nothing but the good stuff!

Organic honey retains natural pollens

Bee pollen is loaded with over 250 biologically active substances including carbs, proteins, amino acids, lipids, fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, enzymes and antioxidants. With organic honey, you can be sure you’re getting the most of those beneficial pollens.

No added ingredients

Organic honey contains no added sugars or fillers. The only ingredient is fresh, natural, golden honey.

Organic honey is safer for bees

You may have heard, bees are in danger! Colony Collapse Disorder is possibly the greatest threat to North American bees today. It’s believed that pesticides are a major stressor for CCD. So while non-organic bee hives may be treated with pesticides or antibiotics, this is never the case for organic beehives.

And better for the environment

Bees have a huge impact on our food supply, pollinating everything from almonds to broccoli to zucchini. When bees to live a healthy life, it’s good for all of us. Organic bee hives and the surrounding areas are certified organic and non-GMO agriculture zones. This means beekeepers work to protect the native plants and encourage biodiversity in the area.

We use a touch of organic honey in all of our craveable gourmet nut and seed buttersexcept our Toasted Coconut Cashew Butter (honey-free). While we use organic honey, our nut butters are low in sugar (2-4g per serving). Our organic honey is also Non-GMO Project Verified, so you can munch on the best almond, cashew, or peanut butter guilt-free.

 

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Источник: https://betsysbest.com/ingredients/how-is-honey-good-for-you/

The Health Benefits of Dark Honey

Look closely inside any bee hive, and you will find an army of bees working in unison to create a sweet, sweet thing: honey. Not only is honey a wonderful natural sweetener, there are also some amazing health benefits that can be gained from incorporating raw honey into your diet. While all honeys contain healthy minerals and antioxidants, these health benefits can be found in higher concentrations in certain dark honeys. Similarly to other goods, such as maple syrup, honey is classified by the USDA into different categories depending on color. These categories are: water white, extra white, white, extra light amber, light amber, amber and dark amber. The classification of honey color is measured using a tool called the Pfund Grader. A variety of factors contribute to the vast color variety of honeys available throughout the world. 

Photos by Kurt Wiegand

In order to produce a certain type of honey, beekeepers position their beehives in areas that contain a high concentration of plants the bees are intended to pollinate. While there is no saying exactly where a bee goes, and exactly what it chooses to gather nectar and pollen from, they generally remain within about a four mile radius when pollinating. This is how we get monofloral honey, or honey that contains over a certain percent sample of represented pollen. Certain plants that the bees pollinate have darker pollen and nectar, and contain different minerals in higher amounts that contribute to the darker color of the honey. Beekeepers will find the honey they harvest will be different colors in different seasons, based on what plants are in bloom and when. Honey that also remains inside of honeycomb for longer periods of time than other honeys can become darker in color, due to some oxidation. These combinations of factors contribute to the wide spectrum of honey color gradient that can be found in the world.

Is Dark Honey Healthier?

Raw honey in general has lots of health benefits. Raw honey is naturally antimicrobial, and contains minerals, enzymes, and antioxidants. Studies have also shown that some raw honey contains Lactobacillus probiotics (Shin H.S, 2005). However, darker honeys have been shown to contain higher amounts of these antioxidants, minerals, and enzymes. Lighter honeys have been recorded to contain about a 0.04% mineral content, when some darker honeys have been recorded to chase bp visa credit card closer to 0.20% (Solayman, Md, 2015). Research seems to conclude that the minerals and antioxidants found in honey have a positive correlation, meaning darker honey has higher amounts of both. Minerals found in honey come from the environment and soil, and then into the plants that bees pollinate. Trace minerals are important to human health, and are needed for body function. Antioxidants are important to our health because they help our bodies fight free radicals, which can cause harm if they become too prevalent in our bodies. Antioxidants prevalent in higher concentrations in darker honeys include flavonoids, phenolic acids, and enzymes. Antioxidant and mineral content found in honey can be tested by measuring the electrical conductivity of a honey sample. Pretty neat!

 Sourwood

Sourwood honey is on the lighter side of our darker honeys, falling in the light amber category. This domestic honey comes from sourwood trees, growing in the Southern Appalachian Mountains and into Georgia. These trees bloom only for about three weeks, and produce high amounts of nectar, making them a highly desirable stop to honeybees! The pollen from the sourwood trees can also be an allergen to some, and it is said that regular consumption of raw sourwood honey can help folks ease these allergy symptoms. This honey has tasting notes of caramel, butter, and a touch of a spice or star anise in the aftertaste. A popular drink how is honey good for you farmers in the Appalachian region is the “switchel”, also known as the haymaker’s punch. This usually consists of a mix of ginger, apple cider vinegar, seltzer water, and sourwood honey. It can help ease stomach pain and be a natural refreshing source of electrolytes on a hot day, offering just some of benefits of honey and apple cider vinegar when working together. You can also use sourwood honey in gingerbread recipes, biscuits, as a pork glaze, or in black tea. 


Palmetto

The next darkest honey in our collection is Palmetto, falling into the amber category. This honey comes from saw palmetto trees. These slow-growing trees grow in the south, including Florida, where our Palmetto honey originates. Bees do not pollinate them until they are mature enough to produce enough nectar, or closer to 100 victoria secret plus size pink sweatpants old! This honey is harder to find and a beautiful result of nature working together over time. It has been said to rival the health benefits of manuka honey, since it is rich in similar enzymes, antioxidants, and antimicrobial compounds. Palmetto honey has a rich, sweet, and smoky flavor with light citrus and wood notes. We think it tastes almost like a toasted marshmallow, and recommend trying it with a smokier tea, like Lapsang Souchong or Russian Caravan.


Black Forest

Getting into the darker honey category of dark amber, we have our Spanish Black Forest honey. This unique honey does not come from the usual blossom nectar and pollen of a plant alone, but also from the help of some of our little friends, the aphids! Aphids and other plant sucking insects feed on trees, leaves, and sap to get their required nutrients. They need to work their way through lots of plant matter, which contains water, sugar, and amino acids, in order to get the right amount to keep them energized. The waste product that they don’t need is what we know as honeydew. They expel this sweet substance onto nearby leaves and branches in large quantities, where it is then utilized by other insects, like honey bees and ants. Because the honeydew is plant matter processed through the digestive system of the aphid, combined with some other pollen and nectar sources, and then processed by honeybees, it contains extra minerals, enzymes, and antioxidants than many other honeys. Honeydew honey is also said to be higher in certain oligosaccharides, or prebiotics that can have a beneficial effect on gut bacteria and digestion. We recommend trying honeydew honeys like our Spanish Black Forest over toast with eggs sprinkled with pepper and turmeric, or in rich earthy aged teas. 


Buckwheat

Buckwheat is our darkest honey, falling into the dark amber category. Buckwheat flowers grow in a variety of climates and can be found in different parts of the world, and ours comes from Washington state. A University of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign study showed that honey made from the pollen and nectar of buckwheat flowers can have 20 times the antioxidant value of lighter honeys, such as sage honey. It is also said to be a natural intestinal health aid, as studies have shown it supports the growth of the good Bifidobacteria and restricts the growth of bad gut bacteria (Jiang et al, 2020). This honey is earthy, rich, and comparable to molasses. It pairs wonderfully with sharp cheeses, as a syrup substitute over breakfast, or as a marinade for barbecue. It also pairs nicely with rooibos based teas, like Saratoga Red Chai.

Overall, raw honey is an excellent and proven healthful alternative to other sweeteners. Buzz on over to our monofloral page to explore these dark honeys for yourself, and try them in your everyday routine, or in exciting new recipes. 


Resources and further reading:

Carbohydrate how is honey good for you of honey from different floral sources and their influence on growth of selected intestinal bacteria: Number line for kids in vitro comparison. Shin H.S; Ustunol Z. Food Res Int 38:721-728, 2005.

Honey  with High Levels of Antioxidants Can Provide Protection to Healthy Human Subjects. Derek D. Schramm; Malina Karim; Heather R. Schrader; Roberta R. Holt; Marcia Cardetti; and Carl L. Keen Departments of Nutrition and Internal Medicine at the University of California. J. Agric. Food Chem., 2003, 51 (6), pp 1732–1735

Jiang L;Xie M;Chen G;Qiao J;Zhang H;Zeng X; “Phenolics and Carbohydrates in Buckwheat Honey Regulate the Human Intestinal Microbiota.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 

Solayman, Md., et al. “Physicochemical Properties, Minerals, Trace Elements, and Heavy Metals in Honey of Different Origins: A Comprehensive Review.” Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, vol. 15, no. 1, 2015, pp. 219–233., 

Terrab, Anass, et al. “Mineral Content and Electrical Conductivity of the Honeys Produced in Northwest Morocco and Their Contribution to the Characterisation of Unifloral Honeys.” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, vol. 83, no. 7, 2003, pp. 637–643., 

University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign. (1998, July 8). Dark Honey Has More Illness-Fighting Agents Than Light Honey. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 21, 2021

Источник: https://www.saratogateaandhoney.com/blogs/honey-education/the-benefits-of-dark-honey

The Amazing Benefits of Local Honey

Why use local honey, you wonder? Shopping local has tremendous environmental benefits, no matter what you’re looking to buy. When it comes to honey, not only are you helping the planet (and community businesses), you’re helping yourself too. I recently took my kids to visit a local honey farm to learn about the benefits of local honey and why this sweet stuff is so amazing.

Buying local honey has many benefits.

The Health Benefits

Local bees make local honey, which means the pollen they collect and bring back to the hive is all sourced from local plants. Since many seasonal allergies are caused by these same plants, eating honey that contains that pollen can possibly combat those allergies. While no formal studies have been conducted on the effects of local honey on allergies, the idea behind trace-exposure to allergens in order to how is honey good for you patients to food allergies is one that’s gaining steam.

In addition to potentially fighting allergies, one of the great benefits of local honey is that it’s unprocessed and pure. The stuff you find in the grocery stores is often filtered, a process that removes the trace amounts of pollen it might contain. The purer the honey, the stronger its medicinal benefits, like potential anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties.

You can reap the benefits with an all-natural sweet treat.

The Environmental Benefits

One of the more interesting things I learned on my visit to the local honey farm was how the local plant life factors into the honey-making process. The honey produced at the farm comes in different flavors, including the traditional wildflower, orange, and avocado. These flavors don’t come from additives, however. Instead, they are created based on the plants from which the bees draw pollen. Releasing the farm-raised bees into select local plant life not only creates some incredible honey flavors, but it also helps pollinate the plants, which is beneficial to all local wildlife.

Besides benefiting the plant life, supporting local honey helps the bee population as well. Since bees are now endangered, it’s more vital than ever to support local bee farmers who are helping raise and maintain healthy bees.

Drizzle local honey on plain yogurt for a healthy dessert.

How To Reap the Rewards

Like many other things in life, honey is best in moderation—you don’t have to consume an entire jar in one sitting to enjoy the benefits. For allergies, just a spoonful of honey a day during allergy season can potentially make a difference. Despite how delicious it is all on its own, there are plenty of creative ways to incorporate a spoonful of honey into your regular diet, too. You can add honey to sauces and as a sugar substitute in baked goods, but if you really want to enjoy the health benefits of local honey, it’s best to keep it raw and unheated.

Some of my absolute favorite ways to use it include adding a tablespoon to fruit smoothies, which my kids adore, drizzling some on top of a sharp, dry cheese for a special snack or hors d’oeuvre, and as a topping for plain Greek yogurt to turn it into a healthy dessert. It also makes a great natural sweetener for lemonades or iced tea.

One of the best things about local good cash back credit cards is the natural variety. The avocado honey, for example, was much less sweet than the wildflower one, with an almost molasses-like flavor. It’s fun to experiment with the different types in recipes.

No matter how you choose to enjoy it, the benefits are clearly worth going local. Keep in mind that honey never goes bad, so even if you pay extra, it’s a worthwhile investment. Share your own uses for local honey with us on Twitter.

Image source: Sher Warkentin

The views and opinions expressed in any guest post featured on our site are those of the guest author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions and views of Tom’s of Maine.

Источник: https://www.tomsofmaine.com/good-matters/natural-products/the-amazing-benefits-of-local-honey

The proven health benefits of honey

Story highlights

  • Honey has proven antibacterial properties
  • For children over the citizens one bank auto loan payoff address of one, honey is an alternative to cough and cold medications
  • The jury is still out on cancer, heart and diabetes benefits
Rock art pictures of honey harvesting, which at first glance look like drawings from A.A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh, date to about 8000 B.C.
Beeswax has been found on pottery dating as far back as 7000 B.C., most likely used for waterproofing. The ancient Egyptians offered honey to the gods and then joined the Greeks, Romans and Chinese in using it as a salve for wounds and a treatment for fevers and stomach ailments.
Today, proponents of honey tout its miraculous healing properties, claiming that it can prevent cancer and heart disease, reduce ulcers, ease digestive problems, regulate blood sugar, soothe coughs and sore throats, and increase athletic performance.
But just how many of these uses, ancient or modern, have been proved by science?

Thumbs up: Antibacterial properties

There's no doubt honey has the power to kill bacteria. Studies have shown that it is effective against dozens of strains, including E. coli and salmonella. A specific type of honey from New Zealand, called manuka honey, along with Malaysian Tualang honey, has been shown to fight staph and the digestive bacteria responsible for peptic ulcers, H. pylori.
What makes honey antimicrobic? Most bees deposit hydrogen peroxide into the honey as they synthesize flower pollen. Add that honey is naturally acidic, and you have a recipe for antibacterial properties.
That would explain honey's centuries-old role in speeding wound healing and treating gastric complaints. Sure enough, modern science has shown honey's effectiveness in treatment of ulcers, bed sores, burns, skin sores and inflammation. Honey has even been known to heal wounds that don't respond to antibiotics, although care must be taken to be sure the honey itself is free of contaminants.
Science has also found that darker, more concentrated honey may be more potent and that the type of plants harvested by the busy bee affects the antibacterial qualities. Although manuka and Tualang honeys have been thoroughly researched, scientists are busy looking at the properties of locally grown honey to understand its potential benefits.

Thumbs up: Soothing throats

A study of 139 children found that honey did a better job of easing nighttime coughs and improving sleep than both the popular cough suppressant dextromethorphan and the antihistamine diphenhydramine (Benadryl).
Another study of 105 children showed that buckwheat honey also outperformed dextromethorphan in suppressing coughs at night. Studies in Italy, using wildflower honey, and Israel, using eucalyptus, citrus and labiatae honeys, found that the gooey stuff outperformed how is honey good for you in reducing both nighttime coughs and sleeping troubles in children with respiratory infections.
But be very careful. Honey should never be given to children under the age of 1, because the digestive systems of infants can't handle any contaminates in honey, such as spores that cause botulism. Infant botulism is the most frequent form of human botulism in the US. how is honey good for you up? Athletic performance
Three studies done at the sport nutrition lab at the University of Memphis found that honey was just as good or better than glucose, or sugar, water in boosting the staying power of endurance athletes. However, the studies were funded by the National Honey Board, an "industry-funded agriculture promotion group," so more research by impartial scientists is needed.

Jury's out: Cancer, heart disease, diabetes

Studies of diabetic rats have found Tualang honey to play a role in regulating blood glucose. But rats aren't people, and experts warn against using too much of the sweet stuff. Honey is still metabolized as a sugar, just like table sugar, molasses, and maple syrup.
In the lab, Tualang honey has been shown to disrupt breast, cervical and skin cancer cells, but a Petri dish is a long way from a human trial. Still, honey holds promise as an anti-cancer agent and a preventative for heart disease because it contains high levels of antioxidants that fight oxidative stress and inflammation, which underlie many cancers and cardiovascular disease.
So, think of honey as you would blueberries, broccoli how is honey good for you other cruciferous veggies, nuts, grapes, dark green veggies, tea and whole grains: Eating a mix of healthy powerhouse foods can only help your body fight disease.
Источник: https://www.cnn.com/2018/01/15/health/honey-health-benefits/index.html

Is Manuka honey worth the money?

Manuka honey has become increasingly popular in recent years, and can be very expensive. It tends to be let me google that for you tricks as having health benefits - but what is the evidence for these?

Manuka honey originated in New Zealand, and it is techonecard from nectar collected by bees that forage on the wild manuka tree, which give it a distinctive flavour. But what about its supposed health benefits?

Most honey is believed to have some bacteria killing properties because it contains chemicals that produce hydrogen peroxide. However, in 1991 a study from the Honey Research Unit in New Zealand showed that when you remove the hydrogen peroxide from a range of honeys, manuka was the only type that kept its ability to kill bacteria. This is due to the presence of a unique ingredient, now identified as methylglyoxal, which has specific antimicrobial properties.

In response to this discovery, jars of manuka honey began to be marketed bearing a UMF number – "Unique Manuka Factor" – relating to how many bacteria the honey could kill once the hydrogen peroxide had been removed.

The labelling on jars has, however, caused some confusion. As well as the UMF rating, some jars display MGO, (methylglyoxal) which equates to the same sort of measurement, while others show NPA or TA. The NPA (non-peroxide activity) rating is similarly founded on the level of methyglyoxal the honey contains once the hydrogen peroxide has been removed. TA is cheapoair refund customer service the total activity, so this includes the hydrogen peroxide, which is present in normal honey. At the same time, some jars can be found with ‘Activity’ or ‘Active’ next to numbers, while some just have numbers alone with no explanation as to their justification.

The Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) in New Zealand has released its own voluntary labelling guidelines.

Источник: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/21sD2l323f9hzdfM7Smw9B4/is-manuka-honey-worth-the-money

September is almost over, but guess what? It's National Honey Barclays mobile banking app Which means you still have a day and a half to indulge in the sweet stuff without the guilt. Better yet, take the time to appreciate the health benefits of honey.

Not only does honey make your tea taste better, it's also a natural way to sweeten and enhance the flavor of foods (Michelle Obama keeps a honey beehive in the White House garden!). It also helps take the edge off a Sunday morning hangover, or so we hear, and may even combat cancer.

To comb even more super-sweet facts about honey, we spoke to Willow Jarosh and Stephanie Clarke, contributing editors at SELF and co-founders of C&J Nutrition. They told us all about the other awesome health benefits of honey—that is benefits beyond being sweet and delicious. Here are seven things treadmill for home flipkart probably didn't know about honey that will have you singing its sticky praises.

1. It may help beat hangovers

Fructose speeds up the oxidation of alcohol in the liver. Honey is roughly equal parts glucose and fructose, so it has the potential to cause this reaction. However, studies that looked at honey's ability to increase alcohol metabolism are using about how is honey good for you ounces of honey (8 tablespoons) per 25 grams of alcohol, which would be about how is honey good for you calories worth of honey. We wouldn't recommend consuming that many calories worth of honey in one day.

2. It contains antioxidants

Some types of honey how is honey good for you been found to contain antioxidants (the darker the honey the more antioxidants it typically contains), which can help fight cell damage that may increase how is honey good for you risk for diseases like cancer, heart disease, etc. However, in order to really pack an antioxidant punch, you'd have to consume more than a teaspoon or two of honey; the American Heart Association recommends that most women consume no more than 25 grams or (6 teaspoons) of total added sugar per day (that's about 100 calories worth). While a teaspoon used here and there can provide a small antioxidant bonus, we'd recommend getting antioxidants from more nutritious sources, like fruits and veggies.

3. It may help fight cancer

Preliminary studies on mice show that some types of honey may inhibit cancer cell growth. So far, studies have only been done in mice, so that can't mls property search translated with certainty to humans.

4. It may help heal your cuts and burns

Some research shows that the topical application of honey on minor to moderate wounds may speed up healing.

5. It may ease coughs

Small studies found that children's coughs decreased with given honey. (And it certainly feels soothing going down when your throat is raw from hacking.)

6. It's sweeter than sugar

Per teaspoon, honey contains 20 calories, 5 grams of sugar and no fat. Granulated sugar has 15 calories, 4 grams of sugar and no fat per teaspoon. Honey is slightly sweeter, so you can use a bit less -- so the calories probably are about equivalent to granulated sugar when you account for using less honey.

7. It may help with weight control

We almost always recommend that people buy the plain version of foods and sweeten them themselves using a natural sweetener, so they're able to control the amount of added sugar. But be sure to consume no more than 6 teaspoons (2 tablespoons) of honey per day, and that's if it's the ONLY added sugar you're eating. If you're getting sugar from other sources, make sure your total sugar intake does not top 6 teaspoons.

Related

Источник: https://www.self.com/story/7-surprising-things-you-didnt

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