how to cut railroad ties in half

Guys that install tie walls use a chainsaw motor with a special 'tie cutter' circular blade. I have rented these and they work really well. Call. I built a 20 X 24 gambriel roof barn / garage with a wood floor using old railroad ties for piers. I cut each one in half and buried them. A #1 grade quality used railroad tie for landscape retaining walls, can not be cut for transport at our location; Each tie weighs approximately 200 lbs. how to cut railroad ties in half

How to cut railroad ties in half -

How much does a used railroad tie weigh?

200 pounds

Can I cut railroad ties with a chainsaw?

Chain saw is slow, chain gets worn very quickly. The very fastest way is with a demolition saw and a carbide blade. You will need to flip the tie over and cut from both sides. you will get a much better cut, much faster, and not need to sharpen the chain after each tie.

What can I use instead of railroad ties?

“Alternatives to Railroad Ties — Some of the naturally durable woods that can be used to replace the creosote-soaked logs (Railroad ties), such as redwood, cedar, cypress, and black locust Woods. It is also possible to buy pressure-treated wood or to buy clear wood and treat the timbers yourself.”

Are old railroad ties safe for gardens?

Are Railroad Ties OK to Use to Construct Vegetable Gardens? Yes, creosote does leach out of the ties and into the soil, but worn-out ties are generally not a problem, because most of their creosote has already leached away. Whether plants take up the creosote has not been settled.

Are railroad ties poisonous to dogs?

The chemicals in old railroad ties has been shown to leak into the soil and be absorbed by plants. Block retaining walls are safe for children, pets, and edible or decorative plants.

How do you get rid of railroad ties in your yard?

When railroad ties are used as edging, they are sometimes partially buried in the ground. You can use a mattock, shovel or other digging tools to remove the soil around the railroad tie.

How do you fix a rotting railroad tie retaining wall?

Repair the damage. If there is surface splintering on the tie, sand or grind it off. If there is rot, sand it away or saw it off. If there are holes in the tie, fill them with spike-hole filler compound, which is specifically meant to fill up holes in railroad ties.

How do you cover a railroad tie retaining wall?

Use pressure-treated plywood to cover the wall. Place a row of 1x6s along the bottom of the railroad-tie retaining wall so the plywood doesn’t sit directly on the patio. Press a sheet of pressure-treated plywood against the wall, resting on the 1x6s, and attach it to the wall with exterior-grade screws.

How do you build a retaining wall with stackable blocks?

How to Build a Retaining Wall

  1. Level the Ground. Measure and lay out the position of your retaining wall on the building site.
  2. Lay the Base. A retaining wall will be most stable if it is built over a porous base.
  3. Set the First Block.
  4. Complete the First Course of Block.
  5. Set the Next Course.
  6. Cut Half Blocks.
  7. Set the Half-Blocks.
  8. Check Each Course for Level.
Источник: https://answerstoall.com/users-questions/how-much-does-a-used-railroad-tie-weigh/

“Railroad Ties,” Ensign, Jan. 1971, 79

Our stone-walled home is tucked among the scrub oak high on a steep mountainside, overlooking the wide valley and lake below. On the sloped clearing in the rear of the home we have built terraces and filled them with soil and sand we have carried up by bucket.

A stone path winds up to the first terrace, where there is a slab bench. On a winter night it is a wondrous sight to pause by the stone bench and look over our snowy housetop to the glittering city lights below. In the springtime we like to climb the stone steps and gather the yellow blooms of wild dogtooth, violets, or balsams.

On that first terrace is our strawberry patch, and in June I love to pick berries in the early morning to eat with my cereal. As summer comes, there is nothing like taking a saltshaker to the higher terraces and feasting on a plump tomato or two. Even higher on the mountainside are treats of raspberries and grapes.

But, after a rain or watering, it is difficult to avoid muddy ground in the higher area. So this year we have been building a stairway of railroad ties to the upper reaches.

With a rented truck we hauled the ties to our home. Then our two sons and I carried the huge timbers on our backs to the terraces, where we sawed them into two-foot lengths. With these we have been building the stairs.

It was hard work packing those ties, soaked with creosote, up our mountainside. At times I felt that the tie on our shoulders was pushing me like a post into the ground as we brushed along the oak up the hill.

So I had mixed feelings the other day as we trucked in another load of ties. I looked forward to building the stairs but not to lugging the heavy lumber, often of oak, uphill. That was a burden that really bothered me.

Then we got an idea—one we should have thought of long before. Why not saw the ties below, then carry the two-foot lengths up the hill?

With a long-toothed Swedish saw, we cut the big ties below. I found it much easier to carry half a tie in two lengths alone than it was for two of us to lug an entire tie together. Also, there were no sore shoulders to nurse afterward.

Too many jobs in my life have I worried and fretted about as I did that load of ties. As I get older, I am trying to realize that each chore can be simplified by dividing it up into smaller parts. How much easier it is to cut up a big assignment, then do each part one by one.

I recall years ago when a secretary was leaving our office, and we engaged a woman to replace her. The new secretary was well experienced. In her previous work she had supervised a number of stenographers.

When she arrived at her new position, the outgoing secretary tried to show her all her new duties in one day. After some hours the new secretary sighed in frustration: “This job is too much,” and she returned to her previous employment.

Since that time, in our office we have tried to show new secretaries their duties in parts—one at a time.

One of the biggest assignments ever given by a father to his son was when King David said in his old age to Solomon: “… the Lord hath chosen thee to build an house for the sanctuary: be strong and do it.” (1 Chr. 28:10.)

King Solomon, showing youthful wisdom, divided the huge task of building a temple into many parts before construction began. This is shown by the number of overseers he appointed: 3,600 of them to supervise the bearers of burdens and hewers in the mountains.

“Then Solomon began to build the house of the Lord at Jerusalem” (2 Chr. 3:1), the account continues.

All of us have been chilled with fright in speaking before a sizable audience, but I take heart in what a speaker once said to me: “Do not look at the mass as you begin to speak. Let your eyes find two or three friendly faces in the hall. They are always there. Then talk to them. Ignore the crowd.”

Time, too, can be made simpler and happier by breaking it into days. Then live each day fully, one at a time.

It is significant that Jesus set the example for prayer when he declared to the multitude on the mount:

“Give us this day our daily bread.” (Matt. 6:11. Italics added.)

It is so easy carrying railroad ties—in parts.

  • Brother Ashton is a Regional Representative of the Council of the Twelve and vice-president of Gillham Advertising Company in Salt Lake City. A well-known writer, his articles have been featured on the back cover of the Instructor since 1944.

Источник: https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/ensign/1971/01/railroad-ties?lang=eng
[Cover] How to Cut Railroad Ties

One of the sturdiest materials that you can possibly work with is railroad ties since they are built to last as long as possible. However, such longevity doesn’t come with no drawbacks. In fact, those who have encountered them in their job can confirm that these are some of the toughest tools to work with, which is why learning how to cut railroad ties may seem pretty hard at first.

If you are thinking about using these in a domestic project, you might face a lot of difficulties, but it is definitely possible. You shouldn’t worry about the heaviness or the massive size of these wooden objects since with this guide you will learn the right way to cut them efficiently. You just have to follow out tips, and you will be chopping them up in no time.

How to Cut Railroad Ties: Here’s What You Will Need

The process of cutting railroad ties is undoubtedly laborious, but there aren’t a lot of power tools involved at least.

As to what you’ll need, first of all, you’ll have to grab an electric or gas-powered chainsaw coupled with carbide tipped chain (it isn’t mandatory, although it speeds up the process), a chainsaw sharpener, and two pieces of scrap wood.

Moreover, you’ll need coveralls or chainsaw chaps, chalk, hearing protection, safety goggles, work gloves and boots, and a measuring tape.

HOW TO CUT RAILROAD TIES: A Word of Caution Before You Start

Now that you are ready to delve deeper into this process, there are some considerations to put in mind beforehand. First of all, the work on hand is extremely demanding, as the size of these ties coupled with the various materials added in the wood like rocks and grit, bolster the difficulty of cutting them to much higher limits than those of regular wood pieces.

Moreover, railroad tiles are designed to be waterproof, so they are covered with “Creosote” which is a substance that provides this trait. This compound is dangerous since it might cause your skin, lungs, and skin when you come in contact with it. Additionally, it can easily penetrate into the soil in the place where these pieces are installed.

To get to the point, you should only work with this material if you absolutely have to, else you might want to opt for an alternative that is both easier to work with and safer since the end result is not worth the pain involved. But you might be forced to use them, and in that case, you should further read this article in order to learn how the process of cutting is done right.

HOW TO CUT RAILROAD TIES in Three Easy Steps

First Step: Setting up Your Work Area

The first thing you need to do is prepare the area in which you are going to have the process done. For more convenience, choose a place that is as close as possible to where you are going to put your ties in order not to have to carry them around too much.

With about three feet of distance between them, place the two chunks of scrap wood first. Now, put the railroad tie that you wish to cut on the two pieces. These will serve as an elevation to the tie in order to make the cutting even easier and avoid them being stuck as you cut through them.

Second Step: Measuring

You may not or may not be able to skip this step altogether depending on the goal that you hope to achieve. If you are doing all of this work just in order to eliminate these giant pieces of wood from your home, you can do so without having to take measurements since these won’t be useful for you. However, if you are using the piece in new construction, you should whip out the measuring tape and the chalk piece to meticulously evaluate and denote the places where you need to make the cuts.

Final Step: Cutting the Ties

Now that everything is ready for you to start making cuts, first take a deep breath and make sure you are wearing all of the appropriate protection since you don’t want to get any of that pesky Creosote stuff in contact with you.

Whenever you’re ready, turn on your chainsaw and start cutting through the first tie, going as deep as 3/4 of its overall depth.

Then, take it out and continue cutting from under it, going in an upwards motion in order to finish the cut. This technique will ensure there is no binding of the tie.

Throughout the process of cutting, be careful of various particles including stones and grit that might change the motion of your chainsaw’s cutting. So you have to work your way at a slow pace, and you should be fine. Moreover, your chain will deteriorate after the prolonged cutting time, since the grit can have such a nasty effect on them, so you will have to sharpen them once in a while for maximum cutting efficiency.

Final Thoughts

Railroad ties are a sturdy material to work with since the problems they pose throughout the process of cutting them are hard to avoid. However, if you are patient and make you sure you wear the appropriate safety gear while also taking proper care of your chainsaw, you should be able to finish it effortlessly and unscathed.

For a satisfying end result, you just need to follow this guide which is the product of our vast experience and trust us in that you won’t go wrong with a similar operation ever again!

PS: if you want to take your skills to the next level, check our buying guides and reviews, where we cover everything you may ever need in your tool box, be it a Tile Saw, Cordless Circular Saw, Circular Saw Blade, Random Orbital Sander, Sliding Compound Miter Saw, Chainsaw Mill, Cordless Tool Set, Table Saw, bucks, or even Chainsaw Chaps. We also like to compare power tool brands, such as DeWalt and Milwaukee.

References:

Источник: https://www.techlifeland.com/how-to-cut-railroad-ties/

How Railroad Ties Almost Built a Lake

One hundred years ago, the actions of a private company could have changed the face of our part of the Ozarks. Following large-scale timber harvesting made possible by the railroad's arrival in Howell County in 1882, additional rail lines were added to get to more trees. For another decade, the virgin timber was pulled out of the hinterlands by any means possible. Even our pristine rivers and streams were utilized to transport logs off hillsides and floated in rafts to processing centers or railheads via small rail trams. By the turn of the century, the bulk of the forests had been cut down. In the early 1900s, railroad ties cut from smaller trees were a source of cash for timber workers and farmers who wanted to make some money on the side. Companies specialized as local purchasers of these ties, usually hacked by hand. The ties, bought at ten cents each, were taken to the railroad and shipped at a substantial profit to markets all over the country.

One of those companies with a buying headquarters at Willow Springs was the Western Tie & Lumber Company of St. Louis. In addition to buying ties from local farms, the company held property along the Jack's Fork and Current Rivers from which it harvested ties. Once the property was cleared, the land became a liability and needed to be sold. In 1920 and 1921, enough ground was accumulated in Shannon County; the company came up with a scheme that could have substantially economically and environmentally impacted the region beyond what was already being done. 

The Mountain View Standard announced in their July 2, 1921 issue: "The Western Tie and Timber Company has obtained a federal permit to establish a dam on the Current River at Red Rock Landing, about eight miles below Eminence, the county seat of Shannon County, and a mile and a half below the "Junction," as the Current River and Jack's Fork is called."

Today the Junction is more commonly known as Two Rivers. Though Red Rock is no depicted on any of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways or Missouri Conservation Department maps, it is near Coot Chute and Coot Mountain. Western Tie and other companies used the area to float ties tied together as rafts for several years. 

The article continued, "The company plans a fifty-foot dam at Red Rock. This will form a lake of backwater which will reach within two miles of Eminence on the Jack's Fork, and will back up the Current River about the same distance, forming a lake in the shape of a half-moon, reaching from some five miles up each fork to the Junction itself and beyond, thus making a beautiful sheet of water ten miles in length and fifty feet deep in the deepest part."

The object of river impoundment proposed at least four decades later was often flood control with a secondary benefit of electrical power generation and recreation, but flood control was not mentioned here.

The Mountain View Standard stated, "Electric power and light from water power furnished by this dam will be sent to many surrounding towns, including Eminence, West Eminence, Winona, Summersville, Birch Tree, Houston, Montier, Mountain View, Centerville and probably Salem. It is also planned to establish and build an electric railroad. This road connecting with the Frisco at Cabool and the Iron Mountain at Ironton will be a highway of trade. Eminence then will no longer be an island town, but will be on a main line connecting two great systems. There will be passenger cars every two hours." 

"The lake formed by the dam will be stocked with fish. There will be summer camps and summer resorts, club houses, and everything that goes to make a pleasant outing. It is expected the lake and its surroundings will be one of the greatest summer resorts in the Ozarks."

Recreation had become the latest economic boom in this part of Missouri. It followed the timber boom, large-scale fruit orchards, and subsistence farming with free-range livestock that had done a pretty good job of stripping the topsoil and filling our rivers with gravel from erosion. Much of the land where these extraction practices had been done wasn't selling. Still, I find it amazing a project this size covering so much ground by a private company could have been entertained.

The Current Wave newspaper in Van Buren wrote in November 1921, "There is much surmising, and many questions are being asked regarding the hydro-electric power plant on Current River. This much is known, that the Western Tie & Timber Company of St. Louis has received the preliminary permit from the government. Under this permit, the company has two years to make plans, drillings, and other preliminary work. We know that much work in the way of surveying, etc., has already been done, and more preliminary work will no doubt be done as conditions permit."

"Information from a reliable source indicated that the dam will be constructed, however the date of commencement of construction is very indefinite. It is reported that competent engineers consider this the best water power site in the State of Missouri. We are sure that a great many people are anxious to see this work start for various reasons, and it will, no doubt, mean a lot to our people in the future, but we must bear in mind that enterprises of this magnitude cannot be accomplished in a day, even when conditions are normal, and in times of stress like the present, they must necessarily be slower of fruition."

The times of stress eluded to were likely a national economic downturn in 1920 and 1921. In those years, the federal budget was slashed by sixty-five percent, and unemployment rose to eleven percent. It was to date one of the worst years in the nation's history, soon to be replaced by the stock market crash of 1929 and the depression that followed. 

The Western Tie and Timber Company had its fingers in many pies, including the purchase of a short line railroad that ran between Ava and Mansfield. The line was also intended to take timber products from Arkansas and connect to the Frisco system with passenger service. That scheme failed the same time the company started building the dam, which engineers now determined would have to be sixty feet high and a quarter of a mile in length. Western Tie must have decided to pull in and concentrate on its core business. The newspapers went silent about the Current River project in 1922 and 1923, and it was soon forgotten.

The Western Tie and Timber Company did not go away, though. In May 1928, the Willow Springs Republican carried a story entitled, "Tie Hackers Stage a Big Event at Willow Springs." They wrote, "Members of the Collins family who reside in large numbers in the country along the western border of Howell and eastern part of Douglas counties won all the prizes in a tie hacking contest at Willow Springs a few days ago, and two of them, Charley Collins and Ben Stubbs got a free trip to the annual convention of the National Association of Tie Producers at Hot Springs, Arkansas, last week as a guest of the Western Tie and Timber Company."

In 1930 the Kansas City Star published an editorial, "Belated Power Protection." They wrote, "It seems a most peculiar situation that Missouri should have drifted along without legislation protecting its water power resources until the far great portion of those resources had passed into private hands, the state being powerless to make an effective protest, no matter what the conditions of the development with relation to public welfare. It is to remedy that situation, even at a late day, that Governor Caulfield now will recommend legislation giving the state the needed and desired authority. Proposed power development that might destroy much of the beauty and recreational value of the Current River in the Ozarks has given particular significance to the movement toward protection."

"Conceivably, in a great number of cases, use of the water power has been and will continue to be a valuable contributory asset to the state. No doubt, with the state laws in existence, permits for most of the power developments already made would have been granted. Yet, there would have been an assured degree of protection in the legislation and a legitimate exercise of state sovereignty in its application, wherever warranted. The federal water power act was not designed to take away such rights from the states. While now the legislation would have a limited reach, since it could not be retroactive, it might prove in various instances a means of preserving from better purposes a part of the resources that remain undeveloped."

Following World War II, the Army Corps of Engineers announced their intention to dam the Current River and create an even larger impoundment than proposed in 1921. This time, there was opposition even within the government at state and national levels to build the dam. In 1961 legislation was introduced to create an Ozark Rivers National Monument along the Current, Eleven Point, and Jack's Fork Rivers, resulting in establishing the Ozark National Scenic Riverways under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service in 1964.

Controversy remains, and my object isn't to stir that pot. I just wanted to note that the issue is a lot older than might be thought; it is one hundred years old this week.

Источник: https://www.howellcountynews.com/history/how-railroad-ties-almost-built-lake

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Railroad ties are one of the strongest, sturdiest, and longest lasting building materials you could work with. But, all of that strength and durability comes at a cost. If you’ve ever worked with them in the past, you already know how difficult they can be to work with.

While using railroad ties for projects around the home is difficult, it isn’t impossible, and you can learn how to cut railroad ties by following the tips in this guide. It’s easy to become intimidated when working with these gargantuan pieces of wood, but fear not, by the time you’re finished with this guide, you should feel confident enough to tackle your project.

A Word of Caution

Before you get started on your project, there are a few things you’ll want to consider. The first of which is the difficulty of the work. Railroad ties are not only exceptionally large, but they often contain grit, rocks, and other materials embedded inside the tie for added durability. This makes them far more difficult to cut than an equivalent sized piece of wood.

Railroad ties are also coated with a carcinogenic compound called Creosote which is designed to weatherproof the ties. Creosote can also irritate your eyes, lungs, and skin if it comes in contact with you. Further, this compound can leach into the ground in the area where you’ve installed the ties.

In other words, if it’s possible, avoid working with railroad ties altogether. In many cases, the effort you’ll expend for this project will not equal the reward, and you should consider working with another material.

But, you may be forced to work with them, and therefore you’ll need to learn how to cut railroad ties. So, we’ll move right along.

What You’ll Need

Cutting railroad ties certainly isn’t easy, but it doesn’t require a ton of tools to do the job right. Here’s what you’ll need

Step I: Setting up Your Work Area

First things first, you’ll need to set up the area in which you’ll be working. If possible, try and work somewhere close to where your ties are set up so you can avoid lugging them around your yard.

Place your two pieces of scrap wood about three feet apart. Later, you’ll be putting your railroad ties on these pieces of wood, so you can elevate them as you cut. This will make it easier for you to cut through the ties, and also prevent the ties from binding as they’re cut.

Take your first railroad tie, and place it on the scrap wood, so that it’s ready to cut.

Step II: Measuring

Depending on what you’re hoping to accomplish with this project, you may be able to skip this step. Many people who are learning how to cut railroad ties are doing so to REMOVE them from their home, instead of using them in new construction. If that’s the case, no measurements will be necessary.

But, if you need to cut railroad ties to size for a new project you’re working on, you’ll want to use your tape measure and a piece of chalk to accurately measure and mark the cuts you need to make in each tie.

Step III: Cutting the Ties

Before you begin cutting the ties, take a moment to make sure that you’re working smartly and safely. Make sure you’re wearing coveralls, boots, safety goggles, hearing protection and gloves. As I mentioned, Creosote is nasty stuff, and you don’t want to get any of it on you.

When you’re ready, fire up your chainsaw and prepare to make your first cut. Cut straight through the tie to about ¾ of the total depth, and then take your chainsaw out and finish your cut by cutting upwards from under the tie. Doing so will help prevent the chain from binding.

As you cut, be especially careful. Railroad ties regularly have grit, small rocks and stones and other goodies lodged inside, and they can affect the way your chainsaw cuts. Work slowly and be vigilant and you shouldn’t run into any problems.

You’ll also need to keep in mind that because of the grit in the railroad tie, cutting through them can wreak havoc on your chain. If you’re making multiple cuts, you’re going to need to sharpen your chain periodically so that it’s able to cut through the ties cleanly.

Final Word

Railroad ties present some unique challenges that make them difficult to work with. But, the task is far from impossible. With some patience, good safety equipment, and your trusty chainsaw, you’ll be able to learn how to cut railroad ties with relative ease.

Follow the tips in this guide, and make sure you’re working slowly and carefully, and you’ll be able to conquer your railroad tie project. For some ideas on how you can use railroad ties at your home, check out these helpful suggestions from HGTV.

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Gus Donaldson
About Gus Donaldson

I built houses for over 30 years and recently retired. I've made lots of mistakes and hopefully teach you not to make the same ones. I still love to build and have a garage workshop that I use for hobby projects like the walnut bookshelf I made for my wife. I like to write and let people know that working with your hands and tools does not need to be intimidating.

Источник: https://www.thesawguy.com/how-to-cut-railroad-ties/

How do you build stairs with railroad ties?

Cut three railroad ties for the first step, making one tie equal to the desired width for the stairs and two ties twice as long as the desired depth for each stair tread. The treads should measure about 1 to 2 feet deep to provide plenty of room for feet to safely step and climb the stairs.

Click to see full answer.

Accordingly, how do you install railroad ties?

How to Build a Railroad Tie Retaining Wall

  1. Step 1: Level and Tamp Down the Area.
  2. Step 2: Cut the Area to Make a Snug Fit for the Railroad Ties.
  3. Step 3: Add in a Layer of Gravel.
  4. Step 4: Level the First Tie in the Wall.
  5. Step 5: Make Your Pins to Secure the Ties Together.
  6. Step 6: Drill Holes in the Tie for the Pins.
  7. Step 7: Pound in the Pins.

Beside above, what is the best way to cut railroad ties? Chainsaw (The Best Way to Cut Railroad Ties)The fastest — and bestway to cut railroad ties is with a chainsaw. Yes, by far the best way to cut railroad ties is with a chainsaw. Though be aware it will take frequent sharpening.

Subsequently, one may also ask, how do you terrace a hill with railroad ties?

Place a 1-inch layer of course sand into the foundation. Tamp the sand down with a tamping tool and lay a row of railroad ties over the sand. Drive railroad spikes through the holes at either end of the railroad ties and into the ground to hold the ties in place.

Can I use railroad ties for a retaining wall?

When building a retaining wall out of any material, and especially with railroad ties, you must have some sort of tie between the wall and the ground it is holding back. With railroad ties you should use a 4 foot length of a tie that goes straight into the hillside and is also resting on the wall itself.

Источник: https://askinglot.com/how-do-you-build-stairs-with-railroad-ties

By Emily Medlock

Frequently Asked Questions

Relay Ties: Heavy creosote retention (black) with four solid sides. Dry rot and plate cutting not permissible. Twisted ties not permissible. End splitting - not more than half way - not more than ¼” in width - one way only and never penetrating the rail bearing area. Hairline splits can be two or three way. Checks shall be ¼” or less wide, not exceeding fifty percent (50%) of overall tie length and not affecting ability to hold spike when in rail-bearing area. No ballast wear. 


Relay Landscape Ties: (#2 relay) Meets all the specifications for a #1 relay tie. Light creosote retention (bleached gray). 


#1 Landscape Ties: A tie with at least three solid sides. Two or three way end splitting is okay, but no more than ½” in width. Minor dry rot is permissible. Plate cut - 1” or less in depth but not rotted out.

#2 Landscape Ties: A tie with at least two solid sides. Surface rot, 1” end splitting, rot at plate area permissible.


#3 Landscape Ties: A tie with at least one solid side. Splits to 18” deep and 1” wide. Heavy dry rot but generally retains the basic shape of a tie.


#4 Landscape Ties: A tie with no good side. Extreme dry rot.
Splits to 48” deep and 2” wide.

Retail Yard Locations

(Click on a location for how to cut railroad ties in half and hours of operations)


Dolomite, AL Retail YardKansas City, KS Retail Yard
Mira Loma, CA Retail YardNew Orleans, LA Retail Yard
Stockton, CA Retail YardToledo, OH Retail Yard
Hamden, CT Retail YardEagle Lake, TX Retail Yard
Granite City, IL Retail YardSalt Lake City, UT Retail Yard
Gary, IN Retail YardTacoma, WA Retail Yard
*Not all retail yards offer all of the services listed, call to verify services and inventory.
Источник: https://www.akrailroad.com/faq-page

How much does a used railroad tie weigh?

200 pounds

Can I cut railroad ties with a chainsaw?

Chain saw is slow, chain gets worn very quickly. The very fastest way is with a demolition saw and a carbide blade. You will need to flip the tie over and cut from both sides. you will get a much better cut, much faster, and not need to sharpen the chain after each tie.

What can I use instead of railroad ties?

“Alternatives to Railroad Ties — Some of the naturally durable woods that can be used to replace the creosote-soaked logs (Railroad ties), such as redwood, cedar, cypress, and black locust Woods. It is also possible to buy pressure-treated wood or to buy clear wood and treat the timbers yourself.”

Are old railroad ties safe for gardens?

Are Railroad Ties OK to Use to Construct Vegetable Gardens? Yes, creosote does leach out of the ties and into the soil, but worn-out ties are generally not a problem, because most of their creosote has already leached away. Whether plants take up the creosote has not been settled.

Are railroad ties poisonous to dogs?

The chemicals in old railroad ties has been shown to leak into the soil and be absorbed by plants. Block retaining walls are safe for children, pets, and edible or decorative plants.

How do you get how to cut railroad ties in half of railroad ties in your yard?

When railroad ties are used as edging, they are sometimes partially buried in the ground. You can use a mattock, shovel or other digging tools to remove bankmobile vibe disbursement soil around the railroad tie.

How do you fix a rotting railroad tie retaining wall?

Repair the damage. If there is surface splintering on the tie, sand or grind it off. If there is rot, sand it away or saw it off. If there are holes in the tie, fill them with spike-hole filler compound, which is specifically meant to fill up holes in railroad ties.

How do you cover a railroad tie retaining wall?

Use pressure-treated plywood to cover the wall. Place a row of 1x6s along the bottom of the railroad-tie retaining wall so the plywood doesn’t sit directly on the patio. Press a sheet of pressure-treated plywood against the wall, resting on the 1x6s, and attach it to the wall with exterior-grade screws.

How do you build a retaining wall with stackable blocks?

How to Build a Retaining Wall

  1. Level the Ground. Measure and lay out the position of your retaining wall on the building site.
  2. Lay the Base. A retaining wall will be most stable if it is built over a hsbc com my contact us base.
  3. Set the First Block.
  4. Complete the First Course of Block.
  5. Set the Next Course.
  6. Cut Half Blocks.
  7. Set the Half-Blocks.
  8. Check Each Course for Level.
Источник: https://answerstoall.com/users-questions/how-much-does-a-used-railroad-tie-weigh/

What is the best tool for cutting large lumber lengthwise?

I initially totally misread this and was thinking the pieces were 2.4 millimeters how to cut railroad ties in half, not 2.4 meters long. To that end, I've removed comments about hand-sawing - that's. impractical for this type of operation. Power tools are the appropriate answer here.

I'd recommend a band saw for resawing arvest bank near me now like this. Generally, band saw blades take a thinner kerf than a table saw will, so if you need each piece to be as close to the 62.5mm as possible, this would probably be your better bet.

Upon my reread of the dimensions in question, you will not be too terribly concerned with a fine-tooth, narrow blade for kerf minimization. You'll want a wide blade for straighter tracking, and few, big teeth for fast cutting in tough wood.

Additionally, you want a 250mm (~10") deep cut. On a normal table saw with a 10" blade (fairly standard in the US, not sure about other locales), you won't actually be able to cut all the way through this depth. A band saw will be your only option. You'll need a big band saw that can handle that depth of cut.

The hand-held circular saw mentioned in the comment to this answer:

  • Will not have the depth of cut you need.
    • The blade is 190mm in diameter, you'll only be able to cut with the 95mm radius, but you don't get full access to that - the depth of cut is only 66mm according to the specs on the page linked.
    • flipping the sleeper over will only get you a partial cut on the other side.
    • You'll still have plenty of wood (250mm - 66mm - 66mm = 118mm) left in the middle that you'll have to cut another way. You're only going to cut 1/4 of the way through your sleeper with each pass!
  • Will not have the control necessary for getting an accurate cut. The sole plate of the circular saw will only have 62 mm (~2.5") to sit on the wood - it will be way too easy to tip the saw, ruining the vertical cut you're trying to make

Also, don't forget that you'll want to measure and cut to take into consideration the kerf if you need both pieces to be the same to the 10th of a mm.

In either powered-saw case (band saw or table saw, as mentioned in another answer), be sure to take great care that you don't lose any fingers (this remains as generally good advice).


  • You will need a band saw to resaw these sleepers.
  • You're dealing with pressure treated lumber, so they will be heavier than non-treated lumber
  • You'll want to make in-feed and out-feed tables to help support the work.

All-in-all, you may want to consider asking the sawmill if they can resaw them for you - they'll have the proper tools and the know-how to do this quickly and safely. Don't just "ask" them to do it, but be prepared to pay for the service - it will be far cheaper than investing in a band saw that will have the capacity you need. Unless, of course, you want a new tool. ;)

Источник: https://diy.stackexchange.com/questions/194705/what-is-the-best-tool-for-cutting-large-lumber-lengthwise
how to cut railroad ties in half Railroad Ties Almost Built a Lake

One hundred years ago, the actions of a private company could have changed the face of our part of the Ozarks. Following large-scale timber harvesting made possible by the railroad's arrival in Howell County in 1882, additional rail lines were added to get to more trees. For another decade, the virgin timber was pulled out of the hinterlands by any means possible. Even our pristine rivers and streams were utilized to transport logs off hillsides and floated in rafts to processing centers or railheads via small rail trams. By the turn of the century, the bulk of the forests had been cut down. In the early 1900s, railroad ties cut from smaller trees were a source of cash for timber workers and farmers who wanted to make some money on the side. Companies specialized as local purchasers of these ties, usually hacked by hand. The ties, bought at ten cents each, were taken to the railroad and shipped at a substantial profit to markets all over the country.

One of those companies with a buying headquarters at Willow Springs was the Western Tie & Lumber Company of St. Louis. In addition to buying ties from local farms, the company held property along the Jack's Fork and Current Rivers i pray for you country song which it harvested ties. Once the property was cleared, the land became a liability and needed to be sold. In 1920 and 1921, enough ground was accumulated in Shannon County; the snell motors mankato minn came up with a scheme that could have substantially economically and environmentally impacted the region beyond what was already being done. 

The Mountain View Standard announced in their July 2, 1921 issue: "The Western Tie how to cut railroad ties in half Timber Company has obtained a federal permit to establish a dam on the Current River at Red Rock Landing, about eight miles below Eminence, the county seat of Shannon County, and a mile and a half below the "Junction," as the Current River and Jack's Fork is called."

Today the Junction is more commonly homes for sale fort smith ar as Two Rivers. Though Red Rock is no depicted on any of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways or Missouri Conservation Department maps, it is near Coot Chute and Coot Mountain. Western Tie and other companies used the area to float ties tied together as rafts for several years. 

The article continued, "The company plans a fifty-foot dam at Red Rock. This will form a lake of backwater which will reach within two miles of Eminence on the Jack's Fork, and will back up the Current River about the same distance, forming a lake in the shape of a half-moon, reaching from some five miles up each fork to the Junction itself and beyond, thus making a beautiful sheet of water ten miles in length and fifty feet deep in the deepest part."

The object of river impoundment proposed at least four decades later was often flood control with a secondary benefit of electrical power generation and recreation, but flood control was not mentioned here.

The Mountain View Standard stated, "Electric power and light from water power furnished by this dam will be sent to many surrounding towns, including Eminence, West Eminence, Winona, Summersville, Birch Tree, Houston, Montier, Mountain View, Centerville and probably Salem. It is also planned to establish and build an electric railroad. This road connecting with the Frisco at Cabool and the Iron Mountain at Ironton will be a highway of trade. Eminence then will no longer be an island town, but will be on a main line connecting two great systems. There will be passenger cars every two hours." 

"The lake formed by the dam will be stocked with fish. There will be summer camps and summer resorts, club houses, and everything that goes to make a pleasant outing. It is expected the lake and its surroundings will be one of the greatest summer resorts in the Ozarks."

Recreation had become the latest economic boom in this part of Missouri. It followed the timber boom, large-scale fruit orchards, and subsistence farming with free-range livestock that had done a pretty good job of stripping the topsoil and filling our rivers with gravel from erosion. Much of the land where these extraction practices had been done wasn't selling. Still, I find it amazing a project this size covering so much ground by a private company could have been entertained.

The Current Wave newspaper in Van Buren wrote in November 1921, "There is much surmising, and many questions are being asked regarding the hydro-electric power plant on Current River. This much is known, that the Western Tie & Timber Company of St. Louis has received the preliminary permit from the government. Under this permit, the company has two years to make plans, drillings, and other preliminary work. We know that much work in the way of surveying, etc., has already been done, and more preliminary work will no doubt be done as conditions permit."

"Information from a reliable source indicated that how to cut railroad ties in half dam will be constructed, however the date of commencement of construction is very indefinite. It is reported that competent engineers consider this the best water power site in the State of Missouri. We are sure that a great many people are anxious to see this work start for various reasons, and it will, no mass gov dua login, mean a lot to our people in the future, but we must bear in mind that enterprises of this magnitude cannot be accomplished in a day, even when conditions are normal, and in times of stress like the present, they must necessarily be slower of fruition."

The times of stress eluded to were likely a national economic downturn in 1920 and 1921. In those years, the federal budget was slashed by sixty-five percent, and unemployment rose to eleven percent. It was to date one of the worst years in the nation's history, soon to be replaced by the stock market crash of 1929 and the depression that followed. 

The Western Tie and Timber Company had its fingers in many pies, including the purchase of a short line railroad that ran between Ava and Mansfield. The line was also intended to take timber products from Arkansas and connect to the Frisco system with passenger service. That scheme failed the same time the company started building the dam, which engineers now determined would have to be sixty feet how to cut railroad ties in half woodforest national bank login page a quarter of a mile in length. Western Tie must have decided to pull in and concentrate on its core business. The newspapers went silent about the Current River project in 1922 and 1923, and it was soon forgotten.

The Western Tie and Timber Company did not go away, though. In May 1928, the Willow Springs Republican carried a story entitled, "Tie Hackers Stage a Big Event at Willow Springs." They wrote, "Members of the Collins family who reside in large numbers in the country along the western border of Howell and eastern part of Douglas counties won all the prizes in a tie hacking contest at Willow Springs a few days ago, and two of them, Charley Collins and Ben Stubbs got a free trip to the annual convention of the National Association of Tie Producers at Hot Springs, Arkansas, last week as a guest of the Western Tie and Timber Company."

In 1930 the Kansas City Star published an editorial, "Belated Power Protection." They wrote, "It seems a most peculiar situation that Missouri should have drifted along without legislation protecting its water power resources until the far great portion of those resources had passed into private hands, the state being powerless to make an effective protest, no matter what the conditions of the development with relation to public welfare. It is to remedy that situation, even at a late day, that Governor Caulfield now will recommend legislation giving the state the needed and desired authority. Proposed power development that might destroy much of the beauty and recreational value of the Current River in the Ozarks has given particular significance to the movement toward protection."

"Conceivably, in a great number of cases, use of the water power has been and will continue to be a valuable contributory asset to the state. No doubt, with the state laws in existence, permits for most of the power developments already made would have been granted. Yet, there would have been an assured degree of protection in the legislation and a legitimate exercise of state sovereignty in its application, wherever warranted. The federal water power act was not designed to take away such rights from the states. While now the legislation would have a limited reach, since it could not be retroactive, it might prove in various instances a means of preserving from better purposes a part of the resources that remain undeveloped."

Following World War II, the Army Corps of Engineers announced their intention to dam the Current River and create an even larger impoundment than proposed in 1921. This time, there was opposition even within the government at state and national levels to build the dam. In 1961 legislation was introduced to create an Ozark Rivers National Monument along the Current, Eleven Point, and Jack's Fork Rivers, resulting in establishing the Ozark National Scenic Riverways under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service in 1964.

Controversy remains, and my object isn't to stir that pot. I just wanted to note that the issue is a lot older than might be thought; it is one hundred years old this week.

Источник: https://www.howellcountynews.com/history/how-railroad-ties-almost-built-lake
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Railroad tie retaining walls can really bring an outdoor space together. Good landscaping in general can spruce up any yard. This includes some nice shade trees, water supplies, and personal touches with outdoor decor. 

railroad tie retaining wallView in gallery

But of course, these things aren’t limited to these three items. In fact, a good retaining wall with repurposed materials is another thing that can make your yard look amazing without too much effort.

What Are Railroad Tie Retaining Walls?

What Is A Railroad Tie Retaining Wallfifth third bank lost card phone number in gallery

There are two things you need to know about to understand railroad tie retaining walls. The first thing is railroad ties. Railroad ties are beams that were originally used to create railroads, especially traditional ones. 

Today, railroad ties are being replaced by metal counterparts, but they are still in use in certain areas. But when railroads are replaced, the railroad ties are repurposed, often landing in the hands of everyday people.

If you are lucky enough to find railroad ties to use, then seize the 1st edition 1999 pokemon booster box. There are a lot of different projects you can take on with railroad ties but a traditional project is a railroad tie retaining wall. 

How To Build A Railroad Tie Retaining Wall

How To Build A Railroad Tie Retaining Wall

Building a retaining wall in general can be difficult. But when you learn what you need to know about retaining walls, you can build your retaining wall with confidence. Here are the steps you can take to build a railroad tie retaining wall. 

Level The Ground

The first thing you want to do is to level the ground. Make sure that everywhere you are adding the railroad ties is even and flat. If you are building up, you can add a little dirt or gravel to the backside at this point.

If you are leaving the area as it is and building a wall against dirt already there, then you can mark the spots where the boards will go. It’s even more important to make sure the ground is level in this case.

Create A Base

After you are sure that the area is level, you can start adding the baseboards. There are a few different ways to do this. The most secure way is to dig down to half the height of a tie. This is usually about four inches.

This is so you can bury the bottom railroad ties to make it even more stable. It’s a good idea at this point to also add vertical boards on either side of the retaining wall. Dig down at least six inches and add the vertical boards every 6-8 feet. 

Add A Moisture Barrier

This is also a good time to add a moisture barrier. This can also work as a weed barrier. Line everywhere the railroad ties will touch with the cloth or plastic. This will prevent moisture from gathering. 

If you buy a moisture barrier and a weed barrier, you can add them both. Seeing weeds sprout up from your retaining wall does not look good at all. So this is an important step m and t online banking app won’t cost you much.

Create A Drain

There are many different types of drains you can create for your retaining wall. A great choice is a French drain which not only is effective but looks quite nice too. You can work with it to become part of your landscape design. 

But a French drain isn’t the only option. There are plenty of different types of drains you can make, the point is making sure the water is led to somewhere you want it to go. Creating a reservoir is another great way to let it play into your design. 

Stagger The Ties

When adding the railroad ties to your retaining wall, make sure to stagger them like blocks. They need to overlap or they won’t be secure at all. It’s a good idea to cut the ties in half at every other level.

You can also get randomly cut railroad ties to stagger, though this is difficult to work with if your retaining wall isn’t perfectly how to cut railroad ties in half. So planning each tie is your best bet for a secure wall that is easy to build. 

Secure The Ties

Every time you add a railroad tie to the wall, secure it with bolts made specifically for this purpose. It’s okay if you drill down a few inches so you don’t have to have 12-inch screws or bolts. This is a normal way to secure them.

A better size is 6-inches because any less isn’t very secure. You want to cover about half of the railroad tie, so drill down halfway and use a smaller bit to make a hole that will allow the screw to pass through. 

Other Retaining Walls

Stacked stone retaining wallView in gallery

There are many other types of retaining walls you can build, some of them even simpler than railroad tie retaining walls. So use your own resources or create a dream retaining wall by choosing the one that speaks to you.

Keep in mind that these are different materials you can use for your retaining wall. Because the technical and architectural types are something that you can look deeper into with a general retaining wall guide. 

Brick

Brick is a safe choice with more options than you’d think. It is safer and more secure than railroad ties but it is harder to work with. In order to use brick, you need to know about bricklaying and how to use mortar.

Stone

Stone is one of the most beautiful types fort financial credit union routing number retaining walls. It looks natural, magical, and has a natural draining system. Stone also needs to be laid by someone with experience with it but it isn’t as picky as a more symmetrical material. 

Concrete

Concrete is a great option for those who want a contemporary design. It is difficult to lay because you need to create a mold for the concrete to be poured into. But with the right base, it is the most secure option. 

Blocks

Blocks of any kind are a great choice because they are secure and stable. You can get wooden blocks, stone blocks, concrete blocks, or even glass blocks. They are easy to lay if you have any experience in laying them.

Caged Rocks

Caged rocks are a unique option with a garden look. They can’t be as tall as other types of retaining walls can be but if you make multiple rows of caged rocks then you can stack them quite well for a stunning design. 

Vegetation

Vegetation walls are very unique and can be useful as well. Some vegetation walls are like stable hedges with a wood or stone base. But others are like vertical gardens that you can actually feed your family with.

Wood

Of course, railroad tie retaining walls are made with wood, but they aren’t the only type of wood you can use. Any type of wood can be used for a retaining wall, so choose what is available or what you like the look of. 

More Ways To Use Railroad Ties – Other Than In Railroad Tie Retaining Walls

If you are more interested in the railroad tie aspect of this than the retaining wall aspect, then you’re probably looking for some ideas on how to use railroad ties. Here are some projects you can use your railroad ties for. 

Railroad Tie Coffee Table

Railroad Ties Coffee table 683x1024View in gallery

A railroad tie coffee table is the perfect thing for any man cave or warm, nature-inspired living room. You can build it with just the railroad ties or bring it together with a bar of concrete as shown here.

That’s what’s so great about railroad ties. They are versatile. If you know your way around a saw, you can even slice them longways to create thinner boards that can be used like traditional lumber from the lumberyard.

Railroad Tie Mantle 

Railroad Tie Mantle View in gallery

If you only have one railroad tie to work with, then a mantle could be all you need for that rustic flair a railroad tie adds. Tell stories around the fireplace about where you got the railroad tie from and imagine the history it has seen.

You can build an entire frame for your fireplace how to cut railroad ties in half railroad ties but if you only have one, this is a good way to showcase it well. Just make sure it is mounted well so it doesn’t fall or rattle when disrupted. 

Railroad Tie Steps

Railroad Tie Steps

This is a great compliment to your railroad tie retaining wall. You can create steps fairly easily with railroad ties as they are already the right size. Just make sure each step is level and secured well into the ground.

You will need to bury each one partway to make sure it is stable. From there, you can use gravel around it or build retaining walls on either side to add stability and create a gorgeous mini-hall in your yard.

Railroad Tie Bench

Railroad Tie BenchView in gallery

There are many different ways to make railroad tie seating. You can build a simple bench with two legs or build one with a raised back. If you know how to build a bench with one thing, you can build one with another.

Building benches isn’t difficult, but having a carpenter on hand your first time is a good idea since it will need to bear the weight of a human. The end result will be worth any money spent on getting a woodworker’s help. 

About the author

Emily Medlock

Emily Medlock is a freelance writer and author. Her heart lies in historical fiction, as well as mental health, home improvement, and all things geeky. Emily has been writing online for over five years. She's an advocate for the truth, empathy, and being yourself.

Источник: https://www.homedit.com/railroad-tie-retaining-walls/

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Railroad ties are one of the strongest, sturdiest, and longest lasting building materials you could work with. But, all of that strength and durability comes at a cost. If you’ve ever worked with them in the past, you already know how difficult they can be to work with.

While using railroad ties for projects around the home is difficult, it isn’t impossible, and you can learn how to cut railroad ties by following the tips in this guide. It’s easy to become intimidated when working with these gargantuan pieces of wood, but fear not, by the time you’re finished with this guide, you should feel confident enough to tackle your project.

A Word of Caution

Before you get started on your project, there are a few things you’ll want to consider. The first of which is the difficulty of the work. Railroad ties how to cut railroad ties in half not only exceptionally large, but they often contain grit, rocks, and other materials embedded inside the tie for added durability. This makes them far more difficult to cut than an equivalent sized piece of wood.

Railroad ties are also coated with a carcinogenic compound called Creosote which is designed to weatherproof the ties. Creosote can also irritate your eyes, lungs, and skin if it comes in contact with you. Further, this compound can leach into the ground in the area where you’ve installed the ties.

In other words, if it’s possible, avoid working with railroad ties altogether. In many cases, the effort you’ll expend for this project will not equal the reward, and you should consider working with another material.

But, you metro pcs pay my bill be forced to work with them, and therefore you’ll need to learn how to cut railroad ties. So, we’ll move right along.

What You’ll Need

Cutting railroad ties certainly isn’t easy, but it doesn’t require a ton of tools to do the job right. Here’s what you’ll need

Step I: Setting up Your Work Area

First things first, you’ll need to set up the area in which you’ll be working. If possible, try and work somewhere close to where your ties are set up so you can avoid lugging them around your yard.

Place your two pieces of scrap wood about three feet apart. Later, you’ll be putting your railroad ties on these pieces of wood, so you can elevate them as you cut. This will make it easier for you to cut through the ties, and also prevent the ties from binding as they’re cut.

Take your first railroad tie, and place it on the scrap wood, so that it’s ready to cut.

Step II: Measuring

Depending on what you’re hoping to accomplish with this project, you may be able to skip this step. Many people who are learning how to cut railroad ties are doing so to REMOVE them from their home, instead of using them in new construction. If that’s the case, no measurements will be necessary.

But, if you need to cut railroad ties to size for a new project you’re working on, you’ll want to use your tape measure and a piece of chalk to accurately measure and mark the cuts you need to make in each tie.

Step III: Cutting the Ties

Before you begin cutting the ties, take a moment to make sure that you’re working smartly and safely. Make sure you’re wearing coveralls, boots, safety goggles, hearing protection and gloves. As I mentioned, Creosote is nasty stuff, and you don’t want to get any of it on you.

When you’re ready, fire up your chainsaw and prepare to make your first cut. Cut straight through the tie to about ¾ of the total depth, and then take your chainsaw out and finish your cut by cutting upwards from under the tie. Doing so will help prevent the chain from binding.

As you cut, be especially careful. Railroad ties regularly have grit, small rocks and stones and other goodies lodged inside, and they can affect the way your chainsaw cuts. Work slowly and be vigilant and you shouldn’t run into any problems.

You’ll also need to keep in mind that because of the grit in the railroad tie, cutting through them can wreak havoc on your chain. If you’re making multiple cuts, you’re going to need to sharpen your chain periodically so that it’s able to cut through the ties cleanly.

Final Word

Railroad ties present some unique challenges that make them difficult to work with. But, the task is far from impossible. With some patience, good safety equipment, and your trusty chainsaw, you’ll be able to learn how to cut railroad ties with relative ease.

Follow the tips in this guide, and make sure you’re working slowly and carefully, and you’ll be able to conquer your railroad tie project. For some ideas on how you can use railroad ties at your home, check out these helpful suggestions from HGTV.

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Gus Donaldson
About Gus Donaldson

I built houses for over 30 years and recently retired. I've made lots of mistakes and hopefully teach you not to make the same ones. I still love to build and have a garage workshop that I use for hobby projects like the walnut bookshelf I made for my wife. I like to write and let people know that working with walmart supercenter springfield mo hands and tools does not need to be how to cut railroad ties in half https://www.thesawguy.com/how-to-cut-railroad-ties/


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