how to draw trico from the last guardian

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Thematic video

The Last Guardian creator: 'I can't face playing my own game'

There are very few games that become legendary for a single moment, a single unforgettable image, but Ico is certainly one of them. For many players, when the eponymous protagonist takes the hand of the captive girl Yorda and leads her from her cage, it is a profoundly emotional experience. Most had never played anything that required one character to connect with another in such a tactile and protective way, and the idea that hand-holding could be a central mechanic was as revolutionary as it was quietly beautiful.

Now, the designer behind that moment Fumito Ueda, is nervously awaiting the release of his third game for Sony, the long-delayed Last Guardian. Little is known about this tale of a boy escaping from a ruined city with the help of a giant creature, but with its hazy, almost dreamlike lighting, vast plaintive landscapes and emphasis on a central relationship, it is very much in the style of Ico and its follow-up, Shadow of the Colossus. It is unmistakably an Ueda game.

But who is Ueda? This 40-something developer, who joined the games industry two years after graduating from Osaka university of arts in 1993, gives few interviews. We know that, as a teenager, he was a huge fan of the Amiga computer and loved the acclaimed cinematic platformers Flashback and Another World (it is perhaps from Metro pcs pay my bill developer Delphine that he learned the art of oblique, highly mannered storytelling). We know his first job in development was at cult studio Warp under the guidance of maverick designer Kenji Eno – creator of the D series and other strange experimental titles for the Sega Saturn and Dreamcast. This must surely have been another major influence. But what of the thinking behind his own games? His own development process?

After meeting Ueda at E3, it’s clear why there is so little backstory about him. In person, he is a playful, mischievous but also likably frustrating presence. He certainly considers every question carefully, he is polite and focused, but time and time again he refuses to share his influences and refutes any attempt to interpret to his work. He exudes this air – whether manufactured or not – of first citizens federal credit union new bedford it. Ten years ago, in a rare biographical interview with the Japanese games magazine Continue, he claimed that while studying art at university he specifically chose to specialise in conceptual art for the main practical component so that he could get away with bashing together something abstract a day before the course deadline. Of course, no one could accuse him of bashing his games together, but he retains the self-deprecating air of the chancer who made good, who is almost mystified by the meaning that people ascribe to his work.

When asked about the way in which intimate relationships have figured highly in his three PlayStation games, he shrugs and smiles. “It’s interesting,” he says. “From our side, we didn’t have a strong intent to portray relationships as a theme of our games. We actually tried not to do that. But as a lot of people played through Ico and Shadow of Colosuss, they said, ‘Oh, these games are about how to draw trico from the last guardian a bond, they’re about trust.’ From my perspective, I just say, here, go ahead, play it – then at the end, the player can come to their own conclusion about what the game is trying to tell them. I don’t like to force feed themes.”

Indeed, it’s surprise about how players have interpreted his past work that led to the pairing at the centre of Last Guardian – the boy and the beast. “Once we were done with Shadow of Colossus there was a moment when I reflected on what we really wanted to communicate and portray in pre approved capital one platinum mastercard game,” he says. “For me it was the main relationship between Wander and the girl, but after the release, I read a lot of feedback from players who were touched by the game, and they said that the relationship between Wander and the horse was the most important and appealing – we got the sense that this was what most people felt. I thought OK, if that’s the case, there are a lot of mechanics from that relationship that we could heighten and expand on. That’s where The Last Guardian came from.”

What’s fascinating is that Ueda doesn’t necessarily see the central relationship between the boy and Trico, or Wander and the horse as a narrative construct, as something to tell an emotional story. For him, there is a mechanical advantage too. The presence of a responsive non-player character can, in such abstract, lightly plotted game worlds, provide essential clues to the player about the nature of their protagonist.

“The main character is controlled by the player, so the main character is you,” he says. “But because every single gamer is different, it’s very hard to give the player an exact definition of the protagonist: it’s up to you who the main character is going to be. As a developer, in order to form such a character you need assistance from that character’s surroundings – that’s where the role of the NPC, or opposite character in the case of our games, comes in. The secondary character helps shape the main character. That’s how we make our games.”

In short, Yorda, Trico and the horse aren’t there just as narrative allies, they’re there – in very much the Hollywood movie script tradition – to help the player interpret the protagonist.

Ueda seems less precise in his methodology when it comes to the look of his games. Ico, Shadow and Last Guardian all share a similar aesthetic – they are vast, lonely worlds, bathed in almost blinding sunlight. Where does that look come from? Ueda claims it’s all about working with the constraints of the hardware. “We need to create using technical specifications that put limitations on what we create,” he says. “It’s really about trying to find the most effective way to visually express what I would like to do: the outcome is what you see.

“For example, when we’re doing level design and we need a character to crawl, or climb or hang, you may think, well, in real life it would look like this, but you can’t just dump that in. In games, there are so many variables and adjustments you have to make. At the same time, you can’t create something totally artificial. So you have to find the right balance, of clearly showing the player how to navigate, but also being able to express what we want to. We sometimes resort to the hazy visuals because we can’t illustrate beyond a certain point.”

It seems sort of unlikely that such a recognisable visual style comes merely out of problems with rendering draw distance, but Ueda is adamant. So how about the architecture in his games, these grand gothic structures built from stone and lined with intricate carvings and statues? Are these based on specific styles or buildings? “I don’t do a lot of study – I haven’t really travelled to see anything as reference,” he says. “I don’t do a lot of interviews, but I get this question all the time! We just go from our imagination. Although we create very large structures, it’s all down to the little details that make it seem as though they really exist. I think those are the things you’re referring to when you say the worlds are dreamlike.”

After leaving Warp, Ueda was employed as a designer at Sony Computer Entertainment Japan, just as work was finishing on the agenda-setting PlayStation titles Final Fantasy VII and Gran Turismo. Sony was feeling confident and when Ueda showed the studio a teaser CGI movie he’d made for Ico, the project was greenlit almost immediately. He was given a team of just five staff, which eventually peaked at the comparatively modest 20. After leaving Sony in 2011, he’s now back with a smaller team at his own studio Gendesign, working with some original TeamIco members including lead programmer Jinji Horagai.

Here, says Ueda, his approach is partly collaborative, partly dictatorial, depending on the element of the game they’re working on – but it’s clear he has the final say on everything. “With level design, it would be impossible for just one person to manage that vision,” he says. “So we all put together ideas together, look at what works and finally we all get to what I imagined. With characters, we don’t have too many in our game and that makes it less of a team job. I already have images of all the characters in my head. I just have them made for me.”

As for video game influences, beyond those Amiga titles, and a previously admitted love for Pa Rappa the Rappa and Western games like Grand Theft Auto III, Ueda is… evasive. “In general, the games that are appealing to me are the ones where the character animations are very intricate and beautiful,” he says. “It’s not just about the asset itself, it’s how I perceive the character…” but then he drifts off into thought once again.

But despite his good-natured evasions, his talk of winging it and his apparent surprise at fans reading so much into his titles, he sometimes – almost despite himself – hints at a hidden perfectionism. When we ask about Trico, who the player needs to work with to solve certain puzzles, but who clearly has a will and intelligence of its own, he admits that the beasts’s obstinacy has been a tricky balancing act. “To be honest, we’re still fine-tuning Trico’s behaviours,” he says. “There are two extremes – if you can fully control a character, what’s the point? It becomes a pet. But at the opposite end if you can’t control it at all it becomes a nuisance, a barrier to progression. We’re still trying to find the balance.”

Ueda has never really explained why he left Sony during the development of Last Guardian. In 2013, he told Edge magazine, “I felt a sense of crisis within myself about a lot of things.” Perhaps the production process, specifically the need to port the game from PlayStation 3 to PlayStation 4, was stressful, perhaps Sony was becoming impatient. Ueda doesn’t broach that directly, but when asked what he has learned from the elongated Last Guardian development period, he is teasingly enigmatic. “There was a lot of learning,” he smiles. “It’s hard to explain, to describe it in words at this moment, but maybe if there’s one thing …” He breaks off for a few seconds and chats animatedly with the translator. “In life, there are always things that mesh well, and things that don’t. In various ways that applies to what we’ve done in the last few years.”

Few people outside of Gendesign or Sony Japan know what’s next for Ueda and his team. A short break, probably, but then? Seven years ago Ueda expressed how to draw trico from the last guardian interest in creating a first-person shooter like Half-Life 2 – it’s hard to image how the elegiac tone of his work would transfer into that space but it’s a fascinating prospect.

In the meantime, one thing he won’t be doing is playing Last Guardian – at least not for a while. “With all my titles – when the game is released, I’m extremely nervous,” he says. “In the week after the release I don’t want to look at the game. All I’ll see are the flaws. I wouldn’t want to see it with that perspective because I don’t want to think about regrets. Even seeing tiny bugs I’ll think, why didn’t we squash that one?But sometime later, maybe after a year, I’ll be able to calm down and take a look.”

This does not sound like the young man who once chose abstract art at university in order to avoid doing actual work. It sounds like a developer who is as careful, playful and quietly structured as his own creations.

And as challenging as Ueda’s evasion is, it’s actually refreshing to meet a designer who doesn’t have a list of worthy cinematic or literary influences to reel off. In an industry always clamouring for artistic legitimacy, here is a creator happy to say: those worlds you love? I imagined them all.

The Last Guardian is released on 25 October

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jun/28/the-last-guardian-fumito-ueda-interview
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Ryan Meitzler

Ryan is the Editor-in-Chief at DualShockers and has been a lover of games as long as he can remember. He holds a BA in English and Cinema and lives in New York City.

Read more of Ryan's articles

Источник: https://www.dualshockers.com/the-last-guardian-3d-chalk-art/

The Last Guardian: Trico

Week 5 study: hair/fur/feathers.

Artstation.

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Источник: https://mushroomtale-fanart.tumblr.com/post/173388607906/the-last-guardian-trico-week-5-study

The Last Guardian

For other uses, see The Last Guardian (disambiguation).

2016 video game

2016 video game

The Last Guardian[a] is a 2016 action-adventure game developed by Japan Studio and GenDesign and published by Sony Interactive Entertainment for the PlayStation 4. Players control a boy who befriends a giant half-bird, half-mammal creature, Trico.

Team Ico began developing The Last Guardian in 2007. It was designed and directed by Fumito Ueda, and shares stylistic, thematic, and gameplay elements with his previous games, Ico (2001) and Shadow of the Colossus (2005). He employed the "design through subtraction" approach he had used for his previous games, removing elements that did not contribute to the core theme of the connection between the boy and Trico.

Sony announced The Last Guardian at E3 2009 with a planned release in 2011 for the PlayStation 3. It suffered numerous delays; Ueda and other Team Ico members departed Sony, forming the studio GenDesign, and hardware difficulties moved the game to the PlayStation 4 in 2012, drawing speculation that the game would not see release. Ueda and GenDesign remained as creative consultants, with Ueda as director and Sony's Japan Studio handling technical development. The Last Guardian was reintroduced at E3 2015. Upon release, it received praise for its art direction, story, and depiction of Trico, though some criticized the gameplay.

Gameplay[edit]

Like its predecessors Ico (2001) and Shadow of the Colossus (2005), The Last Guardian is a third-person game that combines action-adventure and puzzle elements.[1][2] The player controls an unnamed boy who must cooperate with a half-bird-half-mammal creature, Trico, to solve puzzles and explore areas. The name of the creature, Trico (トリコ, Toriko),[3] can be taken to mean "prisoner" (虜, toriko), "baby bird" (鳥の子, tori no ko), or a portmanteau of "bird" (鳥, tori) and "cat" (猫, neko).[4]

The boy can climb on structures, carry objects such as barrels, and operate mechanisms such as levers. Trico's size and agility allow it to reach areas that the boy cannot reach alone, and fight off guards who attempt to capture the boy.[3] Conversely, certain obstacles, such as gates, or glass eyes that frighten Trico, prevent Trico from progressing, and must be removed by the boy.[5] The boy must locate barrels to feed Trico when it is hungry, pet Trico to calm it after a battle, and remove spears thrown at Trico by enemies.[5]

Though the player initially has little command over Trico, the boy learns to command Trico to leap onto ledges or head in a certain direction, among other actions.[6] Although players are encouraged to train Trico to move in the right direction, new areas can be discovered by letting Trico wander independently.[7] At various points, the boy wields a reflective mirror that summons lightning from Trico's tail, which can be used to break certain objects.[8]

The player is returned to the last checkpoint if the boy is captured by guards, or if he falls from too great a height.[9] Multiple playthroughs unlock additional costumes based on previous Ueda games.[10]

Plot[edit]

The player controls the boy, who must care for and work with the large creature, Trico, using its animal instincts to solve puzzles

The Last Guardian's story is framed as a flashback told by an older man (voiced by Hiroshi Shirokuma) recounting his experience as a boy.[3]

The boy (voiced by Tatsuki Ishikawa) awakens in a ruined castle in a deep valley known as the Nest.[11] He discovers an enormous, winged, cat-like creature called a Trico, chained and wounded. Though Trico is hostile, after the boy removes the spears from its body and feeds it, it begins to accept him.[12] The boy unchains Trico and they explore the area, discovering a mirror-like shield that summons lightning-like energy from Trico's tail. The pair make their way through the castle ruins, evading the ghostly soldiers,[13] and Trico's broken horns and wings slowly regrow.

In a flashback, Trico flies to the boy's village and steals him from his dormitory. It flies back to the Nest, but is struck by lightning and chained up by the soldiers. In the present, Trico resuscitates the boy after a cave collapse. After fending off an attack from a second, armored creature, Trico and the boy enter a mysterious tower and discover a malevolent force, the "master of the valley", which manipulates creatures and soldiers. It summons several creatures of the same kind as Trico, which regurgitate stolen children into the tower and savage Trico, tearing off the end of its tail. The boy uses the mirror to summon energy from the severed tail segment and destroy the master of the valley, causing the creatures to plummet from the sky.

Wounded, Trico takes the boy, near-death, and flies to his village. When the terrified villagers attack him the boy instructs Trico to leave. Years later, the boy, now grown, discovers the shield and raises it to the sky, sending a beam of light to the Nest, where Trico resides.[14]

Development[edit]

In his previous game, Shadow of the Colossus, director Fumito Ueda had intended to create an emotional interaction between Mono, the character that Wander wants to save, and the colossi that Wander must fight to save her. He was surprised and inspired to find players felt a stronger connection between Wander and his horse Agro.[15] Ueda wanted to make the relationship between a human and a creature the central concept for his next game.[6][15][12]

Ueda found that people were drawn to games with lifelike creatures, and felt The Last Guardian needed something similar to attract a broad audience. He wanted to create a virtual creature that behaved as realistically as possible, avoiding the unnatural behavior of other virtual animals.[6][8] He based much of Trico's behavior on his childhood experiences growing up in a home full of animals.[16] The final version of Trico is an amalgam of several creatures; the design was "deliberately unbalanced because looking strange was important", according to Ueda.[6] The team wanted to avoid making the animal cute, and instead focused on realistic-looking behavior with "animal-like expressions".[6] Trico's ears react with a cat-like "twitch" if they touch ceilings or other tall features, using the game's mesh-based collision detection.[7] The team added the ability to summon lightning from Trico's tail to have players understand Trico's "force and ferocity".[8] Ueda described Trico as "adolescent", allowing the developers to add humor through its actions.[17] The team used programmed key frame animations instead of more common motion capture techniques, allowing them to capture subtleties that would be difficult using live animal subjects.[18]

As Trico functions similarly how to use google one app the colossi the player climbs in Shadow of the Colossus, journalists have described The Last Guardian as a combination of Ico and Shadow of the Colossus; Ueda stated there was "a bit of each of those [games] in there".[18] He described the relationship between the boy, Trico, and the guards as a game of rock-paper-scissors that changes throughout the game; at times, the boy needs Trico to protect him, while at others the situation is reversed.[17] Though Ico and Shadow of the Colossus have a similar changing connection between pairs of characters, Ueda said there was more "dynamic range" in The Last Guardian.[19]

The Last Guardian is the first Team Ico game to use voice-over narration. As much of the game relies on non-verbal communication between the boy and Trico, Ueda felt the voice-over helped immerse the player in the mindset of the boy. It also provided a way to provide gameplay hints and other context to the player.[19]

Whereas the team had designed the areas of previous games for the characters they had designed in advance, for The Last Guardian they made Trico as flexible as possible, allowing them to create levels and have Trico adapt to them.[12][20] The size difference and interactions between the boy and Trico were informed by the limitations of the PlayStation; if the characters were of the same size, the team would have needed to determine the animation interactions for both, whereas Trico's size meant the boy's animations would not need to affect him much.[8]

Although the boy is less detailed than Trico, he was animated via key frame animation.[18] He places hands on nearby walls, and reaches to pet Trico without player interaction.[7] Ueda felt these animations were necessary to help convince the player of the game world.[7] The animation system uses layers of animation that mimic real-life physics, taking advantage of the greater processing power of the PlayStation 4.[8] The team considered making the player character a girl, but felt it would not be realistic that a female character would have enough stamina to climb Trico.[20]

To create the game's art and architecture, the team used the same "design through subtraction" method they had used to develop Ico and Shadow of the Colossus, four points sheraton downtown san jose ca elements they felt distracted from the core experience.[21] Music is used sparingly to highlight key emotional moments, such as when Trico uses his tail to catch the boy as he falls from a collapsing platform.[21] The game uses vertical space to emphasize the boy's small size.[21]

The Last Guardiangame engine builds on the team's previous development of AI processing from Ico and transformative collisions from Shadow of the Colossus.[6] It flagstar bank online business banking the first Team Ico game to use a full physics engine, Havok.[8] According to Ueda, the effect of wind was modeled separately for each of Trico's feathers.[22] Yasuhide Kobayashi, vice president of Japan Studio, stated that the title The Last Guardian was chosen to appeal to the larger demographic markets in the United States and Europe for the PlayStation 3, hoping to avoid the cultural problems in title and artwork blamed for Ico's low sales in western countries.[23]

In August 2019 interview Fumito Ueda mentioned that Trico they were creating on PlayStation 3 actually had more motion patterns than the PlayStation 4 version did, but they were unable to transfer everything due to transition time issues.[24]

Technical development[edit]

With initial ideas for The Last Guardian envisioned by Ueda since around 2005 after completing Shadow of the Colossus,[25] the game was in active development since 2007, a year after the release of the PlayStation 3.[26][27][28] The working title was Project Trico, revealed to the public due to a leaked video posted at PlayStation Lifestyle in 2008 that showed the current "Target Render" of the game at that time.[29][30] Ueda had long considered the development time for Ico and Shadow of the Colossus, and had anticipated being able "to create something good in a short period of time" with The Last Guardian at the onset.[31] By 2009, the development team had completed enough of the game for it to be showcased during the E3 2009, using an improved render of the same set pieces previously seen in the Target Render[29][30][32][33] and later provided a short top 3 investment banks slice of the game to the press for the Game Developers Conference in early March 2011.[18] Ueda had considered including this demo on the then-upcoming remastered The Ico & Shadow of the Colossus Collection, though it was ultimately not included.[34]

Behind the scenes, the development of The Last Guardian was considered slow by Shuhei Yoshida, the president of Sony Computer Entertainment Worldwide.[26] Yoshida explained that the vision for The Last Guardian was based on a video prepared by Ueda to demonstrate the concepts and style of the game, a process Ueda had used for Ico,[35] and Sony wanted to stay true to that vision.[36] Team Ico, which is a small studio compared to other Sony studios in Japan or other Western developers, were struggling with achieving Ueda's vision for the game on the PlayStation 3 hardware.[36] In 2015 Yoshida revealed that the previous 2009 trailer was "specced up", running at a much lower frame rate on the PlayStation 3 and sped up for the presentation.[37] Around 2011, Sony brought in many of their core development teams such as Santa Monica Studios to review the code and try to improve the performance.[26][38] In 2012, with Sony preparing to announce the PlayStation 4 and still recognizing the sluggish development of the PlayStation 3 version of the game, it was decided to change the target platform to the PlayStation 4 so that Ueda's concept could be fully realized.[26][36] Ueda stated that this choice was primarily Sony's decision, speculating that the PlayStation 3 version of the game at this point would still have been sufficient to convey his concept.[39] Following the target platform switch, Ueda and other members of Team Ico were not as involved with the process, as other teams worked to take the highly customized PlayStation 3 code to adapt it to the PlayStation 4; this included the help of PlayStation 4 lead architect Mark Cerny.[26] With the reintroduction of the game at the E3 2015, Yoshida explained that the game engine is now fully running at speed on the PlayStation 4 and that the remainder of the development lies with the game designers to complete.[26]

Development was hampered by Ueda's departure from Sony in December 2011. With Sony's decision to delay the release of the game early that year, Ueda and other Sony and Team Ico employees opted to leave Sony. Ueda stated in 2013 interview that his departure from Sony was due to feeling "a sense of crisis within myself about a lot of things" on news of the delay.[28] Some of those that departed Sony went on to other projects. For example, executive producer Yoshifusa Hayama joined Bossa Studios to work on social/mobile games,[40] while two Team Ico artists joined an indie startup studio Friends & Foes to develop their first game, Vane, which has been compared visually to The Last Guardian.[41] Ueda and other former Team Ico members, including Jinji Horagai, the lead programmer from Ico and Shadow of the Colossus, created a new studio, GenDesign.[31][42] In founding the studio, they were faced with a choice, according to Ueda: "Do we try to create something new, or do we keep going, providing support on The Last Guardian?"[25] GenDesign opted to commit themselves to helping Sony complete The Last Guardian through contract and working alongside Sony's internal studio, Japan Studio.[43][44] Under this arrangement, GenDesign developed the creative content for the game, such as character design and animation and level design, which was then put into place via Japan Studio, with Ueda maintaining oversight on the completed project.[31][36]

Ueda stated that the final game, as of June 2016, still represents the initial vision he had for The Last Guardian at its onset.[15] The transition from the PlayStation 3 to 4 only improved why was stephen f austin arrested the game looked, but did not change how it played. Ueda stressed it was important during the extended development cycle to keep the question "what kind of game do I want to play?" at the forefront, and to remember that the game needed to be targeted at players experiencing the game for the first time rather than developers that had played it through over and over.[15]Digital Foundry, in comparing the game from its initial Target Render from 2008, the 2009 trailer, the 2015 trailer, and the final game, found very few changes in the game's structure and nature, while observing several improvements and changes made to the rendering systems.[30]

Music[edit]

The Last Guardian's original score was written, orchestrated, conducted, and how to draw trico from the last guardian by Takeshi Furukawa. Furukawa had joined the soundtrack development around 2011, near the same time that the game was being transitioned to the PlayStation 4. Furukawa had been invited to participate by Tommy Kikuchi, the music director for Shadow of the Colossus.[45] During the platform transition, much of the creative work had been put on hold, and Furukawa did not spend extensive effort on the composition until about 2013, three years prior to release. He completed his compositions in early 2016.[45]

Furakawa stated that Ueda trusted him with freedom to compose the music and providing only a broad direction of a cinematic soundtrack and some specific directorial notes. While he was aware of the reputation of the soundtracks by Michiru Oshima and Kow Otani for Ico and Shadow of the Colossus, respectively, and wanted to have The Last Guardian's soundtrack to be similarly unique, Furukawa opted to avoid using these previous works and instead drew his own inspirations primarily from works with a "muted aesthetic", such as Impressionist art and music and French cinema.[45] Furakawa wanted to avoid overstating the emotional aspect of the game, which he felt was already sufficiently conveyed through the gameplay and animation, and instead kept the music restrained except during key narrative elements or in specific locales of the game work.[45] Furukawa did not have to adapt his score significantly to account for changes in story and game direction since these elements were still made within Ueda's vision.[45] He worked with audio lead Tsubasa Ito frequently to review the status and use of his scored compositions.[45]

The performance of the soundtrack was conducted by Furukawa with the London Symphony Orchestra, the Trinity Boys Choir, and London Voices, and was recorded at Lyndhurst Hall.[45] The 19-track Composer's Choice Edition soundtrack was released digitally alongside the game on the PlayStation 4 Music App, and later on other digital retailers. A 24-track CD version of the soundtrack was released by TEAM Entertainment on 21 December 2016.[46] In addition, a two-disc vinyl LP edition was published by iam8bit in 2017.[47]

Release[edit]

Shawn Layden formally reintroduced The Last Guardian at the beginning of Sony's E3 2015 conference.[48] Sony affirmed that that game was now slated for release on the PlayStation 4 with a 2016 release date. Sony also assured fans that Ueda still remained a main developer of the game despite his prior departure from Sony.[49] According to Chris Plante of Polygon, the gameplay presented shows the same gameplay from previous demos, where the young boy and the large creature work together to solve various platforming puzzles.[50] The presentation at E3 2015 was based on the milestone of the game being fully playable, affirmed by selected members of the press,[51] though Yoshida stated they did not do a live gameplay demo as the artificial intelligence behavior of the animal creature could be sporadic and impact the demonstration.[37] Ueda said that the fundamentals of the gameplay had not changed from the original PlayStation 3 version to the PlayStation 4, only that with the more-powerful PlayStation 4, they were able to put more detail into the characters and the environment.[3]

Though the game demo was not playable at the 2015 Tokyo Game Show, part of Sony's display for the game including a full-screen version of Trico that would respond in real time to the actions of the attendees as captured by a PlayStation Move camera.[52] Yoshida stated that they had not shown much additional footage of the game since the E3 2015 announcement as they believed that The Last Guardian is story-heavy and feared showing too much beyond that the game does exist and is playable.[53]

The Last Guardian was announced for a 25 October 2016 release in Japan and North America during Sony's presentation at E3 2016 in June,[54] and was available in a playable form to attendees.[5] In an interview with Kotaku during E3 2016, Ueda commented that the game was fully complete, and the only work remaining was fine-tuning visuals and cut-scenes.[15] A short delay was announced in September 2016, pushing the title back to early December 2016 release, as the developers needed more time to fix bugs that had come up during the final production of the game, according to Yoshida.[55] By 21 October 2016, development of The Last Guardian concluded and the game was submitted for manufacturing.[56] A patch enabled high dynamic range and added 4k resolution support for the PlayStation 4 Pro system.[57]

In addition to regular retail copies, Sony released a "collector's edition" including the game, an artbook, a soundtrack, and a statue of a resting Trico and the boy.[58] The week prior to release, Sony's Joe Palmer stated that pre-order numbers were "exceeding expectations", including high interest in the collector's edition.[59] A standalone demo version of The Last Guardian was released for the PlayStation VR on 12 December 2017; the virtual reality version allows the player to experience interacting with Trico from the viewpoint of the boy.[60] After the launch of the PlayStation 5 in November 2020, players discovered that this game runs at 60 frames per seconds when san judas tadeo an unpatched version from the PlayStation 4 disc. [61]

Reception[edit]

Reception

The Last Guardian received "generally favorable" reviews, according to video game review aggregatorMetacritic.[62] Most reviewers praised the game's environment and story as some of its strongest elements, while the realism of the animal behavior that Trico exhibits was praised by some critics, yet others felt that the realism also hampered the gameplay causing impatience and frustration due to lack of immediate action by Trico when giving commands.[77]

GameSpot's Pete Brown praised the characters, their relationship and the story as the important aspects to the game and overall experience, noting interactions with Trico and acting very independently at times by not knowing "if it's a concerted effort to test your patience for a lovable-yet-stubborn creature". However Brown felt that it added personality to Trico and "sympathy for both characters" in addition to their development within the story and for the player, "culminating in an enrapturing series of revelations that cements your attachment to their personalities".[69] Tom Senior of GamesRadar called Trico "the greatest AI companion in games", in addition to the subtle use of visual and audio cues to add more character and its impact on the gameplay itself.[70]

Reviewing for The Guardian, Simon Parkin praised the design of Trico and its interactions with the world and puzzles, adding further emotional investment. He likened Trico to an "abuse survivor" due to being scared and imprisoned at the start of the game and the thoughtfulness and relationship development of its characters making it "a game, as much as anything, about rehabilitation through kindness and companionship".[75] Chris Carter of Destructoid felt that the detail and realistic behavior of Trico and the boy were "emotive in a way that most developers wouldn't even attempt", potentially being the reason behind the long development, praising the effort put in by Fumito Ueda and the developers nonetheless.[63]US Gamer's Jermey Parish believed that Trico as an in-game character with its own apparent volition was revolutionary in character design, and that the emotional relationship between Trico and the boy was something that could only be effectively done with the interactivity of a video game.[78]

In contrast, Marty Sliva of IGN was critical of Trico's behavior during puzzles combined with camera controls making sections of the game more frustrating, particularly during interiors due to the cramped nature of certain levels and the size of Trico detracting from the experience, calling it "rare to even have to think about the camera in a third-person game in 2016, but I found myself constantly being pulled out of the experience trying to wrestle with my point of view". Sliva however still felt that the game succeeded in the attachment with its characters and delivered memorable moments despite its issues.[71]Game Revolution's James Kozanitis found that there were moments that Trico would continue with traversing the environment and performing tasks even without player input, making the act of controlling Trico at times "ineffective and unnecessary".[68]

Reviewers also noted performance problems with the game running on default PlayStation 4 hardware. Eurogamer's Digital Foundry determined that the game ran into rendering issues and framerate drops on the PlayStation 4, while running at 1080p on the newer PlayStation 4 Pro provided a stable framerate.[79] Philip Kollar of Polygon compared technical aspects to its predecessors release on the PlayStation 2 due to the long development across multiple generations of Sony consoles, stating that the game at times did take advantage of the PlayStation 4 hardware while in others, such as framerate and control issues made its age more noticeable.[72] Sam Byford of The Verge commented that while framerate drops were common in Shadow of the Colossus, they were more acceptable based on the PlayStation 2 hardware of the time and the extent the game maximized out the console's hardware, while such issues on PlayStation 4 for The Last Guardian were less forgivable, making it feel like "a PS3 game that never really came together until the brute force of new hardware allowed the team to ship"; he contrasted this to Final Fantasy XV which had the game's engine rebuilt after its target platform was switched to eighth-generation consoles.[80]

The game was named on several year-end Game of the Year lists, including The New Yorker,[81]Engadget,[82]GameSpot,[83]VG247,[84] and Polygon.[85]

Reaction to delays[edit]

Because of the development delays in The Last Guardian and td us atm near me of updates from Sony, The Last Guardian was considered to have been in development hell over its eight-year development period.[86] Ueda and Yoshida would regularly report progress on the game, but the title was notably absent from major video game conventions, including E3 and the Tokyo Game Show.[31]

Journalists also expressed concern with the potential release of the game when The Last Guardiantrademark had hit some critical milestones. In August 2012, about three years after the trademark had been filed in the United States, Sony had yet to produce a viable product under trademark law,[87][88] and in February 2015, Sony failed to renew the North American trademark for The Last Guardian.[89] Sony re-registered the trademark, noting that associated bank appleton hours of a renewal was an administrative oversight, and the game was still in development.[90]

Prior to the reintroduction in 2015, some journalists expressed concern if The Last Guardian would be as much a landmark game as initially seen. Evan Narcisse for the website Kotaku opined that the lengthy delay of The Last Guardian's release since the 2009 reveal may have been harming the game's relevance on the contemporary market. Narcisse considered that the landscape of games had vastly changed since 2009, during which "by-the-numbers racers, shooters and action-adventure games dominated" the market and the expected emotional impact of The Last Guardian would have made it a stand-out game. Since then, the rise of more independent games such as Papo & Yo, Bastion, The Walking Dead, and Journey had created similar experiences to The Last Guardian, according to Narcisse.[91]Leigh Alexander of Boing Boing agreed, noting that the delay of The Last Guardian had spanned a console generation, and other emotionally filled games have been offered in lieu of The Last Guardian.[92]GamesIndustry.biz's Rob Fahey considered that both The Last Guardian and Final Fantasy XV, which also had a protracted development cycle lasting nearly a decade, represent the last remnants of game development practices from the early 2000s, challenged by the rise of mobile gaming, independent game development, and more efficient software development practices that change the nature and role of auteurs like Ueda and Final Fantasy's Tetsuya Nomura in game development.[93]

News writers were able to play The Last Guardian at E3 2016 and the 2016 Tokyo Game Show in the months before the game's release, and several expressed further concerns about the nature of the game's lengthy development period. Patrick Garrett, writing for VG247, found that the visuals felt flat and aged considering modern hardware capabilities, and expressed concern that while older gamers would readily purchase the game, The Last Guardian may not draw in enough newer gamers to be a commercial success.[94] Philip Kollar for Polygon, though still impressed with the characters, graphics, and core gameplay, found controlling the character difficult and managing the game's camera tricky, elements that made the game feel like a PlayStation 2 game rather than something on modern hardware.[95]Wired's Chris Kohler found much of the demo to require patient observation of Trico's movements and puzzle solving, which, he commented, some players would appreciate but were elements that have slowly been phased out of action games over the last console generation, and other players may not have the patience for these.[96] Brian Ashcraft of Kotaku also noted that the demo's pace was often set by how fast Trico would respond or react, which may test the how to draw trico from the last guardian of players looking for a more action-based experience.[97]

Sales[edit]

In the UK, The Shop amazon prime now Guardian suffered lower than expected sales,[98] debuting at number 7 in the weekly game sales charts.[99] It debuted at number four in the Japanese video game sales charts, with 82,260 copies sold.[100] The following week, it sold an additional 10,754 copies in Japan, bringing the total number of copies sold in the country to 93,014.[101]

Awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Known as Hitokui no Ōwashi Trico (人喰いの大鷲トリコ, Hitokui no Ōwashi Toriko, "Trico the Large Man-Eating Eagle") in Japan.

References[edit]

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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Guardian

I personally don't think so. A part of me wants to believe that he actually found the mirror very early on but that the other villagers either didn't find it or told him not to touch it so he might've used it at night to call Trico but it didn't work so he stopped, but when the children found him he told them to meet him at night so he could tell them the story and then show off the mirror to them. The mirror lit up and nothing else happened. Obviously, we know that Trico could still feel the connection to the mirror and the boy, but there is no way that he'd risk his own life, the one of his partner adn his children suddenlink automated bill pay number come and visit the boy after all those years. The boy probably told everyone what happened in the nest, but the others probably didn't believe him. Maybe they thought he was hallucinating after being swallowed by Trico and they were just glad he came back (the village has never been attacked by the Tricos according to the developers iirc so they have no idea what's going on, they only knew about the horror stories the elder told them and that the Tricos are scared of the eyes). If he wasn't trying to keep the mirror a secret he wouldn't have told the children at night, he would've gathered the whole village. Some people like to think that Trico would come back after the boy uses the mirror but in my opinion, if the villagers really didn't believe his stories and Trico would show up with his family, it'd probably end in a disaster.

Источник: http://www.public-republic.com/author/drawsandfails

Everybody Poops, Including The Last Guardian's Cat Beast

The Last Guardian is filled with magical moments, but none quite as magical as when the legendary winged cat beast takes a massive rolling poo off the side of a treacherous bit of scaffolding.

Without giving too much away, Trico’s digestive tract plays a pretty big role in The Last Guardian, and why shouldn’t it? His behavior is modeled after that of various real-world beasts, and real-world beasts poop all the time. Seriously, they never stop. There’s probably one near you right now, just a-poopin’ away.

That said, someone in the comments of my The Last Guardian review asked me if Trico pooped, and I replied that he did not. I was so wrong. The video below shows an event that occurred during in my playthrough of the game, but somehow I managed to be looking away from Trico as green globes rained from his anus. If not for YouTuber Brian Taylor (via Reddit), I may have never witnessed this majestic moment.

A few observations here.

  • From what I gather from playing through the game, Trico feeds on barrels of blue energy. If he poops out green globes, that must mean his digestive tract absorbs yellow, making him Sinestro’s arch-enemy.
  • I’m how to draw trico from the last guardian Trico attempts to scratch at the ground to bury his poo, but all he is doing here is covering it with wood shavings.
  • How could I have possibly missed this? Half of the screenshots I took while playing were of Trico’s rear end.
  • Since he’s part bird and part cat, does Trico have an anus, or does he sport a cloaca, the combination sex/digestive output gland enjoyed by most reptiles, birds and fish? Rather than just ask, I say we form groups for the opposing theories, mostly because I want a Team Cloaca t-shirt.

Also take note of the size and shape of Trico’s excrement. Maybe draw some pictures. Compose a little song to them. Anything to keep you from just picking them up and running about with them, as in the outstanding threat in The Last Guardian Reddit titled, “Strange green eggs or blobs. No purpose?” (via Games Radar).

Ultimately I appreciate the effort that went into making Trico a living, breathing, pooping creature. He makes a fine companion to the young boy who doesn’t eat, drink or poop the entire time you play him.

Perhaps their bond is so strong that Trico poops for the boy. Imagine being that close to another living being. May we all find that one day.

Источник: https://kotaku.com/everybody-poops-including-the-last-guardians-cat-beast-1789926957

How to draw trico from the last guardian -

Beside me lay a great, man-eating beast: 'Trico'.

Trico

Height

19 feet/5.8 meters

Dislikes

Talismans, Knights, Armored Tricos

Appears in

The Last Guardian


Trico (トリコ, Toriko) is the name of the griffin-like beast in The Last Guardian and the deuteragonist of the game. It looks like a combination of a dog, bird, and a cat. The mysterious masked knights searching for the Boy are no match for its power and ferocity. The boy will need to take care of Trico, both by feeding it mysterious barrels and removing spears from its hide.

Appearance

Trico is a large, hybridized beast with the face of a dog, the ears, body and tail of a cat, and the beak, wings, talons and feathers of a bird. It also sports a pair of horns on its head. Its feathers are a grayish blue with darker feathers on its tail, wings, and nose, while having lighter feathers on its face. The beast's eyes change colors depending on its mood.

Trico's appearance also changes over time. At the beginning, its wings are in tatters, and the horns are broken. By the end of the game, the wings are fully healed and its horns are about a foot long and slightly curved forwards.

History

The Last Guardian™ 20180210160241.jpg

Trico first appears in the cave with the boy, unconscious and wounded. After the Boy cares for the creature, the two start to bond and Trico follows the Boy around.

As the two make their way through the Nest, Trico defends the boy from enemies large and small and helps him access areas and cover ground very quickly. Trico's bond becomes so strong that the beast would protect the Boy from seemingly anything.

It is discovered that Trico is one of many other beasts like itself and was once enslaved to an entity called the Master of the Valley, who controls the beasts and uses them to kidnap human children to sustain its own immortality. However, the Master's control over this creature was broken when Trico was hit by lightning after stealing the Boy. Fearing the power of the now independent beast, the Knights chained Trico up in the cave, hoping it would die from the wounds it sustained from the lightning and the long fall. However, Trico regurgitated the boy, who helped the beast recover and escape.

The two gain entrance to the Master's citadel tower. While Trico holds off a large pack of Armored Tricos, the boy destroys the Master. Badly wounded, Trico decides nonetheless that it is now time that the Boy returned to his village. Upon returning the Boy home, Trico leaves for its own safety, leaving the Boy to tell the story of their extraordinary adventure.

In the final cutscene, it is revealed that Trico not only survived its agonizing wounds but has gone on to sire a young Trico of its own, raising it in the cave where the whole adventure began. It still seems to remember the Boy fondly when it hears the call of the Boy's (now a man) mirror.

Personality

Trico behaves much like a typical domesticated dog. At first, Trico does not trust the Boy, even swiping him into a cave wall when the Boy tries to remove spears from its body. However, after receiving food and care from the Boy, the beast trusts him enough to follow him around. As time goes on, Trico even seeks affection in the form of being fed or being petted, which calms it down after a battle. Trico will also bestow affection on the Boy, rubbing its head against him and nuzzling while making loving whines. Once Trico becomes fully bonded, the beast will protect the Boy without a thought to its own personal safety, even taking on a pack of Armored Tricos without hesitation.

Trico is a creature one would do best not to make an enemy of. When the Boy is endangered or it perceives a threat, Trico goes into a bloodthirsty rage, destroying said threat with vigor. Even if Trico is outmatched, the beast will still throw itself into the fray, fighting until either killed or knocked unconscious.

It is possible that Trico is a younger or less experienced beast, while quite effective against Knights, is easily overpowered by Armored Tricos, even in one-on-one encounters. It is also shown to be rather clumsy as, when kidnapping the Boy in his sleep, the beast gets its head stuck in a window and knocks over a pot, alerting the village to its presence.

This also is supported by how the Boy pronounces the creature's name (in spite of the subtitles reading "Trico"): "Toriko". This name has the suffix "-ko", which can refer to a child or a baby.

Development

The first-ever screenshot for the game (and the only screenshot of the game released for well over two years) depicted a giant length of chain running into a hole in the ground. In the game's first trailer, the creature on the end of the chain was revealed to be Trico.

Powers and abilities

  • The Last Guardian™ 20180210180447.jpg
    Chimeran physiology:
    Trico can best be described as a chimera, a creature composed of several different animals. This gives the beast the abilities of all the species it embodies: the strength of a dog, the agility of a cat, and the flight of a bird.
  • Enhanced strength: Because of its massive size, Trico is incredibly strong, capable of destroying stone structures and smashing groups of enemies with relative ease.
  • Enhanced agility: Trico can climb and leap great distances that would be impossible for any other animal. This is embodied by its cat-like traits. Its large, tridactyl feet are also quite wide, making it an effective swimmer.
  • Flight: Initially, Trico cannot fly because of the wounds that it has sustained, the wings having been badly hurt by lightning and fall damage. However, when its wings are fully healed, Trico can fly great distances and is able to achieve altitude to soar above the clouds. Even when the beast's wings are still healing, it can glide with them for a short period of time.
  • Enhanced durability and healing: Trico can take massive amounts of damage. Swords do not affect the beast, spears only slow it down, and even serious wounds sustained by Armored Tricos, long falls, or being struck by lightning can be shrugged off in a short amount of time. Trico also seems to heal very fast, as it does not bleed very much from spear wounds and can quickly get up from even life-threatening wounds.
  • Prehensile tail: Trico's tail acts as an extra limb. The creature mainly uses this ability to assist the Boy while its four feet are in use. While unable to grab the Boy using its tail, the beast can quickly position it to act like a rope to climb up/down.
  • Enhanced senses: Thanks to its dog-like attributes, Trico has incredible senses of smell and hearing. This helps it find items of interest in the environment, but also serves to distract it when finding pots of the precursor material used to make the food to feed those of its kind, as it creates a miasma that keeps it rapt and oblivious to all else.
  • Intelligence: Trico is rather intelligent, not only able to navigate its way around the environment of the Valley but also follow the Boy's simple directions. The Boy can direct Trico to where he wants to go, pointing out what he wants him to do, and even gesturing actions for Trico to perform like pushing, pulling, or jumping. Presented with a somewhat-complex concept - like stamping down on one end of a wagon to launch the Boy into the air - it can figure out what the Boy wants and perform it quickly and easily.
  • Eyeshine: The color of Trico's eyes change depending on its mood. The huge eyes shine pink when aggressive or angry, glow white when excited or interested, are yellow when it sees a barrel, and when its eyes are dark green, Trico is calm and friendly. Its pupils will contract greatly when the creature is satisfied when being fed a barrel, closely resembling a more human eye.
  • Electricity generation: Early in the game, the boy finds a mysterious mirror. Upon seeing the symbol produced by the mirror, Trico can fire a continuous bolt of electricity from its tail at the mirror's target, useful for destroying obstacles and enemies. However, when the mirror is lost, so is this ability. When the ability is regained later in the game, Trico now fires a built-up pulse of explosive lightning. Trico's tail can fire electricity even when severed from his body. This ability is not directly controlled by Trico.

Weaknesses

  • The Last Guardian™ 20180304194545.jpg
    The Boy
    : First and foremost, Trico will do whatever it takes to protect the Boy, even if that means recklessly throwing itself in harm's way or against an overpowering enemy. While the beast has always survived, it nearly dies several times.
  • Talismans: These huge, hexagonal stained glass panes evoke a strange, insurmountable fear in Trico-beasts. When the talismans come within Trico's eyesight, Trico's animal instincts become apparent, and the creature is unable to do anything but fearfully back away unless the offending pane is destroyed. These objects come in the form of small shields carried by Knights that they will aim against the animal, or as larger stationary ones, mounted on trolleys or suspended by chains. Most often they can be knocked over, broken by throwing a stone, or destroyed with Trico's ranged tail attack (when available).
  • Armored Tricos: As powerful as Trico is, the beast stands little chance against even one of its own kind. While it fights bravely, it is always overwhelmed.
  • Small spaces: Trico's size is not always an advantage, and the well-meaning beast has trouble squeezing into tight spots (although not from lack of trying). At one point, Trico valiantly attempts to squeeze into a mine tunnel, which causes the walls to collapse around it and the Boy.

Effects on gameplay

The Last Guardian™ 20180210154859.jpg

The gameplay of The Last Guardian stems around using Trico's natural instinct to the player's benefit in order to traverse the environment and solve puzzles. Trico reacts based on its surroundings and mood and cannot be controlled directly.

Examples of using Trico's animal instinct includes:

  • When injured by spears, Trico's mobility is reduced or prevented, and the boy must pull them out in order for it to move.
  • When encountered by the armor suits, Trico will become aggressive, destroying them, but, afterward, the boy must pet it to calm the beast down.
  • The boy can feed barrels of food to Trico in order to keep the creature happy and to lure it to places it does not want to immediately go, such as jumping into a pool of knee-deep (to Trico) water.
  • Standing on an upper ledge, getting Trico's attention, then jumping to demonstrate will motivate Trico to jump up to the ledge.
  • After the boy gains Trico's trust, Trico will follow the Boy around and even follow his commands.
  • Trico will occasionally defecate anywhere when left alone for a long period of time.
  • Like a cat, Trico proves hesitant to jump into bodies of deep water.

Meaning of name

"Toriko" is the Japanese word for "prisoner", possibly given during the initial predicament. "Toriko" is also a combination of the Japanese words "tori" (bird) and "neko" (cat), and also has the suffix "-ko", which can refer to a child or a baby. Finally, Project Trico was the name for the game's working title, which is a combination of "Tri" and "Ico". This could be referring to the game itself, which is Team Ico's third release.

Gallery

Trico boy back

It is possible to navigate through the land on Trico's back to surpass obstacles or reach certain heights.

Trico eyes

Trico with green eyes.

Trico pet

The Boy petting Trico.

Trico sit

Trico sitting similarly to a cat.

Trico waiting

Trico looking back at its companion.

Trico lightning

Trico firing lightning from its tail.

Trico catch

Trico catches the Boy.

Trico sunset

Trico in the sunset.

Trico flying

Trico flying, prior to being struck.

TricoConcept1

A concept of Trico.

TricoConcept2

Another concept of Trico.

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SotCFullTemplate.png
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Источник: https://teamico.fandom.com/wiki/Trico

-sh͞a̶dow̨s̷ ̵o̵f͘h͢i͏m̴- — Trico!! I was watching the Shadow of the...

Trico!! I was watching the Shadow of the Colossus play through that @therealjacksepticeye is doing and after seeing the last one I decided to go back and watch The Last Guardian play through, and It reminded me of this drawing I did awhile ago. So I...

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#the last guardian#jacksepticeye#art#artist#video game#drawing#the last guardian trico#trico#the last guardian fan art#fan art#video game fan art#handdrawn#I love it#cute

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I personally don't think so. A part of me wants to believe that he actually found the mirror very early on but that the other villagers either didn't find it or told him not to touch it so he might've used it at night to call Trico but it didn't work so he stopped, but when the children found him he told them to meet him at night so he could tell them the story and then show off the mirror to them. The mirror lit up and nothing else happened. Obviously, we know that Trico could still feel the connection to the mirror and the boy, but there is no way that he'd risk his own life, the one of his partner adn his children to come and visit the boy after all those years. The boy probably told everyone what happened in the nest, but the others probably didn't believe him. Maybe they thought he was hallucinating after being swallowed by Trico and they were just glad he came back (the village has never been attacked by the Tricos according to the developers iirc so they have no idea what's going on, they only knew about the horror stories the elder told them and that the Tricos are scared of the eyes). If he wasn't trying to keep the mirror a secret he wouldn't have told the children at night, he would've gathered the whole village. Some people like to think that Trico would come back after the boy uses the mirror but in my opinion, if the villagers really didn't believe his stories and Trico would show up with his family, it'd probably end in a disaster.

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The Last Guardian is filled with magical moments, but none quite as magical as when the legendary winged cat beast takes a massive rolling poo off the side of a treacherous bit of scaffolding.

Without giving too much away, Trico’s digestive tract plays a pretty big role in The Last Guardian, and why shouldn’t it? His behavior is modeled after that of various real-world beasts, and real-world beasts poop all the time. Seriously, they never stop. There’s probably one near you right now, just a-poopin’ away.

That said, someone in the comments of my The Last Guardian review asked me if Trico pooped, and I replied that he did not. I was so wrong. The video below shows an event that occurred during in my playthrough of the game, but somehow I managed to be looking away from Trico as green globes rained from his anus. If not for YouTuber Brian Taylor (via Reddit), I may have never witnessed this majestic moment.

A few observations here.

  • From what I gather from playing through the game, Trico feeds on barrels of blue energy. If he poops out green globes, that must mean his digestive tract absorbs yellow, making him Sinestro’s arch-enemy.
  • I’m glad Trico attempts to scratch at the ground to bury his poo, but all he is doing here is covering it with wood shavings.
  • How could I have possibly missed this? Half of the screenshots I took while playing were of Trico’s rear end.
  • Since he’s part bird and part cat, does Trico have an anus, or does he sport a cloaca, the combination sex/digestive output gland enjoyed by most reptiles, birds and fish? Rather than just ask, I say we form groups for the opposing theories, mostly because I want a Team Cloaca t-shirt.

Also take note of the size and shape of Trico’s excrement. Maybe draw some pictures. Compose a little song to them. Anything to keep you from just picking them up and running about with them, as in the outstanding threat in The Last Guardian Reddit titled, “Strange green eggs or blobs. No purpose?” (via Games Radar).

Ultimately I appreciate the effort that went into making Trico a living, breathing, pooping creature. He makes a fine companion to the young boy who doesn’t eat, drink or poop the entire time you play him.

Perhaps their bond is so strong that Trico poops for the boy. Imagine being that close to another living being. May we all find that one day.

Источник: https://kotaku.com/everybody-poops-including-the-last-guardians-cat-beast-1789926957
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