one day at a time elena

Elena's role of the precocious, but terribly awkward, teenager in One Day at a Time is performed to incredible perfection. Elena would say this. It's just ripe with things that this family would be talking about.” Both Calderon Kellett and executive. This open-faced Italian pie makes for a delicious Thanksgiving treat. Make ahead: Dough can be made 1 day ahead, covered.

One day at a time elena -

She is an only child of her parents. Add the first question. Penelope tries to decide if she wants to have kids with Max. Moreno, Gomez raves, is “just so brilliant; she knows everything about everything. Alex punches a boy from another school, because he made a racist comment. It was developed by Gloria Calderón Kellett and Mike Royce, with Lear and his producing partner Brent Miller as executive producers. The series was co-created by Roberto Orci along with Andrew Orci, Dan Dworkin, and Jay Beattie. Ad Choices, HBO is once again hoping you’ll ignore the big. This Is It 32m. 9. . The directive makes sense to those who know and love Gomez’s character on the series. Lydia and Schneider take the citizenship test. However an armed criminal forces he building under a lock down and everyone has to stay in. And the representation they do get is so shallow—we always see the gay man story line, and we never see young lesbians. She is an only child of her parents. 4. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 1/1/20) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 1/1/20) and Your California Privacy Rights. Isabella Gómez is a Colombian actress, famous for playing as Elena Alvarez on the Netflix original series One Day at a Time. . ... Lydia Riera, she raises two children: Elena and Alex. Sometimes, Elena’s struggles hit closer to home. This episode really highlights that charm of the show. Vanity Fair may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. Rate. Affiliation From the awards race to the box office, with everything in between: get the entertainment industry's must-read newsletter. They are shown to have many common interests with Elena, such as feminism and geeky TV shows like Doctor Who. Character "I can't even imagine making this girl mad at me. As IMDb celebrates its 30th birthday, we have six shows to get you ready for those pivotal years of your life ... your 30s. Gomez’s prep process was simple: “What I did was, I stood outside of the door and listened to their conversation as if Elena was trying to gather up the courage to go in there,” she says. If you're awesome, be yourself because those that mind don't matter and those that matter don't mind.It might not be the funniest of episodes. But there are some issues as well. In a reimagining of the TV classic, a newly single Latina mother raises her teen daughter and tween son with the "help" of her old-school mom. Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? In season two the show introduced a non-binary love interest for Elena! Rate. Her skin tone has been described as "Wonder Bread." She will casually talk about dating Elvis like it‘s not a big deal.” And she‘s taught Gomez several valuable new skills. She worked with a coach to diminish her accent. Her typical hairstyles include wearing it down, in a bun at the top of her and the rest down, in ponytails, and in two buns at the top of her head, or just in one bun piled at the top of her head. Error: please try again. Penelope struggles with her depression after she decides to end therapy and stop taking medication. Lear's company, Act III Productions, approached Sony with the idea of reimagining the original series with a Hispanic family. Gómez holds a Colombian nationality and belongs to Latina ethnicity. Gomez plays a rarely giddy teenager, who’s enthusiastic about social justice issues. One Day at a Time: Season 1 (Recap) One Day at a Time: Season 2 (Recap) Trailer: I Get It, We're Cuban! 5 of 7 people found this review helpful. Isabella Gómez Was this review helpful to you? One Day at a Time is an American sitcom loosely based on the 1975–1984 CBS … Use the HTML below. Her father is a lawyer. “When you’re 18, [and a] girl, a lot of the characters you go out for is ‘cheerleader,’ ‘pretty girl in the hallway.’” Elena, on the other hand, is defined more by her intellect than her looks—an appealing change of pace for 19-year-old, Colombia-born Gomez, who has been acting since she was 5 years old. Everyone participates in preparations for Elena's quinceanera; Elena reveals something about herself to her father. Directed by Pamela Fryman. She began acting in TV commercials since the age of five. While everyone is supposed to be out of the house, Penelope invites Max to stay the night. View production, box office, & company info. “It was never what I thought I would do. One Day at a Time is an American sitcom based on Norman Lear's 1975–1984 sitcom of the same title. One Day at a Time Wiki is a FANDOM TV Community. She’s also so invested in Elena that she got angry just thinking about anyone daring to hurt her like this. One Day at a Time Quinces 5. This FAQ is empty. Penelope wants Alex and Elena to get summer jobs. Penelope doesn't want her to date until she's out of school, but she may have a secret of her own. Gómez is active on social networking sites. February 9, 1998 Medellín, Colombia Elena, resistant to have a quinces, starts dating a teenager from her class, to later realize that she is a lesbian. This makes so much sense.’ . Syd is portrayed by Sheridan Pierce. To revisit this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories. Gómez was born on February 9, 1998, in Medellín, Colombia. And that's what really matters. 10. Elenais a young Latinx female. She is currently appearing on Pop TV's original sitcom One Day at a Time since 2017, where Isabella Gomez portrays Elena, the activist daughter of Penelope (Justina Machado); who reveal her sexual orientation as a lesbian in Season 1. “It is so cool to be a vessel for Elena,” she says. The show often tackles sexism, diversity, religion and immigration issues. Everyone is stressing about the party. Rate. Rate. Rate. She earns her salary from her acting jobs. And while Syd’s identity confuses most of Elena’s family, their conversations unfold in an organic, genuinely kind way that avoids making Syd or their identity a punch line. "– Syd to Elena, To Zir, With Love Syd is a recurring character in Season 2, Season 3, and Season 4 in Pop TV's One Day at a Time. She is 5'3 and has a slim build. Penelope doesn't want her to date until she's out of school, but she may have a secret of her own. Elena Alvarez The actress is currently living in Echo Park, Los Angeles along with her family. Episodes One Day at a Time Release year: 2017. She appeared a recurring role on the series El Rey Network series Matador and Modern Family. Elena is concerned that Lydia has never voted. Actress This season, the fallout from that revelation continues—and comes to a head when Elena tearfully tells her father that she’ll be fine regardless of whether he’s in her life. Isabella Gómez is a Colombian actress, famous for playing as Elena Alvarez on the Netflix original series One Day at a Time. The series was developed by Gloria Calderon Kellett and Mike Royce, which released on January 6, 2017, and on March 4, 2017, the series renewed by Netflix for a second season. But like in life, when there are problems you still have friends and/or family who count who you can lean on to help you get by. Rate. Rate. One Day at a Time handled Elena’s coming out story wonderfully in season one. “And it’s so mind-blowing that me having fun and getting to do this character that I love can do that for somebody.“. And when we do, we see it for the benefit of men and we sexualize them,” Gomez says, sounding every bit like the character she plays. Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. Schneider makes Elena the building's handyman. “Comedy was never my strong suit,” the actress explains. © 2020 Condé Nast. Though she never saw herself venturing out of dramatic work, she‘s now got a pretty decent comedy mentor on set. Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy. https://one-day-at-a-time.fandom.com/wiki/Isabella_Gómez?oldid=5177. “I was like, ‘That’s funny! She has long black hair that goes to past her neck, is usually wearing glasses. 26 Jan. 2018 Roots. “It makes you connect with the characters in a way that you wouldn’t otherwise, if they didn’t have those very specific things,” Gomez says. This season introduced Syd, Elena’s romantic partner, who identifies as non-binary and uses “they/them” pronouns. community has also found a home on One Day at a Time—particularly those who haven’t seen themselves represented on television much before. With Justina Machado, Todd Grinnell, Isabella Gomez, Marcel Ruiz. Photo of Syd and Elena smiling. Elena tries to break-down Alex's new 'girlfriend', Penelope wants to know if she and Max are exclusive or not, and Lydia and Schneider stalk Leslie. Her father is a lawyer. "Hey, uh, do you want to split that cookie? He is portrayed by James Martinez. One Day at a Time does give Gomez’s dramatic chops plenty of moments to shine as well. One Day at a Time does give Gomez’s dramatic chops plenty of moments to shine as well. Alex and Lydia coach her on flirting with her crush. "—Victor to Penelope just after Elena was born, What Happened Victor Alvarez is a recurring character on the Netflix Original Series One Day at a Time.

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Series / One Day at a Time (2017)

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One Day at a Time is a remake of the 1970s/1980s sitcom of the same name, which debuted in January 2017 on Netflix.

Like the original series, the remake centers around a divorced mom, Penelope (Justina Machado) raising her two kids Elena (Isabella Gómez) and Alex (Marcel Ruiz). They live with Penelope's mother, Lydia (Rita Moreno), in an apartment owned by Schneider (Todd Grinnell) and try to navigate the ups and downs of life.

While the family in the original were Italian-Americans, here they are Cuban-Americans. As such, issues of race, ethnicity, and Cuban cultural heritage play a large part, and the series doesn't shy way from addressing other political topics as well. The series was co-created by Gloria Calderón Kellett, who is Cuban-American herself, and is produced by Norman Lear, who developed the original series.

The series was canceled by Netflix in March 2019 after three seasons, with them citing low ratings as the reason, but Pop TVpicked it up for a fourth season that came out in 2020. This makes One Day at Time the first series to make the jump from a streaming platform to a traditional terrestrial network. The fourth season later aired second-run on CBS beginning in October 2020, reuniting the show with the original's home network. However, following the fourth season, it was cancelled for good.

Now has a page in Spanish, ¡Azúcar!


One Day at a Time contains examples of:

  • Adaptational Attractiveness: While the Schneider of the original series was a Casanova Wannabe, this Schneider is reasonably attractive andgets around.
  • Adaptational Diversity: The original series was about an Italian-American family. Here the family is Cuban-American, and one of the daughters is a lesbian (with a non-binary partner).
  • Adapted Out: The only character with a direct counterpart in the original series here is Schneider.
  • Adult Fear:
    • Carmen's parents getting deported, resulting in Carmen's life being turned upside-down, and her being homeless for a brief period.
    • When Elena finds out Lydia's not an American citizen, she's terrified that something similar could happen to her.
    • The episode "Hello, Penelope" is full of it.
      • First, the idea that you may have to be on antidepressants for the rest of your life, simply to function normally. There's no shame in being on medication, but the stigma around it and mental illness is still very much alive, and it shakes Penelope to the core to realize this.
      • Then, when Penelope goes off her meds, she suffers rapid downward spiral throughout the episode, and is simply unable to keep her life on-track, or her emotions level. Objectively, everything is fine, and she knows it, but she simply cannot be happy.
      • This can be also explained with Penelope stopping her meds suddenly - anti-depressants need to be gradually decreased otherwise there are significant withdrawal effects.
      • When Penelope snaps at Schneider when he is only trying to help her falls under this. Having someone you care about, especially your best friend or family member, snap at you and belittle the issues that you have is a horrible thing to experience, especially if you were just trying to talk to hep them out when they were obviously struggling. Made worse that the issue she choose was his drug addiction and horrible childhood.
      • For Lydia, watching her child suffer so much, knowing there's nothing she can do. And then realizing that she probably inadvertently made it worse with her anti-medication stance.
      • Finally, Penelope having to tell her boyfriend, unsure if he'll still stay with her once he knows. He does.
      • The idea of your close friend or family member being suicidal.

        Penelope: I know what the last part sounds like, but I promise I would never do anything like that.
        Schneider: I know. But I think you know that healthy brains do not go to that place.

    • The whole family and Schneider, especially Penelope, have to deal with the very real possibility of Lydia dying when she has a stroke.
    • In "Locked Down" when Penelope finds out Lydia has a gun.

      Penelope: No matter where you hide it, kids find it. And accidents happen. And things that aren't accidents. We have teenagers in this house. We have a gay teenager in this house. We have a veteran with PTS. This is the last house that should have a gun.

    • "Outside" has Elena and Syd sharing a story about a couple of boys following them around, telling them to kiss until they lost them in a crowd. Penelope follows it with the story of a former mentor for her in the army who one night came into the office drunk when she was alone and touched her inappropriately.
  • An Aesop:
    • "Hold, Please" focuses on the horribly inadequate VA system to get medical assistance for war injuries.
    • "Hello, Penelope" emphasizes the importance of taking anti-depressants and properly dealing with depression and anxiety by showing Penelope going off of her meds and quitting therapy and the resulting breakdown. It also makes a point of saying that if someone you love is suffering from a mental illness, you need to remember that just because you don't understand why they're feeling anxious, depressed, lonely, hopeless, or frightened, it doesn't mean that it isn't real for them.
    • More than one of the Elena-centric plots in season 3 teaches that, while pride in one's sexuality is important, it is unhealthy to base your whole identity around it and neglect the other important aspects of yourself.
    • From "She Drives Me Crazy", nothing goes without saying. Actions may speak louder than words, but an "I love you" goes a long way.
  • The Alleged Car: Mrs. Resnick, whose windows only go down and not back up, the doors stick, there's been a cassette of Toni Braxton's "Unbreak My Heart" stuck in its tape deck longer than Elena's been alive, and has brake problems and stalls out regularly enough that Penelope and the kids have a ritual where Penelope fiddles with the engine while praying, followed by all three of them crossing themselves in unison and starting it again.
  • Alliterative Name: Alex Alvarez. And his full name is Alejandro Alberto Alvarez (...Riera Calderón Leytevidal Inclan.)
  • Ambiguous Situation: Did Elena and Syd have sex in "The First Time"?
  • Artistic License – Medicine: The timeframe of the effects of Penelope ceasing her anti-depressants, in "Hello Penelope", is greatly condensed. In real life, the effects would be much more drawn out and only begin to be noticeable over a longer period of time. The episode implies after a day or two of not taking them, Penelope is unable to get out of bed and possibly suicidal.
  • Artistic License – Religion: The main conflict of "No Mass" could have been avoided by attending Saturday night mass.
  • Art Shift: During the industry shutdown for the COVID-19 pandemic, the crew put out an animated episode with the cast all sending in their lines from home.
  • Bilingual Bonus: There's a lot of unsubtitled Spanish. The crew also clearly makes an effort to get a good amount of people who know the language in the audience, resulting in some big laughs or gasps to lines going over the heads of a lot of viewers.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: Victor, Penelope's estranged husband. When he shows up, he gets along with everyone and seems like he has gotten his life together. Turns out he was lying about stopping drinking and seeking professional help, at which point Penelope kicks him out again. He still stays on good terms with his kids until Elena reveals she's gay, at which point he tells her she is just confused. He still shows up to her quinceañera only to leave right before the father-daughter dance without a word.
  • Bottle Episode: "Hold Please" doesn't leave the Alvarez' living room. The second season finale, "Not Yet" takes place in Lydia's hospital room while she hovers between life and death.
  • But Not Too Black: A Latinx version. Elena is horrified to realize she's inadvertently been passing for white due to her lighter skin color.
  • Catchphrase: One of Lydia's catchphrases is to call people pobrecito/a, which literally translates as "poor little one" and generally refers to an in-the-moment need for sympathy on someone's behalf, or as an equivalent to giving a person the epithet "poor boy/girl", with Lydia using the name for everyone from Syd (to express how they're even more dorky than Elena) to God (because "He tries so hard").
  • Central Theme:
    • Life can be tough, life can be sweet, life can be amazing.
    • Even when you're facing difficult times, there are so many good things in life and you will always be supported by the people who love you.
  • Chekhov's Boomerang: In the episode "Strays", Lydia starts suspecting Elena is "queer" because her friend Carmen spends so much time with her. Eventually it turns out Carmen is spending all her time at the Alvarezes' place because her parents have been deported to Mexico and she's homeless. However, in later episodes we find out Elena is indeed gay, though Carmen is just her best friend and straight herself.
  • Cliffhanger: Season 3 ends on Lydia phoning Penelope from her holiday with Berkowitz... in Cuba.
  • Comically Missing the Point: In "The Turn," proud activist Elena is rocked to realize she "passes" for a white person.

    Elena: You're saying I'm going to go through my whole life without being oppressed at all?

    Penelope: Okay, you know that wouldn't be a bad thing, right?

    Elena: I guess.

    Schneider: Hey, you're still gay, right?

    Elena: Yeah! And a woman, I'm back in!

  • Coming-Out Story: This is the main Story Arc for Elena during the first season as she and her family come to terms with her being a lesbian.
  • Creator Cameo: Co-show runner Gloria Calderón Kellett plays Victor's second wife, with the show making great use of her resemblance to Justina Machado.
  • Cultural Translation:
    • As a popular Latin-American story, it is an obvious candidate for multiple popular Spanish dubs... except, in Spanish how are they going to make jokes about Elena not knowing Spanish? In two ways: 1. instead make fun of her not knowing Cuban slang and parts of its culture, 2. when super necessary (though more common for making jokes at Lydia not knowing English), add "en inglés" and "en castellano" in subtitles. Some translated dialogue from one dub of the pilot vs. the English dialogue:
      Lydia:It means you don't know enough about Cuba to know that I'm insulting you.

      It means you don't know enough Spanish to know that I'm insulting you.

      Elena:Abuela, when are you going to learn that this is the United States?

      Abuela, I'll learn more Spanish when you learn English.

    • Also applies for wordplay, like when in "Hold, Please" Lydia is trying to get Elena to pick an escort for her quinces and says that with social media she only needs to pick a boy and "twat at him" — meaning 'tweet'. In the Spanish this wouldn't work both with the word and grammatically, so instead she says that Elena should "mandarle una teta". She's trying to say 'send him a tweet', but teta means tit. The Spanish might be better because the wordplay is between "send him a tweet" and "send him nudes". (It's kind of disappointing that the Spanish "coño a él" ('twat at him') is nothing like "twittearle" ('tweet him') because that first phrase? It's also slang for 'fuck him' and 'punch him'.)
  • Deliberately Bad Example: Scott, the nursing intern at Penelope's clinic, is lazy, arrogant, obnoxious, and has the maturity of a frat boy. His blatant disrespect of Penelope and opinions of topics like illegal immigration are set up to strengthen Penelope's position.
  • Distracted by the Sexy: Happens to both Alex and Elena with the bikini-clad babes outside their hotel room.
  • Double-Meaning Title: The episode "No Mass" in which the family have disagreements about going to Church every week is a literal title, in different ways, in Spanish and English! No Mass is basically a homophone for No Más, Spanish for 'no more'.
  • Dysfunctional Family:
    • Downplayed with the Alvarez family. They might come at odds with each other and have differing opinions, but at the end of the day they help and respect each other.
    • Played straight with Schneider's family. He has four stepmoms, at least one of whom used to be his nanny, and grew up as a Lonely Rich Kid.
  • Early Installment Weirdness : Along with a bit of Discontinuity. In the pilot, Schneider mentions that the Alvarezes have been in the apartment for ten months. In the second season, we see an episode from when they moved in... 17 years ago.
  • Easily Forgiven:
    • Even though Lydia is a devout Catholic, it takes her about ten seconds of soul-searching to accept the fact that Elena is gay. Lampshaded by Penelope questioning how quickly she turned around, and justified by Lydia responding that Elena is her granddaughter and she will love her no matter what, she just needed an excuse.
    • Subverted hard when Elena gives a gracious speech at Victor's second wedding, but then reveals in private she's still hurting badly over his abandoning her at her quinces and deeply resents that circumstances have forced her to be the one putting in all the effort in their reconciliation.
  • Ethical Slut: Schneider often has one-night stands staying at this place, but he also considers himself a feminist (though he sometimes fails to act like one). In "Strays", he firmly refuses the advances of drunken Lori, as she is married already (and drunk).
  • Exact Eavesdropping: Used several times, most notably when Alex is hiding behind Lydia's curtain and overhears Elena when she's working out if she's gay by talking to the empty room.

    Penelope: I'm guessing you heard all that.
    Schneider: It's just a curtain!

  • Fee Fi Faux Pas: A recurring theme is the unintentional offensiveness the family often suffers through. Perhaps most notable is Schneider getting a thorough lesson in why wearing a Che Guevara shirt around Cuban-Americans is a bad idea.
  • Foreshadowing: Much is made of Schneider's eight years of sobriety in the first half of season 3. after a particularly stressful visit from his father, he falls off the wagon, and is celebrating 30 days sober in the finale.
  • "Friends" Rent Control: Downplayed. Season 3 reveals that the reason Penelope can afford their nice three-bedroom in Echo Park is because Schneider hasn't raised their rent since they moved in.
  • Goth: Carmen belongs firmly in the "gloomy Goth" subcategory.
  • Hanging Up on the Grim Reaper: In the season 2 finale, Lydia is in a medically-induced coma after surgery. After all of her family get to have their emotional speeches, she has one herself in a potential dream sequence where Berto comes through her hospital room doors and they dance and converse and expound on family and life for over 5 minutes. He first says that he has come to get her, and at the end offers his hand but actually asks her if it's time. She looks to the sleeping Penelope and says no.
  • Head-Tiltingly Kinky: Lydia insists she can handle the porn Schneider just discovered on Alex's computer, then does a head tilt complete with opera glasses followed by a pronouncement that they should burn the laptop.
  • He Cleans Up Nicely: A well-dressed, shaven Schneider surprises Penelope with a makeover for Elena's quinces.
  • He Is Not My Boyfriend: Lydia, of Dr. Berkowitz. Much to his disappointment, as he obviously hopes for a Relationship Upgrade.

    Berkowitz:(borrowing Lydia's phrase) We went [to the opera] as platonic companions.

    Penelope: Platonic companions? What the hell does that mean?

    Berkowitz:(sadly) I don't know.

  • Hipster: Schneider is portrayed as this, going so far as serving the Alvarezes quinoa when Lydia goes missing. Elena has hipster-ish moments as well.
  • I Am the Noun: Carmen, who is the immigration project.
  • Informed Attribute: The entire first episode is filled with people telling Penelope that she needs to tweeze her eyebrows. And everyone who does has bigger eyebrows than he does.
  • Jerkass: Victor with Penelope and after finding out Elena is gay. He drinks, he's aggressive, he refuses to deal with his issues, he makes a big deal out of wanting to leave before the quinceañera and then shows up only to leave before the father-daughter dance.
  • Latino Is Brown: Averted overall, as the Alvarezes have a variety of skintones, and also discussed in "The Turn" when Elena realizes her paler skin tone makes her white-passing to those who think all Latinos are brown.

    Penelope:(to Elena) You and your brother are of different shades.

    Lydia: Yes, Papito is a beautiful caramel, and you are... Wonder Bread.

  • Liquid Courage: In season 3, a visit from his browbeating father pushes Schneider Off the Wagon. Half a bottle of scotch gives him the guts to defy and cut ties with his old man, but it also causes him to spiral.
  • Lonely Rich Kid: Schneider was this growing up, most likely contributing to his drug problem.
  • Marry the Nanny: Exaggerated and played for laughs with Schneider, who mentions that his many ex-stepmothers were mostly formerly his nannies.
  • Meaningful Echo: At the end of the pilot, Penelope vents to her mom about how she misses having someone there to hold her and say, "I got you", which Lydia does. In the season 1 finale, after Victor walks out of Elena's quinceañera just before the father-daughter dance, Penelope goes up to Elena and takes his place, saying the same thing.
  • Mistaken for Misogynist: In "Bobos and Mamitas," Penelope gets in an argument with her coworker Scott, who is sexist besides generally insufferable, and learns he earns more money than her, driving her to quit in a huff. When Dr. Berkowitz finds Penelope to beg her to stay at the clinic, she demands to know why her wages are smaller. Turns out, it wasn't Berkowitz being sexist, just a doormat; Scott asked him for a raise and he gave it to him. Penelope decides to go back to work after asking Berkowitz for the same pay as Scott plus extra for overtime.
  • Mood Whiplash:
    • The flashback scenes in 2001 are packed with funny stuff like the younger, blonde-haired Schneider and the horror of Penelope and Victor when they realize Berto and Lydia are going to move in with them. But then Penelope turns on the TV to hear news of a plane hitting a building in New York and you realize which day in 2001 it is... To wit, it's so fluffy that even those detail-eyed viewers were unlikely to consider the possibility even though in hindsight it was simple math — Elena was born August 7th and is five weeks old. Exactly five weeks after 8/7 is 9/11.
    • A lighter version at the end of "The Funeral" as the family have gotten over some long-running issues and are all on the same page with cousin Estrellita giving a toast...in which she celebrated that Tía Ophelia got to live to see "our President make America great again." Everyone just stares in utter disbelief.
  • Moral Dissonance: The show is mostly great at giving solid morals and narratives, but in "No Mass" there's some questionable statements. Though eventually Penelope apologies to Lydia and they compromise, both Penelope and Elena said some things that are very negative to religious people. At one point the all-embracing "I'll make you comfortable even if I'm not" Penelope mocks Lydia's faith in God as being her personal imaginary Security Blanket, which is very Not Cool and was uncalled for even if that's what she thinks — Lydia was just saying that she'd like to go to Church and not have Penelope tell her not to. At another point in the episode, Elena goes against her own moral code in a different way; specifically, the atheist Elena tells Lydia to refer to God by gender-neutral pronouns. Even if Elena did believe in God and believed that God had no gender, she is the show's main advocate for using the pronouns not that you personally like, but that the other party does, and it should be clear to her that Lydia always has liked using male pronouns for God. Telling her to do otherwise is equatable with telling a person's friends to refer to them using a different pronoun to what either of them want. Lydia plays this off by making a quick snarky one-liner, but would be well within her rights to be upset with Elena for trying to tell her to do that, and furthermore because in Spanish the distinct pronoun for God is Él and so functionally and culturally needs to be male unless you want to be really offensive.
  • The Mourning After: Lydia is still deeply in love with her late husband, Berto. It's why she refuses to date Dr. Berkowitz despite genuine feelings for him.
  • Multiple Reference Pun:
    • Elena after getting the handyman job appearing at the door and saying "I'm Butch", referring both to her taking over from the never-seen and implicitly-useless handyman who's named Butch and the fact that she is verysoft butch.
    • In at least one Spanish dub, the scene where Lydia is telling Elena to stand up 'straighter' uses the word 'recto' for 'straighter'. Recto, like the English, means straight as well as upright, but here the translation of Lydia saying "be as straight as you can be" is actually "estad tan recto como tu armario" — be as straight/upright as your closet. Elena's closet is probably really straight literally, but really isn't figuratively. The pun would have probably been contrived in English, but checks out pretty well in Spanish.
  • Mythology Gag: Elena strikes the original Schneider's iconic pose in his same outfit upon being revealed as the new Schneider's employee.
  • Now, Let Me Carry You: After two seasons of Schneider being a source for comfort and support for Penelope, she offers the same to him after he falls of the wagon in late season 3. capped by him laying his head on her shoulder as she had done with him multiple times before.

    Penelope: Someone once told me, "Don't quit before the miracle happens."

    Schneider: That's pretty smart. Who said that?

    Penelope:You did, dummy.

  • OOC Is Serious Business:
    • When Penelope's ex Victor shows up in "Hurricane Victor", Lydia is exceedingly nice to him and constantly suggests Penelope and him should get back together. But when it turns out Victor lied about being sober and getting help for his issues, Lydia gets more serious than we've ever seen her before, giving Victor an ice-cold look and curtly telling him to "go".
    • "The Turn" has the normally chill Alex lash out at his family for "being too Cuban" while cheering for him at a baseball game. The second half of the episode reveals why: He's been facing racism at school and while out with his friends, making him resent his ethnicity.
  • Overly Long Name:
    • Elena Maria Alvarez Riera Calderón Leytevidal Inclan
    • Alejandro Alberto Alvarez Riera Calderón Leytevidal Inclan
    • Lydia Margarita del Carmen Inclan Maribona Leytevidal de Riera.
    • Used the one time when Lydia and Schneider are applying for citizenship, and are called up as "Lydia Margarita Del Carmen Inclan Maribona Leytevidal de Riera" and "something Schneider", both preserving Schneider's Only One Name value and contrasting the two.
    • Again in the Season 3 finale, where Lydia proudly calls her daughter by her full name and then "Nurse Practitioner". Penelope tells her that she can just shorten it to her whole full name, NP.
  • Parental Favoritism:
    • Penelope thinks Lydia puts her brother Tito on a pedestal because of his successful business, even though he spends little time with the family and didn't visit her when she was in a coma, despite being close by on a business trip. Tito feels the same about Penelope, because of her family and because Lydia chooses to live with her.
    • When it comes to her grandchildren, Alex is Lydia's favorite by far. Also he's her favorite person in their entire family. While on a dinner cruise, when Tito poses that if the boat sank and asks who Lydia would save, both he and Penelope say "Alex" at the same time.
  • Parental Sexuality Squick: Averted with Elena and Alex, who are very supportive of Penelope dating. Played straight for Penelope herself, who is initially grossed out when she hears Dr. Berkowitz and Lydia were on a date. Then there's Lydia's frequent reminiscing about her sexacapades with Penelope's father, not to mention them acting like horny teenagers in the flashback to 2001.
    • In "Boundaries", Alex walks in on Penelope masturbating to Outlander and runs away. Even more so when she insists on talking about the situation. And when Lydia chimes in. And when Elena does as well. Poor kid.
  • Parental Substitute: Lydia to Schneider. She cooks for him, gives him advice, and helped him get sober.
  • Platonic Life-Partners: Penelope and Schneider are great friends, but they're clearly only friends.
  • Previously Overlooked Paramour: Elena spends a whole episode doggedly trying to figure out if her crush Dani is gay. She finds out she is... and has a girlfriend already. A dejected Elena is then approached by Syd, who has been present the entire episode and made conversation with her a few times, but she hadn't paid them much attention, until:

    Syd: She has a girlfriend. She's so lucky. [awkward laugh] Hey... you wanna split that cookie?

    Elena: Huh? Wait. [realization as Syd looks at her shyly] OHHHHHHHHH.

    Syd: Oh—never mind—sorry, sorry! I just—

    Elena: NO! GAY! Me! Gay!

    Syd: Oh! Uh... me gay, too.

  • Primal Scene: Perhaps even more uncomfortable than usual as Alex catches Penelope masturbating.
  • Pronoun Trouble: Elena's activist friends have a variety of preferred pronouns, with her significant other Syd using "they/them." Dr. Berkowitz is terrified to open his mouth around them.
  • Punny Name: Done together, Penelope and Victor's fiancée Nicole. Jokes that Victor exchanged a "penny" for a "nickel" are made by Penelope's support group.
  • Race Lift: This series changes the focus from an Italian-American family to a Cuban-American family.
  • Recovered Addict: Schneider.
  • Remake Cameo: Mackenzie Phillips, who played one of the daughters in the original series, plays the coordinator of the women veterans’ support group.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Penelope's brother Tito, who went unmentioned through the first two seasons despite the heavy focus on the family dynamics. He shows up in season 3 and is called up for his distance from the family.
  • Romantic Two-Girl Friendship: Elena and Carmen are very close and physically affectionate, with Penelope and Lydia suspecting that they may not be just friends. However, after Elena comes out, she confirms that Carmen is straight and that their relationship is purely platonic.
  • Running Gag:
    • "Jajaja, que funny."
    • The curtain isn't thick enough to block out sound; People frequently behind the curtain hear things they weren't supposed to.
    • Schneider's figurines of the family
    • Overly Long Name
    • The "dale, [nickname], dale!" song
    • Vicks VapoRub with its name being said in a thick Cuban accent.
  • Same Language Dub: Has received dubs in different dialects of Spanish, and though there are often wars between which are better when it comes to Spanish, the consensus seems to be on the Latin American one — it uses three of the original cast (Rita Moreno, Justina Machado, and Isabella Gómez) to voice their characters, and the show is about Latin Americans so the cultural dubbing is seen as more appropriate and effective (than to put Mexican or European culture onto a Cuban family, something most Hispanic people would agree isn't ideal). It also helps that Netflix has allowed for the audio to be selected so people in Europe can watch the Latin American dub.
  • Secretly Wealthy: In season 3, Schneider pretends to be just a poor guy when he meets a wonderful woman. He finally comes clean when his hot tub causes a leak in the apartment. At which point, she opens her simple blouse to show an expensive top and reveals she's rich too.
  • Series Continuity Error: A few pop up in season 2:
    • Schneider is an Canadian immigrant, and in season 2 he confirms that he does not have to go to jury duty, however in season 1 he mentions needing to get out of jury duty in order to help Alex with a project.
    • "Not Yet" has Schneider talk about how he consistently failed out of rehab and was on his fourth try and failing at that too when Lydia showed up and comforted and encouraged him to try again. The first episode has Schneider mention that their moving in coincided with the fifth anniversary of his sobriety.
  • Shell-Shocked Veteran:
    • In the episode "The Death of Mrs. Resnick", we finally find out why Penelope broke up Victor, her veteran husband: he had a serious case of PTSD, refused to get any help for it, and started acting violently. In "Hurricane Victor", he shows up in person and tells Penelope he's finally getting some professional help, but that turns out to be a lie.
    • Penelope herself tries to go off her anti-depressants in Season 2, resulting in a spiral resembling bipolar disorder where she ends up admitting she needs them after hearing a recording of a possibly suicidal message.
  • Shout-Out:
    • One of the family's surnames being Calderón is a reference to Cuban-American showrunner Gloria Calderón Kellett.
    • In "Quinces", Alex says "Immigrants. We get the job done," in response to Penelope seeing the party hall decorated for the first time.
    • Also in "Quinces", the relatives who supposedly weren't going to come but did are the Fajardos, a reference to another famous Cuban-American, Gloria Estefan (Gloria María Milagrosa Fajardo García de Estefan).
    • In "Supermoon", Elena and Syd mention that they plan to watch Batwoman on their date.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism vs. Cynicism: Being a Norman Lear show, it is somewhere in the middle but it is a feel-good and heartfelt show with believable characters who have real emotions dealing with real situations.
  • Soapbox Sadie: Elena gives Lisa Simpson a run for her money. At least until Lydia catches her lying about riding the bus everywhere after the family's car dies.
  • Spicy Latina: Played with. Penelope has shades of this, and Lydia often goes into full "spicy" mode and is referred to as a "walking stereotype", but the Latina stereotype is also addressed and sometimes deconstructed, especially with Elena.
  • Standardized Sitcom Housing: The Alvarez apartment fits this trope pretty nicely, except for one important deviation: the living room is separated into two with a curtain, so that Lydia can have a space of her own. This marks a difference to the typical Anglo-Saxon sitcom family, both in that the grandparent is living with the nuclear family, and that the family isn't affluent enough to get an apartment with an extra room for Lydia. It's actually an exact recreation of the original show's set.
  • Starbucks Skin Scale: Played for laughs when Elena realizes she benefits from being white-passing, unlike the rest of her Cuban-American family.

    Lydia: Yes, Papito is a beautiful caramel, and you are... Wonder Bread.

  • Stop Being Stereotypical:
    • When the family walks in on Lydia teaching Schneider how to salsa, Elena rolls her eyes in exasperation, saying: "All right! I get it! We're Cuban!" Her protest only spurs Penelope and Alex to join in the dance.
    • Alex is pressured into swiping one of Penelope's painkillers to sell on the street, and is chewed out by Elena for almost becoming a cliched Latino drug dealer.
  • Strange Minds Think Alike: When Penelope asks Dr. Berkowitz to come to the car dealership with her in "The Death of Mrs. Resnick", he assumes she wants him to pose as her husband (she was going to say father). When she asks Schneider, he suggests "son" instead of husband.

    Penelope: [to Schneider, exasperated] Really? You're older than me.

  • Studio Audience: Unlike most sitcoms of its era, One Day at a Time is taped in front of a live audience. This is particularly apparent with Lydia, played by screen legend Rita Morenonote One of fifteen people to win an Emmy and an Oscar and a Tony and a Grammy., as her first appearance in most episodes tends to be greeted with loud cheering.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: In "A Penny and a Nicole", everyone is jarred to realize Victor's new fiancee, Nicole, is almost a perfect dead ringer for Penelope down to her laugh. Even the two women find it incredibly bizarre as Victor himself doesn't seem to see it.
  • Take That!: One of the earliest lines in the first episode of season 4. "It's like there's nothing good on Netflix anymore." As we might remember, Netflix cancelled One Day At A Time which was then saved by Pop TV.
  • The Talk: Penelope tries to give it to Alex when she thinks he's been watching porn. She's not happy about this, mostly due to the awkwardness, but also because she and Victor had previously agreed that she'd give the Talk to Elena and he'd give it to Alex — but, because of Victor's absence, she's wound up having to do both. It results in an extremely traumatized Alex hiding under a blanket and screaming, "WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO ME?!" And then it turns out it wasn't him that was watching the movie anyway, and Penelope realizes she actually needs to have a discussion with Elena.

    Alex:[handing Elena the blanket, entirely sincere] You'll need this...

  • The Unfavorite:
    • It's basically a running gag that Elena is this, especially when it comes to Lydia, but it's always Played for Laughs.
    • In "Hermanos," Penelope figures she's this as Lydia praises her son Tito as near perfect despite how he's distant from the family. Over a dinner, Penelope realizes Tito felt he was the unfavorite as Lydia would always go on about Penelope more and that's why he's been distant from them.

      Penelope: I think she thinks you're perfect. You think she thinks I'm perfect. Really, I think she thinks she's perfect.

  • Values Dissonance: Invoked when Penelope is upset at Alex for pushing himself on a woman. She assumes it's because of his father and is shocked when Alex explains he was taking Lydia's advice to always be assertive and "don't take no for an answer." Lydia explains it as just how things were at that age and it was expected a man to take control with Penelope outraged her mother doesn't realize how close that is to rape and encouraging Alex like this can lead to him getting in serious trouble.
  • Very Special Episode:
    • The entire series builds itself with a large amount of drama with several moments that will drive you to tears, but "Hello, Penelope" is the most prominent. As of very early on, Penelope quits therapy and her antidepressants, now having to deal with depression, anxiety and PTSD with no help, believing she shouldn't need help. The episodes pulls no punches in showcasing how awful is to not treat a mental condition and how support and determination are important.
    • "Not Yet" shows Lydia in a coma. The episode focuses on grief and all main characters telling how important she was from their perspective as well as even revealing some things about their past and how she influenced them.
    • "Nip It In The Bud" and "Drinking And Driving" in season 3, which deal with Penelope finding out Alex has been smoking weed and Schneider relapsing, respectively.
  • Wafer Thin Mint: After Schneider makes a big deal about what bad shape Penelope's couch is in, it splits in half from her eating a single Cheeto.
  • Walking Shirtless Scene: Schneider provides a generous amount of shirtlessness.
  • We Didn't Start the Billy Joel Parodies: In one of the most heartwarming uses of this you're likely to find, Syd writes and performs their own version of "We Didn't Start the Fire" for Elena.

    You set my heart on fire,
    on that day,
    when I didn't know if you were gay.
    You set my heart on fire,
    so please, say yes!
    You don't have to wear a dress!
    Will you go to the dance with me?

  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: Schneider makes more than one reference to his father that reveals him to be this.
  • Wham Shot:
    • After Elena spends a whole episode trying to figure out the mysterious "P" who keeps texting Alex and who he says is his new girlfriend, she finally follows him to a meeting and finds that it's Victor, with the letter standing for "Papi."
    • Schneider stands up to his father and celebrates with Penelope. Then she leaves and he gets out the whiskey bottle his father gave him, which is half empty.
  • The Watson: The first episode of the show's rebirth on Pop features Ray Romano as a census taker, allowing all the characters to introduce themselves to anyone who didn't watch the Netflix seasons.
  • Writers Cannot Do Math: In "A Snowman's Tale", Lydia recalls how he met her late husband Humberto in Havana in 1958, and immediately fell in love with her during a rather steamy dance the two had. Her story is accompanied by a flashback, where Lydia is clearly a grown-up already. But in the very next episode Lydia says that she fled from Cuba through Operation Pedro Pan in 1962, when she was only 15.
  • Wrong Insult Offense: In "The Death Of Mrs. Resnick", they have to climb out of the trunk to get out of the car and Alex's pants rip, causing the entire baseball team to call him "Butt-trunk Boy". He takes offense to the name they chose.

    Alex: Now the entire team calls me "Butt-trunk Boy". They could've called me "Junk In The Trunk". It was right there.

Источник: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Series/OneDayAtATime2017

Happy Pride Month! We’d like to share some thoughts on Elena Alvarez from Netflix’s One Day At A Time. Played with style by Isabella Gomez, Elena is an example of the kind of queer, Latinx representation that we’d love to see more of in media. We invite you to enjoy this love letter to Elena, and One Day At A Time, from poet Julian Randall.

Happy Pride Month to all!

Mid-February and there’s a girl in a stark white tuxedo swaying with her mother, then her brother, then her abuela, then her landlord; Mid-February in Mississippi and she might as well be the only snow for miles. For the first time in months, miles from my own mother, I feel like dancing; for the first time in years, I start to cry. Through the tears, the world is mostly fractals and imaginings; beauty only its loudest color. For the first time I can remember, there is snow and Spanish in Mississippi; I begin to call that color home.

My mother doesn’t dance — not doesn’t “like” to dance, doesn’t dance, so don’t ask her. Story goes that when my mother was a little girl she was dancing with her sisters at a party in Washington Heights. Nobody agrees what the party was for, just that it was some occasion that brought all the daughters of families that fled Trujillo into a winter they couldn’t prepare for, briefly to a place of just being girls and a song. Story goes that my mother was never a gifted dancer; that Abuelo laughed from the corner, likely nursing a beer that chuckled like light off a wave. Story goes that after that laugh, my mother never danced again aside from once or twice at her wedding.

In the only photo of their wedding I have seen, it is New Year’s Eve 1984. She is standing and smiling next to my father, he is taller and wearing a smile that the flash washes out of his eyes. She is wearing an amber dress, like dusk dragging itself off the sky. Outside, past the little courthouse, I imagine dusk in Washington Heights; this is all before I was born. When I arrived in this world, the sun had already set on my chance to sway with my mother like the girl does with hers; like daughters of the same distance, quietly bridging the gap between what happened and what ought to be.

The girl’s name is Elena Alvarez, played on Netflix’s One Day at a Time by Isabella Gomez, and she is the representation I have been waiting on for years. Her family describes her the way anyone in my own family described me in my high school years: excitable, awkward, a nearly insufferable know-it-all. In conversation with all that, me and Elena share other qualities: we are ambitious, brilliant in our mothers’ second languages and utterly graceless in their first; and one more: being the only out queer member of our immediate families. So we share the concern in our mothers’ eyes. We share the sweat that gilds their palms when they think how many more people now hate their child than when they began. We share the silence that means they are trying; that translates to they love us but are afraid to say it in the wrong language.

One Day at a Time

I first thoroughly imagined telling my parents that I was bisexual on a bus to Providence on June 13th, 2016. If you know what that means without my saying then we probably live in the same history, cousins by virtue of the same grief. The bus swayed in slow time with a strong breeze, acres of green blurred into shoddy memory; the morning after the Pulse Shooting was aesthetically a day like any other day. To my parents, it was a day that was tragic but not the kind of tragic that made them think immediately where their son might be. Flanked by wind and trees for hours, I shuffled through the growing list of the dead whose names sounded like half cousins, through reports the shooter was perhaps a regular at the bar he massacred. Hour after hour the distance yawned between us until I knew that when I returned I would have to give my parents something else to worry about. It was the worst kind of translation; to take the silence and make it into a language where, like my own halting Spanish, they were most fluent in the anxieties.

I missed the boat on the first season of One Day at a Time. I found the show when I was quite alone in my Mississippi apartment, this place I moved to roughly a month after telling my parents that I was bisexual; this place about which my mother is always holding her breath. What this means is that I wasn’t granted the slow reveal of Elena’s queerness, it was mentioned in the second season trailer when I arrived; and I was deeply intrigued so I binged the entire thing in a matter of three sleepless days. When the theme song belts through my empty apartment, I’m generally salsa dancing; first nervously and then spinning, boldly but rarely well, holding hands with the air until it laughs like my mother would.

The thing I’ve always loved about salsa, even when I pretend I don’t want to dance with my friends to avoid demonstrating how much I was not taught, is its give and take. If the right song is playing, I mostly imagine another self who was taught what was laughed out of my mother decades before I could have existed. I imagine her taking my hand and this being the way she showed me what she has always tried and mostly succeeded at being: someone who smiles and laughs during your forward steps and is there to be gentle with your retreats; that this is how I would learn to do the same for her. But eventually, if there’s going to be a show, the song has to end, just like that my hand is empty again, just a boy swaying slowly where his mother cannot reach him.

When Mississippi’s muted green winter thawed into another relentless sun I came back this past summer to my parents’ house. On nights where my father is out of the house to learn tai chi or be briefly young again with his best friends, out in some bars where the hairlines froth slowly to grey; I spend most summer nights with my mother in different rooms, her exhausted from work and me trying to secure one fellowship or another. But on a couple of rare nights where the obligations of being my Abuela’s daughter are resolved early, and the applications are done, I have convinced her to start watching One Day at a Time with me. The too loud drum of the Netflix logo fades pixel by pixel and on the screen there we are: ourselves but not ourselves; my mother and me watching the queer Latinx teenager I never got to be.

One Day at a Time

In this episode, she is watching me dance with my first same-sex partner at prom. In this life, we are arguing about me mentioning that I am queer in my artist bio. In another episode, she is holding my hand while I lament establishing a Gay-Straight Alliance in high school without an ounce of the pushback and fear from the father who is so unlike mine; how lonely it is, when the world is more equipped to love you than your own family. In this life, my mother is reminding me that all she knows about where I live are the bodies that floated from the river.

In this life, she is telling me to be quiet because she is afraid that in my loud desire to live, I may well have killed her only son. In a season finale, we are both standing at Abuela’s hospital bed, as we did in our real life at my Abuelo’s; praying in different languages for the chance to say goodbye. It’s not a perfect comparison, nothing on screen could ever hope to hold everything my mother is. But it’s a chance, for a half hour at a time, for me to let her into this other imagination where we are swaying slowly to a song I know but can’t translate; these fragments of a life I’ve led when I am far from her, this dance I do to remember who she is.

A thing I had underestimated was understanding coming out as if it were a one-time TV event. An older queer mentor, when I was at a recent low point, reminded me that few people come out only once. I have to keep doing it, sometimes entering the room like Elena; too loud and always feeling like I have to announce myself or be lost in the noise. What makes the sitcom one of America’s great loves is that it is, at its core, not dissimilar to salsa. There is always more show, always more places to put your foot where there once was the foot of someone you love, and if you are lucky they love you back. I am lucky, my mother loves me more than her two languages can hold, and she is trying to learn better language for who I am and who I am moving towards being.

But, of course, songs end and sometimes, even when you are dancing your best, there is no more show, a snag in the music that beckons the quiet again. Shortly after the premiere of an astounding and brilliant third season, Netflix canceled One Day At A Time because of “low viewership numbers.” It’s not unfamiliar, I salsa by myself, I know back steps, I know absence where there should be someone who loves me. I am 25 so I remember bidding farewell to Taina, to The Brothers Garcia, to a host of families like mine but not mine; I remember the static that they left in their wake, I remember that if I close my eyes it sounded like snow.

One Day at a Time

I’m skeptical about this low-viewership, partially because everyone I know who watches the show watched twice to drive up the viewership numbers, but mostly because of how I met Elena, a season old already. Why did no one think to tell me that I was somewhere, alive and loud and young the way I have always wondered about? I was not a priority, I know that song too. No matter how daring and brilliantly crafted the show was, Netflix was not as committed to letting me know about it as it was about Bloodline, The Santa Clarita Diet or the final season of House of Cards. Not as committed as they were to paying millions on keeping Friends as if there wasn’t also TBS, somewhere else the show lives. There is space, I believe, in the imagination for all of us but always it seems that I am being made to beg to live in a good song a little longer; it seems I am always being made to ask the wrong people how I can be allowed to hold my mother’s hand for a while longer.

Like any relationship, any rhythm you sway to with someone who loves you and wants to shield you from all the imaginations that hate the idea of you and want to harm or end your body because of it, we take forward steps and backward steps. We salsa like this, awkward and out of practice at times but never losing each other’s eyes. It is mid-February and I am back in Mississippi; it looks like it might snow, my mother is holding her breath in Maryland for her bisexual son. I turn the TV on, I let the theme song play, I hear the show is coming back for a fourth season after all, I reach my hand out; I miss her and smile, I know I won’t be dancing by myself for long.

Julian Randall

You can see more of Poet Julian Randall online on his Twitter page here

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Источник: https://blacknerdproblems.com/one-day-at-a-times-elena-alvarez/

One Day At A Time remains as lovable and reliable as family

Few shows are as comforting and challenging as Netflix’s One Day At A Time. The comforting part is obvious, thanks to the warm family dynamic, bright setting, familiar faces (Justina Machado and Rita Moreno, to name a few) and format. For three seasons (and counting, we hope), Gloria Calderón Kellett and Mike Royce’s intimate and exuberant reboot has invited us into the Alvarez home for however long we can spare, a timeframe that becomes more nebulous with each glorious half-hour episode, to cry, laugh, dance, and occasionally rage—but mostly laugh. If its structure remains conventional, all that means is that the show is uniformly great, with “traditions” like socially relevant stories, a vibrant sense of humor, multi-faceted characters, well-timed curtain pulls, and pitch-perfect finales.

ReviewsOne Day At A Time

A-

Pre-Air

Developed by

Gloria Calderón Kellett and Mike Royce; based on One Day At A Time

Starring

Justina Machado, Rita Moreno, Isabella Gomez, Marcel Ruiz, Todd Grinnell, Stephen Tobolowsky, Judy Reyes, Mackenzie Phillips

Premieres

Friday, February 8 on Netflix

Format

Half-hour multi-cam sitcom; complete third season watched for review

While revitalizing a seemingly bygone period of TV, that of the multi-cam-with-a-moral storytelling honed by co-executive producer Norman Lear, One Day At A Time has also bucked modern convention by crafting standalone stories that are as rewarding and enjoyable as season-long arcs. You can and should watch the show from the beginning, but every episode offers an entry point, whether it’s the modern-dating woes of “A Snowman’s Tale,” the ride-or-die bond between siblings in “What Happened,” or the familial free-for-all that is the season-three opener, “The Funeral.” (Come for the Gloria Estefan and Rita Moreno duet, stay for Brooklyn Nine-Ninestars Stephanie Beatriz and Melissa Fumero as members of the extended Alvarez family.)

That the self-contained storylines work as well as the more expansive ones is in great part thanks to the prioritization of character over plot, yet another area in which ODAAT is ahead of the curve. Penelope “Lupe” Alvarez (Machado) is a single mother, an Iraq War vet, a nurse, and someone in therapy for her depression and anxiety; she’s also first-generation Cuban-American, overprotective, ambitious, guilt-ridden, and a bit of a dork. So no matter what the circumstances are—say, a run-in with a misogynistic co-worker or a chance at new love—we not only have a sense of how Penelope will handle them, but we care a whole lot about how she’s affected. ODAAT’s consideration for both character and story has pushed the boundaries of what a streaming series can be: both good-hearted and just plain good (well, great).

Season three, which premieres today on Netflix, continues that development while adding a few new players to the mix: We finally meet Tito (a very suave Danny Pino), Penelope’s Cubanazo brother who can do no wrong in Lydia’s (Moreno) eyes, but gets called to account by series writers Becky Mann and Audra Sielaff in episode four. Though Dr. Berkowitz’s (Stephen Tobolowsky, game as ever to marvel at the EGOT winner in the cast) horrid daughters remain unseen, the show fleshes out their relationship a bit more. Elsewhere, Schneider (Todd Grinnell, who also directs the eighth episode) brings his dad (Alan Ruck) home to meet a new girlfriend (India de Beaufort, Grinnell’s real-life spouse) and the real loves of his life, the Alvarezes. True Blood alums Ed Quinn and Joe Manganiello also make guest appearances that have varying effects on Penelope. And of course, there’s the trio of Estefan, Beatriz, and Fumero, who are, respectively, in the immediately recognizable roles of rival sibling, prima hermana, and the cool cousin who’s everything you want to be when you (or rather, Isabella Gomez’s Elena) grow up.

As for our core ensemble, Penelope is still struggling to balance work, school, family, and a personal life (she gets help with the latter from Alex Quijano’s Mateo). Elena is as nerdy and earnest as ever, cheering for esports teams and dragging her “Syd-nificant other” Syd (Sheridan Pierce) to rallies and 5K fundraisers on dates, while Alex (Marcel Ruiz) remains his sister’s polar opposite and his grandmother Lydia’s best friend. But the third season—which features the usual host of writers and directors, including Calderón Kellett, Royce, Dan Hernandez, Debby Wolfe, and Phill Lewis—respects the growth we’ve seen and complicates every one of these relationships. Elena is proudly out and more comfortable than ever, but that doesn’t mean her peers or even her father Victor (James Martinez) are any more accepting. For the first time, Alex keeps secrets from Lydia, who finally lets down her guard around Elena, resulting in some of the most poignant moments of the series. And though Penelope initially continues to hide her depression and anxiety from her children, she soon questions just whom she’s protecting with her secrecy.

ODAAT has long since perfected its mix of in-the-moment humor and issues-based storytelling, so we get great visual gags (think Dr. B posing as a matador for Lydia) and gentle teasing about baby queer Elena’s boundless enthusiasm—which culminates in the wearing of a “heart-butt” hat—along with heartfelt moments of discovery and vulnerability, like when Penelope has visions of her late father Berto (Tony Plana), who, in one of the most Cuban moments, is still trying to help his daughter be happy from beyond the grave. The larger themes the show has been developing, including how Latinx folks and Latin American immigrants navigate this increasingly unrepentantly xenophobic country, are even more seamlessly woven into the episodic action. Calderón Kellett and her writers wisely afford nothing more than a few sly jokes at the expense of the festering apricot who doesn’t understand the most basic of architectural concepts, but they do highlight the casual racism of New Age performative do-gooders and wealthy absentee fathers. And ODAAT’s ongoing explorations of mental health, different types of masculinity, as well as cultural heritage come into sharper relief while never once coming across as having an agenda.

Now here’s where the “challenging” part comes in—by centering on a multi-generational, multi-cultural, and multi-household family, ODAAT is making viewers rethink what they consider realism in their TV shows. Instead of the whitewashed Los Angeles too often seen in TV and movies, the demographic make-up of the show is much closer to reality, with characters who are Latinx, white, black; queer and straight; non-binary; able-bodied and disabled; poor, middle-class, rich; conservative, liberal, and progressive. (It’s still a mostly sanitized version of the second largest city in the country, but this is a sitcom.) And though we’re always aware of their Cuban heritage—Lydia and her bandera would never let us forget—their experiences manage to be both specific and all-encompassing. There are overbearing mothers and overachieving siblings; single parents and aging parents; recovering addicts and veterans with PTSD; three generations under one roof as well as multiple found families. This is it: representation and realism; a family like yours and also different from yours, but no less valid.

TVReviewsOne Day At A Time

Источник: https://www.avclub.com/one-day-at-a-time-remains-as-lovable-and-reliable-as-fa-1832440919

One day at a time: Elena is annoying

stevesnightmares:

People are always talking about this TV show as if it is the best thing ever, so I tried watching some episodes (I don’t know which series they are from) but GOD Elena is the most annoying character I’ve EVER seen. I can’t stand her AT ALL. uuuugh. No disrespect to who loves the show, good for you, I was hoping to like it too because, as a bi woman, I was looking for some gay women on TV, and this one really intrigued me because she is a teenager and not sexualised, however I find her to be waaaaay to annoying. How can people stand her? If you love her, could you tell me what are her main character/personality traits that you love about her? I’m genuinely curious as to what people love about her. (And like, real personality traits and not vague shit like “She’s strong”)

I personally just ignore her and enjoy the rest of the characters. They made her super obnoxious, cringey, and socially tone-deaf in Season 2, and thankfully, turned her down in Season 3, IMO. 

Источник: https://boundtostray.tumblr.com/post/183015372792/one-day-at-a-time-elena-is-annoying

CBS ‘The Young and the Restless’ Spoilers: Victoria and Ashland Make a Power Move; Devon Turns to Elena for Help; Lily Makes a Distress Call

Nothing like some plot twists to keep CBS ‘The Young and the Restless’ (Y&R) spoilers excited about the possibilities.

We don’t want to get our hopes up, but there’s every chance we’re going to see the worm turn slightly and things won’t be ass simple as they’ve been to this point for Victor Newman (Eric Braeden).

Of course, we could be completely wrong, but that’s the fun of spoilers and speculation.

CBS ‘The Young and the Restless’ Spoilers For November 23: A power grab

With Victor and Adam Newman (Mark Grossman)’s plan all but set and Ashland Locke (Richard Burghi) in the mix, we think we’re going to see how he earned his reputation.

Ashland will fill Victoria Newman (Amelia Heinle) in on their plan and the new Genoa City power couple will make their power play.

This could be a couple of things, but ‘Young and the Restless’ think they’ll make a play to help Chance Comm. And by help we mean purchase/merge with it to help protect it.

This will leave Billy Abbott (Jason Thompson) and Lily Winters (Christel Khalil) not knowing who their friends are as chances are Ashland will have his own reasons.

He may have been buying into the Newman lies about Billy, but the fact Billy didn’t publish the story at their wedding to protect Victoria will be something Ashland will want to reward or payback.

CBS ‘The Young and the Restless’ Spoilers For November 23: Devon needs help

With baby Dominic possibly getting sick again, Devon Hamilton (Bryton James) will turn to Elena Dawson (Brytni Sarpy) for help.

It makes sense if the baby’s sick as he knows her and it’ll be easier to approach her than his cousin.

It’ll also give them a chance to catch up and share some of their pain and triumphs lately as she helps him with Dominic.

We think this will be a touching scene that’ll be fun and pleasant on several levels as it’ll get us thinking of what could’ve been.

Nothing like making us question current relationships, right?

CBS ‘The Young and the Restless’ Spoilers For November 23: Lily makes an emergency call

It was bound to happen now that Chance Comm is legitimately threatened and Billy’s willing to walk away and leave Lily with the company.

So, she’s going to make a call and send a distress signal to the one person that might be able to talk Billy out of his current idea, and that’s Jill Abbott (Jess Walton).

Since Chance Comm was Jill’s idea to begin with, she may be able to talk Billy into staying and continuing to fight. She’ll remind him of Victor’s past and what he’ll probably do, and if that doesn’t get Billy to fight back nothing will.

What do Ashland and Victoria have planned? Let us know below and check back with ‘Young and the Restless’ for the latest updates, spoilers, and speculation around.

For any other soap opera and entertainment news, please visit again Daily Soap Dish. Don’t forget to visit The Go To Family for all of the latest travel news!.

Источник: https://dailysoapdish.com/2021/11/cbs-the-young-and-the-restless-spoilers-victoria-and-ashland-make-a-power-move-devon-turns-to-elena-for-help-lily-makes-a-distress-call/

Cassie King grew up in San Diego, the daughter of loving parents, and she’d wanted to be a teacher since she was 5 years old. As a teenager, she had planned to have children of her own. 

“But with more health crises and climate catastrophes, I started to worry more about the state of the world in just 10 years, let alone in 100 years when the children of my grandchildren would be having kids,” she said. “That makes me feel like it would be wrong to bring someone into that chaos, without their consent.”

After graduating college at the University of California, Berkeley in 2018, she is now working full-time as an animal rights activist, and she has decided never to give birth. 

King, 23, is emblematic of a growing number of young people who are worried about having children in a world marked by climate and ecological crises and threatened by overpopulation.

Two nonprofits, Fair Start Movement and Population Balance, filed a complaint in late October with the United Nations Human Rights Council, on behalf of King and other young women, alleging that the United Nations has failed to protect the rights of younger generations to safely and sustainably have children.

“Young people are increasingly choosing not to have children, not because they don’t want them, but because they’re worried about how the climate crisis will impact their children’s future,” said Carter Dillard, policy advisor for Fair Start, which advocates on behalf of families and children and is based in San Francisco. 

The United Nations is obligated to interpret the “right to found a family” from Article 16 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in a way that preserves that right for generations to come, Dillard said. Instead, U.N. member states have limited the ability of future generations to found a family in a safe and healthy way by “encouraging unsustainable population growth models that have contributed to climate change.”

The obligation to protect the right of future generations to found a family flows from the Council’s vote a month ago, adopting a resolution formally recognizing a healthy and sustainable environment as a basic human right, the complaint alleges. 

Eleven percent of childless adults cite climate change as a “major reason” for why they do not currently have children, and another 15 percent say it’s a “minor reason,” according to a nationally representative 2020 survey by Morning Consult, a data and polling company. 

While climate change was less cited in the survey than other reasons for not having children, like financial issues and career aspirations, the responses suggested that climate change is a growing concern for a younger generation of Gen Z-ers born between 1997 and 2012.

According to their website, the Fair Start Movement was founded in 2014, in the belief that ensuring children “a fair start in life” means providing incentives for smaller and well-planned families, which will also serve as a pathway to a more sustainable future. 

Population Balance, based in Minneapolis, wants to achieve a smaller human footprint by challenging overconsumption and pronatalism, the policy and practice of encouraging people to have children. 

Both groups would like to see the social bias and pressure shift away from reproduction toward having fewer children or no children at all. But some experts worry about the stigma that a change in cultural norms might place on poor and minority women.

“While wealthy white women are generally applauded and congratulated when they reproduce, poor and minority women are already stigmatized for reproducing,” said Quill R. Kukla, a philosophy professor at Georgetown University. “Those women will face disproportionate judgment if we entrench the idea that reproduction is selfish or socially undesirable.” 

Under the U.N. Human Rights Council’s formal complaint procedure, working groups will first assess complaints that are filed and bring those that demonstrate “consistent patterns of gross and reliably attested” human rights violations to the attention of the Human Rights Council. 

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Dillard hopes that the Council will ultimately decide to take the matter up for public consideration, which may lead to a formal resolution process. Resolutions are voted on by member states and represent the position of the majority of the Council’s members on an issue. They can request investigations, call for public debate and develop recommendations and standards.

While the Council’s actions, including resolutions, are not legally binding, its decisions carry political weight and influence the behavior and global perception of nations. Since it was established in 2006, the U.N. Human Rights Council has been regarded as the world’s foremost human rights body, although a number of its 47 members are some of the most egregious rights abusers. 

For Cassie King, the question surrounding procreation in the age of climate change is two-fold: she is worried about bringing children into a world that’s expected to face higher temperatures, more extreme weather events and poorer air and water quality. And she’s worried about the impact that having children could have on global warming. 

A 2017 study published in Environmental Research Letters recommended having one fewer child as the most effective personal lifestyle choice that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries. According to the study, one U.S. family who chooses to have one fewer child would provide the same level of emissions reductions as 684 teenagers choosing to recycle comprehensively for the rest of their lives.

Some people in the public sphere have broached the issue. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) said in an Instagram live stream in March of 2019 that it’s a “legitimate question” to wonder if it’s still OK to have children given that “there’s a scientific consensus that the lives of children are going to be very difficult. Later that year, Prince Harry said in an interview with British Vogue that he and his wife, Meghan Markle, would have no more than two children to limit their environmental impact. 

But concerns about climate change and its impact on child-bearing people and their children aren’t just worries for the future. There is a growing body of evidence that links high temperatures and pollution to worse birth outcomes, such as stillbirth, preterm birth and babies born with low birth weight. 

“If they make it, they don’t always have an easy life—they have an elevated risk of respiratory and neurologic problems in the first few years of their life, and are more likely to get major serious illnesses in adult life,” said Bruce Bekkar, a retired obstetrician-gynecologist who now serves on the board of the advocacy group Climate Action Campaign. 

Bekkar co-authored a 2020 report in the Journal of the American Medical Association that looked at 57 studies published since 2007 that examined heat and air pollution exposure’s effect on newborn children. The study found that the toll of environmental harm is felt disproportionately by Black mothers and babies. 

“Many of the factors unfortunately tend to reinforce one another and occur simultaneously for certain groups,” Bekkar said. 

For example, people who are living in urban heat islands are also living near busy freeways and other polluting sources from industrial sites, Bekkar said. A lot of times, they are also far from markets that sell fresh produce, and they can’t afford reliable access to health care. 

Despite these harms, “we tolerate governments pushing women to have lots of kids and the unsustainable population growth it causes,” the complaint alleges. Governments do so by “actively preventing” access to family planning education, contraception and abortion services.

“The best interpretation of the right to have children would have required the redistribution of wealth to women and children in the mid-20th century,” Dillard said. “Instead it went to the top of the wealth pyramid. We are trying to reverse that.”

Elena Shao

Elena Shao

Reporter, San Francisco

Elena Shao is a fellow at Inside Climate News reporting on environmental justice. She’s based in the San Francisco Bay Area and is a graduate student in Stanford University’s journalism program. You can also find her work in CalMatters, the San Francisco Chronicle, and The Wall Street Journal.

Источник: https://insideclimatenews.org/news/16112021/young-people-children-united-nations-climate-change/

One day at a time: Elena is annoying

stevesnightmares:

People are always talking about this TV show as if it is the best thing ever, so I tried watching some episodes (I don’t know which series they are from) but GOD Elena is the most annoying character I’ve EVER seen. I can’t stand her AT ALL. uuuugh. No disrespect to who loves the show, good for you, I was hoping to like it too because, as a bi woman, I was looking for some gay women on TV, and this one really intrigued me because she is a teenager and not sexualised, however I find her to be waaaaay to annoying. How can people stand her? If you love her, could you tell me what are her main character/personality traits that you love about her? I’m genuinely curious as to what people love about her. (And like, real personality traits and not vague shit like “She’s strong”)

I personally just ignore her and enjoy the rest of the characters. They made her super obnoxious, cringey, and socially tone-deaf in Season 2, and thankfully, turned her down in Season 3, IMO. 

Источник: https://boundtostray.tumblr.com/post/183015372792/one-day-at-a-time-elena-is-annoying

Cowboy Bebop Stars Alex Hassell & Elena Satine Unpack Spike's Tragic Betrayal

WARNING: The following contains spoilers for Cowboy Bebop Season 1, streaming now on Netflix.

Spike Spiegel runs from his past for much of Cowboy Bebop Season 1. However, he soon finds his former best friend Vicious and ex-lover Julia catching up to him. Years before the series starts, Spike formed a relationship with Julia behind her boyfriend Vicious' back. To make matters worse, he leaves them to start a new life. When Vicious learns Spike is still alive years later, after Vicious has married Julia and risen through the ranks of the Syndicate, he brings his full fury against the man that wronged him so long ago.

In an exclusive interview with CBR, Cowboy Bebop's Alex Hassell and Elena Satine talked about layering more emotional complexity into their roles as Vicious and Julia. The duo reflected on how the familiar look for their characters informed their respective performances and described how they maintained the raw intensity needed for their roles.

RELATED: Cowboy Bebop Video Takes Us Behind the Scenes of the Music and Set

Vicious and Julia are the most wounded characters in this version of Cowboy Bebop and the weapon that wounded both of them is Spike Spiegel, and yet, they react in different ways. How is it bringing that and maintaining that level of emotion?

Alex Hassell: It was really fun but also quite exhausting a lot of the time! I realized that my neck would be incredibly tense from having this kind of shaking intensity about Vicious but it's always fun to play that level of emotional life, history, and pain because it's rich material to mine but it is quite hard going sometimes.

Elena Satine: I remember getting home really late from some of the shoots, including the one in our penthouse where things don't go so well. I remember it was such a long day and I should've been tired but my adrenaline was through the roof. I could not sleep. There would be so many days like that where you have to pace, unwind, have a glass of wine, and really calm yourself down.

Spike did do us both wrong in a way and I think, for Julia, that realization is so important in her really finding her own strength and realizing that it's time to take her fate into her own hands. No one is coming for her and going to rescue her. If she doesn't do it herself, she might die in this relationship. I thought that was a very powerful and grounded element. For a show that credit one payment center so heightened, to have such an intense realization was really wonderful as an actor to get to play.

RELATED: Cowboy Bebop: Mustafa Shakir Brings the Heart of the Bebop to Jet

We spend a lot more time with Vicious and Julia in this than we did the Cowboy Bebop anime, humanizing them. What did you want to specifically add to your characters that maybe weren't present in the anime?

Hassell: I think for both of us it was layering because, as you say, there's such a short amount of screen time in the anime. They're not quite symbolic but Vicious is definitely this specter of death. Julia is hopeful, at least in terms of the way the other characters see them. But for us, to have a vulnerability underneath all of that, and this very complicated, fraught emotional life that would create this vulnerability to Vicious and an unhinged quality. The Vicious of the anime is very controlled whereas I think this Vicious wants to be that controlled and often fails. [laughs]

Satine: What I really enjoyed unpacking was this relationship [between Julia and Vicious]. I think there are such great nuances in their life together. Yes, it is an abusive relationship and then you see these moments of Vicious really respecting Julia and her opinion and there's a partnership. It's very unhealthy but it is a complex and layered relationship. It's not black-and-white. In the anime, we see cutaways of Vicious holding a gun to Julia's head and that's not all of it. It is bad but, like any relationship, there are complexities and there are a lot of complexities to this one.

How much does the costuming and art design on these sets help inform your performance?

Hassell: Massively!

Satine: Yeah, I think that anytime there's a huge, physical change. I really love working with wigs -- and the rest of the costume and everything -- but especially wigs. When you step out of your trailer and you don't look like yourself, it really makes the job so much easier. I really do appreciate every aspect of the visual help.

Hassell: You get a lot for free when you're preparing. You might feel like you have to play all these certain qualities but if I stand very still, I look a very certain way so you don't have to play that. You can, in fact, play the opposite of that underneath which I think is really interesting!

Developed for television by André Nemec, Cowboy Bebop is streaming now on Netflix.

KEEP READING: John Cho's Spike Shrugs Off Cowboy Bebop Remake Criticisms

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The Wheel of Time: Bela the Horse Has a Long-Term Story Arc

About The Author
Sam Stone (8277 Articles Published)

Sam Stone is a 10th level pop culture guru living just outside of Washington, DC who knows an unreasonable amount about The Beatles. Home remedies for spondylitis headache can follow him on Twitter @samstoneshow and ask him about Nintendo, pop punk, commercial real estate property management software Star Trek.

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Источник: https://www.cbr.com/cowboy-bebop-alex-hassell-elena-satine-interview/

Cassie King grew up in San Diego, the daughter of loving parents, and she’d wanted to be a teacher since she was 5 years old. As a teenager, she had planned to have children of her own. 

“But with more health crises and climate catastrophes, I started to worry more about the state of the world in just 10 years, let alone in 100 years when the children of my grandchildren would be having kids,” she said. “That makes me feel like it would be wrong to bring someone into that chaos, without their consent.”

After graduating college at the University of California, Berkeley in 2018, she is now working full-time as an animal rights activist, and she has decided never to give birth. 

King, 23, is emblematic of a growing number of young people who are worried about having children in a world marked by climate and ecological crises and threatened by overpopulation.

Two nonprofits, Fair Start Movement and Population Balance, filed a complaint in late October with the United One day at a time elena Human Rights Council, on behalf of King and other young women, alleging that the United Nations has failed to protect the rights of younger generations to safely and sustainably have children.

“Young people are increasingly choosing not to have children, not because they don’t want them, but because they’re worried about how the climate crisis will impact their children’s future,” said Carter Dillard, policy advisor for Fair Start, which advocates on behalf of families and children and is based in San Francisco. 

The United Nations is obligated to interpret the “right to found a family” from Article 16 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in a way that preserves that right for generations to come, Dillard said. Instead, U.N. member states have limited the ability of future generations to found a family in a safe and healthy way by “encouraging unsustainable population growth models that have contributed to climate change.”

The obligation to protect the right of future generations to found a family flows from the Council’s vote a month ago, adopting a resolution formally recognizing a healthy and sustainable environment as a basic human right, the complaint alleges. 

Eleven percent of childless adults cite climate change as a “major reason” for why they do not currently have children, and another 15 percent say it’s a “minor reason,” according to a nationally representative 2020 survey by Morning Consult, a data and polling company. 

While climate change was less cited in the survey than other reasons for not having children, like financial issues and career aspirations, the responses suggested that climate change is a growing concern for a younger generation of Gen Z-ers born between 1997 and 2012.

According to their website, the Fair Start Movement was founded in capital one 360 checking interest rates, in the belief that ensuring children “a fair start in life” means providing incentives for smaller and well-planned families, which will also serve as a pathway to a more sustainable future. 

Population Balance, based in Minneapolis, wants to achieve a smaller human footprint by challenging overconsumption and pronatalism, the policy and practice of encouraging people to have children. 

Both groups would like to see the social bias and pressure shift away from reproduction toward having fewer children or no children at all. But some experts worry about the stigma that a change in cultural norms might place on poor and minority women.

“While wealthy white women are generally applauded and congratulated when they reproduce, poor and minority women are already stigmatized for reproducing,” said Quill R. Kukla, a philosophy professor at Georgetown University. “Those women will face disproportionate judgment if we entrench the idea that reproduction is selfish or socially undesirable.” 

Under the U.N. Human Rights Council’s formal complaint procedure, working groups will first assess complaints that are filed and bring those that demonstrate “consistent patterns of gross and reliably attested” human rights violations to the attention of the Human Rights Council. 

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Dillard hopes that the Council will ultimately decide to take the matter up for public consideration, which may lead to a formal resolution process. Resolutions are voted on by member states and represent the position of the majority of the Council’s members on an issue. They can request investigations, call for public debate and develop recommendations and standards.

While the Council’s actions, including resolutions, are not legally binding, its decisions carry political weight and influence the behavior and global perception of nations. Since it was established in 2006, the U.N. Human Rights Council has been regarded as the world’s foremost human rights body, although a number of its 47 members are some of the most egregious rights abusers. 

For Cassie King, the question surrounding procreation in the age of climate change is two-fold: she is worried about bringing children into a world that’s expected to face higher temperatures, more extreme weather events and poorer air and water quality. And she’s worried about the impact that having children could have on global warming. 

A 2017 study published in Environmental Research Letters recommended having one fewer child as the most effective personal lifestyle choice that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries. According to the study, one U.S. family who chooses to have one fewer child would provide the same level of emissions reductions as 684 teenagers choosing to recycle comprehensively for the rest of their lives.

Some people in the public sphere have broached the issue. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) said in an Instagram live stream in March of 2019 that it’s a “legitimate question” to wonder if it’s still OK to have children given that “there’s a scientific consensus that the lives of children are going to be very difficult. Later that year, Prince Harry said in an interview with British Vogue that he and his wife, Meghan Markle, would have no more than two children to limit their environmental impact. 

But concerns about climate change and its impact on child-bearing people and their children aren’t just worries for the future. There is a growing body of evidence that links high temperatures and pollution to worse birth outcomes, such as stillbirth, preterm birth and babies born with low birth weight. 

“If they make it, they don’t always have an easy life—they have an elevated risk of respiratory and neurologic problems in the first few years of their life, and are more likely to get major serious illnesses in adult life,” said Bruce Bekkar, a retired obstetrician-gynecologist who now serves on the board of the advocacy group Climate Action Campaign. 

Bekkar co-authored a 2020 report in the Journal of the American Medical Association that looked at 57 studies published since 2007 that examined heat and air pollution exposure’s effect on newborn children. The study found that the toll of environmental harm is felt disproportionately by Black mothers and babies. 

“Many of the factors unfortunately tend to reinforce one another and occur simultaneously for certain groups,” Bekkar said. 

For example, people who are living in urban heat islands are also living near busy freeways and other polluting sources from industrial sites, Bekkar said. A lot of times, they are also far from markets that sell fresh produce, and they can’t afford reliable access to health care. 

Despite these harms, “we tolerate governments pushing women to have lots of kids and the unsustainable population growth it causes,” the complaint alleges. Governments do so by “actively preventing” access to family planning education, contraception and abortion services.

“The best interpretation of the right to have children would have required the redistribution of wealth to women and children in the mid-20th century,” Dillard said. “Instead it went to the top of the wealth pyramid. We are trying to reverse that.”

Elena Shao

Elena Shao

Reporter, San Francisco

Elena Shao is a fellow at Inside Climate News reporting on environmental justice. She’s based in the San Francisco Bay Area and is a graduate student in Stanford University’s journalism program. You can also find her work in CalMatters, the San Francisco Chronicle, and The Wall Street Journal.

Источник: https://insideclimatenews.org/news/16112021/young-people-children-united-nations-climate-change/

She is an only child of her parents. Add the first question. Penelope tries to decide if she wants to have kids with Max. Moreno, Gomez raves, is “just so brilliant; she knows everything about everything. Alex punches a boy from another school, because he made a racist comment. It was developed by Gloria Calderón Kellett and Mike Royce, with Lear and his producing partner Brent Miller as executive producers. The series was co-created by Roberto Orci along with Andrew Orci, Dan Dworkin, and Jay Beattie. Ad Choices, HBO is once again hoping you’ll ignore the big. This Is It 32m. 9. The directive makes sense to those who know and love Gomez’s character on the series. Lydia and Schneider take the citizenship test. However an armed criminal forces he building under a lock down and everyone has to stay in. And the representation they do get is so shallow—we always see the gay man story line, and we never see young lesbians. She is an only child of her parents. 4. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 1/1/20) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 1/1/20) and Your California Privacy Rights. Isabella Gómez is a Colombian actress, famous for playing as Elena Alvarez on the Netflix original series One Day at a Time. . Lydia Riera, she raises two children: Elena and Alex. Sometimes, Elena’s struggles hit closer to home. This episode really highlights that charm of the show. Vanity Fair may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. Rate. Affiliation From the awards race to the box office, with everything in between: get the entertainment industry's must-read newsletter. They are shown to have many common interests with Elena, such as feminism and geeky TV shows like Doctor Who. Character "I can't even imagine making this girl mad at me. As IMDb celebrates its 30th 1st united services credit union hours, we have six shows to get you ready for those pivotal years of your life . your 30s. Gomez’s prep process was simple: “What I did was, I stood outside of the door and listened to their conversation as if Elena was trying to gather up the courage to go in there,” she says. If you're awesome, be yourself because those that mind don't matter and those that matter don't mind.It might not be the funniest of episodes. But there are some issues as well. In a reimagining of the TV classic, a newly single Latina mother raises her teen daughter and tween son with the "help" of her old-school mom. Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? In season two the show introduced a non-binary love interest for Elena! Rate. Her skin tone has been described as "Wonder Bread." She will casually talk about dating Elvis like it‘s not a big deal.” And she‘s taught Gomez several valuable new skills. She worked with a coach to diminish her accent. Her typical hairstyles include wearing it down, in a bun at the top of her and the rest down, in ponytails, and in two buns at the top of her head, or just in one bun piled at the top of her head. Error: please try again. Penelope struggles with her depression after she decides to end therapy and stop taking medication. Lear's company, Act III Productions, approached Sony with the idea of reimagining the original series with a Hispanic family. Gómez holds a Colombian nationality and belongs to Latina ethnicity. Gomez plays a rarely giddy teenager, who’s enthusiastic about social justice issues. One Day at a Time: Season 1 (Recap) One Day at a Time: Season 2 (Recap) Trailer: I Get It, We're Cuban! 5 of 7 people found this review helpful. Isabella Gómez Was this review helpful to you? One Day at a Time is an American sitcom loosely based on the 1975–1984 CBS … Use the HTML below. Her father is a lawyer. “When you’re 18, [and a] girl, a lot of the characters you go out for is ‘cheerleader,’ ‘pretty girl in the hallway.’” Elena, on the other hand, is defined more by her intellect than her looks—an appealing change of pace for 19-year-old, Colombia-born Gomez, who has been acting since she was 5 years old. Everyone participates in preparations for Elena's quinceanera; Elena reveals something about herself to her father. Directed by Pamela Fryman. She began acting in TV commercials since the age of five. While everyone is supposed to be out of the house, Penelope invites Max to stay the night. View production, box office, & company info. “It was never what I thought I would do. One Day at a Time is an American sitcom based on Norman Lear's 1975–1984 sitcom of the same title. One Day at a Time Wiki is a FANDOM TV Community. She’s also so invested in Elena that she got angry just thinking about anyone daring to hurt her like this. One Day at a Time Quinces 5. This FAQ is empty. Penelope wants Alex and Elena to get summer jobs. Penelope doesn't want her to date until she's out of school, but she may have a secret of her own. Gómez is active on social networking sites. February 9, 1998 Medellín, Colombia Elena, resistant to have a quinces, starts dating a teenager from her class, to later realize that she is a lesbian. This makes so much sense.’. Syd is portrayed by Sheridan Pierce. To revisit this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories. Gómez was born on February 9, 1998, in Medellín, Colombia. And that's what really matters. 10. Elenais a young Latinx female. She is currently appearing on Pop TV's original sitcom One Day at a Time since 2017, where Isabella Gomez portrays Elena, the activist daughter of Penelope (Justina Machado); who reveal her sexual orientation as a lesbian in Season 1. “It is so cool to be a vessel for Elena,” she says. The show often tackles sexism, diversity, religion and immigration issues. Everyone is stressing about the party. Rate. Rate. Rate. She earns her salary from her acting jobs. And while Syd’s identity confuses most of Elena’s family, their conversations unfold in an organic, genuinely kind way that avoids making Syd or their identity a punch line. "– Syd to Elena, To Zir, With Love Syd is a recurring character in Season 2, Season 3, and Season 4 in Pop TV's One Day at a Time. She is 5'3 and has a slim build. Penelope doesn't want her to date until she's out of school, but she may have a secret of her own. Elena Alvarez The actress is currently living in Echo Park, Los Angeles along with her family. Episodes One Day at a Time Release year: 2017. She appeared a recurring role on the series El Rey Network series Matador and Modern Family. Elena td bank atm deposit near me concerned that Lydia has never voted. Actress This season, the fallout from that revelation continues—and comes to a head when Elena tearfully tells her father that she’ll be fine regardless of whether he’s in her life. Isabella Gómez is a Colombian actress, famous for playing as Elena Alvarez on the Netflix original series One Day one day at a time elena a Time. The series was developed by Gloria Calderon Kellett and Mike Royce, which released on January 6, 2017, and on March 4, 2017, the series renewed by Netflix for a second season. But like in life, when there are problems you still have friends and/or family who count who you can lean on to help you get by. Rate. Rate. One Day at a Time handled Elena’s coming out story wonderfully in season one. “And it’s so mind-blowing that me having fun and getting to do this character that I love can do that for somebody.“. And when we do, we see it for the benefit of men and we sexualize them,” Gomez says, sounding every bit like the character she plays. Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. Schneider makes Elena the building's handyman. “Comedy was never my strong suit,” the actress explains. © 2020 Condé Nast. Though she never saw herself venturing out of dramatic work, she‘s now got a pretty decent comedy mentor on set. Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy. https://one-day-at-a-time.fandom.com/wiki/Isabella_Gómez?oldid=5177. “I was like, ‘That’s funny! She has long black hair that goes to past her neck, is usually wearing glasses. 26 Jan. 2018 Roots. “It makes you connect with the characters in a way that you wouldn’t otherwise, if they didn’t have those very specific things,” Gomez says. This season introduced Syd, Elena’s romantic partner, who identifies as non-binary and uses “they/them” pronouns. community has also found a home on One Day at a Time—particularly those who haven’t seen themselves represented on television much before. With Justina Machado, Todd Grinnell, Isabella Gomez, Marcel Ruiz. Photo of Syd and Elena smiling. Elena tries to break-down Alex's new 'girlfriend', Penelope wants to know if she and Max are exclusive or not, and Lydia and Schneider stalk Leslie. Her father is a lawyer. "Hey, uh, do you want to split that cookie? He is portrayed by James Martinez. One Day at a Time does give Gomez’s dramatic chops plenty new construction homes for sale in jacksonville fl moments to shine as well. One Day at a Time does give Gomez’s dramatic chops plenty of moments to shine as well. Alex and Lydia coach her on flirting with her crush. "—Victor to Penelope just after Elena was born, What Happened Victor Alvarez is a recurring character on the Netflix Original Series One Day at a Time.

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Источник: https://grandnational2016live.com/site/8a5a45-one-day-at-a-time-elena

One Day At A Time remains as lovable and reliable as family

Few shows are as comforting and challenging as Netflix’s One Day At A Time. The comforting part is obvious, thanks to the warm family dynamic, bright setting, familiar faces (Justina Machado and Rita Moreno, to name a few) and format. For three seasons (and counting, we hope), Gloria Calderón Kellett and Mike Royce’s green dot card customer service phone number and exuberant reboot has invited us into the Alvarez home for however long we can spare, a timeframe that becomes more nebulous with each glorious half-hour episode, to cry, laugh, dance, and occasionally rage—but mostly laugh. If its structure remains conventional, all that means is that the show is uniformly great, with “traditions” like socially relevant stories, a vibrant sense of humor, multi-faceted characters, well-timed curtain pulls, and pitch-perfect finales.

ReviewsOne Day At A Time

A-

Pre-Air

Developed by

Gloria Calderón Kellett and Mike Royce; based on One Day At A Time

Starring

Justina Machado, Rita Moreno, Isabella Gomez, Marcel Ruiz, Todd Grinnell, Stephen Tobolowsky, Judy Reyes, Mackenzie Phillips

Premieres

Friday, February 8 on Netflix

Format

Half-hour multi-cam sitcom; complete third season watched for one day at a time elena revitalizing a seemingly bygone period of TV, that of the multi-cam-with-a-moral storytelling honed by co-executive producer Norman Lear, One Day At A Time has also bucked modern convention by crafting standalone stories that are as rewarding and enjoyable as season-long arcs. You can and should watch the show from the beginning, but every episode offers an entry point, whether it’s the modern-dating woes of “A Snowman’s Tale,” the ride-or-die bond between siblings in “What Happened,” or the familial free-for-all that is the season-three opener, “The Funeral.” (Come for the Gloria Estefan and Rita Moreno duet, stay for Brooklyn Nine-Ninestars Stephanie Beatriz and Melissa Fumero as members of the extended Alvarez family.)

That the self-contained storylines work as well as the more expansive ones is in great part thanks to the prioritization of character over plot, yet another area in which ODAAT is ahead of the curve. Penelope “Lupe” Alvarez (Machado) is a single mother, an Iraq War vet, a nurse, and someone in therapy for her depression and anxiety; she’s also first-generation Cuban-American, overprotective, ambitious, guilt-ridden, and a bit of a dork. So no matter what the circumstances are—say, a run-in with a misogynistic co-worker or a chance at new love—we not only have a sense of how Penelope will handle them, but we care a whole lot about how she’s affected. ODAAT’s consideration for both character and story has pushed the boundaries of what a streaming series can be: both good-hearted and just plain good (well, great).

Season three, which premieres today on Netflix, continues that development while adding a few new players to the mix: We finally meet Tito (a very suave Danny Pino), Penelope’s Cubanazo brother who can do no wrong in Lydia’s (Moreno) eyes, but gets called to account by series writers Becky Mann and Audra Sielaff in episode four. Though Dr. Berkowitz’s (Stephen Tobolowsky, game as ever to marvel at the EGOT winner in the cast) horrid daughters remain unseen, the show fleshes out their relationship a bit more. Elsewhere, Schneider (Todd Grinnell, who also directs the eighth episode) brings his dad (Alan Ruck) home to meet a new girlfriend (India de Beaufort, Grinnell’s real-life spouse) and the real loves of his life, the Alvarezes. True Blood alums Ed Quinn and Joe Manganiello also make guest appearances that have varying effects on Penelope. And of course, there’s the trio of Estefan, Beatriz, and Fumero, who are, respectively, in the immediately recognizable roles of rival sibling, prima hermana, and the cool cousin who’s everything you want to be when you (or rather, Isabella Gomez’s Elena) grow up.

As for our core ensemble, Penelope is still struggling to balance work, school, family, and a personal life (she gets help with the latter from Alex Quijano’s Mateo). Elena is as nerdy and earnest as ever, cheering for esports teams and dragging her “Syd-nificant other” Syd (Sheridan Pierce) to rallies and 5K fundraisers on dates, while Alex (Marcel Ruiz) remains his sister’s polar opposite and his grandmother Lydia’s best friend. But the third season—which features the usual host of writers and directors, including Calderón Kellett, Royce, Dan Hernandez, Debby Wolfe, and Phill Lewis—respects the growth we’ve seen and complicates every one of these relationships. Elena is proudly out and more comfortable than ever, but that doesn’t mean her peers or even her father Victor (James Martinez) are any more accepting. For the first time, Alex keeps secrets from Lydia, who finally lets down her guard huntington bank routing number illinois Elena, resulting in some of the most poignant moments of the series. And though Penelope initially continues to hide her depression and anxiety from her children, she soon questions just whom she’s protecting with her secrecy.

ODAAT has long since perfected its mix of in-the-moment humor and issues-based storytelling, so we get great visual gags (think Dr. B posing as a matador for Lydia) and gentle teasing about baby queer Elena’s boundless enthusiasm—which culminates in the wearing of a “heart-butt” hat—along with heartfelt moments of discovery and vulnerability, like when Penelope has visions of her late father Berto (Tony Plana), who, in one of the most Cuban moments, is still trying to help his daughter be happy from beyond the grave. The larger themes the show has been developing, including how Latinx folks and Latin American immigrants navigate this increasingly unrepentantly xenophobic country, are even more seamlessly woven into the episodic action. Calderón Kellett and her writers wisely afford nothing more than a few sly jokes at the expense of the festering apricot who doesn’t understand the most basic of architectural concepts, but they do highlight the casual racism of New Age performative do-gooders and wealthy absentee fathers. And ODAAT’s ongoing explorations of mental health, different types of masculinity, as well as cultural heritage come into sharper relief while never once coming across as having an agenda.

Now here’s where the “challenging” part comes in—by centering on a multi-generational, multi-cultural, and multi-household family, ODAAT is making viewers rethink what they consider realism in their TV shows. Instead of the whitewashed Los Angeles too often seen in TV and movies, the demographic make-up of the show is much closer to reality, with characters who are Latinx, white, black; queer and straight; non-binary; able-bodied and disabled; poor, middle-class, rich; conservative, liberal, and progressive. (It’s still a mostly sanitized version of the second largest city in the country, but this is a sitcom.) And though we’re always aware of their Cuban heritage—Lydia and her bandera would never let us forget—their experiences manage to be both specific and all-encompassing. There are overbearing mothers and overachieving siblings; single parents and aging parents; recovering addicts and veterans with PTSD; three generations under one roof as well as multiple found families. This is it: representation and realism; a family like yours and also different from yours, but no less valid.

TVReviewsOne Day At A Time

Источник: https://www.avclub.com/one-day-at-a-time-remains-as-lovable-and-reliable-as-fa-1832440919

Series / One Day at a Time (2017)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/one_day_at_a_time.jpg

One Day at a Time is a remake of the 1970s/1980s sitcom of the same name, which debuted in January 2017 on Netflix.

Like the original series, the remake centers around a divorced mom, Penelope (Justina Machado) raising her two kids Elena (Isabella Gómez) and Alex (Marcel Ruiz). They live with Penelope's mother, Lydia (Rita Moreno), in an apartment owned by Schneider (Todd Grinnell) and try to navigate the ups and downs of life.

While the family in the original were Italian-Americans, here they are Cuban-Americans. As such, issues of race, ethnicity, and Cuban cultural heritage play a large part, and the series doesn't shy way from addressing other political topics as well. The series was co-created by Gloria Calderón Kellett, who is Cuban-American herself, and is produced by Norman Lear, who developed the original series.

The series was canceled by Netflix in March 2019 after three seasons, with them citing low ratings as the reason, but Pop TVpicked it up for a fourth season that came out in 2020. This makes One Day at Time the first series to make the jump from a streaming platform to a traditional terrestrial network. The fourth season later aired second-run on CBS beginning in October 2020, reuniting the show with the original's home network. However, following the fourth season, it was cancelled for good.

Now has a page in Spanish, ¡Azúcar!


One Day at a Time contains examples of:

  • Adaptational Attractiveness: While the Schneider of the original series was a Casanova Wannabe, this Schneider is reasonably attractive andgets around.
  • Adaptational Diversity: The original series was about an Italian-American family. Here the family is Cuban-American, and one of the daughters is a lesbian (with a non-binary partner).
  • Adapted Out: The only character with a direct counterpart in the original series here is Schneider.
  • Adult Fear:
    • Carmen's parents getting deported, resulting in Carmen's life being turned upside-down, and her being homeless for a brief period.
    • When Elena finds out Lydia's not an American citizen, she's terrified that something similar could happen to her.
    • The episode "Hello, Penelope" is full of it.
      • First, the idea that you may have to be on antidepressants for the rest of your life, simply to function normally. There's no shame in being on medication, but the stigma around it and mental illness is still very much alive, and it shakes Penelope to the core to realize this.
      • Then, when Penelope goes off her meds, she suffers rapid downward spiral throughout the episode, and is simply unable to keep her life on-track, or her emotions level. Objectively, everything is fine, and she knows it, but she simply cannot be happy.
      • This can be also explained with Penelope stopping her meds suddenly - anti-depressants need to be gradually decreased otherwise there are significant withdrawal effects.
      • When Penelope snaps at Schneider when he is only trying to help her falls under this. Having someone you care about, especially your best friend or family member, snap at you and belittle the issues that you have is a horrible thing to experience, especially if you were just trying to talk to hep them out when they were obviously struggling. Made worse that the issue she choose was his drug addiction and horrible childhood.
      • For Lydia, watching her child suffer so much, knowing there's nothing she can do. And then realizing that she probably inadvertently made it worse with her anti-medication stance.
      • Finally, Penelope having to tell her boyfriend, unsure if he'll still stay with her once he knows. He does.
      • The idea of your close friend or family member being suicidal.

        Penelope: I know what the last part sounds like, but I promise I would never do anything like that.
        Schneider: I know. But I think you know that healthy brains do not go to that place.

    • The whole family and Schneider, especially Penelope, have to deal with the very real possibility of Lydia dying when she has a stroke.
    • In "Locked Down" when Penelope finds out Lydia has a gun.

      Penelope: No matter where you hide it, kids find it. And accidents happen. And things that aren't accidents. We have teenagers in this house. We have a gay teenager in this house. We have a veteran with PTS. This is the last house that should have a gun.

    • "Outside" has Elena and Syd sharing a story about a couple of boys following them around, telling them to kiss until they lost them in a crowd. Penelope follows it with the story of a former mentor for her in the army who one night came into the office drunk when she was alone and touched her inappropriately.
  • An Aesop:
    • "Hold, Please" focuses on the horribly inadequate VA system to get medical assistance for war injuries.
    • "Hello, Penelope" emphasizes the importance of taking anti-depressants and properly dealing with depression and anxiety by showing Penelope going off of her meds and quitting therapy and the resulting breakdown. It also makes a point of saying that if someone you love is suffering from a mental illness, you need to remember that just because you don't understand why they're feeling anxious, depressed, lonely, hopeless, or frightened, it doesn't mean that it isn't real for them.
    • More than one of the Elena-centric plots in season 3 teaches that, while pride in one's sexuality is important, it is unhealthy to base your whole identity around it and neglect the other important aspects of yourself.
    • From "She Drives Me Crazy", nothing banner federal credit union loans without saying. Actions may speak louder than words, but an "I love you" goes a long way.
  • The Alleged Car: Mrs. Resnick, whose windows only go down and not back up, the doors stick, there's been a cassette of Toni Braxton's "Unbreak My Heart" stuck in its tape deck longer than Elena's been alive, and has brake problems and stalls out regularly enough that Penelope and the kids have a ritual where Penelope fiddles with the engine while praying, followed by all three of them crossing themselves in unison and starting it again.
  • Alliterative Name: Alex Alvarez. And his full name is Alejandro Alberto Alvarez (.Riera Calderón Leytevidal Inclan.)
  • Ambiguous Situation: Did Elena and Syd have sex in "The First Time"?
  • Artistic License – Medicine: The timeframe of the effects of Penelope ceasing her anti-depressants, in "Hello Penelope", is greatly condensed. In real life, the effects would be much more drawn out and only begin to be noticeable over a longer period of time. The episode implies after a day or two of not taking them, Penelope is unable to get out of bed and possibly suicidal.
  • Artistic License – Religion: The main conflict of "No Mass" could have been avoided by attending Saturday night mass.
  • Art Shift: During the industry shutdown for the COVID-19 pandemic, the crew put out an animated episode with the cast all sending in their lines from home.
  • Bilingual Bonus: There's a lot of unsubtitled Spanish. The crew also clearly makes an effort to get a good amount of people who know the language in the audience, resulting in some big laughs or gasps to lines going over the heads of a lot of viewers.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: Victor, Penelope's estranged husband. When he shows up, he gets along with everyone and seems like he has gotten his life together. Turns out he was lying about stopping drinking and seeking professional help, at which point Penelope kicks him out again. He still stays on good terms with his kids until Elena reveals she's gay, at which point he tells her she is just confused. He still shows up to her quinceañera only to leave right before the father-daughter dance without a word.
  • Bottle Episode: "Hold Please" doesn't leave the Alvarez' living room. The second season finale, "Not Yet" takes place in Lydia's hospital room while she hovers between life and death.
  • But Not Too Black: A Latinx version. Elena is horrified to realize she's inadvertently been passing for white due to her lighter skin color.
  • Catchphrase: One of Lydia's catchphrases is to call people pobrecito/a, which literally translates as "poor little one" and generally refers to an in-the-moment need for sympathy on someone's behalf, or as an equivalent to giving a person the epithet "poor boy/girl", with Lydia using the name for everyone from Syd (to express how they're even more dorky than Elena) to One day at a time elena (because "He tries so hard").
  • Central Theme:
    • Life can be tough, life can be sweet, life can be amazing.
    • Even when you're facing difficult times, there are so many good things in life and you will always be supported by the people who love you.
  • Chekhov's Boomerang: In the episode "Strays", Lydia starts suspecting Elena is "queer" because her friend Carmen spends so much time with her. Eventually it turns out Carmen is spending all one day at a time elena time at the Alvarezes' place because her parents have been deported to Mexico and she's homeless. However, in later episodes we find out Elena is indeed gay, though Carmen is just her best friend and straight herself.
  • Cliffhanger: Season 3 ends on Lydia phoning Penelope from her holiday with Berkowitz. in Cuba.
  • Comically Missing the Point: In "The Turn," proud activist Elena is rocked to realize she "passes" for a white person.

    Elena: You're saying I'm going to go through my whole life without being oppressed at all?

    Penelope: Okay, you know that wouldn't be a bad thing, right?

    Elena: I guess.

    Schneider: Hey, you're still gay, right?

    Elena: Yeah! And a woman, I'm back in!

  • Coming-Out Story: This is the main Story Arc for Elena during the first season as she and her family come to terms with her being a lesbian.
  • Creator Cameo: Co-show runner Gloria Calderón Kellett plays Victor's second wife, with the show making great use of her resemblance to Justina Machado.
  • Cultural Translation:
    • As a popular Latin-American story, it is an obvious candidate for multiple popular Spanish dubs. except, in Spanish how are they going to make jokes about Elena not knowing Spanish? In two ways: 1. instead make fun of her not knowing Cuban slang and parts of its culture, 2. when super necessary (though more common for making jokes at Lydia not knowing English), add "en inglés" and "en castellano" in subtitles. Some translated dialogue from one dub of the pilot vs. the English dialogue:
      Lydia:It means you don't know enough about Cuba to know that I'm insulting you.

      It means you don't know enough Spanish to know that I'm insulting you.

      Elena:Abuela, when are you going to learn that this is the United States?

      Abuela, I'll learn more Spanish when you learn English.

    • Also applies for wordplay, like when in "Hold, Please" Lydia is trying to get Elena to pick an escort for her quinces and says that with social media she only needs to pick a boy and "twat at him" — meaning 'tweet'. In the Spanish this wouldn't work both with the word and grammatically, so instead she says that Elena should "mandarle una teta". She's trying to say 'send him a tweet', but teta means tit. The Spanish might be better because the wordplay is between "send him a tweet" and "send him nudes". (It's kind of disappointing that the Spanish "coño a él" ('twat at him') is nothing like "twittearle" ('tweet him') because that first phrase? It's also slang for 'fuck him' and 'punch him'.)
  • Deliberately Bad Example: Scott, the nursing intern at Penelope's clinic, is lazy, arrogant, obnoxious, and has the maturity of a frat boy. His blatant disrespect of Penelope and opinions of topics like illegal immigration are set up to strengthen Penelope's position.
  • Distracted by the Sexy: Happens to both Alex and Elena with the bikini-clad babes outside their hotel room.
  • Double-Meaning Title: The episode "No Mass" in which the family have disagreements about going to Church every week is a literal title, in different ways, in Spanish and English! No Mass is basically a homophone for No Más, Spanish for 'no more'.
  • Dysfunctional Family:
    • Downplayed with the Alvarez family. They might come at odds with each other and have differing opinions, but at the end of the day they help and respect each other.
    • Played straight with Schneider's family. He has four stepmoms, at least one of whom used to be his nanny, and grew up as a Lonely Rich Kid.
  • Early Installment Weirdness : Along with a bit of Discontinuity. In the pilot, Schneider mentions that the Alvarezes have been in the apartment for ten months. In the second season, we see an episode from when they moved in. 17 years ago.
  • Easily Forgiven:
    • Even though Lydia is a devout Catholic, it takes her about ten seconds of soul-searching to accept the fact that Elena is gay. Lampshaded by Penelope questioning how quickly she turned around, and justified by Lydia responding that Elena is her granddaughter and she will love her no matter what, she just needed an excuse.
    • Subverted one day at a time elena when Elena gives a gracious speech at Victor's second wedding, but then reveals in private she's still hurting badly over his abandoning her at her quinces and deeply resents that circumstances have forced her to be the one putting in all the effort in their reconciliation.
  • Ethical Slut: Schneider often has one-night stands staying at this place, but he also considers himself a feminist (though he sometimes fails to act like one). In "Strays", he firmly refuses the advances of drunken Lori, as she is married already (and drunk).
  • Exact Eavesdropping: Used several times, most notably when Alex is hiding behind Lydia's curtain and overhears Elena when she's working out if she's gay by talking to the empty room.

    Penelope: I'm guessing you heard all that.
    Schneider: It's just a curtain!

  • Fee Fi Faux Pas: A recurring theme is the unintentional offensiveness the family often suffers through. Perhaps most notable is Schneider getting a thorough lesson in why wearing a Che Guevara shirt around Cuban-Americans is a bad idea.
  • Foreshadowing: Much is made of Schneider's eight years of sobriety in the first half of season 3. after a particularly stressful visit from his father, he falls off the wagon, and is celebrating 30 days sober in the finale.
  • "Friends" Rent Control: Downplayed. Season 3 reveals that the reason Penelope can afford their nice three-bedroom in Echo Park is because Schneider hasn't raised their rent since they moved in.
  • Goth: Carmen belongs firmly in the "gloomy Goth" subcategory.
  • Hanging Up on the Grim Reaper: In the season 2 finale, Lydia is in a medically-induced coma after surgery. After all of her family get to have their emotional speeches, she has one herself in a potential dream sequence where Berto comes through her hospital room doors and they dance and converse and expound on family and life for over 5 minutes. He first says that he has come to get her, and at the end offers his hand but actually asks her if it's time. She looks to the sleeping Penelope and says no.
  • Head-Tiltingly Kinky: Lydia insists she can handle the porn Schneider just discovered on Alex's computer, then does a head tilt complete with opera glasses followed by a pronouncement that they should burn the laptop.
  • He Cleans Up Nicely: A well-dressed, shaven Schneider surprises Penelope with a makeover for Elena's quinces.
  • He Is Not My Boyfriend: Lydia, of Dr. Berkowitz. Much to his disappointment, as he obviously hopes for a Relationship Upgrade.

    Berkowitz:(borrowing Lydia's phrase) We went [to the opera] as platonic companions.

    Penelope: Platonic companions? What the hell does that mean?

    Berkowitz:(sadly) I don't know.

  • Hipster: Schneider is portrayed as this, going so far as serving the Alvarezes quinoa when Lydia goes missing. Elena has hipster-ish moments as well.
  • I Am the Noun: Carmen, who is the immigration project.
  • Informed Attribute: The entire first episode is filled with people telling Penelope that she needs to tweeze her eyebrows. And everyone who does has bigger eyebrows than he does.
  • Jerkass: Victor with Penelope and after finding out Elena is gay. He drinks, he's aggressive, he refuses to deal with his issues, he makes a big deal out of wanting to leave before the quinceañera and then shows up only to leave before the father-daughter dance.
  • Latino Is Brown: Averted overall, as the Alvarezes have a variety of skintones, and also discussed in "The Turn" when Elena realizes her paler skin tone makes her white-passing to those who think all Latinos are brown.

    Penelope:(to Elena) You and your brother are of different shades.

    Lydia: Yes, Papito is a beautiful caramel, and you are. Wonder Bread.

  • Liquid Courage: In season 3, a visit from his browbeating father pushes Schneider Off the Wagon. Half a bottle of scotch gives him the guts to defy and cut ties with his old man, but it also causes him to spiral.
  • Lonely Rich Kid: Schneider was this growing up, most likely contributing to his drug problem.
  • Marry the Nanny: Exaggerated and played for laughs with Schneider, who mentions that his many ex-stepmothers were mostly formerly his nannies.
  • Meaningful Echo: At the end of the pilot, Penelope vents to her mom about how she misses having someone there to hold her and say, "I got you", which Lydia does. In the season 1 finale, after Victor walks out of Elena's quinceañera just before the father-daughter dance, Penelope goes up to Elena and takes his place, saying the same thing.
  • Mistaken for Misogynist: In "Bobos and Mamitas," Penelope gets in an argument with her coworker Scott, who is sexist besides generally insufferable, and learns he earns more money than her, driving her to quit in a huff. When Dr. Berkowitz finds Penelope to beg her to stay at the clinic, she demands to know why her wages are smaller. Turns out, it wasn't Berkowitz being sexist, just a doormat; Scott asked him for a raise and he gave it to him. Penelope decides to go back to work after asking Berkowitz for the same pay as Scott plus extra for overtime.
  • Mood Whiplash:
    • The flashback scenes in 2001 are packed with funny one day at a time elena like the younger, blonde-haired Schneider and the horror of Penelope and Victor when they realize Berto and Lydia are going to move in with them. But then Penelope turns on the TV to hear news of a plane hitting a building in New York and you realize which day in 2001 it is. To wit, it's so fluffy that even those detail-eyed viewers were unlikely to consider the possibility even though in hindsight it was simple math — Elena was born August 7th and is five weeks old. Exactly five weeks after 8/7 is 9/11.
    • A lighter version at the end of "The Funeral" as the family have gotten over some long-running issues and are all on the same page with cousin Estrellita giving a toast.in which she celebrated that Tía Ophelia got to live to see "our President make America great again." Everyone just stares in utter disbelief.
  • Moral Dissonance: The show is mostly great at giving solid morals and narratives, but in "No Mass" there's some questionable statements. Though eventually Penelope apologies to Lydia and they compromise, both Penelope and Elena said some things that are very negative to religious people. At one point the all-embracing "I'll make you comfortable even if I'm not" Penelope mocks Lydia's faith in God as being her personal imaginary Security Blanket, which is very Not Cool and was uncalled for even if that's what she thinks — Lydia was just saying that she'd like to go to Church and not have Penelope tell her not to. At another point in the episode, Elena goes against her own moral code in a different way; specifically, the atheist Elena tells Lydia to refer to God by gender-neutral pronouns. Even if Elena did believe in God and believed that God had no gender, she is the show's main advocate for using the pronouns not that you personally like, but that the other party does, and it should be clear to her that Lydia always has liked using male pronouns for God. Telling her to do otherwise is equatable with one day at a time elena a person's friends to refer to them using a different pronoun to what either of them want. Lydia plays this off by making a quick snarky one-liner, but would be well within her rights to be upset with Elena for trying to tell her to do that, and furthermore because in Spanish the distinct pronoun for God is Él and so functionally and culturally needs to be male unless you want to be really offensive.
  • The Mourning After: Lydia is still deeply in love with her late husband, Berto. It's why she refuses to date Dr. Berkowitz despite genuine feelings for him.
  • Multiple Reference Pun:
    • Elena after getting the handyman job appearing at the door and saying "I'm Butch", referring both to her taking over from the never-seen and implicitly-useless handyman who's named Butch and the fact that she is verysoft butch.
    • In at least one Spanish dub, the scene where Lydia is telling Elena to stand up 'straighter' uses the word 'recto' for 'straighter'. Recto, like the English, means straight as well as upright, but here the translation of Lydia saying "be as straight as you can be" is actually "estad tan recto como tu armario" — be as straight/upright as your closet. Elena's closet is probably really straight literally, but really isn't figuratively. The pun would have probably been contrived in English, but checks out pretty well in Spanish.
  • Mythology Gag: Elena strikes the original Schneider's iconic pose in his same outfit upon being revealed as the new Schneider's employee.
  • Now, Let Me Carry You: After two seasons of Schneider being a source for comfort and support for Penelope, she offers the same to him after he falls of the wagon in late season 3. capped by him laying his head on her shoulder as she had done with him multiple times before.

    Penelope: Someone once told me, "Don't quit before the miracle happens."

    Schneider: That's pretty smart. Who said that?

    Penelope:You did, dummy.

  • OOC Is Serious Business:
    • When Penelope's ex Victor shows up in "Hurricane Victor", Lydia is exceedingly nice to him and constantly suggests Penelope and him should get back together. But when it turns out Victor lied about being sober and getting help for his issues, Lydia gets more serious than we've ever seen her before, giving Victor an ice-cold look and curtly telling him to "go".
    • "The Turn" has the normally chill Alex lash out at his family for "being too Cuban" while cheering for him at a baseball game. The second half of the episode reveals why: He's been facing racism at school and while out with his friends, making him resent his ethnicity.
  • Overly Long Name:
    • Elena Maria Alvarez Riera Calderón Leytevidal Inclan
    • Alejandro Alberto Alvarez Riera Calderón Leytevidal Inclan
    • Lydia Margarita del Carmen Inclan Maribona Leytevidal de Riera.
    • Used the one time when Lydia and Schneider are applying for citizenship, and are called up as "Lydia Margarita Del Carmen Inclan Maribona Leytevidal de Riera" and "something Schneider", both preserving Schneider's Only One Name value and contrasting the two.
    • Again in the Season 3 finale, where Lydia proudly calls san jose state university application daughter by her full name and then "Nurse Practitioner". Penelope tells her that she can just shorten it to her whole full name, NP.
  • Parental Favoritism:
    • Penelope thinks Lydia puts her brother Tito on a pedestal because of his successful business, even though he spends little time with the family and didn't visit her when she was in a coma, despite being close by on a business trip. Tito feels the same about Penelope, because of her family and because Lydia chooses to live with her.
    • When it comes to her grandchildren, Alex is Lydia's favorite by far. Also he's her favorite person in their entire family. While on a dinner cruise, when Tito poses that if the boat sank and asks who Lydia would save, both he and Penelope say "Alex" at the same time.
  • Parental Sexuality Squick: Averted with Elena and Alex, who are very supportive of Penelope dating. Played straight for Penelope herself, who is initially grossed out when she hears Dr. Berkowitz and Lydia were on a date. Then there's Lydia's frequent reminiscing about her sexacapades with Penelope's father, not to mention them acting like horny teenagers in the flashback to 2001.
    • In "Boundaries", Alex walks in on Penelope masturbating to Outlander and runs away. Even more so when she insists on talking about the situation. And when Lydia chimes in. And when Elena does as well. Poor kid.
  • Parental Substitute: Lydia to Schneider. She cooks for him, gives him advice, and helped him get sober.
  • Platonic Life-Partners: Penelope and Schneider are great friends, but they're clearly only friends.
  • Previously Overlooked Paramour: Elena spends a whole episode doggedly trying to figure out if her crush Dani is gay. She finds out she is. and has a girlfriend already. A dejected Elena is then approached by Syd, who has been present the entire episode and made conversation with her a few times, but she hadn't paid them much attention, until:

    Syd: She has a girlfriend. She's so lucky. [awkward laugh] Hey. you wanna split that cookie?

    Elena: Huh? Wait. [realization as Syd looks at her shyly] OHHHHHHHHH.

    Syd: Oh—never mind—sorry, sorry! I just—

    Elena: NO! GAY! Me! Gay!

    Syd: Oh! Uh. me gay, too.

  • Primal Scene: Perhaps even more uncomfortable than usual as Alex catches Penelope masturbating.
  • Pronoun Trouble: Elena's activist friends have a variety of preferred pronouns, with her significant other Syd using "they/them." Dr. Berkowitz is terrified to open his mouth around them.
  • Punny Name: Done together, Penelope and Victor's fiancée Nicole. Jokes that Victor exchanged a "penny" for a "nickel" are made by Penelope's support group.
  • Race Lift: This series changes the focus from an Italian-American family to a Cuban-American family.
  • Recovered Addict: Schneider.
  • Remake Cameo: Mackenzie Phillips, who played one of the daughters in the original series, plays the coordinator of the women veterans’ support group.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Penelope's brother Tito, who went unmentioned through the first two seasons despite the heavy focus on the family dynamics. He shows up in season 3 and is called up for his distance from the family.
  • Romantic Two-Girl Friendship: Elena and Carmen are very close and physically affectionate, with Penelope and Lydia suspecting that they may not be just friends. However, after Elena comes out, she confirms that Carmen is straight and that their relationship is purely platonic.
  • Running Gag:
    • "Jajaja, que funny."
    • The curtain isn't thick enough to block out sound; People frequently behind the curtain hear things they weren't supposed to.
    • Schneider's figurines of the family
    • Overly Long Name
    • The "dale, [nickname], dale!" song
    • Vicks VapoRub with its name being said in a thick Cuban accent.
  • Same Language Dub: Has received dubs in different dialects of Spanish, and though there are often wars between which are better when it comes to Spanish, the consensus seems to be on the Latin American one — it uses three of the original cast (Rita Moreno, Justina Machado, and Isabella Gómez) to voice their characters, and the show is about Latin Americans so the cultural dubbing is seen as more appropriate and effective (than to put Mexican or European culture onto a Cuban family, something most Hispanic people would agree isn't ideal). It also helps that Netflix has allowed for the audio to be selected so people in Europe can watch the Latin American dub.
  • Secretly Wealthy: In season 3, Schneider pretends to be just a poor guy when he meets a wonderful woman. He finally comes clean when his hot tub causes a leak in the apartment. At which point, she opens her simple blouse to show an expensive top and reveals she's rich too.
  • Series Continuity Error: A few pop up in season 2:
    • Schneider is an Canadian immigrant, and in season 2 he confirms that he does not have to go to jury duty, however in season 1 he mentions needing to get out of jury duty in order to help Alex with a project.
    • "Not Yet" has Schneider talk about how he consistently failed out one day at a time elena rehab and was on his fourth try and failing at that too when Lydia showed up and comforted and encouraged him to try again. The first episode has Schneider mention that their moving in coincided with the fifth anniversary of his sobriety.
  • Shell-Shocked Veteran:
    • In the episode "The Death of Mrs. Resnick", we finally find out why Penelope broke up Victor, her veteran husband: he had a serious case of PTSD, refused to get any help for it, and started acting violently. In "Hurricane Victor", he shows up in person and tells Penelope he's finally getting some professional help, but that turns out to be a lie.
    • Penelope herself tries to go off her anti-depressants in Season 2, resulting in a spiral resembling bipolar disorder where she ends up admitting she needs them after hearing a recording of a possibly suicidal message.
  • Shout-Out:
    • One of the family's surnames being Calderón is a reference to Cuban-American showrunner Gloria Calderón Kellett.
    • In "Quinces", Alex says "Immigrants. We get the job done," in response to Penelope seeing the party hall decorated for the first time.
    • Also in "Quinces", the relatives who supposedly weren't going to come but did are the Fajardos, a reference to another famous Cuban-American, Gloria Estefan (Gloria María Milagrosa Fajardo García de Estefan).
    • In "Supermoon", Elena and Syd mention that they plan to watch Batwoman on their date.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism vs. Cynicism: Being a Norman Lear show, it is somewhere in the middle but it is a feel-good and heartfelt show with believable characters who have real emotions dealing with real situations.
  • Soapbox Sadie: Elena gives Lisa Simpson a run for her money. At least until Lydia catches her lying about riding the bus everywhere after the family's car dies.
  • Spicy Latina: Played with. Penelope has shades of this, and Lydia often goes into full "spicy" mode and is referred to as a "walking stereotype", but the Latina stereotype is also addressed and sometimes deconstructed, especially with Elena.
  • Standardized Sitcom Housing: The Alvarez apartment fits this trope pretty northwest federal credit union car loan payment, except for one important deviation: the living room is separated into two with a curtain, so that Lydia can have a space of her own. This marks a difference to the typical Anglo-Saxon sitcom family, both in that the grandparent is living with the nuclear family, and that the family isn't affluent enough to get an apartment with an extra room for Lydia. It's actually an exact recreation of the original show's set.
  • Starbucks Skin Scale: Played for laughs when Elena realizes she benefits from being white-passing, unlike the rest of her Cuban-American family.

    Lydia: Yes, Papito is a beautiful caramel, and you are. Wonder Bread.

  • Stop Being Stereotypical:
    • When the family walks in on Lydia teaching Schneider how to salsa, Elena rolls her eyes in exasperation, saying: "All right! I get it! We're Cuban!" Her protest only spurs Penelope and Alex to join in the dance.
    • Alex is pressured into swiping one of Penelope's painkillers to sell on the street, and is chewed out by Elena for almost becoming a cliched Latino drug dealer.
  • Strange Minds Think Alike: When Penelope asks Dr. Berkowitz to come to the car dealership with her in "The Death of Mrs. Resnick", he assumes she wants him to pose as her husband (she was going to say father). When she asks Schneider, he suggests "son" instead of husband.

    Penelope: [to Schneider, exasperated] Really? You're older than me.

  • Studio Audience: Unlike most sitcoms of its era, One Day at a Time is taped in front of a live audience. This is particularly apparent with Lydia, played by screen legend Rita Morenonote One of fifteen people to win an Emmy and an Oscar and a Tony and a Grammy., as her first appearance in most episodes tends to be greeted with loud cheering.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: In "A Penny and a Nicole", everyone is jarred to realize Victor's new fiancee, Nicole, is almost a perfect dead ringer for Penelope down to her laugh. Even the two women find it incredibly bizarre as Victor himself doesn't seem to see it.
  • Take That!: One of the earliest lines in the first episode of season 4. "It's like there's nothing good on Netflix anymore." As we might remember, Netflix cancelled One Day At A Time which was then saved by Pop TV.
  • The Talk: Penelope tries to give it to Alex when she thinks he's been watching porn. She's not happy about this, mostly due to the awkwardness, but also because she and Victor had previously agreed that she'd give the Talk to Elena and he'd give it to Alex — but, because of Victor's absence, she's wound up having to do both. It results in an extremely traumatized Alex hiding under a blanket and screaming, "WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO ME?!" And then it turns out it wasn't him that was watching the movie anyway, and Penelope realizes she actually needs to have a discussion with Elena.

    Alex:[handing Elena the blanket, entirely sincere] You'll need this.

  • The Unfavorite:
    • It's basically a running gag that Elena is this, especially when it comes to Lydia, but it's always Played for Laughs.
    • In "Hermanos," Penelope figures she's this as Lydia praises her son Tito as near perfect despite how he's distant from the family. Over a dinner, Penelope realizes Tito felt he was the unfavorite as Lydia would always go on about Penelope more and that's why he's been distant from them.

      Penelope: I think she thinks you're perfect. You think she thinks I'm perfect. Really, I think she thinks she's perfect.

  • Values Dissonance: Invoked when Penelope is upset at Alex for pushing himself on a woman. She assumes it's because of his father and is shocked when Alex explains he was taking Lydia's advice to always be assertive and "don't take no for an answer." Lydia explains it as just how things were at that age and it was expected a man to take control with Penelope outraged her mother doesn't realize how close that is to rape and encouraging Alex like this can lead to him getting in serious trouble.
  • Very Special Episode:
    • The entire wells fargo visa card customer service builds itself with a large amount of drama with several moments that will drive you to tears, but "Hello, Penelope" is the most prominent. As of very early on, Penelope quits therapy and her antidepressants, now having to deal with depression, anxiety and PTSD with no help, believing she shouldn't need help. The episodes pulls no punches in showcasing how awful is to not treat a mental condition and how support and determination are important.
    • "Not Yet" shows Lydia in a coma. The episode focuses on grief and all main characters telling how important she was from their perspective as well as even revealing some things about their past and how she influenced them.
    • "Nip It In The Bud" and "Drinking And Driving" in season 3, which deal with Penelope finding out Alex has been smoking weed and Schneider relapsing, respectively.
  • Wafer Thin Mint: After Schneider makes a big deal about what bad shape Penelope's couch is in, it splits in half from her eating a single Cheeto.
  • Walking Shirtless Scene: Schneider provides a generous amount of shirtlessness.
  • We Didn't Start the Billy Joel Parodies: In one of the most heartwarming uses of this you're likely to find, Syd writes and performs their own version of "We Didn't Start the Fire" for Elena.

    You set my heart on fire,
    on that day,
    when I didn't know if you were gay.
    You set my heart on fire,
    so please, say yes!
    You don't have to wear a dress!
    Will you go to the dance with me?

  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: Schneider makes more than one reference to his father that reveals him to be this.
  • Wham Shot:
    • After Elena spends a whole episode trying to figure out the mysterious "P" who keeps texting Alex and who he says is his new one day at a time elena, she finally follows him to a meeting and finds that it's Victor, with the letter standing for "Papi."
    • Schneider stands up to his father and celebrates with Penelope. Then she leaves and he gets out the whiskey bottle his father gave him, which is half empty.
  • The Arvest personal online banking The first episode of the show's rebirth on Pop features Ray Romano as a census taker, allowing all the characters to introduce themselves to anyone who didn't watch the Netflix seasons.
  • Writers Cannot Do Math: In "A Snowman's Tale", Lydia recalls how he met her late husband Humberto in Havana in 1958, and immediately fell in love with her during a rather steamy dance the two had. Her story is accompanied by a flashback, where Lydia is clearly a grown-up already. But in the very next episode Lydia says that she fled from Cuba through Operation Homes for sale in union sc Pan in 1962, when she was only 15.
  • Wrong Insult Offense: In "The Death Of Mrs. Resnick", they have to climb out of the trunk to get out of the car and Alex's pants rip, causing the entire baseball team to call him "Butt-trunk Boy". He takes offense to the name they chose.

    Alex: Now the entire team calls me "Butt-trunk Boy". They could've called me "Junk In The Trunk". It was right there.

Источник: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Series/OneDayAtATime2017

Chef Curtis Stone shows Frank and his wife Elena how to make a pear cranberry crostata

Frank Buckley and his wife visited with celebrity chef Curtis Stone and the trio made a pear cranberry crostata.

This open-faced Italian pie makes for a delicious Thanksgiving treat.

This segment aired on California Cooking with Jessica Holmes Episode 118.

Pear Cranberry Crostata with Whisky Caramel Sauce, courtesy of Chef Curtis Stone. Serves 6

Make ahead: Dough can be made 1 day ahead, covered, and refrigerated. Alternatively, it can be frozen for up to 1 month. Caramel sauce can be made up to 3 days ahead, covered and refrigerated. Rewarm before serving.

Ingredients

Crostata:

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 3 tablespoons of caster sugar, divided
  • 3/4 teaspoon of kosher salt, divided
  • 18 tablespoons (2 1/4 sticks) of cold unsalted butter, cubed, divided
  • 1/3 cup (or more) of ice water
  • 2/3 cup of brown sugar, divided
  • 3/4 teaspoon of ground cinnamon, divided
  • 4 Bosc pears, peeled, cored and cut into 1/2-inch wedges
  • 2 cups of fresh or frozen cranberries
  • 1/2 tablespoon of heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons of sanding sugar

Whisky Caramel Sauce:

  • 1 1/3 cups of granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup of heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons of whisky
  • Vanilla ice cream, for serving

Instructions

To make dough and streusel topping:

  1. In food processor, pulse 1 12/3 cups flour, 1 tbs. granulated sugar and 1/2 tsp. kosher salt to blend. Add butter and pulse about 10 times, or until butter is in pea-size pieces; do not over process. While pulsing processor, add 1/3 cup of ice water, then pulse just until moist clumps of dough form, adding more water 1 tbs. at a time if necessary. Form dough into a disc, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
  2. Place a sheet of parchment paper on a work surface. Roll dough on parchment paper to a one day at a time elena thickness. Trim dough to a 14-inch diameter round and transfer parchment to a large sheet pan.
  3. Meanwhile, in medium bowl, mix 3/4 cups flour, 2 tbs. granulated sugar, 1/3 cup brown sugar, and 1/4 tsp. cinnamon to blend. Using your fingers, rub 6 tbs. butter into flour mixture until moist clumps form. Chill crumble for 10 minutes, or until firm.
    To assemble and bake:
  4. Position rack in center of Bosch oven. Select Convection mode and preheat oven to 350°F convection.
  5. In large bowl, whisk 1 tbs. flour, 1/3 cup brown sugar, 1/2 tsp. cinnamon, and 1/4 tsp. salt together. Add pears and cranberries and toss to coat. Transfer pear mixture to center of crostata dough round, leaving a 2 1/2-inch border of dough. Fold dough border over fruit, pleating loosely and pinching to seal any cracks in dough.
  6. Sprinkle streusel topping over fruit. Brush crust with cream and sprinkle with sanding sugar.
  7. Bake crostata for about 45 minutes, or until crust is golden brown and fruit has softened. Let cool slightly.
    To make caramel sauce and serve:
  8. In a medium heavy saucepan, over low heat, stir sugar and 1/4 cup water until sugar has dissolved. Increase heat to medium-high and boil without stirring for about 8 minutes, brushing down sides of pan with a wet pastry brush to dissolve any crystals, until caramel is golden brown. Remove pan from heat and slowly whisk in cream and pinch of salt; caramel will bubble vigorously. Whisk in whisky.
  9. Slice crostata and spoon ice cream and caramel sauce over each slice.

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