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Protein is an essential macronutrient, but not all food sources of protein are created equal, and you may not need as much as you think. Learn the basics about protein and shaping your diet with healthy protein foods.

Jump to:
–What is protein?
–How much protein do I need?
–It’s all about the protein “package”
–Research on protein and human health
–Protein foods and the planet
–The bottom line: choosing healthy protein foods
–[Quiz] Test your protein knowledge!

What Is Protein?

Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, bone, skin, hair, and virtually every other body part or tissue. It makes up the enzymes that power many chemical reactions and the hemoglobin that carries oxygen in your blood. At least 10,000 different proteins make you what you are and keep you that way.

Protein is made from twenty-plus basic building blocks called amino acids. Because we don’t store amino acids, our bodies make them in two different ways: either from scratch, or by modifying others. Nine amino acids—histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine—known as the essential amino acids, must come from food.

How Much Protein Do I Need?

The National Academy of Medicine recommends that adults get a minimum of 0.8 grams of protein for every kilogram of body weight per day, or just over 7 grams for every 20 pounds of body weight. [1]

  • For a 140-pound person, that means about 50 grams of protein each day.
  • For a 200-pound person, that means about edmond sumner pacers jersey grams of protein each day.

The National Academy of Medicine also sets a wide range for acceptable protein intake—anywhere from 10% to 35% of calories each day. Beyond that, there’s relatively little solid information on the ideal amount of protein in the diet or the healthiest target for calories contributed by protein. In an analysis conducted at Harvard among more than 130,000 men and women who were followed for up to 32 years, the percentage of calories from total protein intake was not related to overall mortality or to specific causes of death. [2] However, the source of protein was important.

It’s important to note that millions of people worldwide, especially young children, don’t get enough protein due to food insecurity. The effects of protein deficiency and malnutrition range in severity from growth failure and loss of muscle mass to decreased immunity, weakening of the heart and respiratory system, and death.

However, it’s uncommon for healthy adults in the U.S. and most other developed countries to have a deficiency, because there’s an abundance of plant and animal-based foods full of protein. In fact, many in the U.S. are consuming more than enough protein, especially from animal-based foods. [3]

It’s All About the Protein “Package”

When we eat foods for protein, we also eat everything that comes alongside it: the different fats, fiber, sodium, and more. It’s this protein “package” that’s likely to make a difference for health.

The table below shows a sample of food “packages” sorted by protein content, alongside a range of components that come with it.

To call out a few examples:

  • A 4-ounce broiled sirloin steak is a great source of protein—about 33 grams worth. But it also delivers about 5 grams of saturated fat.
  • A 4-ounce ham steak with 22 grams of protein has only 1.6 grams of saturated fat, but it’s loaded with 1,500 milligrams worth of sodium.
  • 4 ounces of grilled sockeye salmon has about 30 grams of protein, naturally low in sodium, and contains just over 1 gram of saturated fat. Salmon and other fatty fish are also excellent sources of omega-3 fats, a type of fat that’s especially good for the heart.
  • A cup of cooked lentils provides about 18 grams of protein and 15 grams of fiber, and it has virtually no saturated fat or sodium.
person making a workout shake including protein powder

Powdered protein can come from a variety of sources, including eggs, milk (e.g., casein, whey), and plants (e.g., soybeans, peas, hemp). Some protein powders contain protein from multiple sources; for instance, a vegan option might include protein derived from peas, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, and alfalfa. Like other dietary supplements, protein powders are not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for safety. They can often contain non-protein ingredients, including vitamins and minerals, thickeners, added sugars, non-caloric sweeteners, and artificial flavoring. If you choose to consume protein powder, it is important to read the nutrition and ingredient labels beforehand, as products may contain unexpected ingredients and large amounts of added sugars and calories.

Learn more about protein powders and other workout supplements

Research on Protein and Health

Available evidence indicates that it’s the source of protein (or, the protein “package”), rather than the amount of protein, that likely makes a difference for our health. You can explore the research related to each disease in the tabs below, but here’s the evidence-based takeaway: eating healthy protein sources like beans, nuts, fish, or poultry in place of red meat and processed meat can lower the risk of several diseases and premature death.

Protein Foods and the Planet

Icon of a globe with a fork and spoon on the sides; representing eating sustainably for the planet's health
Just as different foods mrs dc america 2019 have differing impacts on human health, they also have differing impacts on the environment. Agriculture is a major contributor of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally, the accumulation of which is driving climate change at a rate unprecedented in human history. However, not all foods have an equal impact. Production of animal-based one has to go food tends to have higher GHG emissions than producing plant-based foods—and dairy and especially red meat (particularly beef, lamb, and goat) stand out for their disproportionate impact.
Protein Scorecard
Source: World Resources Institute, www.wri.org/proteinscorecard

To give you an idea, this “scorecard” from the World Resources Institute illustrates the differing GHG emissions per gram of protein from both animal and plant-based protein foods. [25] Making just one pound (454 grams) of lamb generates five times more GHGs than making a pound of chicken and around 30 times more than making a pound of lentils. [26] In the U.S. alone, beef accounts for 36% of all food-related GHG emissions. [27] Beyond emissions, it’s also important to note that food production places an enormous demand upon our natural resources, as agriculture is a major contributor to deforestation, species extinction, and freshwater depletion and contamination.

Learn more about the impacts of different foods on your plate.

Bottom Line

Protein is a key part of any diet. The average person needs about 7 grams of protein every day for every 20 pounds of body weight. Because protein is found in an abundance of foods, many people can easily meet this goal. However, not all protein “packages” are created equal. Because foods contain a lot one has to go food than protein, it’s important to pay attention to what else is coming with it. That’s why the Healthy Eating Plate encourages choosing healthy protein foods.

Building off this general guidance, here are some additional details and tips for shaping your diet with the best protein choices:

  • Get your protein from plants when possible. Eating legumes (beans and peas), nuts, seeds, whole grains, and other plant-based sources of protein is a win for your health and the health of the planet. If most of your protein comes from plants, make sure that you mix up your sources so no “essential” components of protein are missing. The good news is that the plant kingdom offers plenty of options to mix and match. Here are some examples for each category:
    • Legumes:lentils, beans (adzuki, black, fava, chickpeas/garbanzo, kidney,  lima, mung, pinto etc.), peas (green, snow, snap, split, etc.), edamame/soybeans (and products made from soy: tofu, tempeh, etc.), peanuts.
    • Nuts and Seeds:almonds, pistachios, cashews, walnuts, hazelnuts, pecans, hemp seeds, squash and pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, flax seeds, sesame seeds, chia seeds.
    • Whole Grains: kamut, teff, wheat, quinoa, rice, wild rice, millet, oats, buckwheat,
    • Other: while many vegetables and fruits contain some level of protein, it’s generally in smaller amounts than the other plant-based foods. Some examples with higher protein quantities include corn, broccoli, asparagus, brussels sprouts, and capital credit union online banking login width="2680" height="1842" src="https://cdn1.sph.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/11/4_savory_plants.png" alt="Prioritize hearty and savory plant-based proteins">

Simple strategies for creating filling, delicious, and even budget-friendly plant-based dishes.

  • Upgrade your sources of animal protein. Considering the protein package is particularly important when it comes to animal-based foods:
    • Generally, poultry (chicken, turkey, duck) and a variety of seafood (fish, crustaceans, mollusks) are your best bet. Eggs can be a good choice, too.
    • If you enjoy dairy foods, it’s best to do so in moderation (think closer to 1-2 servings a day; and incorporating yogurt is probably a better choice than getting all your servings from milk or cheese).
    • Red meat—which includes unprocessed beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton, and goat meat—should be consumed on a more limited basis. If you enjoy red meat, consider eating it in small amounts or only on special occasions.
    • Processed meats, such as bacon, hot dogs, sausages, and cold cuts should be avoided. Although these products are often made from red meats, processed meats also include items like turkey bacon, chicken sausage, and deli-sliced chicken and ham. (Processed meat refers to any meat that has been “transformed through salting, curing, fermentation, smoking, or other processes to enhance flavor or improve preservation.” [18])

Looking to reduce red and processed meats, but unsure where to start? Here are a few approaches to cutting-back while keeping your meals satiating and flavorful. Simply find your “starting point” and move forward with the strategies that work for you:

Eat a little less red meat, any way you can

Assess how often you eat red meat, and see if one of these strategies can help you find a way to cut back a bit.

Swap red meat for healthier meats

If you’re thinking of a meal that features red meat, see if you can salem five bank north andover ma it with a better option, like poultry or seafood.

Consume less meat, enjoy more variety

This approach boosts healthy plant-based foods like beans, nuts, whole grains, and other veggies, while still providing ways to incorporate some of your favorite animal-based foods.

Test your protein knowledge!

Ready to see how much you know about protein and healthy protein foods? Try this 10 question quiz to find out:

Terms of Use

The contents of this website are for educational purposes and are not intended to offer personal medical advice. You should seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The Nutrition Source does not recommend or endorse any products.

Источник: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/protein/

Where Do I Go?

Alert

The Food Bank is currently requiring all staff, volunteers, and clients to wear face coverings while at our facilities and mobile pantries. Thank you for your cooperation.

Schedule Curbside Pickup

Fort Collins Fresh Food Share Pantry

The Fort Collins Fresh Food Share is one of the Food Bank’s two fresh food pantries. Clients can choose from a variety of fresh foods, including fruits, vegetables, milk, cheese, bread and yogurt. Through Food Share, guests can also receive government commodities through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP). Eligible seniors can also pick up senior boxes through the Commodities Supplemental Food Program (CSFP).

Tuesday through Saturday • 10 am – 3 pm

1301 Blue Spruce Drive • Fort Collins

CSFP Distribution (senior boxes)
Tuesday through Saturday • 10am – 3pm

Loveland Fresh Food Share Pantry

Clients can also shop at the Loveland Fresh Food Share, the Food Bank’s second food pantry. Clients can choose from a variety of fresh foods, including fruits, vegetables, milk, cheese, bread and yogurt. At the pantry, guests can also receive government commodities through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP). Eligible seniors can also pick up senior boxes through the Commodities Supplemental Food Program (CSFP).

Tuesday through Saturday • 10 am – 3 pm

2600 N. Lincoln Avenue • Loveland

CSFP Distribution (senior boxes)
Tuesday through Saturday • 10am – 3pm

A Food Bank team member distributes food <i>one has to go food</i> a pop-up pantry site.

Poudre High School Mobile Food Pantry

The Food Bank is hosting mobile food pantries throughout Larimer County. Anyone in need of food is welcome to attend. The Poudre High School mobile food pantry is “drive-through” where clients can receive a variety of pre-selected food items. Spanish translation will be available.

1st & 3rd Thursday of every month

Upcoming 2021 dates: Dec 2 & 16
5 – 6:30 pm
Poudre High School • 201 S. Impala Drive • Fort Collins

Image of volunteers at the Grace Place mobile pantry.

Grace Place Mobile Food Pantry

The Grace Place mobile food pantry is “drive-through” where clients can receive a variety of pre-selected food items.

2nd & 4th Saturday of every month

Upcoming 2021 Dates: Dec 11.
Note: Only one mobile pantry in December due to the holidays
10 – 11:30 am
Grace Place •  375 Meadowlark Drive • Berthoud

Image of volunteers at the Foothills mobile pantry.

Foothills Unitarian Church Mobile Food Pantry

2nd & 4th Sunday of every month

Upcoming 2021 dates: Dec 12, Jan 9, Feb 13
Note: Only one mobile pantry in December due to the holidays
1 – 2:30 pm
Foothills Unitarian Church •  1815 Yorktown Avenue • Fort Collins

Family Medicine Center pantry imageone has to go food Medicine Center Pantry

The Food Bank for Larimer County partners with UCHealth and the Family Medicine Center to provide a fresh food pantry at their clinic in Fort Collins. The pantry provides a variety of food, including fresh fruits and vegetables, eggs, milk, cheese, bread and Noosa Yoghurt. Patients and non-patients are welcome to shop up to two times each week.

Tuesday 9 am – 3 pm • Wednesday 9 am – 3 pm • Thursday 12 – 5 pm • Friday 9 am – 12 pm

1025 Pennock Place, Suite 109 • Fort Collins

Staff member makes kids lunches in the kitchen.

Kids Cafe

Whether it free meals for kids during the summer or a nutritious snack after school, our Kids Cafe program works year round ensuring children throughout Larimer County have access to the food they need to thrive.

Learn more

SNAP outreach - family shopping at grocery store

SNAP (Food Stamps) Outreach

Do you need help paying for your monthly groceries? The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) can help you put food on the table. SNAP, also known as food stamps, is a benefit that helps you buy food. It works just like a bank card at most grocery stores and farmers markets. The Food Bank is here to help you get the food you need!

Learn more

Cooking Matters

Cooking Matters

Do you want to learn how to shop for and prepare healthy, low-cost meals? The Food Bank offers free, virtual food skills and nutrition classes for adults in both English and Spanish. Participants will learn how and why to make healthful choices and get ideas for new recipes. Each adult will be mailed a $10 grocery store gift card after each new Cooking Matters class. Email our Nutrition Educator to learn about future classes. You can also head to CookingMatters.org for more information about the program.

Senior Nutrition

Senior Meals

In partnership with Volunteers of America, we provide nutritious meals to seniors 60 years of age and older. Prior to the pandemic, these seniors received these meals at congregate sites throughout Larimer County where they were able to eat together and socialize. For now, congregate meals are not possible, but guests continue to receive nutritious meals so they can remain healthy and thrive.

Senior Meal Sites

Image of a dog in the backseat of a car with the Colorado Pet Pantry logo.

Pet Pantry

In partnership with the Colorado Pet Pantry, the Food Bank hosts a monthly pet supply pantry at our Lincoln Ave. pantry in Loveland. At each pantry event, pet owners can receive food and supplies for their furry family. Currently, the pantry is held the 4th Saturday of each month.

4th Saturday of every month
Novembers pet pantry will be on November 20 due to the Holidays.
Upcoming 2021 dates: November 20, December 18.
1 – 3 pm
2600 N. Lincoln Avenue • Loveland

Learn more

Источник: https://foodbanklarimer.org/where_do_i_go/

Food Insecurity

References

1 Nord M, Andrews M, Carlson S. Household food security in the United States, 2005 [Internet]. Washington: USDA Economic Research Service; 2005 [cited 2017 Nov 27]. Report No.: ERR-29. Available from: https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/45655/29206_err29_002.pdf?v=41334 [PDF – 880 KB]

2 Coleman-Jensen A, Gregory C, Singh A. Household food security one has to go food the United States in 2013. Washington: USDA Economic Research Service; 2014. Report No.: ERR-29.

3 Carlson SJ, Andrews MS, Bickel GW. Measuring food insecurity and hunger in the United States: Development of a national benchmark measure and prevalence estimates. J Nutr. 1999;129(2):510S-516S.

4 USDA Economic Research Service [Internet]. Washington: USDA Economic Research Service; [updated 2017 Nov 27]. Definitions of Food Insecurity; [updated 2017 Oct 4; cited 2017 Nov 27]. Available from: https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us/definitions-of-food-security/

5 Jones A, Ngure F, Pelto G, Young S. What are we assessing when we measure food security? A compendium and review of current metrics. Adv Nutr. 2013;4:481-505. doi: 10.3945/an.113.004119.

6 Food and Agriculture Organization. An introduction to the basic concepts of food security [Internet]. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; 2008 [cited 2017 Nov 27]. Available from: http://www.fao.org/docrep/013/al936e/al936e00.pdf [PDF – 83 KB]

7 Nord M, Andrews M, Winicki J. Frequency and duration of food insecurity and hunger in US households. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2002;34(4):194-201.

8 Sharkey JR, Johnson CM, Dean WR. Relationship of household food insecurity to health-related quality of life in a large sample of rural and urban women. Women Health. 2011;51(5):442-60.

9 Seefeldt KS, Castelli T (University of Michigan). Low-income women's experiences with food programs, food spending, and food-related hardships [Internet]. Washington: USDA Economic Research Service; 2009 Aug [cited 2017 Nov 27]. Report No.: 57. Contractor No.: 59-5000-6-0103. Available from: https://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/35894/PDF [PDF – 249 KB]

10 Nord M, Andrews M, Carlson S. Household food security in the United States, 2007 [Internet]. Washington: USDA Economic Research Service; 2007 [cited 2017 Nov 27]. Report No.: ERR-66. Available from: https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/46084/11227_err66.pdf?v=41056 [PDF – one has to go food KB]

11 Nord M. Characteristics of low-income households with very low food security: An analysis of the USDA GPRA food security indicator. USDA-ERS Economic Information Bulletin No. 25. 2007.

12 Klesges L, Pahor M, Shorr R, Wan J, Williamson J, Guralnik J. Financial difficulty in acquiring food among elderly disabled women: Results from the women’s health and aging. Am J Public Health. 2001;91:68-75.

13 Coleman-Jensen A, Rabbitt MP, Gregory CA, Singh A. Household food insecurity in the United States in 2016. USDA-ERS Economic Research Report No. (ERR-237). 2017.

14 Nord M. Food insecurity in households with children: Prevalence, severity, and household characteristics [Internet]. Washington: USDA Economic Research Service; 2009 [cited 2017 Nov 27]. Report No.: EIB-56. Available from: https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/44419/9360_eib56_1_.pdf?v=41055 [PDF – 1.4 MB]

15 Coleman-Jensen A, Nord M. Food insecurity among households with working-age adults with disabilities [Internet]. Washington: USDA Economic Research Service; 2013 [cited 2017 Nov 27]. Report No.: ERR-144. Available from: https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/45038/34589_err_144.pdf?v=41284 [PDF – 1 MB]

16 Huang J, Guo B, Kim Y. Food insecurity and disability: Do economic resources matter? Soc Sci Res. 2010;39:111-24.

17 Zenk SN, Schultz AJ, Israel BA, James SA, Wilson ML. Neighborhood racial composition, neighborhood poverty, and the spatial accessibility of supermarkets in metropolitan Detroit. Am J Public Health. 2005;95(4):660-7.

18 USDA Economic Research Service. Access to affordable and nutritious food: Measuring and understanding food deserts and their consequences [Internet]. Washington: USDA Economic Research Service; 2009 [cited 2017 Nov 27]. Available from: https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/42711/12698_ap036fm_1_.pdf?v=41055 [PDF – 237 KB]

19 Powell LM, Slater S, Mirtcheva D, Bao Y, Chaloupka FJ. Food store availability and neighborhood characteristics in the United States. Prev Med. 2007;44(3):189-195.

20 Beaulac J, Kristjansson E, Cummins S. A systematic review of food deserts, 1966-2007. Prev Chron Dis. 2009;6(3):A105.

21 Crocket EG, Clancy KL, Bowering J. Comparing the cost of a thrifty food plan market in three areas of New York state. J Nutr Educ. 1992;24(1):71S-78S.

22 Seligman HK, Laraia BA, Kushel MB. Food insecurity is associated with chronic disease among low-income NHANES participants [Internet]. J Nutr. 2010 [cited 2017 Nov 27];140(2):304-10. Available from: http://doi.org/10.3945/jn.109.112573

23 Zenk SN, Schulz AJ, Israel BA, James SA, Bao S, Wilson ML. Neighborhood racial composition, neighborhood poverty, and the spatial accessibility of supermarkets in metropolitan Detroit. Am J Public Health. 2005;95(4):660-667.

24 Holben DH, Pheley AM. Diabetes risk and obesity in food-insecure households in rural Appalachian Ohio [Internet]. Prev Chronic Dis. 2006[cited 2017 Nov 27];3(3). Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2006/jul/05_0127.htm

25 Gundersen C, Kreider B. Bounding the effects of food insecurity on children’s health outcomes. J Health Econ. 2009;28(5):971-983.

26 Metallinos-Katsaras E, Must A, Gorman K. A longitudinal study of food insecurity on obesity in preschool children. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012;112(12):1949-58.

27 Cook JT, Frank DA. Food security, poverty, and human development in the United States. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008;1136(1):193-209.

28 Cook JT. Impacts of child food insecurity and hunger on health and development in children: Implications of measurement approach. In paper commissioned for the Workshop on Research Gaps and Opportunities on the Causes and Consequences of Child Hunger. 2013 April.

29 Burke MP, Martini LH, Çayır E, Hartline-Grafton HL, Meade RL. Severity of household food insecurity is positively associated with mental disorders among children and adolescents in the United States. J Nutr. 2016;146(10):2019-26. doi: 10.3945/jn.116.232298.

30 Bhattarai GR, Duffy PA, Raymond J. Use of food pantries and food stamps in low‐income households in the One has to go food States. J Consum Aff. 2005;39(2):276-98.

31 Huang J, Barnidge E. Low-income children's participation in the National School Lunch Program and household food insufficiency. Soc Sci Med. 2016;150:8-14.

32 Kreider B, Pepper JV, Roy M. Identifying the effects of WIC on food insecurity among infants and children [Internet]. Lexington: University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research; 2012 Oct [cited 2017 Nov 27]. Available from: http://uknowledge.uky.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1027&context=ukcpr_papers [PDF – 1.2 MB]

33 Ratcliffe C, McKernan S, Zhang S. How much does the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program reduce food insecurity? Am J Agric Econ. 2011;93(4):1082-98. doi: 10.1093/ajae/aar026.

34 Larson NI, Story MT. Food insecurity and weight status among US children and families: A review of the literature. Am J Prev Med. 2011;40(2):166-73.

Источник: https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/social-determinants-health/interventions-resources/food-insecurity
Los Angeles, CA 90058

Go, Slow, and Whoa! A Kid's Guide to Eating Right

Looking for an easy way to eat healthier? The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health) suggests we use Go, Slow, and Whoa as a way to think about food.

Think of the healthiest foods as "go" foods. These are foods like steamed or raw veggies and skim or low-fat milk that are good to eat almost anytime.

Foods that are OK to eat sometimes are "slow" foods. Foods like hamburgers or pancakes aren't off limits — but they shouldn't be eaten every day. One has to go food most, you'll want to eat these foods just a couple of times a week.

Some foods should make you stop, think, and say, "Whoa! Should I eat that?" These foods are the least healthy. They are the most likely to cause weight problems, especially if a person eats them jose canseco rookie card value the time. "Whoa!" foods are once-in-a-while foods, like French fries or ice cream.

Go Foods

Eat these almost anytime:

Vegetables

  • Almost all fresh, frozen, and canned vegetables without added fat (such as butter) or sauces

Fruits

  • All fresh and frozen fruits
  • Canned fruits packed in juice

Breads and Cereals

  • Whole-grain breads, pitas, and tortillas
  • Whole-grain pasta, brown rice
  • Hot and cold unsweetened whole-grain breakfast cereals

 Milk and Milk Products

  • Skim and 1% milk
  • Fat-free and low-fat yogurt
  • Part-skim, reduced-fat, and fat-free cheese
  • Low-fat and fat-free cottage cheese

Meats and Other Sources of Protein

  • Beef and pork that has the fat cut off before cooking
  • Extra-lean ground beef
  • Chicken and turkey without skin
  • Tuna canned in water
  • Fish and shellfish that's been baked, broiled, steamed, or grilled
  • Beans, split peas, and lentils
  • Tofu
  • Egg whites and substitutes

Sweets and Snacks

  • Sweets and snacks are never "go" foods. Even though some sweets and snacks are lower in fat and calories, people should limit the amount of sweets and snacks they eat so they don't take in more calories than their bodies need.

Spreads and Condiments

  • Ketchup
  • Mustard
  • Fat-free creamy salad dressing
  • Fat-free mayonnaise
  • Fat-free sour cream
  • Vinegar

Drinks

  • Water
  • Fat-free and 1% milk
  • Diet soda
  • Diet and one has to go food iced teas and lemonade

Slow Foods

Eat these sometimes:

Vegetables

  • All vegetables in added fat and sauces
  • Oven-baked fries
  • Avocados

Fruits

  • 100% fruit juice
  • Fruits canned in light syrup
  • Dried fruits

Breads and Cereals

Milk and Milk Products

  • 2% milk
  • Processed cheese spreads

Meats and Other Sources of Protein

  • Lean ground beef
  • Broiled hamburgers
  • Chicken and turkey with the skin
  • Tuna canned in oil
  • Ham
  • Low-fat hot dogs
  • Canadian bacon
  • Peanut butter
  • Nuts
  • Whole eggs cooked without added fat, such as boiled or poached

Sweets and Snacks

  • Ice milk bars
  • Frozen fruit-juice bars
  • Low-fat frozen yogurt
  • Low-fat ice cream
  • Fig bars
  • Ginger snaps
  • Baked chips
  • Low-fat microwave popcorn
  • Pretzels

Spreads and Condiments

  • Vegetable oil*
  • Olive oil*
  • Oil-based salad dressing*
  • Low-fat creamy salad dressing
  • Low-fat mayonnaise
  • Low-fat sour cream
  • Soft margarine

Drinks

  • 2% milk
  • 100% fruit juice
  • Sports drinks

Whoa Foods

Eat these once in a while:

Vegetables

  • Any vegetable fried in oil, such as French fries or hash browns

Fruits

  • Fruits canned in heavy syrup

Breads and Cereals

  • Doughnuts, muffins, croissants, and sweet rolls
  • Sweetened breakfast cereals
  • Crackers that have hydrogenated oils (trans fats)

Milk and Milk Products

  • Whole milk
  • Full-fat cheese
  • Cream cheese
  • Yogurt made from whole milk

Meats and Other Sources of Protein

  • Beef and pork that hasn't had the fat cut off before cooking
  • Fried hamburgers
  • Fried chicken
  • Bacon
  • Fried fish and shellfish
  • Chicken nuggets
  • Hot dogs
  • Lunch meats
  • Pepperoni
  • Sausage
  • Ribs
  • Whole eggs cooked with added fat, such as butter, fat, or oil

Sweets and Snacks

  • Cookies, cakes, and pies
  • Cheesecake
  • Ice cream
  • Chocolate candy
  • Chips
  • Buttered microwave popcorn

Spreads and Condiments

  • Butter
  • Stick margarine
  • Lard
  • Salt pork
  • Gravy
  • Regular creamy salad dressing
  • Mayonnaise
  • Tartar sauce
  • Sour cream
  • Cheese sauce
  • Cream cheese
  • Cream cheese dips

Drinks

Source: U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health

*Vegetable and olive oils that have no saturated or trans fats and can be eaten daily, but in limited portions to meet daily calorie needs.

Источник: https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/go-slow-whoa.html

The Problem of Food Waste

Hide References

  1. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Economic One has to go food Service. “Food Security in the U.S.: Key Statistics & Graphics.” USDA, October 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us/key-statistics-graphics.aspx
  5. United States Department of Agriculture. “USDA and EPA Join with Private Sector, Charitable Organizations to Set Nation’s First Food Waste Reduction Goals. Press Release No. 0257.15” USDA, September 16, 2015. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.usda.gov/media/press-releases/2015/09/16/usda-and-epa-join-private-sector-charitable-organizations-set
  6. Thyberg, Krista L., and David J. Tonjes. “Drivers of Food Waste and Their Implications for Sustainable Policy Development.” Resources, Conservation and Recycling, vol. 106, 2016, pp. 110–123. Retrieved 14 April, 2020, from https://commons.library.stonybrook.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1020&context=techsoc-articles
  7. Ibid.
  8. Ibid. travel money card contact us United States Department of Agriculture, Office of the Chief Economist. “U.S. Food Waste Challenge: FAQ’s.” USDA, June 2013. Retrieved April 2015, from https://www.usda.gov/oce/foodwaste/faqs.htm 
  9. Economic Research Service. “Energy Use in the US Food System.” USDA, March 2010. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/pub-details/?pubid=46377
  10. Lubowski, Ruben N. et al. “Major Uses of Land in the United States, 2002.” USDA Economic Research Service, May 2006. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/7203/files/ei060014.pdf
  11. Economic Research Service. “Irrigation & Water Use.” USDA, 2018. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/farm-practices-management/irrigation-water-use/
  12. ReFED. “A Roadmap to Reduce U.S. Food Waste By 20 Percent.” ReFED, 2016. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.refed.com/downloads/ReFED_Report_2016.pdf
  13. Yaffe-bellany, David, and Michael Corkery. “Dumped Milk, Smashed Eggs, Plowed Vegetables: Food Waste of the Pandemic.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 11 Apr. 2020. Retrieved 14 April, 2020, from www.nytimes.com/2020/04/11/business/coronavirus-destroying-food.html
  14. Charles, Dan. “Food Shortages? Nope, Too Much Food In The Wrong Places.” NPR, NPR, 3 Apr. 2020. Retrieved 14 April 2020, from www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2020/04/03/826006362/food-shortages-nope-too-much-food-in-the-wrong-places
  15. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  16. Ibid.
  17. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United States: Fisheries and Aquaculture Department. “Discards in the world’s marine fisheries: An update.” FAO, 2005. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.fao.org/tempref/docrep/fao/008/y5936e/y5936e00.pdf
  18. Bergmann, Melanie. “Damage sustained by epibenthic invertebrates discarded in the Nephrops fishery of the Clyde Sea area, Scotland.” Journal of Sea Research, 45 (2): 105–118  (February 2001). Tcf bank atm deposit from: https://epic.awi.de/10387/
  19. Stuart, Tristram. “The global food waste scandal.” TED, Salon London, Spring 2012. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.ted.com/talks/tristram_stuart_the_global_food_waste_scandal?language=en
  20. Block, Ben. “European Fisheries Law Undergoes Review.” World Watch Institute, 2013. Retrieved March 8, 2019, from https://www.worldwatch.org/node/5892
  21. Love, Dave C. et al. “Wasted seafood in the United States: Quantifying loss from production to consumption and moving toward solutions.” Global Environmental Change, 35, 116-124 (November 2015). Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378015300340
  22. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United States: Fisheries and Aquaculture Department. “Discards in the world’s marine fisheries: An update.” FAO, 2005. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.fao.org/tempref/docrep/fao/008/y5936e/y5936e00.pdf
  23. Groenewold, Stefan and Fonds, Mark. “Effects on benthic scavengers of discards and damaged benthos produced by the beam-trawl fishery in the southern North Sea.” ICES Journal of Marine Science, 57(5): 1395-1406 (October 2000). Retrieved March one has to go food, 2019, from https://doi.org/10.1006/jmsc.2000.0914
  24. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved Wells fargo student loan payment contact number 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  25. Groenewold, Stefan and Fonds, Mark. “Effects on benthic scavengers of discards and damaged benthos produced by the beam-trawl fishery in the southern North Sea.” ICES Journal of Marine Science, 57(5): 1395-1406 (October 2000). Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://doi.org/10.1006/jmsc.2000.0914
  26. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United States: Fisheries and Aquaculture Department. “Discards in the world’s marine fisheries: An update.” FAO, 2005. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.fao.org/tempref/docrep/fao/008/y5936e/y5936e00.pdf
  27. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  28. Douglas, Leah. “Chicken Company to Cull Birds as Processing Capacity Banks to open student checking account Food and Environment Reporting Network, 12 Apr. 2020. Retrieved 14 April 2020, from thefern.org/ag_insider/chicken-company-to-cull-birds-as-processing-capacity-plummets/
  29. Ibid.
  30. Ibid.
  31. Ibid.
  32. Buzby, Jean C. et al. “The Value of Retail- and Consumer-Level Fruit and Vegetable Losses in the United States.” The Journal of Consumer Affairs, Fall 2011, 492-515. Retrieved April  2015 from https://ucanr.edu/datastoreFiles/234-2202.pdf
  33. Economic Research Service. “Food Security in the U.S.: Key Statistics & Graphics.” USDA, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us/key-statistics-graphics.aspx
  34. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  35. Buzby, Jean C. et al. “The Estimated Amount, Value, and Calories of Postharvest Food Losses at the Retail and Consumer Levels in the United States.” Economic Research Service, USDA, February 2014. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/43833/43680_eib121.pdf
  36. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  37. Ibid.
  38. Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic. “Recommendations to Strengthen the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Act.” NRDC, September 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/recommendations-bill-emerson-good-samaritan-act-fs.pdf
  39. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  40. Ibid.
  41. Bloom, Jonathan. American Wasteland: How America Throws Away Nearly Half Its Food (and What We Can Do About One has to go food. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press. p 143.
  42. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  43. Ibid.
  44. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  45. Love, Dave C. et al. “Wasted seafood in the United States: Quantifying loss from production to consumption and moving toward solutions.” Global Environmental Change, 35, 116-124 (November 2015). Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378015300340
  46. Gerlock, Grant. “To End Food Waste, Change Needs to Begin at Home.” NPR’s The Salt, November 17, 2014. Retrieved September 22, 2015, from https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/11/17/364172105/to-end-food-waste-change-needs-to-begin-at-home
  47. Buzby, Jean C. et al. “The Estimated Amount, Value, and Calories of Postharvest Food Losses at the Retail and Consumer Levels in the United States.” Economic Research Service, USDA, February 2014. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/43833/43680_eib121.pdf
  48. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  49. Natural Resources Defense Council. “Two-Thirds of Food Wasted at Home in Three Major U.S. Cities is Edible.” NRDC, October 25, 2017. Retrieved November 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/media/2017/171024-0
  50. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  51. Natural Resources Defense Council. “Two-Thirds of Food Wasted at Home in Three Major U.S. Cities is Edible.” NRDC, October 25, 2017. Retrieved November 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/media/2017/171024-0
  52. Lehner, Peter. “Tackling Food Waste at Home.” NRDC, August 21, 2012. Retrieved April 2015, from https://www.nrdc.org/experts/peter-lehner/tackling-food-waste-home
  53. Food Marketing Institute, “U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends 2015,” FMI, 2015. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.fmi.org/forms/store/ProductFormPublic/u-s-grocery-shopper-trends-2015-full-report
  54. Waste & Resources Action Programme. “Consumer insight: date labels and storage guide.” WRAP, May 2011. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.wrap.org.uk/sites/files/wrap/Technical%20report%20dates.pdf
  55. Gunders, Dana. “Wasted: How America is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Natural Resources Defense Council, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-2017-report.pdf
  56. Ibid.
  57. Ibid.
  58. Ibid.
  59. Ibid.
  60. Ibid.
  61. US Environmental Protection Agency. “Sustainable Management of Food Basics.” EPA, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-management-food/sustainable-management-food-basics
  62. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. “Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis.” Fifth Assessment Report, Table 8.7. Cambridge University Press, 2013. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.climatechange2013.org/images/report/WG1AR5_ALL_FINAL.pdf
  63. Waste & Resources Action Programme. “New estimates for household food and drink waste in the UK. Final report (version 1.1)” WRAP, November 2011. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://www.wrap.org.uk/sites/files/wrap/New%20estimates%20for%20household%20food%20and%20drink%20waste%20in%20the%20UK%20FINAL%20v2%20(updated%207thAugust2012).pdf
  64. McKinsey & Company. Resource revolution: Meeting the world’s energy, materials, food and water needs.” McKinsley Global Institute, November 2011. Retrieved from March 7, 2019, from  https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/sustainability-and-resource-productivity/our-insights/resource-revolution
  65. Hall, Kevin D. “The Progressive Increase of Food Waste in America and Its Environmental Impact.” PlosOne, November 25, 2009. Retrieved March 7, 2019, from https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0007940
Источник: https://foodprint.org/issues/the-problem-of-food-waste/

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