air force f 22

The U.S. Air Force plans to slim down its fighter fleet from seven planes to just four. · One of the aircraft the service wants to ditch is the F. WASHINGTON — The Air Force on Friday awarded Lockheed Martin a $10.9 billion contract to modernize its F-22 Raptor fighter jet. The largest assemblage of U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor stealth fighter planes is in the Pacific region for exercises analysts say is a strong.

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Extremely Powerful F-22 Raptor Shows Its Crazy Ability

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US Air Force to send dozens of F-22 Raptor fighter jets to Pacific in powerful message as tensions with China escalate

THE US Air Force is set to send dozens of F-22 Raptor fighter jets to the Pacific as tensions with China escalate.

Around 25 of the aircraft will head to Guam and Tinian islands later this month in what experts say is a powerful message to the Communist nation.

The US Air Force is set to send dozens of F-22 Raptor fighter jets to the Pacific

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Around 25 of the aircraft will head to Guam and Tinian islands later this month

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Gen. Ken Wilsbach, Pacific Air Forces commander, told CNN: "We have never had this many Raptors deployed together in the Pacific Air Forces area of operations."

Experts fear China will blast the United States off the top spot to become the world's top economic and military power within the next decade.

Defense analyst Carl Schuster said: "The Pacific Air Force is demonstrating that it can deploy as many or more fifth-generation aircraft into the theater on short notice than (China) currently has in its entire inventory."

Normal deployments feature six to 12 of the jets, Schuster said.

America has around 180 F-22s; China has up to 24 fifth-generation fighters.

Former Australian air force officer Peter Layton said: "The US is actively practicing the deployments it will make if there is a major crisis or war.

"The US is taking China very seriously and is developing its force posture and training its forces to be able to quickly move into position."

GOING NUCLEAR

The move is part of Operation Pacific Iron 2021.

"Airmen deployed in support of Pacific Iron 2021 will demonstrate Multi-capable Airmen skills and conduct simulated combat flight operations from local airports in Guam and Tinian," the Pacific Air Forces said in a statement.

They added: "More than 35 aircraft and approximately 800 Airmen from Pacific Air Forces and Air Combat Command will deploy to the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command’s area of responsibility in July to participate in Operation Pacific Iron 2021."

A bombshell Pentagon report said the world is edging towards nuclear war because Russia and China are modernizing ballistic missiles, and developing new submarines.

Beijing is reportedly considering whether to develop autonomous nuclear weapons systems, the New York Post reports.

Ambassador Robert Wood told reporters last week: “If they were to develop, these kinds of weapons and aerial systems, this has the potential to change the strategic stability environment in a dynamic way.”

SUPERPOWER TAKEOVER?

China is on course to overtake the US and become the biggest economic powerhouse, Professor Kerry Brown, of the Lau China Institute at King's College London, told The Sun.

"Economically, barring total disaster for China, it will be the largest economy some time in the next decade," Professor Brown said.  

China's rapid military modernisation has fuelled growing concern among its Asian neighbours and in the West.

The People's Liberation Army now has the world's second-largest annual budget after the US armed forces and has been adding sophisticated new aircraft, showcased in a flyover at the start of the centenary ceremony featuring a squadron of China's J-20 stealth fighters.

The country is enmeshed in a deepening rivalry with the United States for global power status and has seen recent clashes with India along their disputed border.

And China's ambitions show no sign of dampening.

'TOTAL CONTROL'

Ashok Swain, professor of peace and conflict research at Sweden's Uppsala University, believes China will "get the upper hand, both economically and militarily, on bilateral terms" in the next decade.

"The US is spending on its military at least three times more than China, but China is spending more and more every year to modernise its military and develop new weapons," the 56-year-old told The Sun.

"China, under Xi Jinping, has become very different from what it was expected to be ten years ago when the Chinese Communist Party was celebrating its 90th anniversary.

"There is no hope anymore of regular transition of power or some openness in the political system.

"Xi now has total control of the country, party, and military."

Robert Sutter of George Washington University's Elliot School of International Affairs warned that Xi is "setting up China for a protracted struggle with the US".

"In foreign affairs it involves growth of wealth and power, with China unencumbered as it pursues its very self-centered policy goals at the expense of others and of the prevailing world order," Sutter said.

New data has revealed how the Communist Party ranks swelled by 2.43 million in 2020 - the largest annual gain since Xi became president in 2013 - to 95.15 million members now.

China is on course to overtake the US and become the biggest economic powerhouse

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Источник: https://www.the-sun.com/news/3295124/us-air-force-f-22-fighter-jets-pacific-china/

I/ITSEC 2021: Unintended consequences (Opinion)

Over the years, training coverage in Shephard has reflected the debate frequently aired in the military and industry concerning the live-virtual balance. In other words, how much live training needs to be completed compared to time spent in the simulator? With air domain training accounting for around 65% of all spending on training and simulation, this conversation usually focuses on flight simulation.

At present, the consensus is that the balance should be 50% live and 50% virtual. It is unclear how this figure was arrived at, but its adoption by some of the world’s most established and mature air forces, including the USAF, RAF, RAAF, German Air Force and French Air Force, has provided an accepted accord that some others are now adopting.

The benefits of increased time spent in the virtual world presupposes that the synthetic training system in question is of sufficient fidelity to match accurately the characteristics of the real aircraft. If that is so, time spent in the simulator has many advantages. These include savings accrued by not paying more than $30,000 per hour to fly an F-35 and reducing the costs associated with wear and tear on a frontline airframe.

Other advantages associated with virtual training include the ability to network the device with other aircraft simulators to create a composite air operations exercise, as well as the ability to precisely repeat scenarios to extract teaching points to enable the pilot to understand fully the mission.

The benefits of offloading live training into the virtual world not only concern operational pilots. Through programmes such as the USN’s Project Avenger, the USAF’s Undergraduate Pilot Training 2.0 and the RAF’s trials of CAE’s Sprint Trainer, the use of low-cost virtual systems that allow student pilots to proceed at their own pace is growing. This is related to moves towards removing elementary and/or intermediate training aircraft from syllabi.

Another source of pressure to move more training into the virtual sphere comes from airspace restrictions, shortages and security. Closely related to this is the performance of modern aircraft and their weapons. Aircraft such as the F-22, F-35 and soon the B-21 have sensors and weapons that operate at extreme ranges. This sensitive data needs to be protected in secure virtual environments and not presented on live ranges where potential enemies can listen to and observe capabilities.

The Talon Military Operations Area was recently expanded by 93%. (Photo: US DoD)

Airspace shortages do not affect all countries. In the US, for example, a portion of the national airspace in southeast New Mexico, where the 49th Wing from Holloman AFB trains F-16 pilots, known as the Talon Military Operations Area, was recently expanded by 93%.

The USAF said that F-16 student pilots will be able to fly as high as 51,000ft when authorised by ATC and as low as 500ft over some unpopulated areas of the airspace. They will also see an increase in the variety of their missions and tactics, and an improvement in the techniques and procedures they can execute in the new airspace.

Despite the advantages of virtual training, Shephard has highlighted two shortcomings in the past: a lack of g-force, leading to the potential for negative training, and the lack of jeopardy in undertaking certain manoeuvres that can, again, lead to negative training.

In discussing the topic with Air Mshl (ret) Sir Stuart Atha, director of defence capability at BAE Systems, we came to add an additional shortcoming – asset erosion. This has occurred as an unintended consequence of pushing more flight training into the virtual environment.

With more virtual hours and fewer live, the true picture of what is required to mount real-world operations – maintenance staff, spares, supporting assets such as fighter controllers and ordnance – has been forgotten or, worse still, deliberately seized upon by governments as a legitimate source for cost savings.

Virtual learning is vastly beneficial, but it needs to be placed in context, both in training and in terms of its impact on operations.

More from I/ITSEC 2021 News

Источник: https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/training-simulation/iitsec-2021-unintended-consequences-opinion/

F-22s conduct first airstrikes in Afghanistan

WASHINGTON — In a first use of expanded military authorities in Afghanistan, U.S. warplanes destroyed eight Taliban opium production facilities in Helmand Province Sunday, the top U.S. general there said Monday.

U.S. Forces Afghanistan commander Gen. John Nicholson said U.S. and Afghan forces in total took out 10 facilities on the first day of Operation Jagged Knife, a combined air operation that involved Afghan A-29s and U.S. B-52s and F-22s to take out a series of factories that Nicholson said were used as a revenue source for the Taliban.

The operation marked the first use of the F-22 to conduct airstrikes in Afghanistan. The highly advanced stealth fighter has capabilities that exceed what should have been necessary to destroy a Taliban target, raising questions as to why that platform was selected.

On Monday, Nicholson said the F-22 was selected in a last-minute decision, based on what aircraft was available with the capability to carry a small diameter precision bomb. Nicholson showed a clip of a target hit by an F-22 that dropped 250-pound small diameter bombs inside a compound. The bombs destroyed two of the structures inside the compound, leaving one, “to avoid collateral damage,” Nicholson said.

“It wasn’t because of some of the other capabilities of that aircraft,” that the F-22 was selected, Nicholson said.

In a statement, U.S. Air Forces Central Command said the F-22 was used “for a variety of reasons, but primarily to mitigate collateral damage and civilian casualties by employing small diameter bombs carried by the aircraft.”

In another strike, B-52s dropped 2,000-pound bombs on another drug production facility.

The ongoing operations reflect how the U.S. military has changed tactics since August, when President Donald Trump approved expanding the authorities under which U.S. forces could attack the Taliban and other militant groups in Afghanistan, Nicholson said. Before, U.S. forces could strike only in defense of Afghan forces and when they were fighting in close proximity to them.

Previously, “these targets were much harder to get to and really were not part of the [old] authorities,” Nicholson said.

“These new authorities allow us to attack the enemy …. to attack their financial networks, their revenue streams,” Nicholson said.

Nicholson said U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies estimate that the Taliban earns about $200 million a year from opium production in Afghanistan. The strikes are focused on the drug production facilities, not Afghan farmers growing opium poppy, the core ingredient in heroin and other opiate drugs, Nicholson said.

The Marines also provided overhead fires support with the High-Mobility Rocket Systems (HIMARS), and the Army provided surveillance support, Air Forces Central Command spokesman Lt. Col. Damien Pickart said.

Nicholson declined to say how many U.S. aircraft were involved in the operation or how many facilities the U.S. intends to strike in the continuing operation. Nicholson estimated that there are about 400 to 500 opium production facilities in Afghanistan.

Pickart said the F-22s took off from Al Dhafra Air Base in the United Arab Emirates and the B-52s were from the 69th Expeditionary Bomber Squadron assigned to Al Udeid Air Base’s 379th Air Expeditionary Wing,

The airstrikes were supported by KC-10 and KC-135 refuelers, surveillance aircraft and command and control aircraft, Pickart said.

About Tara Copp

Tara Copp is the Pentagon Bureau Chief for Military Times and author of the award-winning military nonfiction "The Warbird: Three Heroes. Two Wars. One Story."

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Источник: https://www.militarytimes.com/flashpoints/2017/11/20/f-22s-conduct-first-airstrikes-in-afghanistan/

No, F-22 pilots aren’t ‘walking off the job’ to avoid the COVID-19 vaccine

If men stopped filming themselves rant in their cars then the world would be a better place. One such rant posted to Twitter on Friday spread false information about the effects of the Department of Defense mandating service members take COVID-19 vaccines. 

Specifically, the man falsely claimed that Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin had texted the entire Department of Defense and said that all active-duty service members must be vaccinated by 10 a.m. on Friday or they will be court-martialed. He also falsely claimed that, because of the mandate, 12 F-22 Raptor pilots “walked off the job.”

“A dozen of the best pilots in the world: thousands of hours of training, millions of dollars of training, off the job,” the man said, before falsely claiming that 16 crew members for B-52 Stratofortress bombers also “walked off the job.”

The unidentified man’s video was viewed over 460,000 times, and soon the term “F-22” was trending on Twitter, which is bizarre because everything he said was false. Here’s why:

‘The Secretary of Defense texted all active-duty military personnel’

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin has better things to do than send late-night texts to a million service members. As anyone who’s been around the military a while knows, when SecDef Austin says something is mandatory, it gets rolled out on fancy Department of Defense letterhead with his big signature at the bottom. When asked if Austin sent such a message, Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby responded flatly, “Not true.”

‘All active-duty service members must be vaccinated by 10 a.m. or they will be court-martialed.’

This claim is also false, Kirby said. The Department of Defense did mandate the COVID-19 vaccine late last month when the version produced by Pfizer was fully approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The deadline varies for each service, but the one for the Air Force is Nov. 2 for active duty airmen and Dec. 2 for the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve.

In a statement earlier this month, the Air Force said that any refusal to receive the vaccine without an approved exemption or accommodation “may be punishable under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ),” so Twitter man may have a point about court-martials, but it didn’t come from the Secretary of Defense. Also, it is highly unlikely that 12 Air Force pilots simply walked off the job because … 

No, F-22 pilots aren’t ‘walking off the job’ to avoid the COVID-19 vaccine

‘A dozen pilots … walked off the job.’

Even if a dozen pilots wanted to rage-quit their careers over a vaccine, it’s not like they can just hang up their hat and leave. Officers who wish to resign under normal conditions must meet with their immediate commander or supervisor, who then must help them schedule their separation while “considering their preference and the interests of the Air Force,” according to Air Force regulations. The commander or supervisor also must sign the separation application and the applicant must be close to fulfilling whatever service commitment is left in their contract. So no, it’s not like a pilot can just yell “I quit!” on their way out the door.

Nobody has quit

It’s unclear where Twitter man got his information from, because all DoD resources this reporter consulted said that either no pilots have quit or that they are not tracking the information. Staff Sgt. Delaney Gonzales, a spokesperson for Langley-Eustis, said no pilots with the F-22-equipped 1st Fighter Wing have resigned over the COVID-19 vaccine mandate, while 2nd Lt. Kayla Fitzgerald, a spokesperson at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, said that the 325th Fighter Wing “is not aware of similar claims within its organization.”

An official with Air Force headquarters said they were not aware of any F-22 pilots resigning due to the vaccine mandate, and other outlets received a similar response.

“We are unaware of any pilots that have resigned their commissions due to the COVID vaccine,” Deana Heitzman, a spokesperson with the Air Force press desk, told PolitiFact on Friday. 

Twitter man may have gotten his information from Real Raw News, which published an article on Sept. 1 claiming that 12 pilots from the 1st Fighter Wing at Langley-Eustis and 15 pilots from the 2nd Bomb Wing at Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana resigned over the vaccine. Real Raw News has reported false information in the past, Politifact said, such as that the military had arrested President Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden, or that the military seized the White House to return Donald Trump as president.

“This website contains humor, parody, and satire,” Real Raw News says on its ‘about us’ page. “We have included this disclaimer for our protection, on the advice of legal counsel.”

The thing is, Twitter man’s false information is not just limited to whether or not pilots are resigning over the COVID-19 vaccine. The man goes on to say that, because there are fewer F-22 pilots, “you can kiss Taiwan good-bye. I would hate to be a Taiwanese citizen right now,” as if F-22s are the only thing standing between Taiwan and its covetous neighbor, China.

No, F-22 pilots aren’t ‘walking off the job’ to avoid the COVID-19 vaccine

“You can kiss Taiwan good-bye.”

F-22s are not the bulwark of Taiwanese freedom. While China does view the island as a renegade province and many experts believe that the next major war is likely to start there, the Raptor would likely play only a small role, if any, in the island’s defense. For one thing, only about half the 186-ship fleet is even capable of flying in combat, according to Air Force Magazine. The fighter is so maintenance-heavy that it can’t even outrun a hurricane, much less fly across the Pacific to stop China from invading Taiwan at the drop of a hat.

The F-22 is a great air superiority fighter, and while there are units flying it in Hawaii and in Alaska, it may not necessarily be the first on the scene should a fight go down over Taiwan. For example, there are Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy fighter units based in nearby Japan and Korea, and there are Navy aircraft carriers and other ships constantly carrying out freedom of navigation patrols in the South China Sea. So the F-22 is awesome, but it’s not the savior of the free world.

All of which is to say: if you get your news from a guy filming himself in a car, make sure you do some additional research.

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David Roza
Источник: https://taskandpurpose.com/news/air-force-f-22-pilots-covid-vaccine/

An In-Depth Analysis of why USAF wants to retire the F-22 Raptor


The USAF wants to retire the F-22 Raptor beginning around 2030 mainly due to two reasons: the F-22’s high operating costs, and the F-22’s obsolescence in a number of areas, with the latter being the primary reason.

As already reported, Speaking during the McAleese FY2022 Defense Programs Conference Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr., Air Force Chief of Staff, said on May 12, 2021 that the US Air Force (USAF) will cut its fighter inventory from seven fleets to four, and the F-22 is not on his short list.

Asked to clarify, an Air Force spokesperson said Brown is thinking very long-term and in the context of “a very small fleet,” which will become increasingly hard to support, especially as it passes the 25-year age mark in 2030. The F-22 will “eventually” retire from the inventory, she said, noting the F-22’s likely successor will be the Next Generation Air Dominance (NGAD).

‘The USAF wants to retire the F-22 beginning around 2030 mainly due to two reasons: the F-22’s high operating costs, and the F-22’s obsolescence in a number of areas, with the latter being the primary reason,’ aviation expert James Smith says on Quora.

‘With regards to high operating costs, the F-22 fleet was not produced in sufficient quantities to replace the F-15, and therefore its logistics and supply chain do not benefit from economy of scale as much as jets like the F-16 and F-35. The F-22 also uses legacy stealth materials that increase maintenance costs; properly retrofitting the F-22 with the F-35’s more durable full material stack is also not possible without replacing the composite panels of every F-22. These composites are not the same, so the structural strength of the jet and possibly the thickness of its skin would be affected, requiring recertification of its life limit and likely some redesigns of panels and doors to accommodate altered geometry. There are also a number of other technological advances that allows fighters to be cheaper to maintain, but which would require redesigns of the F-22, some being quite deep.

F-22 print

‘In terms of obsolescence, the F-22’s biggest issues are its limited range, its outdated core avionics and its stealth design.’

Smith continues;

‘For range, the F-22 was designed primarily for fighting in Europe and turn of the millennium era threats, and so its combat radius of approximately 590 nautical miles (less with any use of supercruise) is not ideal for a war with China. This is because jets may need to be flying from locations like Guam and relying on tankers only ~400 nautical miles (if F-22s are using supercruise) behind the F-22’s, which would then be threatened by new very long range missiles and enemy stealth fighters that may be able to slip sufficiently far past fighter screens to take those tankers out.

‘By comparison, the F-35A (land-based variant) has an air-to-air combat radius of 760 nautical miles, with a new engine being developed for it which would boost that to nearly 1000 nautical miles. The F-22’s NGAD successor is also anticipated to have an approximately 1000+ nautical miles combat radius.

This Cool Photo Shows the Different Colors of F-22’s Composite Materials and Stealthy Paint

‘For its core avionics the F-22 is considerably hampered by old ADA code with limited modularity, being run on old processors. Because the software isn’t very modular or open, adding a new sensor requires a lot of extra work. For the F-22 to outperform jets like the J-20 into the 2030s and beyond, it needs to keep up by getting a helmet mounted display, a panoramic cockpit display, updated electronic warfare systems, long range infrared sensors, updated communications systems, improved sensor fusion and combat ID systems, etc. Developing a clean sheet system based around an open architecture will take time and money, but from there it’ll be much easier to keep cutting edge, which will be critical as we enter into something resembling a second Cold War.

‘For stealth, the F-22 is quite stealthy, but its potential was compromised in order to make it very agile, which in this day and age is becoming a lesser and lesser priority as air-to-air missiles become more advanced.’

Smith concludes;

‘By creating a clean sheet fighter, you can make a jet better shaped to have highly effective stealth against both fire control radar bands like the X-band, and lower frequency “counter-stealth” search radars operating in the UHF and VHF bands, allowing jets like NGAD to escort B-21 bombers as they penetrate deep into enemy airspace.’

F-22 Raptor model

Photo credit: U.S. Air Force


Dario Leone

Dario Leone is an aviation, defense and military writer. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviation Geek Club” one of the world’s most read military aviation blogs. His writing has appeared in The National Interest and other news media. He has reported from Europe and flown Super Puma and Cougar helicopters with the Swiss Air Force.

Источник: https://theaviationgeekclub.com/an-in-depth-analysis-of-why-usaf-wants-to-retire-the-f-22-raptor/

Is the Air Force's F-22 fighter jet making pilots sick?

Military officers rarely speak out against their services, but in our lead story you'll hear from two elite pilots who question the safety of Air Force's most sophisticated, stealthy, and expensive fighter jet, the F-22 Raptor. Maj. Jeremy Gordon and Capt. Joshua Wilson have chosen to stop flying the F-22 because they say during some flights they and other pilots have experienced oxygen deprivation, disorientation, and worse. They are concerned about their safety in the air, as well as the long-term health consequences. The Air Force says it is doing all it can to investigate and solve the problem, and are keeping the jets in the air with careful supervision of the pilots.


The following script is from "The Raptor" which originally aired on May 6, 2012. Lesley Stahl is the correspondent. Karen Sughrue, producer.

The shiniest jewel in the Air Force is its F-22 Raptor, a sleek, stealth fighter jet that the Pentagon says can outgun and outmaneuver any combat plane anywhere in the world. But for all its prowess, the Raptor has yet to be used in combat. It was designed to go up against an enemy with a sophisticated air force, which means it sat on the sidelines during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, leaving its 200 pilots to fly mainly training missions.

But the Raptor - the most expensive fighter ever - has been plagued by a mysterious flaw that causes its pilots to become disoriented while at the controls from a lack of oxygen.

Tonight, you will hear from two of them who have come to believe the jet is endangering their lives and those of the people in communities they fly over.

They are so concerned they have taken the extraordinary step of risking their careers by appearing on 60 Minutes in uniform -- and without permission -- to blow the whistle on a plane they love to fly.

When you hear about the F-22, it's always in superlatives: the newest, fastest, stealthiest, highest-flying, most gravity-defying, enemy-killing combat machine in the sky.

Josh Wilson: It's invincible. It's the bottom line.

Its pilots are highly-trained, and competitively chosen, the elite jet jockeys of the Air Force.

Jeremy Gordon: I firmly believe in the aircraft.

Major Jeremy Gordon and Captain Josh Wilson are with the Virginia Air National Guard, based at Langley Air Force Base near Norfolk. They're two of only 200 pilots qualified to fly the F-22.

Josh Wilson: Its ability to go up into lethal force where we need it. It is absolutely unmatched.

Josh has been flying it for two years, Jeremy for six.

Lesley Stahl: What makes it unique when you're flying it?

Jeremy Gordon: The ability to know what's going on all the way around you all the time.

Josh Wilson: It is just a phenomenal, phenomenal machine.

Both flew combat missions in the Iraq War. Major Gordon was awarded the Air Force's highest honor for heroism: the Distinguished Flying Cross. In Air Force evaluations, he was called quote "a superstar...flawless." Captain Wilson was called: "a superb officer with intense warrior spirit."

Josh Wilson: It was, you know, kind of a surreal experience.

Josh says that during a routine F-22 training mission in February 2011, he suddenly realized he was losing control.

Josh Wilson: Several times during the flight, I had to really concentrate, immense concentration on just doing simple, simple tasks. Our training tells you if you suspect something's probably going on, go ahead and pull your emergency oxygen and come back home. When I did make that decision to pull the emergency oxygen ring, I couldn't find it. I couldn't remember, you know, what part of the aircraft it was in.

Lesley Stahl: So this emergency ring was exactly where it should've been?

Josh Wilson: Uh-huh.

Источник: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/is-the-air-forces-f-22-fighter-jet-making-pilots-sick/

A $201M maintenance error: Air Force releases cause of F-22 crash at Eglin AFB in 2020


EGLIN AFB — Last year's crash of an F-22 Raptor fighter jet on the Eglin Air Force Base reservation has been traced to "a maintenance error made after the aircraft was washed, which impacted control inputs transmitted to the aircraft," according to a Wednesday email from the Air Force's Air Combat Command.

The F-22, assigned to the 43rd Fighter Squadron of the 325th Fighter Wing, crashed on the morning of May 15, 2020, about 12 miles northeast of the main section of Eglin during what the Air Force described as a routine training mission.

The pilot ejected safely and there were no injuries on the ground, but the aircraft, valued at $201 million, was destroyed. Parts of the 325th Fighter Wing were moved to Eglin from nearby Tyndall AFB in 2018 as Hurricane Michael bore down on Panama City and eventually laid waste to the installation.

From 2020: Eglin AFB releases additional information on Friday F-22 crash

Due to what an Air Combat Command spokeswoman on Wednesday called "operational security concerns," an Accident Investigation Board report, which would have been subject to public release, was not pursued in connection with the F-22 crash. "Operational security" is a risk management process designed to keep sensitive information from falling into unintended hands.

Instead, the spokeswoman said the crash was probed through a commander-directed investigation and a Safety Investigation Board. Neither of those reports are subject to public release, but are intended for internal Air Force use.

Safety investigation boards typically comprise six to 10 officers and senior enlisted personnel, headed by a colonel. Accident investigation boards, on the other hand, are headed by a senior pilot and include another pilot along with a “maintenance expert, flight surgeon, judge advocate and any other needed specialists," according to the Air Combat Command website.

From 2020:F-22 Raptor crashes on Eglin reservation; pilot ejects safely

And according to the Office of Inspector General for the Secretary of the Air Force, commander-directed investigations can be used "to investigate systemic (or procedural) problems or to look into matters regarding individual conduct or responsibility."

A single paragraph in Wednesday's email providing what the spokeswoman called key details of the Safety Investigation Board report and the commander-directed investigation, notes that "(u)pon takeoff, the pilot noticed a Flight Control System advisory and elected to continue with takeoff. Shortly after the aircraft became airborne, the pilot began having trouble controlling the aircraft and declared an emergency. While a recovery plan was being coordinated, the pilot continued to have issues with the aircraft and ejected."

Flight control systems comprise the parts of the aircraft that move to change its direction, height and other flight characteristics, and includes the cockpit controls for those aircraft surfaces. The F-22 Raptor is a "fly-by-wire" aircraft, in which the pilot's control inputs are translated electronically to move the jet's flight control surfaces.

Air Combat Command will not release any additional information on the crash, according to the command spokeswoman. 

The F-22 crash was one of two aircraft crashes that occurred within days of each other in May of last year at Eglin. On the night of May 19, 2020, an F-35 fighter jet from the 58th Fighter Squadron of the Eglin-based 33rd Fighter Wing crashed on landing. As with the F-22 crash, the pilot safely ejected but the aircraft, valued at $176 million, was destroyed.

Technically, the F-35 crashed as a result of the pilot leaving a "speed hold" feature of the aircraft engaged during landing, a subsequent shallow flight angle that contributed to severe bouncing on the runway, and the pilot's lack of success in getting the aircraft airborne again for a second landing attempt, according to an Accident Investigation Board (AIB) report released late last year.

But the AIB report also cited pilot fatigue, as well as issues with the F-35's oxygen delivery system and the flight information display in the pilot's helmet, along with apparent differences between the F-35 simulator and the actual aircraft, as contributing factors in the crash.

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Источник: https://www.nwfdailynews.com/story/news/local/2021/07/28/air-force-maintenance-error-caused-2020-f-22-crash-at-eglin-afb/5399988001/
air force f 22

The fast, stealthy F-22 Raptor is "unquestionably" air force f 22 best air-to-air fighter in the arsenal of the world's leading air force. That's what outgoing Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz wrote in 2009.

Three years later, a contingent of German pilots flying their latest Typhoon fighter have figured out how to shoot air force f 22 the Lockheed Martin-made F-22 in mock combat. The Germans' tactics, revealed in the latest Combat Aircraft magazine, represent the latest reality check for the $400-million-a-copy F-22, following dozens of pilot blackouts, and possibly a nwbia, reportedly related to problems with the unique g-force-defying vests worn by Raptor pilots.

In mid-June, 150 German airmen and eight twin-engine, non-stealthy Typhoons arrived at Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska for an American-led Red Flag exercise involving more than 100 aircraft from Germany, the U.S. Air Force and Army, NATO, Japan, Australia and Poland. Eight times during the two-week war game, individual German Typhoons flew against single F-22s in basic fighter maneuvers meant to simulate a close-range dogfight.

The results were a surprise to the Germans and presumably the Americans, too. "We were evenly matched," Maj. Marc Gruene told *Combat Aircraft'*s Jamie Hunter. The key, Gruene said, is to get as close as possible to the F-22 . and stay there. "They didn't expect us to turn so aggressively."

Gruene said the Raptor excels at fighting from beyond visual range with its high speed and altitude, sophisticated radar and long-range AMRAAM missiles. But in a slower, close-range tangle -- which pilots call a "merge" -- the bigger and heavier F-22 is at a disadvantage. "As soon as you get to the merge . the Typhoon doesn't necessarily have to fear the F-22," Gruene said.

This is not supposed to be the sort of reaction the F-22 inspires. For years the Air Force has billed the Raptor as an unparalleled aerial combatant. Even former Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who in 2009 famously cut F-22 production to just 187 copies, called the stealth jet "far and away the best air-to-air fighter ever produced" and predicted "it will ensure U.S. command of the skies for the chase business account customer service generation." And it's slowly getting taken off the probation it incurred after seemingly suffocating pilots.

Admittedly, advanced air forces plan to do most of their fighting at long range and avoid the risky, close-in tangle -- something Gruene acknowledged in his comments to Combat Aircraft. But there's evidence that, in reality, most air combat occurs at close distance, despite air arms' wishful thinking. That could bode poorly for the F-22's chances in a future conflict.

In a 2008 study (big file!), the Air Force-funded think tank RAND warned against assuming long-range missiles will work. RAND looked at 588 air-to-air shoot-downs since the 1950s and counted just 24 that occurred with the attacker firing from beyond visual range. Historically, American long-range air-to-air missiles have been 90-percent less effective than predicted, RAND asserted.

Despite the historical air force f 22, there persists in Air Force circles "a hypothetical vision of ultra-long range, radar-based, air-to-air combat," to quote air power skeptic Pierre Sprey, co-designer of the brute-simple F-16 and A-10 warplanes.

It remains to be seen whether the Raptor and its AMRAAM missiles can reverse these trends. If long-range tactics fail, the F-22 force could very well find itself fighting up close with the latest fighters from China, Russia fnb com lb online other rival nations. And if the Germans' experience is any indication, that's the kind of battle the vaunted F-22s just might lose.

Update, July 31: Some commenters claim the Red Flag exercise is not indicative of the way the F-22 would fight in the real world. In an actual shooting war, an F-22's opponent "won't make it to visual range," one reader asserted. The Raptor's stealth would allow it to sneak up high and fast and kill the enemy from long range using an AMRAAM missile, commenters insist.

But that's assuming two things. One, that the rules of engagement in a future conflict will allow to the Air Force to shoot down targets without visually identifying them -- a risky assumption given the world's increasingly crowded airspace. Two, that the AMRAAM even works. Missile-maker Raytheon hasn't delivered a new AMRAAM in two years after it was found that the weapon's rocket motor doesn't work in a cold environment, which is exactly where the high-flying F-22 is most at home.

Even when the AMRAAM functions as designed, it's still not a reliable long-range killer. Since the AMRAAM entered front-line service in 1992, it has been used by Air Force F-15s and F-16s in at least nine aerial battles resulting in the destruction of nine Iraqi and Serbian aircraft. But that's pretty much all we know. Public data "does not include the number of shots taken or the engagement range," Air Force Lt. Col. Patrick Higby wrote in a 2005 paper.

Higby, for his part, concluded that at least four of the AMRAAM kills occurred within visual range. In the balance, long-range missiles are not as effective as the Air Force has long hoped, Higby wrote. "Air-to-air combat has not transformed into a long-range slugfest of technology."

Given that even the F-22 could find itself in a close-range dogfight, the stealthy jet has other disadvantages besides its heavy weight and large size. Technical problems forced the Air Force to omit a helmet-mounted sight from the Raptor. This key piece of gear allows pilots in other planes -- including the German Typhoon -- to lock missiles onto a target merely by looking at it. “We had a Raptor salad for lunch,” one German pilot quipped after using his jet's helmet sight and maneuverability to get the best of an F-22 over Alaska.

Источник: https://www.wired.com/2012/07/f-22-germans/

F-22s conduct first airstrikes in Afghanistan

WASHINGTON — In a first use of expanded military authorities in Afghanistan, U.S. warplanes destroyed eight Taliban opium production facilities in Helmand Province Sunday, the top U.S. general there said Monday.

U.S. Forces Afghanistan commander Gen. John Nicholson said U.S. and Afghan forces in total took out 10 facilities on the first day of Operation Jagged Knife, a combined air operation that involved Afghan A-29s and U.S. B-52s and F-22s to take out a series of factories that Nicholson said were used as a revenue source for the Taliban.

The operation marked the first use of the F-22 to conduct airstrikes in Afghanistan. The highly advanced stealth fighter has capabilities that exceed what should have been necessary to destroy a Taliban target, raising questions as to why that platform was selected.

On Monday, Nicholson said the F-22 was selected in a last-minute decision, based on what aircraft was available with the capability to carry a small diameter precision bomb. Nicholson showed a clip of a target hit by an F-22 that dropped 250-pound small diameter bombs inside a compound. The bombs destroyed two of the structures inside the compound, leaving one, “to avoid collateral damage,” Nicholson said.

“It wasn’t because of some of the other capabilities of that aircraft,” that the F-22 was selected, Nicholson said.

In a statement, U.S. Air Forces Central Command said the F-22 was used “for a variety of reasons, but primarily to mitigate collateral damage and civilian casualties by employing small diameter bombs carried by the aircraft.”

In another strike, B-52s dropped 2,000-pound bombs on another drug production facility.

The ongoing operations reflect how the U.S. military has changed tactics since August, when President Donald Trump approved expanding the authorities under which U.S. forces could attack the Taliban and other militant groups in Afghanistan, Nicholson said. Before, U.S. forces could strike only in defense of Afghan forces and when they air quality san jose ca today fighting in close proximity to them.

Previously, “these targets were much harder to get to and really were not part of the [old] authorities,” Nicholson said.

“These new authorities allow us to attack the enemy …. to attack their financial networks, their revenue streams,” Nicholson said.

Nicholson said U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies estimate that the Taliban earns about $200 million a year from opium production in Afghanistan. The strikes are focused on the drug production facilities, not Afghan farmers growing opium poppy, the core ingredient in heroin and other opiate drugs, Nicholson said.

The Marines also provided overhead fires support with the High-Mobility Rocket Air force f 22 (HIMARS), and the Army provided surveillance support, Air Forces Central Command spokesman Lt. Col. Damien Pickart said.

Nicholson declined to say how many U.S. aircraft were involved in the operation or how many facilities the U.S. intends to strike in the continuing operation. Nicholson estimated that there are about 400 to 500 opium production facilities in Afghanistan.

Pickart said the F-22s took off from Al Dhafra Air Base in the United Arab Emirates and the B-52s were from the 69th Expeditionary Bomber Squadron assigned to Al Udeid Air Base’s 379th Air Expeditionary Wing,

The airstrikes were supported by KC-10 and KC-135 refuelers, surveillance aircraft and command and control aircraft, Pickart said.

About Tara Copp

Tara Copp is the Pentagon Bureau Chief for Military Times and author of the award-winning military nonfiction "The Warbird: Three Heroes. Two Wars. One Story."

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Источник: https://www.militarytimes.com/flashpoints/2017/11/20/f-22s-conduct-first-airstrikes-in-afghanistan/

Air Force F-22s make first landing at Fort Drum airfield for rapid refueling operation

Ed Chiasson, Wheeler-Sack Army Airfield operations officer, watches as an F-22 Raptor from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, lands for a hot refueling operation Sept. 21. (Photo by Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs)
A fire crew from Fort Drum Directorate of Fire and Emergency Services’ Station 3 supports the hot refuel operation Sept. 21 at Wheeler-Sack Army Airfield. (Photo by Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs)
Two F-22 Raptors from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, touched ground at Wheeler-Sack Army Airfield for the first time Sept. 21. The brief visit demonstrated both Fort Drum’s capabilities to expand its airfield operations to support different types of aircraft, as well as <b>air force f 22</b> ability of 174th Maintenance Group Detachment 1 to facilitate rapid refueling and armament for unit training missions. (Photo by Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs)

FORT DRUM, N.Y. (Sept. 23, 2021) -- Two F-22 Raptors from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, touched ground at Wheeler-Sack Army Airfield for the first time Sept. 21 and, roughly 30 minutes later, they were gone.

The brief visit demonstrated both Fort Drum’s capabilities to expand its airfield operations to support different types of aircraft, as well as the ability of 174th Maintenance Group Detachment 1 to facilitate rapid refueling and armament for unit training missions.

The F22s were using military operating airspace in the region for combat training with F-35 aircraft from the 158th Fighter Wing, located at Vermont Air National Guard Base in Burlington.

After their first engagement, the jets landed, refueled and were “back in the fight,” according to Air Force Maj. Christian Sturick, commander of the 174th Maintenance Group Detachment 1 / Forward Operating Location (FOL).

“For the air crews of the F-35s and F-22s to be able to meet in the airspace to train, fight and practice their tactics is a huge a capability,” he said. “What we are doing here is giving them ability to hot refuel, where they disengage from the fight and refuel very rapidly and get back in the fight immediately.”

Sturick said that the refueling operation at Wheeler-Sack Army Airfield provided a longer training opportunity for the aviation units, which otherwise would have returned to their home stations for refueling.

“We give them that ability to have an embedded Air Force maintenance unit here at Fort Drum,” he said. “My maintainers can refuel them and rearm them, if that’s the case.”

Sturick said that the maintenance detachment has been operating at Fort Drum for 35 years and was permanently assigned at Wheeler-Sack Army Airfield in 1997.

Michael Delaney, WSAA airfield manager, said that the refueling operation also was supported by Fort Drum air traffic control personnel and a fire crew.

While this is the first time that F-22s have landed on the tarmac, he said that Fort Drum has supported unit training from all branches of the armed forces and they continue to look for opportunities to support a wide variety of aircraft.

Источник: https://www.army.mil/article/250535/air_force_f_22s_make_first_landing_at_fort_drum_airfield_for_rapid_refueling_operation

I/ITSEC 2021: Unintended consequences (Opinion)

Over the years, training coverage in Shephard has reflected the debate frequently aired in the military and industry concerning the live-virtual balance. In other words, how much live training needs to be completed compared to time spent in the simulator? With air domain training accounting for around 65% of all spending on training and simulation, this conversation usually focuses on flight simulation.

At present, the consensus is that the balance should be 50% live and 50% virtual. It is unclear how this figure was arrived at, but its adoption by some of the world’s most established and mature air forces, including the USAF, RAF, RAAF, German Air Force and French Air Force, has provided an accepted accord that some others are now adopting.

The benefits of increased time spent in the virtual world presupposes that the synthetic training system in question is of sufficient fidelity to match accurately the characteristics of the real aircraft. If that is so, time spent in the simulator has many advantages. These include savings accrued by not paying more than $30,000 per hour to fly an F-35 and reducing the costs associated with wear and tear on a frontline airframe.

Other advantages associated with virtual training include the ability to network the device with other aircraft simulators to create a composite air operations exercise, as well as the ability to precisely repeat scenarios to extract teaching points to enable the pilot to understand fully the mission.

The benefits of offloading live training into the virtual world not only concern operational pilots. Through programmes such as the USN’s Project Avenger, the USAF’s Undergraduate Pilot Training 2.0 and the RAF’s trials of CAE’s Sprint Trainer, the use of low-cost virtual systems that allow student pilots to proceed at their own pace is growing. This is related to moves towards removing elementary and/or intermediate training aircraft from syllabi.

Another source of pressure to move more training into the virtual sphere comes from airspace restrictions, shortages and security. Closely related to this is the performance of modern aircraft and their weapons. Monticello banking company such as the F-22, F-35 and soon the B-21 have sensors and weapons that operate at extreme ranges. This sensitive data needs to be protected in secure virtual environments and not presented on live ranges where potential enemies can listen to and observe capabilities.

The Talon Military Operations Area was recently expanded by 93%. (Photo: US DoD)

Airspace shortages do not affect all countries. In the US, for example, a portion of the national airspace in southeast New Mexico, where the 49th Wing from Holloman AFB trains F-16 pilots, known as the Talon Military Operations Area, was recently expanded by 93%.

The USAF said that F-16 student pilots will be able to fly as high as 51,000ft when authorised by ATC and as low as 500ft over some unpopulated areas of the airspace. They will also see an increase in the variety of their missions and tactics, and an improvement in the techniques and procedures they can execute in the new airspace.

Despite the advantages of virtual training, Shephard has highlighted two shortcomings in the past: a lack of g-force, leading to the potential for negative training, and the lack of jeopardy in undertaking certain manoeuvres that can, again, lead to negative training.

In discussing the topic with Air Mshl (ret) Sir Stuart Atha, director of defence capability at BAE Systems, we came to add an additional shortcoming – asset erosion. This has occurred as an unintended consequence of pushing more flight training into the virtual environment.

With more virtual hours and fewer live, the true picture of what is required to mount real-world operations – maintenance staff, spares, supporting assets such as fighter controllers and ordnance – has been forgotten or, worse still, deliberately seized upon by governments as a legitimate source for cost savings.

Virtual learning is vastly beneficial, but it needs to be placed in context, both in training and in terms of its impact on operations.

More from I/ITSEC 2021 News

Источник: https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/training-simulation/iitsec-2021-unintended-consequences-opinion/

US Air Force to send dozens of F-22 Raptor fighter jets to Pacific in air force f 22 message as tensions with China escalate

THE US Air Force is set to send dozens of F-22 Raptor fighter jets to the Pacific as tensions with China escalate.

Around 25 of the aircraft will head to Guam and Tinian islands later this month in what experts say is a powerful message to the Communist nation.

The US Air Force is set to send dozens of F-22 Raptor fighter jets to the Pacific

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Around 25 of the aircraft will head to Guam and Tinian islands later this month

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Gen. Ken Wilsbach, Pacific Air Forces commander, told CNN: "We have never had this many Raptors deployed together in the Pacific Air Forces area of operations."

Experts fear China will blast the United States off the top spot to become the world's top economic and military power within the next decade.

Defense analyst Carl Schuster said: "The Pacific Air Force is demonstrating that it can deploy as many or more fifth-generation aircraft into the theater on short notice than (China) currently has in its entire inventory."

Normal deployments feature six to 12 of the jets, Schuster said.

America has around 180 F-22s; China has up to 24 fifth-generation fighters.

Former Australian air force officer Peter Layton said: "The US is actively practicing the deployments it will make if there is a major crisis or war.

"The US is taking China very seriously and is developing its force posture and training its forces to be able to quickly move into position."

GOING NUCLEAR

The move is part of Operation Pacific Iron 2021.

"Airmen deployed in support of Pacific Iron 2021 will demonstrate Multi-capable Airmen skills victoria secret pink hoodie sets conduct simulated combat flight operations from local airports in Guam and Tinian," the Pacific Air Forces said in a statement.

They added: "More than 35 aircraft and approximately 800 Airmen from Pacific Air Forces and Air Combat Command will deploy to the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command’s area of responsibility in July to participate in Operation Pacific Iron 2021."

A bombshell Pentagon report said the world is edging towards nuclear war because Russia and China are modernizing ballistic missiles, and developing new submarines.

Beijing is reportedly considering whether walmart stock price 1990 develop autonomous nuclear weapons systems, the New York Post reports.

Ambassador Robert Wood told reporters last week: “If they were to develop, these kinds of weapons and aerial systems, this has the potential to change the strategic stability environment in a dynamic way.”

SUPERPOWER TAKEOVER?

China is on course to overtake the US and become the biggest economic powerhouse, Professor Kerry Brown, of the Lau China Institute at King's College London, told The Sun.

"Economically, barring total disaster for China, it will be the largest economy some time in the next decade," Professor Brown said.  

China's rapid military modernisation has fuelled growing concern among its Asian neighbours and in the West.

The People's Liberation Army now has the world's second-largest annual budget after the US armed forces and has been adding sophisticated new aircraft, showcased in a flyover at the start of the centenary ceremony featuring a squadron of China's J-20 stealth fighters.

The country is enmeshed in a deepening rivalry with the United States for global power status and has seen recent clashes with India along their disputed border.

And China's ambitions show no sign of dampening.

'TOTAL CONTROL'

Ashok Swain, professor of peace and conflict research at Sweden's Uppsala University, believes China will "get the upper hand, both economically and militarily, on bilateral terms" in the next decade.

"The US is spending on its military at least three times more than China, but China is spending more and more every year to modernise its military and develop new weapons," the 56-year-old told The Sun.

"China, under Xi Jinping, has become very different from what it was air force f 22 to be ten years ago when the Chinese Communist Party was celebrating its 90th anniversary.

"There is no hope anymore of regular transition of power or some openness in the political system.

"Xi now has total control of the country, party, and military."

Robert Sutter of George Washington University's Elliot School of International Affairs warned that Xi is "setting up China for a protracted struggle with the US".

"In foreign affairs it involves growth of wealth and power, with China unencumbered as it pursues its very self-centered policy goals at the expense of others and of first state bank and trust basehor kansas prevailing world order," Sutter said.

New data has revealed how the Communist Party ranks swelled by 2.43 million in 2020 - the largest annual gain since Xi became president in 2013 - to 95.15 million members now.

China is on course to overtake the US and become the biggest economic powerhouse

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Источник: https://www.the-sun.com/news/3295124/us-air-force-f-22-fighter-jets-pacific-china/

A $201M maintenance error: Air Force releases cause of F-22 crash at Eglin AFB in 2020


EGLIN AFB — Last year's crash of an F-22 Raptor fighter jet on the Eglin Air Force Base reservation has been traced to "a maintenance error made after the aircraft was washed, which impacted control inputs transmitted to the air force f 22 according to a Wednesday email from the Air Force's Air Combat Command.

The F-22, assigned to the 43rd Fighter Squadron of the 325th Fighter Wing, crashed on the morning of May 15, 2020, about 12 miles northeast of the main section of Eglin during what the Air Force described as a routine training mission.

The pilot ejected safely and there were no injuries on the ground, but the aircraft, valued at $201 million, was destroyed. Parts of the 325th Fighter Wing were moved to Eglin from nearby Tyndall AFB in 2018 as Hurricane Michael bore down on Panama City and eventually laid waste to the installation.

From 2020: Eglin AFB releases additional information on Friday F-22 crash

Due to what an Air Combat Command spokeswoman on Wednesday called "operational security concerns," an Accident Investigation Board report, which would have been subject to public release, was not pursued in connection with the F-22 crash. "Operational security" is a risk management process designed to keep sensitive information from falling into unintended hands.

Instead, the spokeswoman said the crash was probed through a commander-directed investigation and a Safety Investigation Board. Neither of those reports are subject to public release, but are intended for internal Air Force use.

Safety investigation boards typically comprise six to 10 officers and senior enlisted personnel, headed by a colonel. Accident investigation boards, on the other hand, are headed by a senior pilot and include another pilot along with a “maintenance expert, flight surgeon, judge advocate and any other needed specialists," according to the Air Combat Command website.

From 2020:F-22 Raptor crashes on Eglin reservation; pilot ejects safely

And according to the Office of Inspector General for the Secretary of the Air Force, commander-directed investigations can be used "to investigate systemic (or procedural) problems or to look into matters regarding individual conduct or responsibility."

A single paragraph in Wednesday's email providing what the spokeswoman called key details of the Safety Investigation Board report and the commander-directed investigation, notes that "(u)pon takeoff, the pilot noticed a Flight Control System advisory and elected to continue with takeoff. Shortly after the aircraft became airborne, the pilot began having trouble controlling the aircraft and declared an emergency. While a recovery plan was being coordinated, the pilot continued to have issues with the aircraft and ejected."

Flight control systems comprise the parts of the aircraft that move to change its direction, height and other flight characteristics, and includes the cockpit controls for those aircraft surfaces. The F-22 Raptor is a "fly-by-wire" aircraft, in which the pilot's control inputs are translated electronically to move the jet's flight control surfaces.

Air Combat Command will not release any additional information on the crash, according to the command spokeswoman. 

The F-22 crash was one of two aircraft crashes that occurred within days of each other in May of last year at Eglin. On the night of May 19, 2020, an F-35 fighter jet from the 58th Fighter Squadron of the Eglin-based 33rd Fighter Wing crashed on landing. As with the F-22 crash, the pilot safely ejected but the aircraft, valued at $176 million, was destroyed.

Technically, the F-35 crashed as a result of the pilot leaving a "speed hold" feature of the aircraft engaged during landing, a subsequent shallow flight angle that contributed to severe bouncing on the runway, and the pilot's lack of success in getting the aircraft airborne again for a second landing attempt, according to an Accident Investigation Board (AIB) report released late last year.

But the AIB report also cited pilot fatigue, as well as issues with the F-35's oxygen delivery system and the flight information display in the pilot's helmet, along with apparent differences between the F-35 simulator and the actual aircraft, as contributing factors in the crash.

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Источник: https://www.nwfdailynews.com/story/news/local/2021/07/28/air-force-maintenance-error-caused-2020-f-22-crash-at-eglin-afb/5399988001/

Is the Air Force's F-22 fighter jet making pilots sick?

Military officers rarely speak out against their services, but in our lead story you'll hear from two elite pilots who question the safety of Air Force's most sophisticated, stealthy, and expensive fighter jet, the F-22 Raptor. Maj. Jeremy Gordon and Capt. Joshua Wilson have chosen to stop flying the F-22 because they say during some flights they and other pilots have experienced oxygen deprivation, disorientation, and worse. They are concerned about their safety in the air, as well as the long-term health consequences. The Air Force says it is doing all it can to investigate and solve the problem, and are keeping the jets in the air with careful supervision of the pilots.


The following script is from "The Raptor" which originally aired on May 6, 2012. Lesley Stahl is the correspondent. Karen Sughrue, producer.

The shiniest jewel in the Air Force is its F-22 Raptor, a sleek, stealth fighter jet that the Pentagon says can outgun and outmaneuver any combat plane anywhere in the world. But for all its prowess, the Raptor has yet to be used in combat. It was designed to go up against an enemy with a sophisticated air force, which means it sat on the sidelines during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, leaving its 200 pilots to fly mainly training missions.

But the Raptor - the most expensive fighter ever - has been plagued by a mysterious flaw that causes its pilots to become disoriented while at the controls from a lack of oxygen.

Tonight, you will hear from two of them who have come to believe the jet is endangering their lives and those of the people in communities they fly over.

They are so concerned they have taken the extraordinary step of risking their careers by appearing on 60 Minutes in uniform -- and without permission -- to blow the whistle on a plane they love to fly.

When you hear about the F-22, it's always in superlatives: the newest, fastest, stealthiest, highest-flying, most gravity-defying, enemy-killing combat machine in the sky.

Josh Wilson: It's invincible. It's the bottom line.

Its pilots are highly-trained, and competitively chosen, the elite jet jockeys of the Air Force.

Jeremy Gordon: I firmly believe in the aircraft.

Major Jeremy Gordon and Captain Josh Wilson are with the Virginia Air National Guard, based at Langley Air Force Base near Norfolk. They're two of only 200 pilots qualified to fly the F-22.

Josh Wilson: Its ability to go up into lethal force where we need it. It is absolutely unmatched.

Josh has been flying it for two years, Jeremy for six.

Lesley Stahl: What makes it unique when you're flying it?

Jeremy Gordon: The ability to know what's going on all the way around you all the time.

Josh Wilson: It is just a phenomenal, phenomenal machine.

Both flew combat missions in the Iraq War. Major Gordon was awarded the Air Force's highest honor for heroism: the Distinguished Flying Cross. In Air Force evaluations, he was called quote "a superstar.flawless." Captain Wilson was called: "a superb officer with intense warrior spirit."

Josh Wilson: It was, you know, kind of a surreal experience.

Josh says that during a routine F-22 training mission in February 2011, he suddenly realized he was losing control.

Josh Wilson: Several times during the flight, I had to really concentrate, immense concentration on just doing simple, simple tasks. Our training tells you if you suspect something's probably going on, go ahead and pull your emergency oxygen and come back home. When I did make that decision to pull the emergency oxygen ring, I couldn't find it. I couldn't remember, you know, what part of the aircraft it was in.

Lesley Stahl: So this emergency ring was exactly where it should've been?

Josh Wilson: Uh-huh.

Источник: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/is-the-air-forces-f-22-fighter-jet-making-pilots-sick/

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