pay my target card bill online

Authorize.net supports payment processing by helping small businesses accept credit card and eCheck payments online, in person, via mobile devices. If you sign up in the store they should print out a temporary slip you can use. If you sign up online they should send you the card number and you can add. Certain online purchases may also qualify for free two-day shipping when you use your REDcard. How Do I Pay Off My Target REDcard? pay my target card bill online

Pay my target card bill online -

Target RedCard™

Overall card rating

4.3

from Credit Karma members

Most helpful positive review

My Limit Keeps Going Up!

Credit Karma Member

I've had this card for a little more than a year and they've been steadily increaing my limit without me having to ask. I'm not even sure if there's a place on their website to make a request for a higher limit but I started out at $600 and then it was $1000. Then one day out of the blue they thanked me for my business and bumped it up to $1500. Now I'm at a $2300 credit limit which is great because it gives me that extra room to maintain a low utilization rate. I use it primarily for a few groceries and most of my consumables. But what I really like about it is the ease of use when it comes to making payments. Other store card sites have me searching and digging around to find the area to make a payment but Target clearly says "Pay Bill Here". ?

Most helpful negative review

Run away!

Credit Karma Member

This card is not good at all, the only good thing about me having the card was closing the account. I had a purchase I did not make and their disputes team wouldn?t even open a case.

Member ratings

All member reviews (95)

Difficult to deal with.

Credit Karma Member

So. I’ve had the card for essentially one week with a $1000 credit limit. I have yet to use the card, but every interaction I’ve had thus far has been oddly irritating. First, when I applied, I used my legal address as I have recently moved from New York to Massachusetts. I called to see if I could update the address to have it mailed to my actual home as opposed to my former address which I still have access to. The representative most literally described the request as “highly suspicious”. The issue I truly took was that I simply didn’t care what address it was mailed to, for purposes of convenience alone, I requested my new physical address, but was highly amendable to it going to the alternate as I still have access to the address. It just was such a strangely aggressive implication and quite frankly, rude. So upon receiving the card, I called to activate and was told I needed to wait during a former business day to do so as the department responsible for verification needed to approve it. Like. I simply did it to receive the discount for a large television purchase, but with each interaction, it seems hardly worth it as it is literally jumping through hoops to gain access. The irony is that I was barely asked any questions in the application process, which was fine online and felt seamless. But any after thought or inquiry has been highly problematic. I’ll hold out hope, but I’m borderline appalled at this point.

Best retail card

Credit Karma Member

This is by far the best retail card on the market. Target already has everything reasonably priced and you can find nearly everything at their stores and online so you can save money on almost anything. You get a 5% discount when paying so you don't have to deal with having to redeem points or cash back which makes this card very nice and simple. I would recommend using only this card when paying at target.

Credit Karma Member

Dont believe credit karmas "very good odds"

Credit Karma Member

I was denied this card with 689 fico with both transunion and equifax and a 717 fico with experian. I only applied because im trying to build my credit and with credit karmas rating it seemed like a safe bet. Now my scores been dinged 7 points and a hard inquiry with no card issued will be on there for two years. Thanks for nothing Credit Karma.

Credit Karma Member

Credit Karma Member

Bankruptcy ch 7 cs 653

Credit Karma Member

Credit karma says very good odds for this card but got a review in 7-10 days

Credit Karma Member

Definitely not worth it

Credit Karma Member

I applied for this card in a target store on December 23, 2019 and was approved. They gave me a receipt and said that it was going to be my temporary card and if I wanted to use it, I can only use it in store. The very next day a charge on my account for $217 appeared on my account. The charge came from Target.com and I was furious because there was no way that was me. I called them on January 3, 2020 and explained the situation, but they told me that first they need to review my account for “fraudulent” activity. Target had locked my account so there was no way I could verify I was the owner unless I sent them personal information over fax. After 2 weeks and many faxes later I had the charge cleared. Closed the account immediately after

No credit increase after 18 months...

Credit Karma Member

I have a credit scores from TU of 740 & Ex 739. I have been a card holder for 18 months, use the card frequently, and still have the original credit limit of $700. I have cards with $5,000-$10,000 limits, yet no increase. I have contacted customer service several times & I’m always told the same “we increase limits monthly when we review your account”. Explained I refuse to go over 15% of my credit on any card, and would spend more & use my card more often, yet they don’t seem to want to reward good customers. I like the 5% discount but would truly like a credit increase. Don’t understand with scores this high how you get an increase?

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Источник: https://www.creditkarma.com/reviews/credit-card/single/id/target

How to Pay Your Target REDcard Online

Individuals and families who shop at Target on a regular basis benefit when they apply for and receive a Target REDcard. This card allows users to receive 5 percent off all of their purchases every day, take advantage of free 2-day shipping on online orders and enjoy an extra 30 day extended return policy. Paying your Target REDcard and other credit cards online can be a convenient way to manage your bills and avoid postage costs. With consistent on-time payments, you can improve your credit score and avoid additional fees, especially if you pay your balance in full monthly.

Signing In

Making Payments

Once you have logged in to your account, click "Schedule a Payment" under Payment Information in the left-hand navigation. Enter your desired payment amount and your checking or savings account number from which you want your payment debited. To avoid late fees of up to $35 and negative marks on your credit report, you'll need to pay at least the minimum amount due listed on the bill's due date, which is 25 days after the close of each billing cycle. If you do not pay your balance in full, your account may be subject to finance charges, depending on the terms of your card agreement.

Scheduling in Advance

You can schedule your payment up to 30 days in advance or sign up for Auto Pay to have your payment automatically scheduled each month. This option eliminates the chance that you'll forget to pay the bill on the due date, thus incurring unnecessary late fees. Find Auto Pay information under "Manage Auto Pay" in the Payment Information section. You can opt to pay a specific amount each month or the full balance due, whichever is most convenient for you.

Change Your Billing Date

Target REDcard automatically assigns your due date as 25 days after the close of each billing cycle. If the timing of this due date doesn't work for you, you can call 1-800-424-6888 and request a new due date for future bills. This is an excellent option for salaried individuals who may be paid on the 1st of each month, or bi-weekly pay employees who'd rather have their due date fall in the middle of the month.

References

Writer Bio

Karen Spaeder began her editorial career at Entrepreneur magazine. True to the entrepreneurial spirit, she works at a startup digital marketing firm, blogs at karenspaeder.com, teaches yoga and runs her own organic beauty business. Spaeder holds degrees in English and certifications in yoga, karate and early childhood education.

Источник: https://pocketsense.com/pay-target-redcard-online-7595523.html

Target adds 'buy now pay later' options with Affirm and Sezzle ahead of holiday shopping season


Target is the latest retailer to jump on the "buy now, pay later" bandwagon.

Ahead of the busy holiday season, Target is offering shoppers additional ways to pay for their purchases with new installment plans from Affirm and Sezzle, the retailer told USA TODAY exclusively Wednesday.

Installment plans, which are beginning to replace traditional layaway plans, are increasingly popular with retailers. Amazon and Walmart have adopted them, as have Macy’s and Bed Bath & Beyond. Newer entrants include Paypal, which bought Paidy, and Square, which bought Afterpay.

Not only can installment plans boost sales, they allow shoppers who don't have the cash at the time to snag deals and stock up on holiday gifts.

►Save better, spend better:  Money tips and advice delivered right to your inbox. Sign up here

Consumers who use buy now, pay later tend to be younger, and some don't qualify for credit cards. The advantage: They can spread out the cost of a purchase over a few weeks or months in installment payments.

Target says the new options allow consumers to buy what they need to “take advantage of our best deals” and pay at a pace that works for them. 

“Through our partnerships with Sezzle and Affirm, we’re offering guests additional flexible payment options that meet even more of their needs no matter how they choose to shop," Gemma Kubat, Target’s president of financial and retail services, told USA TODAY.

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How popular these installment plans will be with holiday shoppers is unclear, but more retailers have added them in recent months.

According to a report by Lending Tree, interest in store credit cards plunged in 2021. But the report also found that consumers were still slightly more likely to use store credit cards for holiday shopping than the buy now, pay later installment plans.

Sezzle CEO Charlie Youakim said his service is different from a credit card, which benefits when consumers carry a balance and pay interest.

“We don’t win in that scenario," Youakim told USA TODAY. "Where Sezzle wins is when we extend the right amount of credit to the customer, so that they can repay us. We know that we're getting a lot of young customers that are new to financial services and credit so we're trying to become the right training wheels product.”

Target's announcement comes ahead of its three-day Deal Days sale, which begins Sunday. The sale kicks off the retailer's holiday shopping season and launches a new price match guarantee.

Purchases with Sezzle and Affirm also qualify for the price match guarantee, Target said. Sezzle is for smaller purchases, while Affirm is for purchases over $100.

Sezzle offers no interest and no fees for consumers who make payments on time. Affirm interest rates vary and are subject to approval.

►Target Deal Days 2021: Target to kick off holiday sales early with 'Deal Days' and new price match guarantee

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The end of traditional layaway

Walmart also is working with Affirm after removing seasonal layaway from most of its stores last year.

“We've learned a lot in the past year as our customers’ needs and shopping habits have changed,” Walmart said in a statement to USA TODAY. “Based on what we learned, we are confident that our payment options provide the right solutions for our customers.”

Affirm also is working with Amazon and select customers now have the option to split the total cost of purchases of $50 or more into monthly payments.

“Over half of Americans are interested in using a pay-over-time solution for their holiday shopping this year and the majority (69%) will do so because they believe it helps them to better budget,” Silvija Martincevic, Affirm's chief commercial officer, said in a statement.

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Follow USA TODAY reporter Kelly Tyko on Twitter: @KellyTyko. For shopping news, tips and deals, join us on our Shopping Ninjas Facebook group. 

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/shopping/2021/10/06/target-shopping-affirm-sezzle-buy-now-pay-later-holiday-layaway/5993437001/
gift-cards-holidays-cnet-2021-006

The scams start out innocently enough.

Maybe a phone call from someone who says he works for Amazon, claiming he noticed someone hacked into your account. Maybe someone who says she works for Microsoft, offering a refund for a computer security service you bought a few years ago that stopped working.

Lisa Hernandez was trying to reach Match.com, the dating site, to cancel her account when it happened to her. The 50-year-old single mother of four had signed up for the service but decided she didn't want to stay with it.

She searched on Google for a customer service number to call. What she found instead was a fake website, built to look legitimate but with a phone number that connected her to a scammer posing as Match customer service. Kevin, the man on the other end of the line, said he could help. First, though, he told her she needed to install a program called TeamViewer, which allowed him remote control of her computer.

He then directed Hernandez to log into her bank's website. "We're going to directly refund you your money," he promised and asked her to fill out a computer-generated form for her refund of $93. Instead, Kevin set his scam in motion by manipulating the code on her computer to make it look like he had deposited $9,000 into her bank account instead, effectively doubling her savings.

The only way to fix the mistake, he told her, was to buy gift cards with the extra money she'd received and give him the numbers. Then he could put the money back into Match's bank accounts and all would be settled. "I need you to go to the store to get Target cards," she remembers him saying. Otherwise, he'd lose his job. She did as he asked, giving him nearly $9,000 worth of gift cards.

Moments just like this happen to tens of millions of Americans every year. While it's easy to assume most victims are elderly, surveys suggest it's much broader. Victims are old and young, rich and poor. Some people get scammed multiple times. Some victims have family members who fight fraud for a living. It's struck my family. Likely, it's happened to yours, too.

When you think of computer crimes, identity theft usually comes first to mind. That's because it cost Americans a staggering $56 billion last year, according to Javelin Strategy and Research. But it tends to feel more like an inconvenience than theft, because you usually get your money back thanks to a nearly half-century-old law designed to protect consumers from any "unauthorized" credit charges. The fees we pay help cover the losses to that fraud. But it's different with gift cards -- they have no such legal protections. When a victim shares the card number with a scammer, they've effectively authorized its use. Even identity fraud insurance, which would cover ID theft in the case of a data breach, often doesn't apply when you've given the information willingly.

"If someone coerces you, then you're out of luck," said Kathy Stokes, director of fraud prevention programs at AARP.

It's impossible to fathom how much money these scammers have taken. Many victims don't report the crime to authorities, often because they're embarrassed and quickly learn the hard truth that they're unlikely to get their money back. So when the Federal Trade Commission counted more than $245 million in money lost to gift card scams since 2018, most experts said the actual number is likely many multiples worse than that.

"This is only the tip of the iceberg," said John Breyault, vice president for public policy, telecommunications and fraud at the National Consumers League.

The anecdotal data suggests he's right. The FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center, for example, said it receives more than 2,000 complaints each day about all sorts of internet scams, from fraudulent business impersonation to fake romances to gift card scams. All told, the FBI tallied $4.2 billion in fraud losses reported by victims last year.

Some stores put up signs next to gift card racks and checkout counters warning about fraud. Others say they're training employees to spot potential victims. But they aren't doing much else. "The business incentive in the gift card space is for these cards to be used with as little friction as possible," Breyault said. "They don't want to get into the way of someone buying a gift card and buying a Coke on the way out."

gettyimages-scammer

From gift to fraud

The gift card industry is already larger than the gross domestic product of all but a handful of countries. It's still growing, too, and surveys suggest its use is pretty evenly split along racial, gender and economic lines.

By 2027, gift card spending is expected to reach $2.7 trillion -- topping all but the US, China, Japan, Germany and the UK. That's already up from $1 trillion in 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic supercharged consumer spending, according to Research and Markets. And this year, as a congested global supply chain is causing a shortage of some popular gifts, more than one in five people plan to use gift cards when shopping during the holidays, according to a YouGov survey commissioned by CNET parent company Red Ventures.

Retailers love gift cards, too. They get to hold onto any money we don't spend for years, industry experts say. And when we do use up our gift cards, we tend to buy things more expensive than the gift card can cover, a term some companies internally call "up-spend." So retailers try to make gift cards as easy to buy as they can. You can find all manner of gift cards for all sorts of things at drug stores, convenience shops and grocery chains. 

"If someone coerces you, then you're out of luck."

Kathy Stokes, AARP

After reading the FTC's data last year, Stokes at AARP set out to take on gift card scams. In April, the organization began a three-year program to throw its educational and marketing weight behind the problem, and for good reason. One study it commissioned found that a quarter of US adults were unsure whether it's a sign of a scam for a business to ask for payment in gift cards, something no legitimate business would do. AARP also built up parts of its website, Fraud Watch Network, publishing articles about the scams and examples of the scripts they use, and it expanded its fraud hotline with hopes of helping victims spot a scam as it's happening.

So far, things haven't gone as she'd hoped. "We thought it would be an easy message," she said. But it turns out most of the people who end up coming to AARP for help do so after they've been scammed.

People like Hernandez. She got in touch after she was scammed in August. Though she's accepted that the money's mostly gone, she can't shake how violating the whole experience was. As a nurse in the San Francisco Bay Area, Hernandez built her career on trust. She works a second job as a caregiver too, where she's regularly given her client's bank card to withdraw money from an account or buy stuff from the store. "I would never think of taking from them," Hernandez says. "I would never betray that."

Which is maybe why she trusted Kevin, who was begging her to buy gift cards. Hernandez spent $3,500 on seven Target cards, then withdrew another $5,000 to buy more. As she gave him the card numbers, Kevin told her not to look at her bank account for a couple days. She did anyway and found that the extra money he'd manipulated the bank webpage to show in her account was gone. Instead, she had just about $500 balance left.

Kevin called her again, saying one of the $500 cards didn't go through. When she began to ask questions, one of Kevin's colleagues got on the phone and began yelling at her. As they kept demanding Hernandez get more gift cards, the horrible realization dawned on her. "I said, 'You just took my money.'"

gettyimages-scammer2

Read more: You'd better watch out: 'Tis the season for holiday shopping scams

New twist

The confidence game, as some call it, has been around since ancient times. Con artists are even in the Bible where they're referred to as false prophets, "who come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves." Scammers are the reason we all bristle about snake oil, the fake cure-all elixir sold in the 18th century and 19th century, born from supposedly old Chinese medicinal techniques.

To be successful, a con artist typically needs to be charismatic, quick-witted and intelligent. After all, they have to be good at gaining people's confidence.

"It exploits people's trust," Cathy Scott, a true crime author, wrote in Psychology Today. "Even the most rational people have proven susceptible to crimes of trickery."

The internet's anonymity and quick communication helped to supercharge fraud. Gift card scammers can come from all over the world, too. All they need is a mic and an easily downloaded phone app installed on their computer. The phone app hides their location behind a toll-free number or a seemingly local US one.

The scam that victimized Hernandez isn't the only one out there. A scammer might pretend to be an FBI agent, calling with a warrant for your arrest. They might pose as an IRS agent threatening to cancel your Social Security number for some offense of which you're innocent. In those schemes, the only way to stop the police supposedly coming to your door is with the help of another scammer who pretends to be a lawyer, conveniently a phone call away, who takes payment in gift cards.

"This is only the tip of the iceberg."

John Breyault, National Consumers League

Sometimes the scammers pretend to be tech support, calling to repair your printer. Or they say your internet is hacked and then get you to install screen-sharing software like TeamViewer or AnyDesk to show technical gobbledygook that they say is proof the hackers have taken over. You just need to buy security, they say, with gift cards.

"Scammers know if they make it emotional and create this sense of urgency and fear, the logical part of your brain disconnects and the fight-or-flight kicks in -- which is great for protecting you, but it's terrible at making decisions," said Eva Velasquez, head of the nonprofit Identity Theft Resource Center, and a former law enforcement investigator of economic and financial crimes.

Her team's research found that if you can interrupt that emotional response, the logical side has a chance to kick in. That's partly why retailers have put signs up at gift card racks, warning about potential fraud. "Have you been asked to buy gift cards to pay a fine, taxes, fees or to help someone?" one sign at a Giant grocery store in Maryland reads. "Never provide numbers to ANYONE over the phone or by email."

Still, Velasquez said, scams of all sorts have become even more prevalent during the pandemic. "It's been growing and growing, and the explosion over the last 18 months is unprecedented," she said. "It's going to take at least a decade to unwind and get to the bottom of how big a problem it is."

apple-iphone-lock-cybersecurity-0465

Read more: Don't fall for these clever Black Friday scams this year

Trust betrayed

One of the first things Mark told me when recounting his experience being scammed was how bad it made him feel. It had only happened a few weeks earlier, in October, and it still stung. He requested his full name be withheld to avoid embarrassment with his family.

The call from the scammers started out seemingly normal. The person calling claimed to be from Amazon, concerned about a rogue $750 purchase with his credit card.

The person on the other end of the phone claimed Amazon had already stopped the supposed charge but asked Mark to buy gift cards that they could use as bait to track down scammers. Once all the scammers were caught, Mark was told, they'd give the gift cards back.

"Dumb me, I believed that," he said.

"It's going to take at least a decade to unwind and get to the bottom of how big a problem it is."

Eva Velasquez, Identity Theft Resource Center

Mark is in his 70s and retired after a successful career as crew for some of the most memorable summer blockbuster films from the 1990s. But he says he's not computer savvy. "I have trouble getting along on it," he said. "I mostly use it to play puzzles and stuff."

At first, the scammers asked Mark to buy $3,000 in gift cards from Target and Apple. If a store employee asked why he was spending so much money, the scammers told him to say the cards were gifts for a party.

Retailers have a blind spot for situations like Mark's. The companies have sophisticated software and entire teams devoted to detecting customers who are trying to scam them. But when a customer comes in, buying gift cards, "the retailers are learning it's very difficult to track," said David Fletcher, senior vice president at ClearSale, which helps detect fraud at the online stores of more than 4,000 merchants, including Motorola, Under Armour and Bath & Body Works.

That's why some retailers train employees to ask probing questions at checkout. Best Buy, in a statement, said it's also added warning signs to gift card displays and checkout counters. Its systems flash a warning on the credit card reader screen when customers purchase gift cards above a certain limit.

But it still isn't enough. Fletcher himself became a victim when scammers emptied a $100 gift card his mother had bought for the fishing store Bass Pro Shops. He suspects scammers took photos of the account codes on the back of cards while they were still on the rack and waited until they were activated.

"Gift cards are so hard to trace back to fraudsters," he said.

Not that any of the questions the clerk asked Mark made any difference.

Read more: Cryptocurrency scams are all over social media. Don't get duped

At his first stop, the teller would only let him buy a couple cards, at $500 each. "It was kind of a surprise," he said of the limit. In retrospect, he appreciates it now.

But the scammers convinced Mark to go to more stores. Mark remembers checkout clerks asking what the cards were for a couple times. The scammers kept asking Mark for more money until he became suspicious and checked the value on the Target cards he had purchased. That's when he learned most of the money was gone.

When Mark contacted the police, they took down his information but didn't ask for the phone numbers the scammers called from. Experts say it's nearly impossible to track fraudsters through their numbers anyway. Instead, the police suggested Mark contact AARP for support and also to help guide him through reporting and other things to do. His bank, from which he'd ultimately withdrawn $5,000, declined to refund his losses.

"I feel so stupid about the whole thing," he said.

Like Hernandez, the nurse, Mark hopes that sharing his story will help people learn some of the tricks the scammers use and avoid the same mistakes he made. 

While Mark said his savings are enough to cover the losses he suffered, the fraudsters made off with nearly all of Hernandez's money. And she gave up getting a refund from Match too.

"It's tough and embarrassing, and I feel kind of dumb," Hernandez said, adding that she tends to keep the tough things that happen in her life to herself, though eventually she did tell some details to her kids. "I had to go and pray a lot."

She also decided she's going to stay away from dating for now. But she did have one last confrontation with Kevin, who promised to make it better. 

Hernandez was desperate to get her money back, but she was also upset. "I don't know how you can do this to people," she remembers saying. Kevin asked for her address and ended the conversation saying he'd send her the money in the mail. She hoped his conscience might have changed him.

She hasn't heard from Kevin since.

The story continues Friday, when we look at efforts to fight back at the scammers.

Источник: https://www.cnet.com/tech/services-and-software/gift-card-scams-are-growing-and-were-all-paying-the-price/

Someone might ask you to pay for something by putting money on a gift card, like a Google Play or iTunes card, and then giving them the numbers on the back of the card. If they ask you to do this, they’re trying to scam you. No real business or government agency will ever insist you pay them with a gift card. Anyone who demands to be paid with a gift card is a scammer. Read on to learn more about gift card scams.

What Gift Card Scams Looks Like

Gift cards are for gifts, not for payments. But they’re popular with scammers because they’re easy for people to find and buy, and they have fewer protections for buyers compared to some other payment options. They’re more like cash: once you use the card, the money on it is gone. Scammers like this.

If someone calls you and demands that you pay them with gift cards, you can bet that a scammer is behind that call. Once they have the gift card number and the PIN, they have your money. Scammers may tell you many stories to get you to pay them with gift cards, but this is what usually happens:

  1. The caller says it’s urgent. The scammer says you have to pay right away or something terrible will happen. But you don’t, and it won’t.
  1. The caller usually tells you which gift card to buy. They might say to put money on an eBay, Google Play, Target, or iTunes gift card. They might send you to a specific store — often Walmart, Target, CVS, or Walgreens. Sometimes they say to buy cards at several stores, so cashiers won’t get suspicious. And, the caller might stay on the phone with you while you go to the store and load money onto the card. These are all signs of a scam.
  1. The caller asks you for the gift card number and PIN. The card number and PIN on the back of the card let the scammer get the money you loaded onto the card. And the scammer gets it right away.

How Scammers Convince You To Pay With Gift Cards

Scammers pretend to be someone they’re not to convince you to pay with gift cards. They want to scare or pressure you into acting quickly, so you don’t have time to think or talk to someone you trust. Here’s a list of common gift card scams and schemes:

  • The caller says they’re from the government — maybe the IRS or the Social Security Administration. They say you have to pay taxes or a fine, but it’s a scam.
  • Someone calls from tech support, maybe saying they’re from Apple or Microsoft, saying there’s something wrong with your computer. But it’s a lie.
  • You meet someone special on a dating website, but then he needs money and asks you to help him. This romance scammer makes up any story to trick you into sending him gift cards.
  • The scammer pretends to be a friend or family member in an emergency and asks you to send money right away — but not tell anyone. This is a scam. If you’re worried, hang up and call your friend or relative to check that everything is all right.
  • Someone says you’ve won a prize but first, you have to pay fees or other charges with a gift card. Remember: no honest business or agency will ever make you pay with a gift card. But also — did you even enter that sweepstakes?
  • The caller says she’s from your power company, or another utility company. She threatens to cut off your service if you don’t pay immediately. But utility companies don’t work that way. It’s a scam.
  • You get a check from someone for way more than you expected. They tell you to deposit the check, then give them the difference on a gift card. But that check will be fake and you’ll be out all that money.

What To Do If You Paid a Scammer With Gift Cards

If you paid a scammer with a gift card, tell the company that issued the card right away.

Contact information for popular gift card companies

Amazon

Ebay

Google Play

iTunes

  • Call Apple Support right away at 1 (800) 275-2273. Say “gift card” to connect with a live representative.
  • Ask if the money is still on the iTunes card. If so, Apple can put a freeze on it. You might be able to get your money back from them.
  • Keep the iTunes card itself and your receipt for the iTunes card.
  • Learn about iTunes gift card scams and how to report them.

Steam

  • If you have a Steam account, report gift card scams online. Click the “Purchases” option, then click, “I have charges from Steam that I didn’t make.” Then click, “Contact Steam Support.”
  • Keep the Steam card itself and your receipt for the Steam card.
  • Learn about Steam gift card scams.

MoneyPak

Don’t see your card on this list? Look for the company’s contact information on the card itself, or do some research online to find out how to reach the card issuer. If you can’t find the contact information or the card issuer doesn’t want to talk to you, report it to the FTC.

Safely Buying and Using Gift Cards

Remember that gift cards are for gifts, not for payments. So if you buy gift cards to give away or donate:

  • Stick to stores you know and trust. Avoid buying from online auction sites because the cards may be fake or stolen.
  • Check it out before you buy it. Make sure the protective stickers are on the card and that they do not appear to have been tampered with. Also check that the PIN number on the back isn’t showing. Get a different card if you spot a problem.
  • Keep your receipt. This, or the card’s ID number, will help you file a report if you lose the gift card.

Report Fraud

If someone asks you to pay them with gift cards:

  • Report it to the Federal Trade Commission at ReportFraud.ftc.gov. Report it even if you didn’t pay. Your report helps law enforcement stop scams.
  • You can also report it to your state attorney general.
  • If you lost money, also report it to local law enforcement. A police report may help when you deal with the card issuer.
Источник: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/gift-card-scams

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Mastercard, the Mastercard brand mark and Tap & go are registered trademarks of Mastercard International Incorporated. 

Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/banking/debit-mastercard.html
gift-cards-holidays-cnet-2021-006

The scams start out innocently enough.

Maybe a phone call from someone who says he works for Amazon, claiming he noticed someone hacked into your account. Maybe someone who says she works for Microsoft, offering a refund for a computer security service you bought a few years ago that stopped working.

Lisa Hernandez was trying to reach Match.com, the dating site, to cancel her account when it happened to her. The 50-year-old single mother of four had signed up for the service but decided she didn't want to stay with it.

She searched on Google for a customer service number to call. What she found instead was a fake website, built to look legitimate but with a phone number that connected her to a scammer posing as Match customer service. Kevin, the man on the other end of the line, said he could help. First, though, he told her she needed to install a program called TeamViewer, which allowed him remote control of her computer.

He then directed Hernandez to log into her bank's website. "We're going to directly refund you your money," he promised and asked her to fill out a computer-generated form for her refund of $93. Instead, Kevin set his scam in motion by manipulating the code on her computer to make it look like he had deposited $9,000 into her bank account instead, effectively doubling her savings.

The only way to fix the mistake, he told her, was to buy gift cards with the extra money she'd received and give him the numbers. Then he could put the money back into Match's bank accounts and all would be settled. "I need you to go to the store to get Target cards," she remembers him saying. Otherwise, he'd lose his job. She did as he asked, giving him nearly $9,000 worth of gift cards.

Moments just like this happen to tens of millions of Americans every year. While it's easy to assume most victims are elderly, surveys suggest it's much broader. Victims are old and young, rich and poor. Some people get scammed multiple times. Some victims have family members who fight fraud for a living. It's struck my family. Likely, it's happened to yours, too.

When you think of computer crimes, identity theft usually comes first to mind. That's because it cost Americans a staggering $56 billion last year, according to Javelin Strategy and Research. But it tends to feel more like an inconvenience than theft, because you usually get your money back thanks to a nearly half-century-old law designed to protect consumers from any "unauthorized" credit charges. The fees we pay help cover the losses to that fraud. But it's different with gift cards -- they have no such legal protections. When a victim shares the card number with a scammer, they've effectively authorized its use. Even identity fraud insurance, which would cover ID theft in the case of a data breach, often doesn't apply when you've given the information willingly.

"If someone coerces you, then you're out of luck," said Kathy Stokes, director of fraud prevention programs at AARP.

It's impossible to fathom how much money these scammers have taken. Many victims don't report the crime to authorities, often because they're embarrassed and quickly learn the hard truth that they're unlikely to get their money back. So when the Federal Trade Commission counted more than $245 million in money lost to gift card scams since 2018, most experts said the actual number is likely many multiples worse than that.

"This is only the tip of the iceberg," said John Breyault, vice president for public policy, telecommunications and fraud at the National Consumers League.

The anecdotal data suggests he's right. The FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center, for example, said it receives more than 2,000 complaints each day about all sorts of internet scams, from fraudulent business impersonation to fake romances to gift card scams. All told, the FBI tallied $4.2 billion in fraud losses reported by victims last year.

Some stores put up signs next to gift card racks and checkout counters warning about fraud. Others say they're training employees to spot potential victims. But they aren't doing much else. "The business incentive in the gift card space is for these cards to be used with as little friction as possible," Breyault said. pay my target card bill online don't want to get into the way of someone buying a gift card and buying a Coke on the way out."

gettyimages-scammer

From gift to fraud

The gift card industry is already larger than the gross domestic product of all but a handful of countries. It's still growing, too, and surveys suggest its use is pretty evenly split along racial, gender and economic lines.

By 2027, gift card spending is expected to reach $2.7 trillion -- topping all but the US, China, Japan, Germany and the UK. That's already up from $1 trillion in 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic supercharged consumer spending, according to Research and Markets. And this year, as a congested global supply chain is causing a shortage of some popular gifts, more than one in five people plan to use gift cards when shopping during the holidays, according to a YouGov survey commissioned by CNET parent company Red Ventures.

Retailers love gift cards, too. They get to hold onto any money we don't spend for years, industry experts say. And when we do use up our gift cards, we tend to buy things more expensive than the gift card can cover, a term some companies internally call "up-spend." So retailers try to make gift cards as easy to buy as they can. You can find all manner of pay my target card bill online cards for all sorts of things at drug stores, convenience shops and grocery chains. 

"If someone coerces you, then you're out of luck."

Kathy Stokes, AARP

After reading the FTC's data last year, Stokes at AARP set out to take on gift card scams. In April, the organization began a three-year program to throw its educational and marketing weight behind the problem, and for good reason. One study it commissioned found that a quarter of US adults were unsure whether it's a sign of a scam for a business to ask for payment in gift cards, something no legitimate business would do. AARP also built up parts of its website, Fraud Watch Network, publishing articles about the scams and examples of the scripts they use, and it expanded its fraud hotline with hopes of helping victims spot a scam as it's happening.

So far, things haven't gone as she'd hoped. "We thought it would be an easy message," she said. But it turns out most of the people who end up coming to AARP for help do so after they've been scammed.

People like Hernandez. She got in touch after she was scammed in August. Though she's accepted that the money's mostly gone, she can't shake how violating the whole experience was. As a nurse in the San Francisco Bay Area, Hernandez built her career on trust. She works a second job as a caregiver too, where she's regularly given her client's bank card to withdraw money from an account or buy stuff from the store. "I would never think of taking from them," Hernandez says. "I would never betray that."

Which is maybe why she trusted Kevin, who was begging her to buy gift cards. Hernandez spent $3,500 on seven Target cards, then withdrew another $5,000 to buy more. As she gave him the card numbers, Kevin told her not to look at her bank account for a couple days. She did anyway and found that the extra money he'd manipulated the bank webpage to show in her account was gone. Instead, she had just about $500 balance left.

Kevin called her again, saying one of the $500 cards didn't go through. When she began to ask questions, one of Kevin's colleagues got on the phone and began yelling at her. As they kept demanding Hernandez get more gift cards, the horrible realization dawned on her. "I said, 'You just took my money.'"

gettyimages-scammer2

Read more: You'd better watch out: 'Tis the season for holiday shopping scams

New twist

The confidence game, as some call it, has been around since ancient times. Con artists are even in the Bible where they're referred to as false prophets, "who come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves." Scammers are the reason we all bristle about snake oil, the fake cure-all elixir sold in the 18th century and 19th century, born from supposedly old Chinese medicinal techniques.

To be successful, a con artist typically needs to be charismatic, quick-witted and intelligent. After all, they have to be good at gaining people's confidence.

"It exploits people's trust," Cathy Scott, a true crime author, wrote in Psychology Today. "Even the most rational people have proven susceptible to crimes of trickery."

The internet's anonymity and quick communication helped to supercharge fraud. Gift card scammers can come from all over the world, too. All they need is a mic and an easily downloaded phone app installed on their computer. The phone app hides their location behind a toll-free number or a seemingly local US one.

The scam that victimized Hernandez isn't the only one out there. A scammer might pretend to be an FBI agent, calling with a warrant for your arrest. They might pose as an IRS agent threatening to cancel your Social Security number for some offense of which you're innocent. In those schemes, the only way to stop the police supposedly coming to your door is with the help of another scammer who pretends to be a lawyer, conveniently a phone call away, who takes payment in gift cards.

"This is only the tip of the iceberg."

John Breyault, National Consumers League

Sometimes the scammers pretend to be tech support, calling to repair your printer. Or they say your internet is hacked and then get you to install screen-sharing software like TeamViewer or AnyDesk to show technical gobbledygook that they say is proof the hackers have taken over. You just need to buy security, they say, with gift cards.

"Scammers know if they make it emotional and create this sense of urgency and fear, the logical part of your brain disconnects and the fight-or-flight kicks in -- which is great for protecting you, but it's terrible at making decisions," said Eva Velasquez, head of the nonprofit Identity Theft Resource Center, and a former law enforcement investigator of economic and financial crimes.

Her team's research found that if you can interrupt that emotional response, the logical side has a chance to kick in. That's partly why retailers have put signs up at gift card racks, warning about potential fraud. "Have you been asked to buy gift cards to pay a fine, taxes, fees or to help someone?" one sign at a Giant grocery store in Maryland reads. "Never provide numbers to ANYONE over the phone or by email."

Still, Velasquez said, scams of all sorts have become even more prevalent during the pandemic. "It's been growing and growing, and the explosion over the last 18 months is unprecedented," she said. "It's going to take at least a decade to unwind and get to the bottom of how big a problem it is."

apple-iphone-lock-cybersecurity-0465

Read more: Don't fall for these clever Black Friday scams this year

Trust betrayed

One of the first things Mark told me when recounting his experience being scammed was how bad it made him feel. It had only happened a few weeks earlier, in October, and it still stung. He requested his full name be withheld to avoid embarrassment with his family.

The call from the scammers started out seemingly normal. The person calling claimed to be from Amazon, concerned about a rogue $750 purchase with his credit card.

The person on the other end of the phone claimed Amazon had already stopped the supposed charge but asked Mark to buy gift cards that they could use as bait to track down scammers. Once all the scammers were caught, Mark was told, they'd give the gift cards back.

"Dumb me, I believed that," he said.

"It's going to take at least a decade to unwind and get to the bottom of how big a problem it is." pay my target card bill online

Eva Velasquez, Identity Theft Resource Center

Mark is in his 70s and retired after a successful career as crew for some of the most memorable summer blockbuster films from the 1990s. But he says he's not computer savvy. "I have trouble getting along on it," he said. "I mostly use it to play puzzles and stuff."

At first, the scammers asked Mark to buy $3,000 in gift cards from Target and Apple. If a store employee asked why he was spending so much money, the scammers told him to say the cards were gifts for a party.

Retailers have a blind spot for situations like Mark's. The companies have sophisticated software and entire teams devoted to detecting customers who are trying to scam them. But when a customer comes in, buying gift cards, "the retailers are learning it's very difficult to track," said David Fletcher, senior vice president at ClearSale, which helps detect fraud at the online stores of more than 4,000 merchants, including Motorola, Under Armour and Bath & Body Works.

That's why some retailers train employees to ask probing questions at checkout. Best Buy, in a statement, said it's also added warning signs to gift chase banks open near me today displays and checkout counters. Its systems flash a warning on the credit card reader screen when customers purchase gift cards above a certain limit.

But it still isn't enough. Fletcher himself became a victim when scammers emptied a $100 gift card his mother had bought for the fishing store Bass Pro Shops. He suspects scammers took photos of the account codes on the back of cards while they were still on the rack and waited until they were activated.

"Gift cards are so hard to trace back to fraudsters," he said.

Not that any of the questions the clerk asked Mark made any difference.

Read more: Cryptocurrency scams are all over social media. Don't get duped

At his first stop, the teller would only let him buy a couple cards, at $500 each. "It was kind of a surprise," he said of the limit. In retrospect, he appreciates it now.

But the scammers convinced Mark to go to more stores. Mark remembers checkout clerks asking what the cards were for a couple times. The scammers kept asking Mark for more money until he became suspicious and checked the value on the Target cards he had purchased. That's when he learned most of the money was gone.

When Mark contacted the police, they took down his information but didn't ask for the phone numbers the scammers called from. Experts say it's nearly impossible to track fraudsters through their numbers anyway. Instead, the police suggested Mark contact AARP for support and also to help guide him through reporting and other things to do. His bank, from which he'd ultimately withdrawn $5,000, declined to refund his losses.

"I feel so stupid about the whole thing," he said.

Like Hernandez, the nurse, Mark hopes that sharing his story will help people learn some of the tricks the scammers use and avoid the same mistakes he made. 

While Mark said his savings are enough to cover the losses he suffered, the fraudsters made off with nearly all of Hernandez's money. And she gave up getting a refund from Match too.

"It's tough and embarrassing, and I feel kind of dumb," Hernandez said, adding that she tends to keep the tough things that happen in her life to herself, though eventually she did tell some pay my target card bill online to her kids. "I had to go and pray a lot."

She also decided she's going to stay away from dating for now. But she did have one last confrontation with Kevin, who promised to make it better. 

Hernandez was desperate to get her money back, but she was also upset. "I don't know how you can do this to people," she remembers saying. Kevin asked for her address and ended the conversation saying he'd send her the money in the mail. She hoped his conscience might have changed him.

She hasn't heard from Kevin since.

The story continues Friday, when we look at efforts to fight back at the scammers.

Источник: https://www.cnet.com/tech/services-and-software/gift-card-scams-are-growing-and-were-all-paying-the-price/

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Neither TD Bank US Holding Company, nor its subsidiaries or affiliates, is responsible for the content of third party sites hyper-linked from this page, nor do they guarantee or endorse the information, recommendations, products or services offered on third party sites.

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3Visa’s Zero Liability Policy does not apply to certain commercial card and anonymous prepaid card transactions or transactions not processed by Visa. Cardholders must take care in protecting their card and notify TD Bank immediately of any unauthorized use.

Источник: https://www.td.com/us/en/personal-banking/learning/getting-started-with-td-cards/

Target adds 'buy now pay later' options with Affirm and Sezzle ahead of holiday shopping season


Target is the latest retailer to jump on the "buy now, pay later" bandwagon.

Ahead of the busy holiday season, Target is offering shoppers additional ways to pay for their purchases with new installment plans from Affirm and Sezzle, the retailer told USA TODAY exclusively Wednesday.

Installment plans, which are beginning to replace traditional layaway plans, are increasingly popular with retailers. Amazon and Walmart have adopted them, as have Macy’s and Bed Bath & Beyond. Newer entrants include Paypal, which bought Paidy, and Square, which bought Afterpay.

Not only can installment plans boost sales, they allow shoppers who don't have pay my target card bill online cash at the time to snag deals and stock up on holiday gifts.

►Save better, spend better:  Money tips and advice delivered right to your inbox. Sign up here

Consumers who use buy now, pay later tend to be younger, and some don't qualify for credit cards. The advantage: They can spread out the cost of a purchase over a few weeks or months in installment payments.

Target says the new options allow consumers to buy what they need to “take advantage of our best deals” and pay at a pace that works for them. 

“Through our partnerships with Sezzle and Affirm, we’re offering guests additional flexible payment options that meet even more of their needs no matter how they choose to shop," Gemma Kubat, Target’s president of financial and retail services, told USA TODAY.

►Walmart-Home Depot partnership:  Home Depot online orders will soon be delivered through Walmart's GoLocal service

Amazon Epic Deals event:  Get major savings on tech, kitchen essentials and more at the early Black Friday sale

How popular these installment plans will be with holiday shoppers is unclear, but more retailers have added them in recent months.

According to a report by Lending Tree, interest in store credit cards plunged in 2021. But the report also found that consumers were still slightly more likely to use store credit cards for holiday shopping than the buy now, pay later installment plans.

Sezzle CEO Charlie Youakim said his service is different from a credit card, which benefits when consumers carry a balance and pay interest.

“We don’t win in that scenario," Youakim told USA TODAY. "Where Sezzle wins is when we extend the right amount of credit to the customer, so that they can repay us. We know that we're getting a lot of young customers that are new to financial services and credit so we're trying to become the right training wheels product.”

Target's announcement comes ahead of its three-day Pay my target card bill online Days sale, which begins Sunday. The sale kicks off the pay my target card bill online holiday shopping season and launches a new price match guarantee.

Purchases with Sezzle and Affirm also qualify for the price match guarantee, Target said. Sezzle is for smaller purchases, while Affirm is for purchases over $100.

Sezzle offers no interest and no fees for consumers who make payments on time. Affirm interest rates vary and are subject to approval.

►Target Deal Days 2021: Target to kick off holiday sales early with 'Deal Days' and new price match guarantee

Burger King nugget news: Burger King adding Ghost Pepper Chicken Nuggets nationwide, starting Impossible Nuggets test

The end of traditional layaway

Walmart also is working with Affirm after removing seasonal layaway from most of its stores last year.

“We've learned a lot in the past year as our customers’ needs and shopping habits have changed,” Walmart said in a statement to USA TODAY. “Based on what we learned, we are confident that our payment options provide the right solutions for our customers.”

Affirm also is working with Amazon and select customers now have the option to split the total cost of purchases of $50 or more into monthly payments.

“Over half of Americans are interested in using a pay-over-time solution for their holiday shopping this year and the majority (69%) will do so because they believe it helps them to better budget,” Silvija Martincevic, Affirm's chief commercial officer, said in a statement.

►Sunscreen recall 2021: Coppertone recalling select spray sunscreens due to presence of benzene

►Apple picking this year?: These kitchen tools will turn your apples into fall's best treats

Follow USA TODAY reporter Kelly Tyko on Twitter: @KellyTyko. For shopping news, tips and deals, join us on our Shopping Ninjas Facebook group. 

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/shopping/2021/10/06/target-shopping-affirm-sezzle-buy-now-pay-later-holiday-layaway/5993437001/

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1CommBank rewards are only eligible at participating store locations. Check the ‘participating stores’ section of your reward on the app for more information. You must spend the required minimum amount in one transaction to be eligible for cashback.

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The target market for these products will be found within the product’s Target Market Determination, available here.

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The advice on this website has been prepared without considering your objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of that, you should, before acting on the advice, consider its appropriateness to your circumstances. Please read our Financial Services Guide (PDF). Full terms and conditions for the transaction and savings accounts (PDF) mentioned are available here or from pay my target card bill online CommBank branch. Full terms and conditions for Electronic Banking are available here.

Mastercard, the Mastercard brand mark and Tap & go are registered trademarks of Mastercard International Incorporated. 

Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/banking/debit-mastercard.html

Someone might ask you to pay for something by putting money on a gift card, like a Google Play or iTunes card, and then giving them the numbers on the back of the card. If they ask you to do this, they’re trying to scam you. No real business or government agency will ever insist you pay them with a gift card. Anyone who demands to be paid with a gift card is a scammer. Read on to learn more about gift card scams.

What Gift Card Scams Looks Like

Gift cards are for gifts, not for payments. But they’re popular with scammers because they’re easy for people to find and buy, and they have fewer protections for buyers compared to some other payment options. They’re more like cash: once you use the card, the money on it is gone. Scammers like this.

If someone calls you and demands that you pay them with gift cards, you can bet that a scammer is behind that call. Once they have the gift card number and the PIN, they have your money. Scammers may tell you many stories to get you to pay them with gift cards, but this is what usually happens:

  1. The caller says it’s urgent. The scammer says you have to pay right away or something terrible will happen. But you don’t, and it won’t.
  1. The caller usually tells you which gift card to buy. They might say to put money on an eBay, Google Play, Target, or iTunes gift card. They might send you to a specific store — often Walmart, Target, CVS, or Walgreens. Sometimes they say to buy cards at several stores, so cashiers won’t get suspicious. And, the caller might stay on the phone with you while you go to the store and load money onto the card. These are all signs of a scam.
  1. The caller asks you for the gift card number and PIN. The card number and PIN on the back of the card let the scammer get the money you loaded onto the card. And the scammer gets it right away.

How Scammers Convince You To Pay my target card bill online With Gift Cards

Scammers pretend to be someone they’re not to convince you to pay with gift cards. They want to scare or pressure you into acting quickly, so you don’t have time to think or talk to someone you trust. Here’s a list of common gift card scams and schemes:

  • The caller says they’re from the government — maybe the IRS or the Social Security Administration. They say you have to pay taxes or a fine, but it’s a scam.
  • Someone calls from tech support, maybe saying they’re from Apple or Microsoft, saying there’s something wrong with your computer. But it’s a lie.
  • You meet someone special on a dating website, but then he needs money and asks you to help him. This romance scammer makes up any story to trick you into sending him gift cards.
  • The scammer pretends to be a friend or family member in an emergency and asks you to send money right away — but not tell anyone. This is a scam. If you’re worried, hang up and call your friend or relative to check that everything is all right.
  • Someone says you’ve won a prize but first, you have to pay fees or other charges with a gift card. Remember: no honest business or agency will ever make you pay with a gift card. But also — did you even enter that sweepstakes?
  • The caller says she’s from your power company, or another utility company. She threatens to cut off your service if you don’t pay immediately. But utility companies don’t work that way. It’s a scam.
  • You get a check from someone for way more than you expected. They tell you to deposit the check, then give them the difference on a gift card. But that check will be fake and you’ll be out all that money.

What To Do If You Paid a Scammer With Gift Cards

If you paid a scammer with a gift card, tell the company that issued the card right away.

Contact information for popular gift card companies

Amazon

Ebay

Google Play

iTunes

  • Call Apple Support right away at 1 (800) 275-2273. Say “gift card” to connect with a live representative.
  • Ask if the money is still on the iTunes card. If so, Apple can put a freeze on it. You might be able to get your money back from them.
  • Keep the iTunes card itself and your receipt for the iTunes card.
  • Learn about iTunes gift card scams and how to report them.

Steam

  • If you have a Steam account, report gift card scams online. Click the “Purchases” option, then click, “I have charges from Steam that I didn’t make.” Then click, “Contact Steam Support.”
  • Keep the Steam card itself and your receipt for the Steam card.
  • Learn about Steam gift card scams.

MoneyPak

Don’t see your card on this list? Look for the company’s contact information on the card itself, or do some research online to find out how to reach the card issuer. If you can’t find the contact information or the card issuer doesn’t want to talk to you, report it to the FTC.

Safely Buying and Using Gift Cards

Remember that gift cards are for gifts, not for payments. So if you buy gift cards to give away or donate:

  • Stick to stores you know and trust. Avoid buying from online auction sites because the cards may be fake or stolen.
  • Check it out before you buy it. Make sure the protective stickers are on the card and that they do not appear to have been tampered with. Also check that the PIN number on the back isn’t showing. Get a different card if you spot a problem.
  • Keep your receipt. This, or the card’s ID number, will help you file a report if you lose the gift card.

Report Fraud

If someone asks you to pay them with gift cards:

  • Report it to the Federal Trade Commission at ReportFraud.ftc.gov. Report it even if you didn’t pay. Your report helps law enforcement stop scams.
  • You can also report it to your state attorney general.
  • If you lost money, also report it to local law enforcement. A police report may help when you deal with the card issuer.
Источник: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/gift-card-scams

Target launches its own mobile payments system with debut of ‘Wallet’

As promisedearlier, Target today launched its own mobile payments system with the introduction of “Wallet” in the Target app. Wallet, as the name implies, allows Target shoppers in-store to both check out using their smartphone as well as take advantage of their Cartwheel digital coupons and discounts with only one scan of their barcode.

Already, Cartwheel savings in Target’s app had worked like this – that is, after adding the discounts on selected products to your Target account using the Cartwheel feature, shoppers could present a barcode to be scanned at the point-of-sale to take advantage of the savings. The only difference between that and today, is that shoppers can now also choose to pay using their Target REDcard at the same time.

Target’s REDcard is available as both a debit card that links to customers’ bank accounts and a store credit card, and offers 5 percent back on purchases to encourage its use.

According to the retailer, the advantage for consumers is faster checkout – up to four times faster than “other payment types” it says, a jab at traditional payment methods like chip-and-PIN cards, for example, which are notoriously slow. (Of course, the retailer benefits, too, by pushing users to REDcard where it saves on credit card processing fees.)

In the near future, Target Wallet will also support the ability to add and pay with Target GiftCards as well, the retailer says.

Target isn’t the only major brick-and-mortar retailer with its own payments system. Walmart previously launched WalmartPay; CVS has CVS Pay; and Kohl’s has Kohl’s Pay, for example. (Perhaps we should give Target credit for not naming its solution Target Pay.)

In addition to saving the company money by shifting consumers to store cards, in-house mobile payment solutions give retailers access to the consumer data they would have otherwise given up, had the shopper checked out with a mobile payment solution like Apple Pay, where that data is not shared.

“Wallet louis edmonds chin the Target app makes checkout easier and faster than ever,” said Mike McNamara, Target’s chief information and digital officer, in a statement about Wallet’s launch. “Guests are going to love the convenience of having payment, Cartwheel offers, Weekly Ad coupons and GiftCards all in one place with Wallet.”

The new Wallet feature is available on both Android and iOS versions of the Target app.

Источник: https://techcrunch.com/2017/12/04/target-launches-its-own-mobile-payments-system-with-debut-of-wallet/

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