checking account numbers and routing numbers generator

The routing number, account number, and check number are located at the bottom edge of your check. Routing numbers are always 9 digits long. Silvergate Bank 4250 Executive Square Suite 300. La Jolla, CA 92037. Domestic Wires: RTN/ABA 322286803. Beneficiary Information: Account number, Name. Want funds deposited or withdrawn directly from your CEFCU account? Just use CEFCU's routing number — 271183701 — and your 10-digit account number. checking account numbers and routing numbers generator

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Bank Account Number Generator

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Источник: https://www.qarya.org/bank-account-number-generator/

What is a wire transfer?openWhat is a Remittance transfer?closedHow do I send a domestic or international wire transfer?closedWhat should I do if I receive an error message that discusses exact fees from other banks?closedAre checking account numbers and routing numbers generator countries where I should only send USD and not the local/foreign currency?closedDo business wires require exact fees to be known?closedHow do I assert an error with my Remittance Transfer?closedHow do I cancel a Remittance Transfer?closedCan someone wire funds to my account at Bank of America?closedAre there fees and limits for domestic and international wire transfers?closedWhat else do I need to send a wire transfer?closedWhat is a SWIFT Code?closedWhich Bank of America SWIFT Code should I provide?closedWhat is an IBAN number?closedDoes Bank of America have an IBAN number?closedHow should I obtain the IBAN numbers of another bank?closedHow soon can an international recipient receive the funds from a wire transfer?closed

What is a wire transfer?open

A wire transfer is an electronic payment service for transferring funds by wire, for example through SWIFT, the Federal Reserve Wire Network or the Clearing House Interbank Checking account numbers and routing numbers generator System.

What should I do if I receive an error message that discusses exact fees from other banks?open

For Remittance Transfers, we're now required by law to inform you of the exact fees you will incur for international wires, including fees from other banks. For some requests, we won't have the exact fees from other banks and therefore will not be able to process it. If your request was in US dollars, you may try again in foreign currency –– this may help us determine the exact fees incurred for this transaction and enable us to send the wire request successfully.

How do I assert an error with my Remittance Transfer?open

Contact us at 877.337.8357 (or 302.781.6374 from outside of the U.S.).

You can also write to us at:
Bank of America, N.A.
PO Box 25118
Tampa, FL 33622-5118

For international wires initiated by a consumer primarily for personal, family or household purposes, you must contact us within 180 days of the date we indicated to you that funds would be made available to the recipient. Please have the following information handy:

  • Your name and address (or telephone number)

  • The problem with the transfer, and why you believe it's an error

  • The name of the person receiving the funds, and if you know it, his or her telephone number or address

  • The dollar amount of the transfer

  • The confirmation code (provided from the Transfer Receipt)

We'll determine whether an error occurred within 90 days after you contact us and we'll correct any error promptly. We'll tell you the results within 3 business days after completing our investigation. If we decide that there was no error, we'll send you a written explanation. You may ask for copies of any documents we used in our investigation.

Please note that in the event you provide an incorrect account number or institutional identifying number, and we are not able to recover the funds, you may lose the amount of the payment order.

How do I cancel a Remittance Transfer?open

International wire transfers initiated by a consumer primarily for personal, family or household purposes may be cancelled within 30 minutes of confirmation for a full refund, including any fees. We'll refund your money within 3 business days of your request to cancel a transfer as long as the funds have not already been picked up or deposited into the recipient's account.

If you initiated the international wire transfer through Online Banking, the best way to cancel is to Sign in to Online Banking; select the Transfer tab and then select Send money to someone using their account number at another bank from the dropdown menu. You can also call us at 877.337.8357. From outside of the U.S., call us collect at 302.781.6374.

If you initiated the international wire transfer at a banking center, you can get the transfer canceled by going to the nearest banking center or by calling us at 877.337.8357 (or 302.781.6374 from outside the U.S.).

Can someone wire funds to my account at Bank of America?open

Yes, someone with your account information can wire funds directly to your Bank of America account. You will need to provide your account number and wire transfer routing number. For incoming international wires, you will also need to provide the appropriate SWIFT Code.

Bank of America's SWIFT code BOFAUS3N should be used for incoming wires in U.S. dollars.

Bank of America's SWIFT code BOFAUS6S should be used for incoming wires in foreign currency.

If you do not know or are unsure of the type of currency being received please use BOFAUS3N.

To find your account number and wire transfer routing number, Sign in to Online Banking, select your desired account and then select the Information & Services tab.

Are there fees and limits for domestic and international wire transfers?open

Fees and limits may apply, depending on your account type and the type of wire. You will be able to review any fees checking account numbers and routing numbers generator limits before completing your wire transfer in Online Banking. Latest transfer limits are also available in our Online Banking service agreement. For Remittance Transfers, we're required by law to inform you of the exact fees you will incur for international wires, including fees from other banks. For some requests, we won't have the exact fees from other banks and therefore will not be able to process it. If your request was in US dollars, you may try again in foreign currency –– this may help us determine the exact fees incurred for this transaction and enable us to send the wire request successfully.

What is a SWIFT Code?open

The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) Code is a unique identification code that may be required by some banks, broker-dealers and investment managers for the completion of international wire transfers.

Which Bank of America SWIFT Code should I provide?open

Bank of America’s SWIFT code BOFAUS3N should be used for incoming wires in U.S. dollars.

Bank of America’s SWIFT code BOFAUS6S should be used checking account numbers and routing numbers generator incoming wires in foreign currency.

If you do not know or are unsure of the type of currency being received please use BOFAUS3N.

Someone sending an incoming international wire to you may also ask for Bank of America’s address. The address to provide is as follows:

BOFAUS3N (for incoming wires in US dollars or unknown currency)
Bank of America, NA
222 Broadway
New York, New York 10038


BOFAUS6S (for incoming payments in foreign currency)
Bank of America, NA
555 California St
San Francisco, CA 94104

What is an IBAN number?open

The International Bank Account Number (IBAN) is the international standard for identifying international bank accounts across national borders.

The IBAN is comprised of a maximum of 27 alphanumeric characters within Europe and a maximum of 34 outside of Europe (German IBAN: 22 characters). At present, the United States does not participate in IBAN. Therefore, Bank of America does not have an IBAN number.

When sending wire transfers to countries that have IBAN numbers, we recommend including those numbers in your wire transfer documentation. According to the European Directive, only the account-keeping bank may calculate the IBAN / check digits. To obtain the IBAN numbers of another bank, please visit that banks website or contact them directly to obtain that information.

How soon can an international recipient receive the funds from a wire transfer?open

If you are transferring funds to an international account, your account will be debited the same day and Bank of America will send the payment out immediately. The beneficiary's bank will generally receive sun realty nags head nc funds 1 to 2 days later. The funds will usually be credited to the beneficiary within 2 days. However, there are a number of factors which could delay the credit to the beneficiary. These include, but are not limited to: local bank holidays, delays by an intermediary bank or other local conditions. Note, too, that some countries have been designated as slow-to-pay layer countries. Transfers made to or from a slow-to-pay country may experience delays in crediting the beneficiary's account.

List of Slow-to-Pay Countries

  • Afghanistan
  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Bangladesh
  • Benin
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Botswana
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cameroon
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Congo
  • Congo, The Democratic Republic of
  • Cuba
  • Djibouti
  • Egypt
  • Ethiopia
  • Gabon
  • Gambia, The
  • Ghana
  • Guinea
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Iran
  • Iran, Islamic Republic of
  • Iraq
  • Kenya
  • Korea, Democratic People's Republic of (North Korea)
  • Korea, Republic of (South Korea)
  • Kosovo
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Mali
  • Mauritius
  • Mexico
  • Morocco
  • Mozambique
  • Myanmar
  • Namibia
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • North Korea
  • Pakistan
  • Philippines
  • Russia
  • Russian Federation
  • Rwanda
  • Senegal
  • Sierra Leone
  • Somalia
  • South Korea
  • Sri Lanka
  • Sudan
  • Swaziland
  • Syria
  • Syrian Arab Republic
  • Tanzania
  • Tanzania, United Republic of
  • The Gambia
  • Tunisia
  • Uganda
  • Viet Nam
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe
Источник: https://www.bankofamerica.com/deposits/wire-transfers-faqs/

International Bank Account Number

Alphanumeric code that uniquely identifies a bank account in any participating country

The IBAN on this bank statement is grouped with the account number, sort code and BIC.
A typical British bank statementheader (from a fictitious bank), showing the location of the account's IBAN

The International Bank Account Number (IBAN) is an internationally agreed system of identifying bank accounts across national borders to facilitate the communication and processing of cross border transactions with a reduced risk of transcription errors. An IBAN uniquely identifies the account of a customer at a financial institution. It was originally adopted by the European Committee for Banking Standards (ECBS) and later as an international standard under ISO 13616:1997. The current standard is ISO 13616:2020, which indicates SWIFT as the formal registrar. Initially developed to facilitate payments within the European Union, it has been implemented by most European countries and numerous countries in other parts of the world, mainly in the Middle East and the Caribbean. As of May 2020, 77 countries were using the IBAN numbering system.[1]

The IBAN consists of up to 34 alphanumeric characters comprising a country code; two check digits; and a number that includes the domestic bank account number, branch identifier, and potential routing information. The check digits enable a check of the bank account number to confirm its integrity before submitting a transaction.

Background[edit]

Before IBAN, differing national standards for bank account identification (i.e. bank, branch, routing codes, and account number) were confusing for some users. This often led to necessary routing information being missing from payments. Routing information as specified by ISO 9362 (also known as Business Identifier Codes (BIC), SWIFT ID or SWIFT code, and SWIFT-BIC) does not require a specific format for the transaction so the identification of accounts and transaction types is left to agreements of the transaction partners. It also does not contain check digits, so errors of transcription were not detectable and it was not possible for a sending bank to validate the routing information prior to submitting the payment. Routing errors caused delayed payments and incurred extra costs to the sending and receiving banks and often to intermediate routing banks.[2]

In 1997, to overcome these difficulties, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) published ISO 13616:1997.[3] This proposal had a degree of flexibility that the European Committee for Reserve america new mexico Standards (ECBS) believed would make it unworkable, and they produced a "slimmed down" version of the standard which, amongst other things, permitted only upper-case letters and required that the IBAN for each country have a fixed length.[4] ISO 13616:1997 was subsequently withdrawn and replaced by ISO 13616:2003.[3] The standard was revised again in 2007 when it was split into two parts. ISO 13616-1:2007 "specifies the elements of an international bank account number (IBAN) used to facilitate the processing of data internationally in data interchange, in financial environments as well as within and between other industries" but "does not specify internal procedures, file organization techniques, storage media, languages, etc. to be used in its implementation".[5] ISO 13616-2:2007 describes "the Registration Authority (RA) responsible for the registry of IBAN formats that are compliant with ISO 13616-1 [and] the procedures for registering ISO 13616-compliant IBAN formats".[6] The official IBAN registrar under ISO 13616-2:2007 is SWIFT.[7]

IBAN imposes a flexible but regular format sufficient for account identification and contains validation information to avoid errors of transcription. It carries all the routing information needed to get a payment from one bank to another wherever it may be; it contains key bank account details such as country code, branch codes (known as sort codes in the UK and Ireland) and account numbers, and it contains check digits which can be validated at source according to a single standard procedure.[8] Where used, IBANs have reduced trans-national money transfer errors to under 0.1% of total payments

Structure[edit]

The IBAN consists of up to 34 alphanumeric characters, as follows:

The check digits represent the checksum of the bank account number which is used by banking systems to confirm that the number contains no simple errors.

IBAN is traditionally expressed in groups of four characters separated by spaces, the last checking account numbers and routing numbers generator being of variable length as shown in the example below; when transmitted electronically, spaces are omitted.[1]

Country IBAN formatting example
Belgium
Brazil
Costa Rica
France
Ireland
Germany
Greece
Mauritius
Pakistan
Poland
Romania
Saint Lucia
Saudi Arabia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland state street bank and trust atlanta Kingdom

Permitted IBAN characters are the digits 0 to 9 and the 26 Latin alphabetic charactersA to Z.[9] This applies even in countries where these characters are not used in the national language (e.g., Thailand).

Basic Bank Account Number[edit]

The Basic Bank Account Number (BBAN) format is decided by the national central bank or designated payment authority of each country. There is no consistency between the formats adopted. The national authority may register its BBAN format with SWIFT but is not obliged to do so. It may adopt IBAN without registration. SWIFT also acts as the registration authority for the SWIFT system, which is used by most countries that have not adopted IBAN. A major difference between the two systems is that under SWIFT there is no requirement that BBANs used within a country be of a pre-defined length.

The BBAN must be of a fixed length for the country and comprise case-insensitive alphanumeric characters. It includes the domestic bank account number, branch identifier, and potential routing information. Each country can have a different national routing/account numbering system, up to a maximum of 30 alphanumeric characters.

Check digits[edit]

The check digits enable the sending bank (or its customer) to perform a sanity check of the routing destination and account number from a single string of data at the time of data entry.[4] This check is guaranteed to detect any instances where a single character has been omitted, duplicated, mistyped or where two characters have been transposed. Thus routing and account number errors are virtually eliminated.[9]

Processing[edit]

One of the design aims of the IBAN was to enable as much validation as possible to be done at the point of data entry.[10] In particular, the computer program that accepts an IBAN will be able to validate:

  • Country code
  • Number of characters in the IBAN correspond to the number specified for the country code
  • BBAN format specified for the country code
  • Account number, bank code and country code combination is compatible with the check digits

The check digits are calculated using MOD-97-10 as per ISO/IEC 7064:2003[9] (abbreviated to mod-97 in this article), which specifies a set of check character systems capable of protecting strings against errors which occur when people copy or key data. In particular, the standard states that the following can be detected:

  • All single substitution errors (the substitution of a single character for another, for example for )
  • All or nearly all single (local) transposition errors (the transposition of two single characters, either adjacent or with one character between them, for example or for )
  • All or nearly all shift errors (shifts of the whole string to the left or right)
  • High proportion of double substitution errors (two separate single substitution errors in the same string, for example for )
  • High proportion of all other errors

The underlying rules for IBANs is that the account-servicing financial institution should issue an IBAN, as there are a number of areas where different IBANs could be generated from the same account and branch numbers that would satisfy the generic IBAN validation rules. In particular cases where is a valid check digit, will not be a valid check digit, likewise, if is a valid check digit, will not be a valid check digit, similarly with and.

The UN CEFACT TBG5 has published a free IBAN validation service in 32 languages for all 57 countries[needs update] that have adopted the IBAN standard.[11] They have also published the Javascript source code of the verification algorithm.[12]

An English language IBAN checker for ECBS member country bank accounts is available on its website.[13]

Algorithms[edit]

Validating the IBAN[edit]

An IBAN is validated by converting it into an integer and performing a basic mod-97 operation (as described in ISO 7064) on it. If the IBAN is valid, the remainder equals 1.[Note 1] The algorithm of IBAN validation is as follows:[8]

  1. Check that the total IBAN length is correct as per the country. If not, the IBAN is invalid
  2. Move the four initial characters to the end of the string
  3. Replace each letter in the string with two digits, thereby expanding the string, where A = 10, B = 11. ., Z = 35
  4. Interpret the string as a decimal integer and compute the remainder of that number on division by 97

If the remainder is 1, the check digit test is passed and the IBAN might be valid.

Example (fictitious United Kingdom bank, sort code 12-34-56, account number 98765432):

• IBAN:GB82WEST 1234 5698 7654 32
• Rearrange: W E S T12345698765432 G B82
• Convert to integer:3214282912345698765432161182
• Compute remainder:3214282912345698765432161182mod 97 = 1

Generating IBAN check digits[edit]

According to the ECBS "generation of the IBAN shall be the exclusive responsibility of the bank/branch servicing the account".[8] The ECBS document replicates part of the ISO/IEC 7064:2003 standard as a method for generating check digits in the range 02 to 98. Check digits in the ranges 00 to 96, 01 to 97, and 03 to 99 will also provide validation of an IBAN, but the standard is silent as to whether or not these ranges may be used.

The preferred algorithm is:[8]

  1. Check that the total IBAN length is correct as per the country. If not, the IBAN is invalid.
  2. Replace the two check digits by 00 (e.g., GB00 for the UK).
  3. Move the four initial characters to the end of the string.
  4. Replace the letters in the string with digits, expanding the string as necessary, such that A or a = 10, B or b = 11, and Z or z = 35. Each alphabetic character is therefore replaced by 2 digits
  5. Convert the string to an integer (i.e. ignore leading zeroes).
  6. Calculate mod-97 of the new number, which results in the remainder.
  7. Subtract the remainder from 98 and use the result for the two check digits. If the result is a single-digit number, pad it with a leading 0 to make a two-digit number.

Modulo operation on IBAN[edit]

Any computer programming language or software package that is used to compute D mod 97 directly must have the ability to handle integers of more than 30 digits. In practice, this can only be done by software that either supports arbitrary-precision arithmetic or that can handle 219-bit (unsigned) integers,[Note 2] features that are often not standard. If the application software in use does not provide the ability to handle integers of this size, the modulo operation can be performed in a piece-wise manner (as is the case with the UN CEFACT TBG5 Javascript program).

Piece-wise calculation D mod 97 can be done in many ways. One such way is as follows:[14]

  1. Starting from the leftmost digit of D, construct a number using the first 9 digits and call it N.[Note 3]
  2. Calculate N mod 97.
  3. Construct a new 9-digit N by concatenating the above result (step 2) with the next 7 digits of D. If there are fewer than 7 digits remaining in D but at least one, then construct a new N, which will have less than 9 digits, from the above result (step 2) followed by the remaining digits of D
  4. Repeat steps 2–3 until all the digits of D have been processed

The result of the final calculation in step 2 will be D mod 97 = N mod 97.

Example[edit]

In this example, the above algorithm for D mod 97 will be applied to D = 3214282912345698765432161182. (The digits are colour-coded to aid the description below.) If the result is one, the IBAN corresponding to D passes the check digit test.

  1. Construct N from the first 9 digits of D
    N = 321428291
  2. Calculate N mod 97 = 70
  3. Construct a new 9-digit N from the above result (step 2) followed by the next 7 digits of D.
    N = 702345698
  4. Calculate N mod 97 = 29
  5. Construct a new 9-digit N from the above result (step 4) followed by the next 7 digits of D.
    N = 297654321
  6. Calculate N mod 97 = 24
  7. Construct a new N from the above result (step 6) followed by the remaining 5 digits of D.
    N = 2461182
  8. Calculate N mod 97 = 1

From step 8, the final result is D mod 97 = 1 and the IBAN has passed this check digit test.

National check digits[edit]

In addition to the IBAN check digits, many countries have their own national check digits used within the BBAN, as part of their national account number formats. Each country determines its own algorithm used for assigning and validating the national check digits - some relying on international standards, some inventing their own national standard, and some allowing each bank to decide if or how to implement them. Some algorithms apply to the entire BBAN, and others to one or more of the fields within it. The check digits may be considered an integral part of the account number, or an external field separate from the account number, depending on the country's rules.

Most of the variations used are based on two categories of algorithms:

- ISO 7064 MOD-97-10: Treat the account number as a large integer, divide it by 97 and use the remainder or its complement as the check digit(s).

- Weighted Sum: Treat the account number as a series of individual numbers, multiply each number by a weight value according to its position in the string, sum the products, divide the sum by a modulus (usually 10 or 11) and use the remainder or its complement as the check digit.

In both cases, there may first be a translation from alphanumeric characters to numbers using conversion tables. The complement, if used, means the remainder is subtracted from a fixed value, usually the modulus or the modulus plus one (with the common exception that a remainder of 0 results in 0). Note that some of the national specifications define the weights order from right to left, but since the BBAN length in the IBAN is fixed, they can be used from left to right as well.

Country Algorithm Weights Modulo Complement Comments
Albania[15]Weighted 9, 7, 3, 1, 9, 7, 3, 1 10 10 - r, 0 → 0 Applies only to the bank code + branch code fields.
Belgium[16]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 (variant) 97 r, 0 → 97
Bosnia and Herzegovina[17]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 97 98 - r
Croatia[16]ISO 7064 MOD-11-10 11,10 11 - r Calculated separately for the bank code (7 digits) and account number (10 digits).
Czech Republic[16]Weighted 6, 3, 7, 9, 10 ,5 ,8 ,4 ,2 ,1 11 11 - r, 0 → 0 Calculated separately for the account number (10 digits) and branch number (6 digits, using the last 6 weights).
East TimorISO 7064 MOD-97-10 97 98 - r
Estonia[16][18][19]Weighted 7, 1, 3, 7, 1, 3, 7, 1, 3, 7, 1, 3, 7 10 10 - r, 0 → 0 Applies only to the branch code + account number fields (ignoring the bank code).
Finland[16]Luhn 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2 10 10 - r, 0 → 0 Uses the Luhn Algorithm, where the sum is taken of the individual digits of the multiplication products rather than the products themselves.
France[16]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 (variant) 97 97 - r The mapping form characters to coefficients is non-standard: the digits 0-9 are converted to their respective values, letters 'A-I' converted to 1-9, letters J-R converted to 1-9 and letters S-Z converted to 2-9, respectively.
Hungary[16]Weighted 9, 7, 3, 1, 9, 7, 3, 1, 9, 7, 3, 1, 9, 7, 3, 1 10 10 - r, 0 → 0 There are two separate check digits - one for the bank code + branch code, and one for the account number, each calculated separately.
Iceland[16]Weighted 3, 2, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 11 11 - r, 0 → 0 Applies only to the first 8 digits of the national identification number, with the check digit stored at the 9th.
Italy[16]Conversion + Sum 26 r Characters are converted to digits using two different conversion tables, one for odd positions and one for even positions (the first character is considered odd): odd-positioned digits 0-9 are converted to their respective values in the sequence 1, 0, 5, 7, 9, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, and characters in the range A-Z are converted to 1, 0, 5, 7, 9, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 2, 4, 18, 20, 11, 3, 6, 8, 12, 14, 16, 10, 22, 25, 24, 23 respectively. Even-positioned characters are converted using the natural zero-based value, i.e. digits 0-9 converted to the respective numbers 0-9, and letters A-Z to the range 0-25. After conversion the numbers are summed (without weights), and the result taken modulo 26. This is then converted back into a single letter in the range A-Z (in natural order) which is used as the check digit (or rather, check character).
North Macedonia[16]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 97 98 - r
MauritaniaISO 7064 MOD-97-10 (variant) 97 97 - r
Monaco[16]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 (variant) 97 97 - r Uses the same algorithm as France.
Montenegro[16]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 97 98 - r
Norway[16]Weighted 5, 4, 3, 2, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 11 11 - r, 0 → 0, 1 → invalid If the first two digits of the account number (not the bank code) are both zeros, then the calculation applies only to the remaining 4 digits of the account number, otherwise it applies to the entire BBAN (bank code + account number).
Poland[16][20]Weighted 3, 9, 7, 1, 3, 9, 7 10 10 - r, 0 → 0 Applies only to the bank code + branch code (without the account number).
Portugal[16]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 97 98 - r
San Marino[16]Conversion + Sum 26 r Uses the same algorithm as Italy.
Serbia[16]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 97 98 - r
Slovakia[16]Weighted 6, 3, 7, 9, 10 ,5 ,8 ,4 ,2 ,1 11 11 - r, 0 → 0 Calculated separately for the account number (10 digits) and branch number (6 digits, using the last 6 weights).
Slovenia[16]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 97 98 - checking account numbers and routing numbers generator
Spain[16]Weighted 1, 2, 4, 8, 5, 10, 9, 7, 3, 6 11 11 - r, 0 → 0, 1 → 1 There are two separate check digits - one for the bank code + branch code, and one for the account number, each calculated separately. The account number is 10 characters long and uses all of the weights, whereas the bank code + branch code are 8 characters long and thus use only the last 8 weights in the calculation (or equivalently, pad with two zeros on the left and use the 10 weights).
Tunisia[16]ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 (variant) 97 97 - r

Adoption[edit]

Adoption of the IBAN

  IBAN structure is defined

  IBAN structure is registered with SWIFT

  Country participates in SEPA

  Euro is country's currency

International bank transactions use either an IBAN or the ISO 9362 Business Identifier Code system (BIC or SWIFT code) in conjunction with the BBAN (Basic Bank Account Number).[21]

EEA and territories[edit]

The banks of most countries in Europe publish account numbers using both the IBAN format and the nationally recognised identifiers, this being mandatory within the European Economic Area.[22]

Day-to-day administration of banking in British Overseas Territories varies from territory to territory; some, such as South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, have too small a population to warrant a banking system while others, such as Bermuda, have a thriving financial sector.[23] The use of the IBAN is up to the local government—Gibraltar, being part of the European Union is required to use the IBAN,[22] as are the Crown dependencies, which use the British clearing system,[24] and the British Virgin Islands have chosen to do so. As of April 2013[update], no other British Overseas Territories have chosen to use the IBAN.[1] Banks in the Caribbean Netherlands also do not use the IBAN.

As of February 2014, the IBAN is mandatory for all banking transactions in countries that use the euro.

Single Euro Payments Area[edit]

Main article: Single Euro Payments Area

The IBAN designation scheme was chosen as the foundation for electronic straight-through processing in the European Economic Area. The European Parliament mandated that a bank charge needs to be the same amount for domestic credit transfers as for cross-border credit transfers regulated in decision 2560/2001 (updated in 924/2009).[22] This regulation took effect in 2003. Only payments in euro up to €12,500 to a bank account designated by its IBAN were covered by the regulation, not payments in other currencies.

The Euro Payments regulation was the foundation for the decision to create a Single Euro Payments Area (SEPA). The European Central Bank has created the TARGET2 interbank network that unifies the technical infrastructure of the 26 central banks of the European Union (although Sweden has opted out). SEPA is a self-regulatory initiative by the banking sector of Europe as represented in the European Payments Council (EPC). The European Union made the scheme mandatory through the Payment Services Directive published in 2007. Since January 2008, all countries were required to support SEPA credit transfer, and SEPA direct debit was required to be supported since November 2009. The regulation on SEPA payments increased the charge cap (same price for domestic payments as for cross-border payments) to €50,000.

With a further decision of the European Parliament, the IBAN scheme for bank accounts fully replaced the domestic numbering schemes from 31 December 2012.[25] On 16 December 2010, the European Commission published regulations that made IBAN support mandatory for domestic credit transfer by 2013 and for domestic direct debit by 2014 (with a 12 and 24 months transition period respectively).[26] Some countries had already replaced their traditional bank account scheme by IBAN. This included Switzerland where IBAN was introduced for national credit transfer on 1 January 2006 and the support for the old bank account numbers was not required from 1 January 2010.[27]

Based on a 20 December 2011 memorandum,[28] the EU parliament resolved the mandatory dates for the adoption of the IBAN on 14 February 2012.[29] On 1 February 2014, all national systems for credit transfer and direct debit were abolished and replaced by an IBAN-based system.[29] This was then extended to all cross-border SEPA transactions on 1 February 2016 (Article 5 Section 7).[29] After these dates the IBAN is sufficient to identify an account for home and foreign financial transactions in SEPA countries and banks are no longer permitted to require that the customer supply the BIC for the beneficiary's bank.

In the run-up to the 1 February 2014 deadline, it became apparent that many old bank account numbers had not been allocated IBANs—an issue that was addressed on a country-by-country basis. In Germany, for example, Deutsche Bundesbank and the German Banking Industry Committee required that all holders of German bank codes ("Bankleitzahl") published the specifics of their IBAN generation format taking into account not only the generation of check digits but also the handling of legacy bank codes, thereby enabling third parties to generate IBANs independently of the bank.[30] The first such catalogue was published in June 2013 as a variant of the old bank code catalog ("Bankleitzahlendatei").[31]

Non-EEA[edit]

Banks in numerous non-European countries including most states of the Middle East, North Africa and the Caribbean have implemented the IBAN format for account identification.[1] In some countries the IBAN is used on an ad hoc basis, an example was Ukraine where account numbers used for international transfers by some domestic banks had additional aliases that followed the IBAN format as a precursor to formal SWIFT registration.[32] This practice in Ukraine ended on 1 November 2019 when all Ukrainian banks had fully switched to the IBAN standard.[33]

The degree to which a bank verifies the validity of a recipient's bank account number depends on the configuration of the transmitting bank's software—many major software packages supply bank account validation as a standard function.[34] Some banks outside Europe may not recognize IBAN, though this is expected to diminish with time. Non-European banks usually accept IBANs for accounts in Europe, although they might not treat IBANs differently from other foreign bank account numbers. In particular, they might not check the IBAN's validity prior to sending the transfer.[35]

Banks in the United States do not use IBAN as account numbers for U.S. accounts and use ABA routing transit numbers.[36] Any adoption of the IBAN standard by U.S. banks would likely be initiated by ANSI ASC X9, the U.S. financial services standards development organization: a working group (X9B20) was established as an X9 subcommittee to generate an IBAN construction for U.S. bank accounts.[37]

Canadian financial institutions have not adopted IBAN and use routing numbers issued by Payments Canada for domestic transfers, and SWIFT for international transfers. There is no formal governmental or private sector regulatory requirement in Canada for the major banks to use IBAN.

Australia and New Zealand do not use IBAN. They use Bank State Branch codes for domestic transfers and SWIFT for international transfers.[38]

IBAN formats by country[edit]

This table summarises the IBAN formats by country:[1]

  • The kk after the two-character ISO country code represents the check digits calculated from the rest of the IBAN characters. If it is a constant for the country concerned, this will be stated in the Comments column. This happens where the BBAN has its own check digits that use the same algorithm as the IBAN check digits
  • The BBAN format column shows the format of the BBAN part of an IBAN in terms of upper case alpha characters (A–Z) denoted by "a", numeric characters (0–9) denoted by "n" and mixed case alphanumeric characters (a–z, A–Z, 0–9) denoted by "c". For example, the Bulgarian BBAN (4a,6n,8c) consists of 4 alpha characters, followed by 6 numeric characters, then by 8 mixed-case alpha-numeric characters
  • Descriptions in the Comments field have been standardised with country-specific names in brackets. The format of the various fields can be deduced from the BBAN field
Country Chars BBAN Format IBAN Fields Comment
Albania28 8n,16c b = National bank code
s = Branch code
x = National check digit
c = Account number
Andorra24 8n,12c b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
Austria20 16n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Azerbaijan28 4c,20n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Bahrain22 4a,14c b = National bank code
c = Account number
Belarus28 4c, 4n, 16c b = National bank or branch code
a = Balance account number
c = Account number
Belgium16 12n b = National bank code
c = Account number
x = National check digits
Bosnia and Herzegovina20 16n k = IBAN check digits (always "39")
b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
x = National check digits
Brazil29 23n,1a,1c b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
t = Account type (cheque account, savings account etc.)
n = Owner account number ("1", "2" etc.)[39]
Bulgaria22 4a,6n,8c b = BIC bank code
s = Branch (BAE) number
t = Account type
c = Account number
Costa Rica22 18n 0 = always zero
b = bank code
c = Account number
Croatia21 17n b = Bank code
c = Account number
Cyprus28 8n,16c b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
Czech Republic24 20n b = National bank code
s = Account number prefix
c = Account number
Denmark18 14n b = National bank code
c = Account number
x = National check digit
Dominican Republic28 4a,20n b = Bank identifier
c = Account number
East Timor23 19n k = IBAN check digits (always = "38")
b = Bank identifier
c = Account number
x = National check digits
Egypt29 25n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
El Salvador28 4a, 20n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Estonia20 16n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
x = National check digit
Faroe Islands[Note 4]18 14n b = National bank code
c = Account number
x = National check digit
Finland18 14n b = Bank and branch code
c = Account number
x = National check digit
France[Note 5]27 10n,11c,2n b = National bank code
s = Branch code (code guichet [fr])
c = Account number
x = National check digits (clé RIB [fr])
Georgia22 2c,16n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Germany22 18n b = Bank and branch identifier (Bankleitzahl or BLZ)
c = Account number
Gibraltar23 4a,15c b = BIC bank code
c = Account number
Greece27 7n,16c b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
Greenland[Note 4]18 14n b = National bank code
c = Account number
x = National check digit
Guatemala[40]28 4c,20c b = National bank code
c = Account number
m = Currency code
t = Account type
Hungary28 24n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
x = National check digit
Iceland26 22n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
t = Account type
c = Account number
i = Account holder's kennitala (national identification number)
Iraq23 4a,15n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
Ireland22 4c,14n a = BIC bank code
b = Bank/branch code (sort code)
c = Account number
Israel23 19n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number 13 digits (padded with zeros)
Italy27 1a,10n,12c x = Check character (CIN [it])
b = National bank code (Associazione Bancaria Italiana or Codice ABI)
s = Branch code (Coordinate bancarie [it] or CABCodice d'Avviamento Bancario)
c = Account number
Jordan[41]30 4a,22n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
Kazakhstan20 3n,13c b = National bank code
c = Account number
Kosovo20 4n,10n,2n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Kuwait30 4a,22c b = National bank code
c = Account number.
Latvia21 4a,13c b = BIC bank code
c = Account number
Lebanon28 4n,20c b = National bank code
c = Account number
Libya25 21n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
Liechtenstein21 5n,12c b = National bank code
c = Account number
Lithuania20 16n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Luxembourg20 3n,13c b = National bank code
c = Account number
North Macedonia19 3n,10c,2n k = IBAN check digits (always = "07")
b = National bank code
c = Account number
x = National check digits
Malta31 4a,5n,18c b = BIC bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
Mauritania27 23n k = IBAN check digits (always "13")
b = National bank code
s = Branch code (code guichet [fr])
c = Account number
x = National check digits (clé RIB [fr])
Mauritius30 4a,19n,3a b = National bank code
s = Branch identifier
c = Account number
0 = Zeroes
m = Currency code
Monaco27 10n,11c,2n b = National bank code
s = Branch code (code guichet [fr])
c = Account number
x = National check digits (clé RIB [fr]').
Moldova24 2c,18c b = National bank code
c = Account number
Montenegro22 18n k = IBAN check digits (always = "25")
b = Bank code
c = Account number
x = National check digits
Netherlands[Note 6]18 4a,10n b = BIC Bank code
c = Account number
Norway15 11n b = National bank code
c = Account number
x = Modulo-11 national check digit
Pakistan24 4c,16n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Palestinian territories29 4c,21n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Poland28 24n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
x = National check digit
c = Account number,
Portugal25 21n k = IBAN check digits (always = "50")
b = National bank code (numeric only)
s = Branch code (numeric only)
c = Account number (numeric only)
x = National check digits (numeric only)
Qatar29 4a,21c b = National bank code
c = Account number[42]
Romania24 4a,16c b = BIC Bank code (first four alpha characters)
c = Branch code and account number (bank-specific format)
Saint Lucia32 4a,24c b = Bank code
c = Account number
San Marino27 1a,10n,12c x = Check character (CIN [it])
b = National bank code (Associazione bancaria italiana or Codice ABI)
s = Branch code (Coordinate bancarie [it] or CABCodice d'Avviamento Bancario)
c = Account number
Sao Tome and Principe25 21n b = National bank code
s = Branch number
c = Account number
Saudi Arabia24 2n,18c b = National bank code
c = Account number preceded by zeros, if required
Serbia22 18n k = IBAN check digits (always = "35")

b = National bank code
c = Account number
x = Account check digits

Seychelles31 4a,20n,3a b = Bank code
s = Branch code
n = Account number
m = Currency code
Slovakia24 20n b = National bank code
s = Account number prefix
c = Account number
Slovenia19 15n k = IBAN check digits (always = "56")
b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Checking account numbers and routing numbers generator number
x = National check digits
Spain24 20n b = National bank code
s = Branch code
x = Check digits
c = Account number
Sudan18 14n k = IBAN check digits
b = National bank code
c = Account number
Sweden24 20n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Switzerland21 5n,12c b = National bank code
c = Code identifying a bank account
Tunisia24 20n k = IBAN check digits (always "59")
b = National bank code
s = Branch code
c = Account number
x = National check digits
Turkey26 5n,17c b = National bank code
0 = Zero (reserved)
c = Account number
Ukraine[1][43]29 6n, 19c b = Bank code
c = Account number preceded by zeros, if required
United Arab Emirates23 3n,16n b = National bank code
c = Account number
United Kingdom[Note 7]22 4a,14n b = BIC bank code
s = Bank and branch code (sort code)
c = Account number
Vatican City[44]22 3n,15n b = National bank code
c = Account number
Virgin Islands, British24 4c,16n b = National bank code
c = Account number

In addition to the above, the IBAN is under development in countries below but has not yet been catalogued for general international use.[45][46]

In this list

  • represent the IBAN checksum
  • represents an alphabetic character
  • represents an alphanumeric character
  • represents a numeric character.
Country Chars BBAN Format Example
Algeria26 22n
Angola25 21n
Benin28 2c, 22n
Burkina Faso28 2c, 22n
Burundi16 12n
Cabo Verde25 21n
Cameroon27 23n
Central African Republic27 23n
Chad27 23n
Comoros27 23n
Congo, Republic of the27 23n
Côte d'Ivoire28 1a, 23n
Djibouti27 23n
Equatorial Guinea27 23n
Gabon27 23n
Guinea-Bissau25 2c, 19n
Honduras28 4a, 20n
Iran26 22n
Madagascar27 23n
Mali28 2c, 22n
Morocco28 24n
Mozambique25 21n
Nicaragua32 4a, 24n
Niger28 2a, 22n
Senegal28 1a, 23n
Togo28 2a, 22n

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^In equations, the remainder of A divided by B is denoted A mod B orA (mod B), e.g., 2 = 14 mod 12. See Remainders.
  2. ^The IBAN value, ZZ59ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ, is converted to the largest possible integer, approximately 3.5 × 1065 per ISO 7064 MOD-97-10 (before taking the modulus). 2219 - 1 is approximately equal to 8.4 × 1065, thus 219-bit unsigned integers can accommodate all valid IBAN values.
  3. ^231 is approximately equal to 2.1 × 109, making it possible for any 9-digit integer to be handled using 32 bit integer arithmetic
  4. ^ abRegistered at SWIFT as part of Denmark, but with its own country code.
  5. ^French Guyana, French Polynesia, French Southern Territories, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Mayotte, New Caledonia, Réunion, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Martin (French part), Saint Pierre and Miquelon, and Wallis and Futuna Islands have their own ISO country code but use "FR" as their IBAN country code.
  6. ^Not applicable to Aruba, Curaçao, Sint Maarten, and the Caribbean Netherlands.
  7. ^The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Isle of Man and the Bailiwicks of Guernsey and Jersey use this format. British Overseas Territories have their own formats — only Gibraltar and the British Virgin Islands use IBANs.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to IBAN.
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Bank_Account_Number

The Bank Routing Number, sometime referred as ABA Number, is a 9 digit number assigned by the American Bankers Association (ABA) to uniquely identify the bank on which payment is drawn. The bank routing number is also referred as check routing number because it generally appears at the bottom of your check leaflet.

Routing Number on checks is actually a Routing Transit Number (RTN), a 9 digit code which was designed to facilitate the sorting, bundling, and shipment of paper checks back to the drawer’s (check writer’s) account. The RTN is also used by Federal Reserve Banks to process Fedwire funds transfers, and by the Automated Clearing House to process direct deposits, bill payments, and other such automated transfers. Routing numbers may differ depending on where your account was opened and the type of transaction made.

Routing Number on Checks

You can use the search box provided below to find the routing number for your bank.

Источник: https://routingno.com/bank-routing-numbers/

class (generator: Any

Bases:

Implement default bank provider for Faker.

Important

Bank codes, account numbers, and other ID’s generated by this provider are only valid in form, i.e. they conform to some standard/format, are of the expected lengths, and have valid checksums (where applicable). Results generated that turn out to be valid in real life are purely coincidental.

Sources:

() → str¶

Generate an ABA routing transit number.

>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.aba().'076048766''057593829''052194896''034115783''025659384'
() → str¶

Generate the bank provider’s ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country code.

>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.bank_country().'GB''GB''GB''GB''GB'
() → str¶

Generate a Basic Bank Account Number (BBAN).

>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.bban().'MYNB48764759382421''TZIR92411578156593''RPOQ40801609753513''SHHZ28711587148418''KRGZ98947196593423'
() → str¶

Generate an International Bank Account Number (IBAN).

>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.iban().'GB84MYNB48764759382421''GB13TZIR92411578156593''GB51RPOQ40801609753513''GB03SHHZ28711587148418''GB56KRGZ98947196593423'
(length: Optional[int] = None, primary: bool = False, use_dataset: bool = False) → str¶

Generate a SWIFT code.

SWIFT codes, reading from left to right, are composed of a 4 alphabet character bank code, a 2 alphabet character country code, a 2 alphanumeric location code, and an optional 3 alphanumeric branch code. This means SWIFT codes can only have 8 or 11 characters, so the value of can only be or the integers or. If the value isthen a value of or will randomly be assigned.

Because all 8-digit SWIFT codes already refer to the primary branch or office, the argument only has an effect if the value of is. If is and isthe 11-digit SWIFT codes generated will always end in to denote that they belong to primary branches/offices.

For extra authenticity, localized providers may opt to include SWIFT bank codes, location codes, and branch codes used in their respective locales. If isthis method will generate SWIFT codes based on those locale-specific codes if included. If those codes were not included, then it will behave as if wereand in that mode, all those codes will just be randomly generated as per the specification.

>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift().'YNBIGB65ZT4''SGQEGBSIGQ8''JDXCGBV4''LNKTGBN9''OQIBGB9AFZA'
>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift(length=8).'MYNBGBQ6''PMZJGB4W''SGQEGBSI''YDTZGBQ8''WZTEGBTG'
>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift(length=8,use_dataset=True).'MYNBGBQ6''PMZJGB4W''SGQEGBSI''YDTZGBQ8''WZTEGBTG'
>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift(length=11).'MYNBGBQ65ZT''PLSGGB6ISIG''TZIRGBJTGEV''PRDLGB1UN94''OQIBGB9AFZA'
>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift(length=11,primary=True).'MYNBGBQ6XXX''PMZJGB4WXXX''SGQEGBSIXXX''YDTZGBQ8XXX''WZTEGBTGXXX'
>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift(length=11,use_dataset=True).'MYNBGBQ65ZT''PLSGGB6ISIG''TZIRGBJTGEV''PRDLGB1UN94''OQIBGB9AFZA'
>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift(length=11,primary=True,use_dataset=True).'MYNBGBQ6XXX''PMZJGB4WXXX''SGQEGBSIXXX''YDTZGBQ8XXX''WZTEGBTGXXX'
(primary: bool = False, use_dataset: bool = False) → str¶

Generate an 11-digit SWIFT code.

This method uses under the hood with the argument set to. If is set tothe SWIFT code will always end with. All 11-digit SWIFT codes use this convention to refer to the primary branch/office.

>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift11().'MYNBGBQ65ZT''PLSGGB6ISIG''TZIRGBJTGEV''PRDLGB1UN94''OQIBGB9AFZA'
>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift11(use_dataset=True).'MYNBGBQ65ZT''PLSGGB6ISIG''TZIRGBJTGEV''PRDLGB1UN94''OQIBGB9AFZA'
(use_dataset: bool = False) → str¶

Generate an 8-digit SWIFT code.

This method uses under the hood with the argument set to and with the argument omitted. All 8-digit SWIFT codes already refer to the primary branch/office.

>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift8().'MYNBGBQ6''PMZJGB4W''SGQEGBSI''YDTZGBQ8''WZTEGBTG'
>>> Faker.seed(0)>>> for_inrange(5):. fake.swift8(use_dataset=True).'MYNBGBQ6''PMZJGB4W''SGQEGBSI''YDTZGBQ8''WZTEGBTG'

© Copyright 2014, Daniele Faraglia Revision.

Built with Sphinx using a theme provided by Read the Docs.
Источник: https://faker.readthedocs.io/en/master/providers/faker.providers.bank.html

Commerce Bank Routing Number

  • What is a check routing number?

    The American Bankers Association routing number (a.k.a. ABA number, routing transit number or checking routing number) is a 9-digit number that serves to identify the specific financial institution responsible for the payment of a negotiable instrument.

  • Where can I find my account number?

    Open the Commerce Bank Mobile Banking App and select your checking account.

    Scroll past your recent transactions and tap Routing & Account Number to show both.

    In desktop Online Banking, it’s at the bottom left side of the Account Activity screen.

  • What is the SWIFT code for Commerce Bank?

    The SWIFT code is used when transferring money between banks, particularly for international wire transfers.

    Commerce Bank's SWIFT code is CBKCUS44.

  • Where is the routing number on my checks?

    The sample graphic below shows where the routing number can be found in the bottom left corner of your checks.

    sample check showing where the check routing number is located

  • What is the routing number for Commerce Bank?

    Commerce Bank’s routing number is 101000019.

  • Источник: https://www.commercebank.com/personal/bank/checking/routing-number

    International Bank Account Number (IBAN)

    Migrating to International Bank Account Number (IBAN) Standards

    We are pleased to inform you that Standard Chartered Bank Jordan is migrating to International Bank Account Number (IBAN) standard for numbering of customer Bank accounts effective 2nd February, 2014 as per the directive issued by the Central Bank of Jordan.

    Why International Bank Account Number (IBAN)

    Central Bank of Jordan has directed for the adoption of IBAN in Jordan which is to facilitate Straight Through Processing (STP) of Electronic Payments by minimizing delays and extra costs associated with incorrect account numbers. IBAN implementation will help in bringing more efficiency in remittance related transactions.

    Your International Bank Account Number (IBAN)

    IBAN is not a new account number. We have simply created an IBAN for your existing account number using the ISO standard format. IBAN will consist of Jordan country specific codes along with your account number, example of which is provided below:

    Your existing account number :XXXXXXXXXXX
    IBAN :JOZZ SCBL 00000000 YY XXXXXXXXXXX
    (ZZ's denote unique check digit, Y's denote currency code and XX's denotes the 11 digit account number).
    SWIFT Code (BIC) of our Bank :SCBLJOAX

    Please refer to your paper or electronic statement for your account number and IBAN.

    You can also use our IBAN Generator tool provided on our website to generate the IBAN number by simply typing in your old account number. Kindly note, IBAN number will vary with currency of account.

    Use of International Bank Account Number (IBAN)

    Please note that effective 2nd February, 2014 it is compulsory to use your IBAN for the following local & international electronic payments:

    • Receiving an electronic payment from a Bank within or outside Jordan
    • Sending an electronic payment to a Bank within Jordan
    • Sending an electronic payment to a Bank in a country that has adopted IBAN
    Kindly communicate the IBAN mentioned in your Bank statement to parties from whom you receive and expect to receive electronic payments, both in Jordan & abroad. There is a requirement to checking account numbers and routing numbers generator those parties well in advance to quote your IBAN in electronic payments from 2nd February, 2014.
    For More Information

    Should you require any clarification, please contact us on +962 6 5658011 or on 080022099 for further information.

    Thank you for banking with Standard Chartered Bank.

    Here you'll find information and guidance on payment methods, from direct debits and branch codes, to SWIFT codes to ensure the safety of domestic and cross-border transactions.

    Alternatively, please complete our contact form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.

    Contact Me

    Our Official working Hours are from Sundays to Thursdays, from 8:30 AM till 3:00 PM

    Источник: https://www.sc.com/jo/ways-to-bank/iban.html

    youtube video

    How to Find Your Routing Number in 60 Seconds

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